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CAMERON LASATER U N D E R G RAD UATE AR C H ITE CTU R E P O RTF O LI O 2 0 1 4


RESUME

U N D E R G RAD UATE AR C H ITE CTU R E P O RTF O LI O 2 0 1 4


EDUCATION

AWARDS AND GRANTS

North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC

Dean’s List, 2009-2014

Bachelor of Architecture, May 2014 Overall GPA: 3.7

North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC

Bachelor of Environmental Design in Architecture, May 2013 Overall GPA: 3.6

Prague Institute, Prague, Czech Republic NCSU School of Design Study Abroad Program, Fall 2012

Shawcroft Drawing Competition Nomination, 2013 Student Research Grant, Fall 2011

-Grant applied for Spring/Summer 2012, based on the proposal of a study on the influence of the Active Design movement on New York City through a case study of the High Line Park.

ASSOCIATIONS

SKILLS

AIAS American Institute of Architects, Students

Computer Programs:

YAF Young Architect’s Forum BEC-RT Research Triangle Building Enclosure Council

AutoCAD Revit EnergyPlus Google Sketchup

Adobe Photoshop Adobe Illustrator Adobe InDesign Microsoft Office Suite

RELEVANT EMPLOYMENT HISTORY LHC Structural Engineers, Raleigh, NC [Intern]

May 2010 – August 2010

-Attended meetings with Architects and assisted engineers on site visits to numerous projects -Supported the efforts of the firm by regularly providing AutoCAD drafting and expertise. -Assisted in the efficient day-to-day administrative operations of the firm though regular management and maintenance of office documents, receiving incoming inquiries, and ensuring general office needs were met.


TABLE OF CONTENTS U N D E R G RAD UATE AR C H ITE CTU R E P O RTF O LI O 2 0 1 4


01 02 03 04 05 06 07

ZIZKOV

CHARLESTON

CTBUH

NCMA

NCSU

NCSU

GEORGETOWN

03 08

C+O Canal Visitor’s Center: 2014

Professors: J. Patrick Rand, Dennis Stallings

09 1 4

Performing Arts Center: 2013 Professor: Vinny Petrarca

1 5 20

College of Design Building: 2011 Professor: Dana Gulling Partner: Palmer Fox

2 1 24

College of Design Staircase: 2011 Professor: Dana Gulling Partner: Christa LiBrizzi

25 30

Institute for the Environmental Sciences Plan: 2012

Professor: Henry Hanson Partner: David Goldsmith

Urban Analysis and Museum: 2010

3 1 36

Professor: Sara Queen Urban Analysis Partner: Chase Hoke

Tall Building Competition: 2011

37 40

Mentor: Sara Queen Partners: Andy Park, Palmer Fox, Sarah Mann

01 02


The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal stretches from Washington, D.C. to Cumberland, Maryland along the North bank of the Potomac River. This Visitor Center, located between Thomas Jefferson St. and 30th St., reflects the current use of the canal as a park and exercise environment. Additional programming allows the Visitor Center to be used as a Wellness Center to supplement locals’ exercise routines.

STUDIO: ARC502, SPRING 2014 PROFESSORS: J. PATRICK RAND, DENNIS STALLINGS GEORGETOWN, WASHINGTON D.C.

01

C+O CANAL VISITOR CENTER


03 04


16 9 1

9

5

8

8

8

8

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

SITE PLAN

16 12

10

15

10

14

14


3

11

10

1 1

10

2

7 7 7 7 4 6 10

10 13

10

5

10

2

6 4

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

PROGRAM KEY

1 LOBBY 2 EXHIBITION SPACE 3 CAFE 4 CLASSROOM 5 SMALL AUDITORIUM 6 SEMINAR ROOM 7 ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE 8 WELLNESS STUDIO 9 LOCKER ROOM 10 RESTROOM 1 1 ENTRY COURT 12 COURTYARD 13 GREEN ROOF 14 BICYCLE REPAIR AND STORAGE 15 EXHIBITION STORAGE 16 MECHANICAL

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

DETAIL MODEL

ALUMINUM FRAMING ALUMINUM TUBES SUPPORT THE WOOD SLATS

KILN-DRIED WOOD SLATS

3”x12” @ 10” O.C.

ALUMINUM CURTAINWALL SYSTEM CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE WALL AND FLOOR SYSTEM

05 06


SECTION FACING NORTH

SECTION FACING EAST


GROUND FLOOR LOBBY

EXHIBITION SPACE

WELLNESS STUDIOS

FIRST FLOOR BALCONY

EAST ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION

07 08


The NCMA Performing Arts Center is built along a ridge to contain a central outdoor space that can be used as an outdoor amphitheater. It allows views and approach to the building from the outside to dictate entrances and circulation. The building is easily accessible along the existing trails, but visually independent from the other museum buildings. It creates a public space that can be viewed from many locations along the trails.

STUDIO: ARC501, FALL 2013 PROFESSOR: VINNY PETRARCA RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

02

NCMA

PERFORMING ARTS CENTER


09 1 0


12 11

10 9

3 2

10

4 1

5 11 7 8

8

10

6

10

8

GROUND FLOOR PLAN FIRST FLOOR PLAN

4

6

SITE PLAN

8

9 9


PROGRAM KEY

1 LOBBY 2 TICKET BOOTH 3 CONCESSIONS 4 BLACK BOX THEATER 5 CINEMA THEATER 6 COURTYARD 7 REHEARSAL ROOM 8 PRACTICE ROOM 9 SEMINAR ROOM 10 ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE 1 1 STORAGE 12 MECHANICAL

AXONOMETRIC VIEW GREEN ROOF

STEEL FRAME CONSTRUCTION CONCRETE BLOCK WITH STONE VENEER CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE RETAINING WALL

11 12


The building form is designated by the topography of the ridge, and acts as a retaining wall for the outdoor space, which flows out from the building and down the ridge.

O TOP

PHY GRA

PRO

M GRA

M F OR

2030 CHALLENGE DIAGRAMS

SUSTAINABILITY

FRITTED GLASS

SECTION FACING NORTH


ACOUSTICAL BARRIERS

GATHERING SPACES

WATER RUNOFF

GEOTHERMAL WELLS

SECTION FACING NORTH

13 14


This project is about creating identity for the College of Design. While it was important to present ourselves to the public, accomplished through voyueristic review rooms and a detached exhibition, it was necessary to embrace the internal nature of the school. The primary entrance is offered to the campus as an artistic expression of the school’s principles as well as to extend further the plaza space between sas and park shops. This building fronts the street and establishes a public realm for both design students and the rest of campus to inhabit. The sequence of outdoor spaces provide a varied experience available to anyone on campus for many different uses and purposes.

STUDIO: ARC302, SPRING 2012 PROFESSOR: DANA GULLING RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

03

NCSU

COLLEGE OF DESIGN


15 16


FIRST FLOOR PLAN 3

7

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

1

6

6

6

1

4

7

2

7

2

2 2

2

SITE / GROUND FLOOR PLAN

B

A 3

13

C

2 2

10

1 8

B

9

A

13

2

2

12 5

6 6 6

2

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

2

11

4

1


PROGRAM KEY

1 LOBBY 2 STUDIO 3 AUDITORIUM 4 SEMINAR ROOM 5 OFFICES 6 REVIEW ROOM 7 EXHIBITION SPACE 8 COMPUTER LAB 9 WOOD SHOP 10 COURTYARD 1 1 GREEN ROOF 12 BALCONY 13 MECHANICAL/STORAGE

DETAIL MODEL

ALUMINUM MULLIONS TERRACOTTA PANELS VAPOR BARRIER RIGID INSULATION TRACK SYSTEM GYPSUM BOARD

FLOOR DECKING STEEL FRAME STRUCTURE

SECTION PERSPECTIVE EXHIBITION SPACE AUDITORIUM REVIEW ROOMS OFFICES RESTROOM HVAC SHAFT ELEVATOR SHAFT LOBBY

17 18


SECTION THROUGH OUTDOOR CONNECTIONS


SECTION THROUGH BRIDGE

19 20


Continuing the green, regenerative strategies of Syme’s rain garden to the South-East, the rain stair uses its form to catch and store Raleigh’s average (48 in/yr) precipitation to irrigate the surrounding site. The stair replaces the previous wooden staircase that connected the College of Design to the rest of campus to the southwest. The stair is meant to become a learning tool for our current and future students. The materials used were derived from a concept that architecture should be composed of stereotomic, tectonic, and membrane componenets. In this project, concrete becomes the stereotomic, steel the tectonic, and zinc roofing the membrane.

STUDIO: ARC302, SPRING 2012 PROFESSOR: DANA GULLING RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

04

NCSU STAIRCASE DESIGN


2 1 22


SYSTEM The rain catchment system uses Zinc, corrugated roof and a “rain chain” to collect rain fall for irrigation purposes. The system can irrigate 1200 square feet during the peak of raleigh’s highest temperatures (june-september).

CATCHMENT

Water is brought down the rain chain due to the inherent high surface tension and adhesion properties of the water’s molecules. It then follows the pedestrian down and around before entering a gravel, filtration system at the bottom. The water is then stored in an underground cistern where it can be dispersed.

SITE PLAN

FILTRATION

DISTRIBUTION


COMPONENTS

STEREOTOMIC - CONCRETE TECTONIC - STEEL MEMBRANE - ZINC

PLAN

23 24


The railway station land area consists of 38 hectares and is surrounded by a residential area, park, and a cemetery. The existing building is virtually unused. We proposed that the building be repurposed as a market and shopping center. The site is classified as a brownfield site, so it lends itself to being used by an institution that studies soils and environmental sciences. The Zizkov Institute for Environmental Science is a site that connects the urban ecosystems, transportation and institutions of Prague.

STUDIO: ARC401, FALL 2012 PROFESSOR: HENRY HANSON PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC

05

ZIZKOV URBAN PLAN


25 26


PHASE ONE

BIOCORRIDOR MARKETPLACE ZIZKOV INSTITUTE TRAM LINE

PHASE TWO

EXTENSION OF BIOCORRIDOR MULTIUSE URBAN DISTRICT CAR CIRCULATION

PHASE THREE

RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT EXTENSION OF BIOCORRIDOR BUSINESS PARK

SITE LOCATION


PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION HUB BIOCORRIDOR

FARMER’S MARKET/ REUSE OF THE EXISTING BUILDING

FILTRATION POND

SITE PLAN 27 28


SECTION THROUGH COURTYARD

SECTION THROUGH PEDESTRIAN PATHS


SECTION THROUGH MARKET AND TRAM LINE

29 30


This project started with a heavy focus on site analysis. Located in Charleston, South Carolina, the transportation routes, location of historic districts, and water landmarks were studied and modeled. We then zoomed in on the precinct of Charleston that the site was located in and analysed the unique aspects of surrounding buildings. These site conditions heavily influenced the form and experience of the museum. Made up of four components; the walls of light, surveyor, city, and books; the project creates indoor and outdoor spaces that can support multiple uses.

STUDIO: ARC202, SPRING 2011 PROFESSOR: SARA QUEEN CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA

06

CHARLESTON MUSEUM OF THE CITY


3 1 32


CITY ANALYSIS Transportation The city of Charleston is unique due to its location on a peninsula between three major rivers. The rivers were used as transportation routes before the highways and railroad came into place. Historic districts Charleston grew out of a small port on the southeast end of the peninsula. From there it grew in stages both North and West, with the urban fabric getting more sparse as it grew. Water landmarks Charleston was built on marshland, which together with the rivers formed the peninsula. As they continuously shift over time, they affect the urban fabric.

SITE LOCATION


PRECINCT ANALYSIS This precinct of historic Charleston is rich with churches and open green spaces. It is characterized by the orientation of the buildings to the street and to the softscape, by the building uses, and by the diversity of time periods represented by the buildings. The churches in the center of the precinct are the most historic and are surrounded by the most green space, showing their importance.

SITE PLAN 33 34


WALL OF LIGHT THIS WALL PROVIDES A BOUNDARY BETWEEN LIGHT AND SHADOW, CREATING A SPACE WHERE BOTH CAN BE EXPERIENCED. IT CREATES A SPACE WHERE THE CITY IS PUT ON DISPLAY. WALL OF THE SURVEYOR THIS WALL ACTS AS A THRESHOLD BETWEEN THE CITY STREET AND THE MUSEUM. IT RESPECTS THE REPETITION OF THRESHOLDS DOWN MEETING STREET. WALL OF THE CITY THIS WALL MARKS ENTRY USING MASS AND VOID. ITS MASSIVENESS ALLOWS FOR A HABITABLE PLACE BETWEEN SPACES, AND HOLDS THE STREET’S WALL. WALL OF BOOKS THIS WALL USES MASS AND VOID TO HOLD VERTICAL MOVEMENT AND DISPLAY SPACE.

MUSEUM OF THE CITY

STREET VIEW

SECTION A-A

WALL OF LIGHT

SECTION B-B


A

A

C

C

PROGRAM KEY

1 ATRIUM 2 PERMANENT EXHIBITION 3 TEMPORARY EXHIBITION 4 LOBBY 5 MECHANICAL/STORAGE 6 FRONT PORCH

5

3

B

B

2

2 B

1

6

B

1

3

3

4

A

C

GROUND FLOOR

C

A

FIRST FLOOR 1’ 5’

ENTRANCE AND ATRIUM

SECTION C-C

10’

20’

PERMANENT EXHIBITION

35 36


The 2012 CTBUH student competition focused on addressing a building’s relationship with the urban fabric, integrating existing street life, and reflecting their environment in a productive way. As a group, we decided to focus on the site-specific aspect of the prompt and design a building that could be built on the moon as a result of lunar mining of Helium-3.

COMPETITION, SUMMER 2012 MENTOR: SARA QUEEN LUNAR CITY

07

CTBUH TALL BUILDING COMPETITION ENTRY


37 38


06

ISTRICT

SITE: THE MOON Once nuclear fusion is achieve, helium 3 will be in great demand because there is thought to be millions of tons contained in the lunar soil. Using helium 3 in fusion reactors will be safer and produce less radioactive waste than other means of producing nuclear energy.

05 DISTRICT

FORM: ROTATING CIRCLE One way to generate artificial gravity is by centrifugal force. Centrifugal forces create tidal effects and for these effects to not be harmful, the radius and velocity of the spinning object has to be proportionally correct. A building on the moon with a radius of 2.5 miles would need to go 300 miles an hour for humans to occupy it safely. VELOCITY: MAGNETIC LEVITATION High-speed trains are achievable by magnets that suspend, guide, and propel them. Because the absense of friction allows higher speeds, this “maglev” system could be used to reach the necessary speed to create gravity in a building on the moon. 800

700

600

500

400

300

200

01

100

LUNAR LANDINGS

04

0

SATURN V (1967-1973) SPACE SHUTTLE (1982-2011) ARES I (2012-2020) ARES V (2012-2020) FUTURE CARGO LAUNCH VEHICLES

DISTRICT

02

TEMPORARY LUNAR BASES

03

MINING

TOPOGRAPHY PLAN

04

RUNOFF

TREATMENT

PERMANENT SETTLEMENT

PRECIPITATION

INFILTRATION

EVAPORATION

TOPOGRAPHY SECTION


06 DISTRICT

05 DISTRICT

840 825 810 795 780 765 750 735 720 705 690 675 660 645

04

07

DISTRICT

DISTRICT

630 615 600

PROGRAMATIC DISTRIBUTION - UNIVERSAL PLAN VIEW/ LOCAL SECTION 585

570

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

555 540 525 GOVERNMENT 510 HOSPITAL 495 BUINESS/LAB 480 COMMERCIAL/PUBLIC 465 LEASURE/STADIUM 450 FACILITIES/POWER 435 LIVESTOCK/FARMINING 420 EDUCATION 405 RESIDENTIAL RELIGION INTRA/INTER TRAM

03

08

DISTRICT

DISTRICT

PROGRAMATIC ZONE DISTRIBUTION - GLOBAL PLAN VIEW/ LOCAL SECTION 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

CORE INTRA/INTER TRANSIT LOW-INCOME RESIDENCE LUXURY RESIDENCE EDUCATION FACILITIES/POWER RELIGION/SERVICE GOVERNMENT BUSINESS/CORPORATE COMMERCIAL/PUBLIC

01 DISTRICT

HOSPITAL/LAB

02

STADIUM/THEATER LIVESTOCK/FARM

DISTRICT

PROGRAMATIC DISTRIBUTION - UNIVERSAL PLAN VIEW/ LOCAL SECTION PROGRAMATIC DISTRIBUTION - UNIVERSAL PLAN VIEW 01 02 03 04 05

06

07

08 GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL BUSINESS/LAB COMMERCIAL/PUBLIC LEISURE/STADIUM FACILITIES/POWER LIVESTOCK/FARMING EDUCATION RESIDENTIAL RELIGION INTRA/INTER TRAM 39 40



Architecture Portfolio 2014