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CAMBRIDGE SENIOR SCIENCE

BIOLOGY

VCE UNITS 1&2 VCE UNITS 3&4

ALL NEW FOR THE 2022-26 STUDY DESIGN

Brighter thinking for a better future

Simon Maaser Brett Drummond Ben Elliott Kylie May Victoria Shaw

cambridge.edu.au/vcescience


Brighter thinking for a better future

ALL THE TOOLS FOR VCE SUCCESS

STUDENTS:

Guides students to success in the new Study Design 2A NuCLEIC ACIDS

Demonstrates the interconnectedness of Biology

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Nucleic acids

2A

This all-new series fully prepares students for success in VCE Biology without overwhelming them with content they won’t be assessed on. ENGAGE

ntral process in g life possible 2B The genetic code and gene expression DNA TRANSCRIPTION mRNA Amino acid tRNA

TRANSLATION ein Prot

mRNA Ribosome

Study Design: Nucleic acids as information molecules that encode interactions for the synthesis of proteins: the structure of DNA, the three forms of RNA (mRNA, rRNA and tRNA) and a comparison of their respective nucleotides

Glossary: Complementary Monomer Nucleotide Polymer

What are nucleic acids?

factors is the ability to store and pass on genetic material.indicate The biomolecules that contain EXPLAIN headings and icons assessable all this information are known as nucleic acids. Nucleic acids are found in two forms: deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA). You may have heard people need-to-know coverage. discuss nucleic acids in various ways, without realising that this was what they were In Unit 1 Biology, you learned about factors that are essential for life. One of those

LINK

referring to. Phrases such as ‘You are a combination of your Mum and your Dad’ or ‘It’s all about genetics’ refer to the function that DNA (and nucleic acids in general) has in our body. The concepts regarding how genetic information is passed on through generations were discussed in more detail in Unit 2.

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UNIT 1

With an increased emphasis on interconnectedness in Biology, students are encouraged to recognise the connections between topics, build a better mental map of the course, promoting better recall of concepts. Concept maps visualise the chapter structure and highlight links to other biology concepts and topics.

UNIT 2

EXPLAIN This chapter will extend your understanding of nucleic acids as you learn about their role in a key process within cells. In this process, shown in Figure 2A–1, organisms convert the information contained within their genetic material (in the form of nucleic acids) into functional molecules (in the form of proteins).

VIDEO 2A–1 INTRODUCING NUCLEIC ACIDS

Nitrogenous bases

LINK

he in 2D Gene structure and regulation

2B THE GENETIC CODE AND GENE EXPRESSION

Translation

Transcription

Protein Sugar–phosphate backbone DNA

RNA

Figure 2A–1 The process through which the genetic information contained within DNA is converted into the functional units in our bodies, proteins

However, you first need to study nucleic acids. This section examines the similarities and differences between these molecules, as well as their structure and function.

Stimulus material in ENGAGE boxes explores1Cwhy CELL TYPES students need to study a particular topic, or why it is Cellnot types important, but assessable.

1C

Study Design: Cells as the basic structural feature of life on Earth, including the distinction between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

Glossary: Cytoplasm Eukaryote

Nucleoid Prokaryote

ENGAGE

Bacteria

Fossil records reveal that bacteria were the first type of organism on Earth, 3.5 billion years ago. Bacteria are now the most prevalent organism on Earth – an estimated 5 million trillion trillion (that is, a 5 with 30 zeroes after it). This means there are more bacteria on Earth than stars in the universe. At any one time, you can find up to 1010 bacteria in your mouth and 1014 bacteria in Figure 1C–1 A volcanic hot spring, Sunset Lake, your gut. Of all the bacteria, 85% are Yellowstone National Park, United States. The considered ‘good’ bacteria and 15% colours are created by thermophilic bacteria are considered ‘bad’ bacteria. Even growing in the hot water. though the bacteria in your body outnumber the cells in your body by about 10 to 1, bacteria contribute only 1–3% of your body mass. Bacteria are able to live in extreme environments, such as volcanic hot springs and hydrothermal vents. Cytosol

Plasmid

1

Figure 1C–2 Bacteria can be found everywhere. Ultraviolet (UV) light shone onto a computer keyboard reveals bacterial contamination, through a process that causes the bacteria to fluoresce.

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Ribosomes

Plasma membrane

Genetic material Flagellum Figure 1C–3 Diagrammatic representation of a bacterium. The bacterium has the four common features of all organisms (genetic material, cytosol, ribosomes, plasma membrane) but lacks membrane-bound organelles.

Link icons connect students to related topics. Both the concept maps and link icons are hyperlinked in the Interactive Textbook.


Meticulous assessment preparation This series has a focus on exactly what students need to know for VCE success and they will be further supported in their assessment preparation by a number of features: Modelling of logbook development provides exemplar entries and walks students through each entry in two steps from initial investigation planning to a demonstration of what their final version might look like.

Students have control over their progress Learning intentions matched to the Study Design at the start of each chapter show students what they need to know and do to meet the syllabus requirements. The learning intentions are repeated as an end-ofchapter Success Criteria checklist, linked to questions in the Chapter Review, which can be ticked when questions are answered correctly.

Skills boxes in every section offer advice on how to approach assessment tasks and exam questions, such in plants: summary or what skills as how to identify key termsWater in transport a question students should master to achieve a strong assessment result.

4E PLANT SYSTEMS

124 5E BIOTECHNOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS OF BIOCHEMICAL PATHWAYS

CHAPTER 3 DNA MANIPULATION TECHNIQUES AND THEIR APPLICATIONS

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3B APPLICATION AND IMPLICATIONS OF DNA MANIPULATION TECHNIQUES

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3C GENETICALLY MODIFIED AND TRANSGENIC ORGANISMS

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VIDEO 3D–1 SKILLS: QUESTIONS ABOUT CRISPR-CAS9

As you will explore in Section 5E, CRISPR-Cas9 has demonstrated huge benefits for the agricultural industry in editing plant genomes, for improving photosynthetic efficiency and crop yields, and in the development of biofuels. As with any new technology, there are concerns about the use of CRISPR-Cas9. In 2015, concerns were raised by reports that this technique could be used to edit the genome of human embryos. The ethical and social implications here are similar to those outlined in sections 3B and 3C.

3D SKILLS Questions about CRISPR-Cas9 The use of CRISPR-Cas9 as a genome editing tool is new content in the current Study Design. The Study Design states that students need to know: The function of CRISPR-Cas9 in bacteria and the application of this function in editing an organism’s genome

Digital feature

When review questions are completed in the Interactive Textbook and students answer multiple-choice and short-answer questions correctly, the checklist is ticked automatically to record achievement.

The function of CRISPR-Cas9 in bacteria is immune defence against genes that viruses inject into them to express as proteins and reproduce. A nucleotide sequence from the virus is incorporated into the bacterium’s CRISPR sequence as a ‘memory’, so the next time that virus is encountered, the bacterium produces gRNA, which directs Cas9 to cut the viral gene up into pieces. This function can be applied to genome editing in live cells in the laboratory, through the following steps and diagram: 1 Guide RNA is created to match the desired gene sequence to be edited. 2 This gRNA, along with Cas9, is injected into the cell. 3 When the guide RNA binds to its target gene sequence, the active sites of the Cas9 enzyme make a precise cut in the organism’s DNA. 4 The cell’s own DNA repair enzymes repair the break. 5 Scientists can manipulate the repair enzymes to delete or disrupt the gene at the repair site, thereby preventing a harmful gene from being expressed. Or they can insert a new sequence of DNA nucleotides to change a detrimental allele to a beneficial one.

1 Guide RNA

It takes the combined action of the different forces working together to draw a continuous stream of water throughout a plant more than 100 metres tall. The movement of water in a plant can be summarised as follows. • Water moves into the plant by osmosis, which generates root pressure that forces water upwards over a short distance. • The main upward pull of transpiration, water loss from the leaves, draws water through the xylem along the length of the plant. • The adhesion and cohesion properties of water enable transpiration to pull a continuous stream of water from the roots up to the highest shoots.

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DOC

223

2B OSMOSIS WORKSHEET 4E–2 TRANSPIRATION IN ACTION

Check-in questions – Set 4 1 Define ‘transpiration’. 2 What three purposes does transpiration serve in a plant? 3 What is the relationship between stomata and transpiration? 4 Name the environmental factors that increase and decrease the rate of transpiration.

4E SKILLS Plant systems: using diagrams to represent key processes In Biology, you will often be required to answer questions about complicated processes that require a lot of information. It is easy to become overwhelmed, particularly under assessment conditions and, as a result, leave out key information that is required to gain marks. However, if you include a simple diagram in your answer, it will help to guide you through your response. It will also encourage you to include more detail at each stage and enable you to show a higher level of knowledge. Regardless of your artistic ability, including a simple diagram can be very useful.

VIDEO 4E–2 SKILLS: PLANT SYSTEMS

Consider the following question. Question: Below is a picture of an apple tree. Explain in detail how the fruit on this tree is provided with the water it needs to grow. (3 marks)

2 Injected into cell with Cas9

Cas9

Target gene sequence 3 Complementary genomic sequence Target cell DNA

3 DNA is cut

4 Cell's enzymes repair the break 5 Repair with deletions or disruptive inserts

Gene is disabled

or

5 Repair with beneficial insert

Gene has a new sequence

Each section contains formative check-in questions plus summative section questions to assess student learning. These can be completed in the Interactive Textbook and self-assessed. Review questions at the end of each unit made up of multiple-choice and shortanswer questions will help students assess if they have mastered the content.

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A NEW LEVEL OF DIGITAL SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS

THE INTERACTIVE TEXTBOOK POWERED BY CAMBRIDGE EDJIN Powered by Cambridge Edjin, the trusted teaching and learning platform that also powers Cambridge HOTmaths, the online version of the student text delivers a host of interactive features to enhance the teaching and learning experience, and when connected to a class teacher account offers a powerful Learning Management System.

I n t e r a c t i ve f e a t u r e s For the Units 1&2 resource, prior knowledge quizzes and access to Year 9 & 10 content from Cambridge Science for the Victorian Curriculum helps students revise previous content. Access to Unit 1&2 material is also included in the Unit 3&4 Interactive Textbook. Interactive concept maps show how chapters are constructed and hyperlinks provide an alternative means of navigation through the content. 90 videos per book, created for this series, introduce and illustrate concepts, demonstrate skills, provide worked examples, or enhance and clarify student knowledge and are indicated by an icon in the Print Textbook. Interactive animations of diagrams and tables allow students to learn concepts, processes and complex structures at their own pace. They may also be used by teachers as presentations in class and are indicated by an icon in the Print Textbook. Roll-over glossary definitions immediately define key terms. Link icons navigate to related content elsewhere in the Interactive Textbook.

Workspaces allow students to enter their own working (including scientific notation) directly into the Interactive Textbook for all short-answer questions. Answers can be typed, drawn or uploaded on a computer or tablet device. Self-assessment tools allow students to check their answers (where teachers have enabled access to the suggested responses), self-assess their working using a four-point scale and use a red flag to alert their teacher if they had trouble with a question. These tools also link short-answer questions to the chapter checklists. Chapter review questions are linked to the Success Criteria checklist. Downloadable worksheets (40 per book) for all chapters can be used for homework or in class. Answers are provided in the Online Teaching Suite. Access to the Offline Textbook, a downloadable version of the student text with note-taking and bookmarking enabled.

The Interactive Textbook is available as a calendaryear subscription and is accessed online through Cambridge GO using a unique 16-character code supplied on purchase. The Interactive Textbook is provided with the printed text, or is available for purchase separately as a digital-only option. cambridge.edu.au/go

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TEACHERS:

SUPPORTING YOUR DELIVERY OF THE NEW STUDY DESIGN Providing you with the necessary content and skills-development tools to ensure your students will excel.

Comprehensively meets the requirements of the new Study Design Our experienced author team of practising teachers have comprehensively reviewed the new Study Design to ensure Cambridge Senior Science Biology VCE reflects changes such as: •

the increased focus on practical skills and bioethical understanding

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives from knowledge, culture and history

CRISPR-Cas9 in editing genomes / improving photosynthetic efficiencies and crop yield

adaptions of specific types of plants (C3, C4 and CAM)

biofuel production

microbiota barriers

sympatric speciation.

Scan QR to look at the key changes to the VCE Biology Study Design

Focus on what students really need to know Teachers know what their students really need to master in order to achieve VCE success and this series has been written from the ground up to support teachers to deliver just that – exactly the skills and the knowledge required without the inessential content that can distract and overwhelm students.

Tools to scaffold learning The formative check-in questions and summative review questions for each section can be answered in the Interactive Textbook and teachers can choose to give students access to the suggested responses to selfassess. Teachers can view student responses and provide direct feedback in the Interactive Textbook. The Task Manager in the Online Teaching Suite also helps teachers to allocate work geared to a student’s progress and ability.

Skills development supported The Units 1&2 and Units 3&4 books each include a scientific investigations chapter to help you guide students through the skills they require to conduct an investigation, analyse scientific evidence and communicate results. A chapter on research task strategies in Units 1&2 provides guidance for planning an investigation and advice on the ethical, social, legal and economic considerations involved.

Downloadable practical activities and investigations The Online Teaching Suite provides downloadable practicals and modifiable documents for experiments, open-ended investigations or ideas for activities that meet the requirements of the science investigation skills component of the Study Design. These practicals can be used by teachers as part of the school assessed course (SAC) work.

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A NEW LEVEL OF DIGITAL SUPPORT FOR TEACHERS

THE ONLINE TEACHING SUITE POWERED BY CAMBRIDGE EDJIN The Online Teaching Suite combines the Interactive Textbook powered by Cambridge Edjin and its rich digital content with a suite of supplementary resources and a powerful Learning Management System when linked to students using the Interactive Textbook in a class.

Teacher support Task Manager: direct students on a custom activity sequence based on their scores in measurable activities. Test generator: quickly create customised tests from a bank of multiple-choice questions. Tests are automarked in the Interactive Textbook or can be printed and used for homework or assessment practice. Student workspace entries: review responses and red flags raised by students who are having difficulty. You can choose to give students access to suggested responses for self-assessment. Sample assessment tasks and tests: save time preparing materials for the SAC requirement of the Study Design. Exam Generator: create custom trial exams using questions from past VCE Biology exams to target topics that your students are having difficulty with. Tests can be downloaded and used in class or for revision. VCAA marking allocation for each question is also provided. (For new areas of the Study Design, questions will be designated as VCAA style). Multiple-choice questions will be auto-marked if completed online. Reporting tools: monitor student and class results on auto-marked questions, self-assessment scores and completion of tasks. Teacher note icons: access further support including details on a topic, links to websites or ideas for further activities.

Additional downloadable and editable teacher resources: •

Chapter tests (two per chapter) of similar size and scope to the Chapter Reviews, with alternative questions for some topics

Practicals and activities

Curriculum grids and teaching programs

Checklists linking all questions to the Success Criteria

Curated weblinks to internet resources

Chapter summaries which can be given to students as model answers for the summarywriting activity suggested in the Chapter Reviews

Practice exams

Solutions for all tests and worksheets

PowerPoint files for the animated diagrams are editable by teachers. Over 60 per book.

The Online Teaching Suite is accessed online through Cambridge GO. Your Cambridge Education Resources Consultant will provide access to the Online Teaching Suite if your school has purchased or booklisted Cambridge Senior Science Biology VCE. The Online Teaching Suite is also available for purchase separately and can be activated using the unique 16-character code supplied on purchase.

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cambridge.edu.au/go


NEW TO CAMBRIDGE EDJIN

CREATE CUSTOM TRIAL EXAMS

EXAM GENERATOR

Teachers can filter by question-type, topic and degree of difficulty

Teachers have access to the answers for all questions

Draw on a bank of exam-style and actual VCAA exam questions to create custom trial exams that target topics your students are having difficulty with

+

+

VCAA marking allocation for each question is also provided

Multiple-choice questions

Written answer questions 2020 BIOLOGY EXAM

Use the following information to answer Questions 9–11. The apparatus shown below was set up in a Biology laboratory.

2020 BIOLOGY EXAM

Question 10 The bubbles produced in this experiment are likely to contain A. oxygen. B. glucose. C. water vapour. D. carbon dioxide.

Multiple-choice questions can be downloaded or Question 11 used online for Repeating the experiment three times and finding an average result at each distance increases the A. reliability of the data. auto-marking B. accuracy of the data. C. D.

Geophagus cf. brachybranchus

b.

i.

Amatitlania siquia

1 mark

400 Hypsophrys nematopus 800

S

T lactase persistence happened relatively quickly 600 The increase in frequency of the allele for in some Thorichthys ellioti populations. U 1000 125.0 100.0 75.0 50.0 25.0 0.0 Explain why the frequency of this allele relatively 3 marks time sinceincreased divergence (mya) quickly.

a.

The student presented the results as a graph. Source: H López-Fernández et al., Which one of the following graphs is the best representation of the results? ‘Morphology and efficiency of a specialized foraging behavior, sediment sifting, A.

in neotropical cichlid fishes’, PLoS ONE, 9(3): e89832, 6 March 2014, <https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0089832> Effect of four different molecules on rate of Effect of four different molecules on rate of B. cellular respiration in human liver cells cellular respiration in human liver cells

Molecular homology can be used to construct a phylogenetic tree.

1200

1200

Based on the information above, state which two species of cichlid fish would be expected to have the 1000 1000 most similar amino acid sequences in their proteins. Justify your answer. carbon carbon

ii.

DO NOT WRITE IN THIS AREA

Name the type of mutation that occurred 7500 years ago in central Europe. R

DO NOT WRITE IN THIS AREA

Sodium hydrogen carbonate (a source of carbon dioxide) was added to pond water in a beaker. A piece of an aquatic plant called Elodea was added and placed under a funnel in the beaker. A lamp was placed 5 cm away from the beaker and switched on. The number of bubbles produced by the Elodea was recorded for one minute. The experiment was repeated with the lamp placed 10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm and 25 cm away from the beaker. The entire experiment was repeated three times and an average result at each distance was calculated.

a.

DO NOT WRITE IN THIS AREA

Elodea under a funnel in a beaker of pond water with sodium hydrogen carbonate

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Question 7 (8 marks) Only 35% of the world’s adult human population can digest lactose, which is found ‘Geophagus’ in milk. These 17 people 2020 BIOLOGY EXAM steindachneri continue to produce the enzyme lactase throughout their lives. Most people who can digest lactose have European ancestry. There is evidence Question that people40kept animals for milk in Europe 10 500 years ago. Mikrogeophagus altispinosus A student the effect of the presence of four cytosine different molecules, R, S, T and U, on the rate of cellular About 7500 years ago in central Europe, a gene investigated mutation occurred in the lactase gene, where was respiration human allows liver cells. The production of carbon replaced by thymine. The allele produced by this in mutation individuals to produce lactase dioxide and to by the cells was recorded over a five-minute digest lactose throughout their lives. interval. The final concentration of carbon dioxide was recorded. The data collected is shown below. Satanoperca daemon Researchers have estimated that populations in Europe with this mutation produced more offspring than populations who did not have this mutation. Molecule present Concentration of carbon dioxide (ppm) after ve minutes

lamp (light source)

Question 9 The dependent variable in this experiment is the A. amount of sodium hydrogen carbonate added to the beaker. B. number of bubbles produced in one minute. C. time taken to count the bubbles produced. D. distance of the lamp from the beaker.

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Question 8 (7 marks) The phylogenetic tree below shows the evolutionary relationship between seven species of cichlid fish.

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DO NOT WRITE IN THIS AREA

2020 BIOLOGY EXAM

dioxide (ppm) after 5 min

800

dioxide (ppm) after 5 min

600 400 200

In some present-day populations there are0no individuals with the mutation. R

S

T

Give two reasons for the absence of the mutation in these populations. molecule present

C.

U

R

3 marks

S

T

U

Practice exams can be downloaded and used in class or for revision

Effect of four different molecules on rate of cellular respiration in human liver cells

1200 carbon 1000 dioxide 800 (ppm) 600 after 400 5 min 200 0

800 600 400 200 0

2 marks

D.

molecule present

Effect of four different molecules on rate of cellular respiration in human liver cells

Key

Molecule R Molecule S

R

S

T

molecule present

U

Molecule T

SECTION B – Question 8 – continuedMolecule U

precision of the data. validity of the data. SECTION B – Question 7 – continued

END OF SECTION A TURN OVER

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CONTENTS

UNITS 1&2

UNITS 3&4

Available May, 2021

Available August, 2021

Unit 1: How do organisms regulate their functions?

Unit 3: How do cells maintain life?

1. Cellular structure

1. Key background knowledge required for Units 3&4

2. Cellular functioning

2. From DNA to proteins

3. Cellular regeneration and regulation

3. DNA manipulation techniques and their applications

4. Functioning systems

4. Enzymes

5. Regulation of systems

5. Biochemical pathways: photosynthesis and cellular respiration

6. Scientific investigations Unit 1 Revision exercise Unit 2: How does inheritance impact on diversity? 7. Reproduction strategies, adaptations and diversity 8. Inheritance 9. Research task strategies Unit 2 Revision exercise

Unit 3 Revision exercise Unit 4: How does life change and respond to challenges? 6. Foreign invaders: self versus non-self 7. Immunity: lines of defence 8. Emergence and treatment of new diseases 9. Evolution: genetic changes in populations over time 10. Evolution over time 11. Human evolution 12. Scientific investigations Unit 4 Revision exercise

Contents are subject to change prior to publication.

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AUTHORS

Simon Maaser

Ky l i e M ay

Simon Maaser is the lead author of our VCE Biology team and Head of Science at Brighton Grammar School where he teaches 7–10 Science, VCE Biology and VCE Chemistry. He has also been involved in VCE Biology Examinations and Study Design reviews.

Kylie May is Head of Biology at Brighton Grammar School and has also been Head of 7–10 Science there. Previously she taught at Wellington Secondary College where she was Head of Science.

V i c t o ri a S h aw B re tt D ru m m o n d Brett Drummond is a science communicator and co-founder of MStranslate, an organisation which communicates research summaries on multiple sclerosis (MS). He has been a private tutor for VCE Biology and Chemistry.

Victoria Shaw has been committed to sharing her love for science with Year 7–12 students for the past 18 years and previously studied pharmacology. She was Head of Science at an independent school for several years, volunteers as an assessor for the VCAA and IBE, and runs workshops in Biology and Psychology.

B e n E l l i o tt Ben Elliott is the Year 7–10 Science Co-ordinator at Brighton Grammar School and a VCE Biology teacher. He previously taught Science and A-Level Biology at Mill Hill School in London where he was also Assistant Head of House and School Council Co-ordinator.

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