Page 1

2010

WINTER

CREVIEW ALU

Strengthening the Workforce Cal U continues a proud tradition of building careers in education, health care and industry.


2010

WINTER

CALU REVIEW

The California University of Pennsylvania Magazine CAL U REVIEW Vol. 38 - No. 1 The Cal U Review is published quarterly by the Office of University Relations and is distributed free. Third class postage paid at California.

CHANCELLOR John C. Cavanaugh

FROM THE PRESIDENT

Since its inception, California University has played an important role in building the region’s workforce. As you may know, the institution was founded in 1852. By 1865 it had been chartered as a normal school, dedicated to training teachers for Pennsylvania’s public school system. In short order, the school earned a reputation for graduating educators well prepared to stand at the head of the class — and to assume leadership positions in both the educational field and the business world. As it grew into a four-year state teachers college, California’s strong industrial arts education programs also produced graduates who became leaders in industry and technology. In fact, the broad-based education offered here, as well as the institution’s emphasis on bedrock values, provided students with an educational foundation for success in many walks of life. Today, students at California University can choose from among 150 undergraduate majors or concentrations and 50 graduate programs. Each is a pathway to a successful and rewarding career. Each plays a part in building a diverse and vibrant workforce. Preparing teachers remains an important part of the University’s mission. The result is evident in schools throughout Pennsylvania, where approximately 30,000 Cal U alumni are at work. Across the United States, about one in six technology education teachers holds a diploma from Cal U. The University has stepped up to meet the growing need for health care workers by offering a continuum of programs in nursing, one of the professions in greatest demand both nationally and here in the commonwealth. Recognizing the rapid pace of change, especially in technology-based industries, Cal U asks industry professionals to serve on advisory boards that help to keep programs on the cutting edge. The University also continues to earn national accreditation for its programs, with a goal of having every eligible program accredited. This recognition assures employers that Cal U programs meet national standards, and it affirms that our graduates are receiving marketable degrees. In this edition of the Review, you will learn more about Cal U’s contributions to the region’s workforce. I hope you see reflected in these efforts our University’s commitment to serving the communities where we live and work, and to helping our students build both character and careers. With warmest wishes,

Angelo Armenti, Jr. President California University of Pennsylvania

2 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

BOARD OF GOVERNORS Kenneth M. Jarin, chairman Aaron Walton, vice chair C.R. “Chuck” Pennoni, vice chair Rep. Matthew E. Baker Nick Barcio (student) Marie Conley Lammando Paul S. Dlugolecki Rep. Michael K. Hanna Sen. Vincent J. Hughes Richard Kneedler

Jamie Lutz (student) Jonathan B. Mack Joseph F. McGinn Sen. Jeffrey E. Piccola Gov. Edward G. Rendell Harold C. Shields Thomas M. Sweitzer Christine J. Toretti Mackenzie Marie Wrobel (student) Gerald L. Zahorchak

ON THE COVER: Josh Cramer ’05 (right), a teacher at South Park Middle School, is among the nationwide network of technology education instructors with diplomas from Cal U.

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA President Dr. Angelo Armenti, Jr. Geraldine M. Jones, provost and vice president for academic affairs Dr. Joyce A. Hanley, executive vice president Dr. Lenora Angelone, vice president for student development and services Angela J. Burrows, vice president for university relations Dr. Charles Mance, vice president for information technology Ron Huiatt, vice president for development and alumni relations Robert Thorn, interim vice president for administration and finance COUNCIL OF TRUSTEES Leo Krantz, chair Robert J. Irey, vice chair Ashley Baird, secretary (student trustee) Peter J. Daley II ’72, ’75 James T. Davis ’73 Annette Ganassi Lawrence Maggi ’79

Michael Napolitano ’68 Gwendolyn Simmons Jerry Spangler ’74 Mr. Aaron Walton ’68 The Honorable John C. Cavanaugh, Chancellor, ex-officio

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS Rosemary Bucchianeri ’69, president Dr. Harry Serene ’65, vice president Dr. Lorraine Vitchoff ’74, secretary Deanne Zelenak ’79, treasurer Michael Napolitano ’68, immediate past president Dr. Roger M. Angelelli ’64 Lawrence O. Maggi ’79 Ryan Astor ’01 Mary Jo (Zosky) Barnhart ’84 Richard J. Majernik ’55 Joseph Dochinez ’51 Alex D. Matthews ’84 Barbara (Williams) Fetsko ’75 Dante Morelli ’02 Dr. Paul Gentile ’62 Bethanne (Borsody) Natali ’91 Tim Gorske ’62 Melanie (Stringhill) Patterson ’82 Alan James ’62 Frederick Retsch ’62, ’66 Len Keller ’61 James Stofan ’71 Dr. Anthony Lazzaro ’55 Dr. Tim Susick ’76, ’78 Jim Lokay ’02 Karen L. (Blevins) Webber ’70

INSIDE DEPARTMENTS

FEATURES

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

16 – 17

ALUMNI CALENDAR

18

NOMINATIONS

19 – 20

CAMPUS CLIPS

22 – 23

SPORTS ROUNDUP

28 – 29

PAYING IT FORWARD

30 – 31

MILESTONES

32 – 34

Raffle revs up

9

The IA/TE Alumni Society raffles off a Harley-Davidson motorcycle to boost its endowed scholarship fund.

Website reaction: WOW!

10

The University website, www.calu.edu, has been rebuilt completely with users in mind.

STUDENT BOARD MEMBERS Ashley Baird Ashley Foyle

Chase Loper Jason Springer

Dynamic duo

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS Dr. Angelo Armenti, Jr., President Dale Hamer ’60 Ron Huiatt

Geraldine M. Jones ’71 Leo Krantz Dr. Linda Toth ’75

Alumni Linda and Harry Serene step into leadership roles at the Foundation for California University and the Alumni Association Board of Directors.

STUDENT ASSOCIATION, INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS Jacqueline Davis, president Ashley Baird, treasurer Bonnie Keener Jenna Dunmire, secretary Jim Lokay ’02 Bill Abbott Marc Roncone ’03 Rachel Hajdu Aaron Talbott Robert Irey Dr. Donald Thompson Sam Jessee ’90 Courtney Vautier SAI EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS Dr. Lenora Angelone ’89,’92,’97 Dr. Nancy Pinardi ’95, ’96, ’98

Leigh Ann Lincoln Larry Sebek

FOUNDATION FOR CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA BOARD OF DIRECTORS Linda H. Serene ’64, president David L. Amati ’70, vice president J. William Lincoln Michele Mandell ’69, secretary Robert Lippencott ’66 Paul Kania ’87, treasurer Michael A. Perry ’63 Roger Angelelli ’64 Paul I. Phillips ’69 Thomas Crumrine ’64 Jerry L. Spangler ’74 William R. Flinn ’68 Saundra L. Stout ’72 Richard C. Grace ’63 Steven P. Stout ’85 Dale L. Hamer ’60 Patricia A. Tweardy ’68 Annette M. Kaleita ’55 Ben Wright Gary Kennedy ’58 Angelo Armenti, Jr., ex-officio John Lechman ’74 Ron Huiatt, ex-officio David H. Lee ’71 Rosemary Bucchianeri ’69, ex-officio EDITOR Christine Kindl WRITERS Wendy Mackall Bruce Wald ’85 Colleen C. Derda PHOTOGRAPHERS Ken Brooks Tod Gombar Eric Schmadel

Lindy Kravec Cindy Cusic Micco

Greg Sofranko S.C. Spangler Josh Stepp

12 CAMPAIGN TOTAL REACHES $20 MILLION California University’s capital campaign, The Campaign to Build Character and Careers, has reached the $20 million mark on its way to a goal of $35 million. Announced in June 2009, the campaign will build endowed scholarships, establish an Honors College and a School of Business and Professional Studies, and enhance academic enrichment through expanded internships, outstanding campus lectures, character education, and academic and program support. To learn more, visit www.calu.edu, send an e-mail to calucampaign@calu.edu or call the Office of University Development and Alumni Relations at 724-938-5759.

Winter commencement

14

Three distinguished alumni share their thoughts with August and December graduates.

Mutual benefits

24

Partnerships with the Pittsburgh Penguins, Pittsburgh Steelers and Carnegie Science Center raise Cal U’s profile and provide opportunities for students.

Professional development

26

This year's Frederick Douglass Scholar shares his research and hones his teaching skills.

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 3 ■


2010

WINTER

CALU REVIEW

The California University of Pennsylvania Magazine CAL U REVIEW Vol. 38 - No. 1 The Cal U Review is published quarterly by the Office of University Relations and is distributed free. Third class postage paid at California.

CHANCELLOR John C. Cavanaugh

FROM THE PRESIDENT

Since its inception, California University has played an important role in building the region’s workforce. As you may know, the institution was founded in 1852. By 1865 it had been chartered as a normal school, dedicated to training teachers for Pennsylvania’s public school system. In short order, the school earned a reputation for graduating educators well prepared to stand at the head of the class — and to assume leadership positions in both the educational field and the business world. As it grew into a four-year state teachers college, California’s strong industrial arts education programs also produced graduates who became leaders in industry and technology. In fact, the broad-based education offered here, as well as the institution’s emphasis on bedrock values, provided students with an educational foundation for success in many walks of life. Today, students at California University can choose from among 150 undergraduate majors or concentrations and 50 graduate programs. Each is a pathway to a successful and rewarding career. Each plays a part in building a diverse and vibrant workforce. Preparing teachers remains an important part of the University’s mission. The result is evident in schools throughout Pennsylvania, where approximately 30,000 Cal U alumni are at work. Across the United States, about one in six technology education teachers holds a diploma from Cal U. The University has stepped up to meet the growing need for health care workers by offering a continuum of programs in nursing, one of the professions in greatest demand both nationally and here in the commonwealth. Recognizing the rapid pace of change, especially in technology-based industries, Cal U asks industry professionals to serve on advisory boards that help to keep programs on the cutting edge. The University also continues to earn national accreditation for its programs, with a goal of having every eligible program accredited. This recognition assures employers that Cal U programs meet national standards, and it affirms that our graduates are receiving marketable degrees. In this edition of the Review, you will learn more about Cal U’s contributions to the region’s workforce. I hope you see reflected in these efforts our University’s commitment to serving the communities where we live and work, and to helping our students build both character and careers. With warmest wishes,

Angelo Armenti, Jr. President California University of Pennsylvania

2 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

BOARD OF GOVERNORS Kenneth M. Jarin, chairman Aaron Walton, vice chair C.R. “Chuck” Pennoni, vice chair Rep. Matthew E. Baker Nick Barcio (student) Marie Conley Lammando Paul S. Dlugolecki Rep. Michael K. Hanna Sen. Vincent J. Hughes Richard Kneedler

Jamie Lutz (student) Jonathan B. Mack Joseph F. McGinn Sen. Jeffrey E. Piccola Gov. Edward G. Rendell Harold C. Shields Thomas M. Sweitzer Christine J. Toretti Mackenzie Marie Wrobel (student) Gerald L. Zahorchak

ON THE COVER: Josh Cramer ’05 (right), a teacher at South Park Middle School, is among the nationwide network of technology education instructors with diplomas from Cal U.

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA President Dr. Angelo Armenti, Jr. Geraldine M. Jones, provost and vice president for academic affairs Dr. Joyce A. Hanley, executive vice president Dr. Lenora Angelone, vice president for student development and services Angela J. Burrows, vice president for university relations Dr. Charles Mance, vice president for information technology Ron Huiatt, vice president for development and alumni relations Robert Thorn, interim vice president for administration and finance COUNCIL OF TRUSTEES Leo Krantz, chair Robert J. Irey, vice chair Ashley Baird, secretary (student trustee) Peter J. Daley II ’72, ’75 James T. Davis ’73 Annette Ganassi Lawrence Maggi ’79

Michael Napolitano ’68 Gwendolyn Simmons Jerry Spangler ’74 Mr. Aaron Walton ’68 The Honorable John C. Cavanaugh, Chancellor, ex-officio

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS Rosemary Bucchianeri ’69, president Dr. Harry Serene ’65, vice president Dr. Lorraine Vitchoff ’74, secretary Deanne Zelenak ’79, treasurer Michael Napolitano ’68, immediate past president Dr. Roger M. Angelelli ’64 Lawrence O. Maggi ’79 Ryan Astor ’01 Mary Jo (Zosky) Barnhart ’84 Richard J. Majernik ’55 Joseph Dochinez ’51 Alex D. Matthews ’84 Barbara (Williams) Fetsko ’75 Dante Morelli ’02 Dr. Paul Gentile ’62 Bethanne (Borsody) Natali ’91 Tim Gorske ’62 Melanie (Stringhill) Patterson ’82 Alan James ’62 Frederick Retsch ’62, ’66 Len Keller ’61 James Stofan ’71 Dr. Anthony Lazzaro ’55 Dr. Tim Susick ’76, ’78 Jim Lokay ’02 Karen L. (Blevins) Webber ’70

INSIDE DEPARTMENTS

FEATURES

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

16 – 17

ALUMNI CALENDAR

18

NOMINATIONS

19 – 20

CAMPUS CLIPS

22 – 23

SPORTS ROUNDUP

28 – 29

PAYING IT FORWARD

30 – 31

MILESTONES

32 – 34

Raffle revs up

9

The IA/TE Alumni Society raffles off a Harley-Davidson motorcycle to boost its endowed scholarship fund.

Website reaction: WOW!

10

The University website, www.calu.edu, has been rebuilt completely with users in mind.

STUDENT BOARD MEMBERS Ashley Baird Ashley Foyle

Chase Loper Jason Springer

Dynamic duo

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS Dr. Angelo Armenti, Jr., President Dale Hamer ’60 Ron Huiatt

Geraldine M. Jones ’71 Leo Krantz Dr. Linda Toth ’75

Alumni Linda and Harry Serene step into leadership roles at the Foundation for California University and the Alumni Association Board of Directors.

STUDENT ASSOCIATION, INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS Jacqueline Davis, president Ashley Baird, treasurer Bonnie Keener Jenna Dunmire, secretary Jim Lokay ’02 Bill Abbott Marc Roncone ’03 Rachel Hajdu Aaron Talbott Robert Irey Dr. Donald Thompson Sam Jessee ’90 Courtney Vautier SAI EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS Dr. Lenora Angelone ’89,’92,’97 Dr. Nancy Pinardi ’95, ’96, ’98

Leigh Ann Lincoln Larry Sebek

FOUNDATION FOR CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA BOARD OF DIRECTORS Linda H. Serene ’64, president David L. Amati ’70, vice president J. William Lincoln Michele Mandell ’69, secretary Robert Lippencott ’66 Paul Kania ’87, treasurer Michael A. Perry ’63 Roger Angelelli ’64 Paul I. Phillips ’69 Thomas Crumrine ’64 Jerry L. Spangler ’74 William R. Flinn ’68 Saundra L. Stout ’72 Richard C. Grace ’63 Steven P. Stout ’85 Dale L. Hamer ’60 Patricia A. Tweardy ’68 Annette M. Kaleita ’55 Ben Wright Gary Kennedy ’58 Angelo Armenti, Jr., ex-officio John Lechman ’74 Ron Huiatt, ex-officio David H. Lee ’71 Rosemary Bucchianeri ’69, ex-officio EDITOR Christine Kindl WRITERS Wendy Mackall Bruce Wald ’85 Colleen C. Derda PHOTOGRAPHERS Ken Brooks Tod Gombar Eric Schmadel

Lindy Kravec Cindy Cusic Micco

Greg Sofranko S.C. Spangler Josh Stepp

12 CAMPAIGN TOTAL REACHES $20 MILLION California University’s capital campaign, The Campaign to Build Character and Careers, has reached the $20 million mark on its way to a goal of $35 million. Announced in June 2009, the campaign will build endowed scholarships, establish an Honors College and a School of Business and Professional Studies, and enhance academic enrichment through expanded internships, outstanding campus lectures, character education, and academic and program support. To learn more, visit www.calu.edu, send an e-mail to calucampaign@calu.edu or call the Office of University Development and Alumni Relations at 724-938-5759.

Winter commencement

14

Three distinguished alumni share their thoughts with August and December graduates.

Mutual benefits

24

Partnerships with the Pittsburgh Penguins, Pittsburgh Steelers and Carnegie Science Center raise Cal U’s profile and provide opportunities for students.

Professional development

26

This year's Frederick Douglass Scholar shares his research and hones his teaching skills.

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 3 ■


STRENGTHENING THE WORKFORCE

Still at the Head of the Class Thorough preparation and real-world experience make Cal U teachers stand out

S

tudent-focused educators of the 21st century may have something in common with those normal-school teachers who staffed Pennsylvania’s one-room schoolhouses in the mid-1800s. If they received their teacher training at one particular institution, they all graduated with more than just a thorough knowledge of the three R’s.

Then, as now, education majors at California University of Pennsylvania also acquired a deep-rooted sense of pedagogy and professionalism. That makes all the difference in the world when it comes to actually securing teaching jobs, says Dr. Dan Engstrom, acting associate dean and director of student teaching for the College of Education and Human Services.

“At Cal U, there’s always been a strong connection between theory and practice,” he says. “Not only are our faculty members experienced educators themselves, we make sure our students have more classroom experience than students from most other schools.” Professional development partnerships with four local school districts are just one way that Cal U professors and students test educational theories in the classroom. By collaborating with teachers in Uniontown, Charleroi, Belle Vernon and California area school districts, Cal U’s pre-service teachers learn firsthand what really works in the classroom.

On-the-job training According to Engstrom, one trend in education is a push toward more practicum hours for students entering the profession. Right now, Pennsylvania requires 45 hours of field work for education majors; eventually it will require as many as 190. “Most Cal U students have more than 100 hours of field observations and 15 weeks of full-time student teaching experience before graduation,” says Engstrom. “More practicums make for betterprepared graduates,” adds Melissa Nelson, a December ’09 graduate with a dual Master of Education degree in elementary education and special

education. “When a student goes on an interview, it becomes apparent very quickly whether he or she is comfortable in the classroom.” Preparedness leads to employment. In a recent survey by payscale.com, graduates currently working as educators were asked to name their alma mater. When the results were compiled, California University of Pennsylvania ranked as the 15th most popular teaching college in the United States. The only Pennsylvania university to be included in this elite group, Cal U boasts about 30,000 teacher education alumni working in schools across the commonwealth. In spite of Cal U’s reputation for excellent teacher preparation, graduates face fierce competition for new positions. Every year the American Association for Employment in Education assesses the supply and demand for certain teaching positions across the United States, as well as by region. In its 2010 Job Search Handbook for Educators, the Mid-Atlantic region appears to be “balanced” when it comes to many jobs in elementary and middle schools, and in traditional subject areas such as language arts and social studies. That means there are enough educators per position, and vice versa. On the other hand, disciplines such as math, the sciences and special education are experiencing a teacher shortage. In this type of environment, educators agree that it is imperative for students to differentiate themselves. Many are obtaining dual certification — adding special education or reading specialist credentials, for example — to show their ability to facilitate learning in all student populations. Others are looking for jobs outside the region, where the need is greater. Cal U graduates are regularly recruited by school districts across the country at job fairs such as the annual PERC Fair, held every April by the Pittsburgh Education Recruitment Consortium. To help students find employment, the College of Education and Human Services hosted its inaugural Student Teaching Showcase in December. In all,

120 student teachers met in the Performance Center to demonstrate their professional experiences and leadership activities to an audience of faculty, family members, other students, and administrators and teachers from local school districts.

Tech Ed: Not Your Father’s Wood Shop One of the brightest spots on the horizon for education majors is technology education. Unlike the woodshop or metalworking classes of years gone by, “tech ed” utilizes engineering and design theory to solve problems. Although Cal U has had some type of “technology” teacher preparation courses in its curriculum since 1889, the current tech ed program is ranked among the best in the country. In a national study reported in The Tech Teacher, national data indicate that Pennsylvania is a powerhouse in technology education, producing 27 percent of all tech ed teachers in the United States. Cal U accounted for 15 percent of those teachers. Dr. Stanley Komacek, a professor of technology education, says Cal U not only has one of the largest tech ed teacher programs in the country, but also one of the strongest student bodies. The University’s student club, TEAC (Technology Ed Association of Cal), regularly competes in engineering design and problem-solving competitions, and its members earn national championships.

“Technological literacy is a critical competence in today’s workforce,” says Komacek. “That is why technology education is growing in importance in K-12 education. Today’s students must be technologically literate if we expect them to be successful in tomorrow’s workforce.” In his technology education classes at South Park Middle School, alumnus Josh Cramer ’05 challenges students to think critically and utilize engineering and design processes to solve problems. Through partnerships with local companies, including Kennametal and Westinghouse Electric, Cramer brings young engineers into his classroom to talk with students about how technology skills are used in the real world. “We do a lot of projects, and they have a lot of fun. But in the end, it’s about problem solving,” he says. “If I get one future engineer out of each class and one person to support that engineer, I’d feel really successful.” Cramer sees technology education moving from the high school and middle school to the elementary level. This trend, coupled with the retirement of an estimated 586 tech ed teachers in Pennsylvania schools by 2015, makes the employment outlook excellent for Cal U’s technology education students. It also ensures Cal U will continue to sit at the head of the class when it comes to educating future educators. ■ By Lindy Kravec, a Peters Township-based writer

JOB OPPORTUNITIES The Pennsylvania Center for Workforce Information and Analysis (www.pawork stats.state.pa.us) projects that these occupations will have the greatest number of openings for workers through 2014:

1. Food Preparation/Service 2. Management 3. Health Care (Practitioners/technicians) 4. Health Care Support 5. Personal Care/Service 6. Education, Training and Library Services 7. Transportation and Material-moving 8. Building and Grounds Cleaning/Maintenance 9. Food and Beverage Service 10. Motor Vehicle Operations

Josh Cramer ’05 (left) teaches technology classes at South Park Middle School. Joining him is student teacher Brad Kszastowski.

4 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 5 ■


STRENGTHENING THE WORKFORCE

Still at the Head of the Class Thorough preparation and real-world experience make Cal U teachers stand out

S

tudent-focused educators of the 21st century may have something in common with those normal-school teachers who staffed Pennsylvania’s one-room schoolhouses in the mid-1800s. If they received their teacher training at one particular institution, they all graduated with more than just a thorough knowledge of the three R’s.

Then, as now, education majors at California University of Pennsylvania also acquired a deep-rooted sense of pedagogy and professionalism. That makes all the difference in the world when it comes to actually securing teaching jobs, says Dr. Dan Engstrom, acting associate dean and director of student teaching for the College of Education and Human Services.

“At Cal U, there’s always been a strong connection between theory and practice,” he says. “Not only are our faculty members experienced educators themselves, we make sure our students have more classroom experience than students from most other schools.” Professional development partnerships with four local school districts are just one way that Cal U professors and students test educational theories in the classroom. By collaborating with teachers in Uniontown, Charleroi, Belle Vernon and California area school districts, Cal U’s pre-service teachers learn firsthand what really works in the classroom.

On-the-job training According to Engstrom, one trend in education is a push toward more practicum hours for students entering the profession. Right now, Pennsylvania requires 45 hours of field work for education majors; eventually it will require as many as 190. “Most Cal U students have more than 100 hours of field observations and 15 weeks of full-time student teaching experience before graduation,” says Engstrom. “More practicums make for betterprepared graduates,” adds Melissa Nelson, a December ’09 graduate with a dual Master of Education degree in elementary education and special

education. “When a student goes on an interview, it becomes apparent very quickly whether he or she is comfortable in the classroom.” Preparedness leads to employment. In a recent survey by payscale.com, graduates currently working as educators were asked to name their alma mater. When the results were compiled, California University of Pennsylvania ranked as the 15th most popular teaching college in the United States. The only Pennsylvania university to be included in this elite group, Cal U boasts about 30,000 teacher education alumni working in schools across the commonwealth. In spite of Cal U’s reputation for excellent teacher preparation, graduates face fierce competition for new positions. Every year the American Association for Employment in Education assesses the supply and demand for certain teaching positions across the United States, as well as by region. In its 2010 Job Search Handbook for Educators, the Mid-Atlantic region appears to be “balanced” when it comes to many jobs in elementary and middle schools, and in traditional subject areas such as language arts and social studies. That means there are enough educators per position, and vice versa. On the other hand, disciplines such as math, the sciences and special education are experiencing a teacher shortage. In this type of environment, educators agree that it is imperative for students to differentiate themselves. Many are obtaining dual certification — adding special education or reading specialist credentials, for example — to show their ability to facilitate learning in all student populations. Others are looking for jobs outside the region, where the need is greater. Cal U graduates are regularly recruited by school districts across the country at job fairs such as the annual PERC Fair, held every April by the Pittsburgh Education Recruitment Consortium. To help students find employment, the College of Education and Human Services hosted its inaugural Student Teaching Showcase in December. In all,

120 student teachers met in the Performance Center to demonstrate their professional experiences and leadership activities to an audience of faculty, family members, other students, and administrators and teachers from local school districts.

Tech Ed: Not Your Father’s Wood Shop One of the brightest spots on the horizon for education majors is technology education. Unlike the woodshop or metalworking classes of years gone by, “tech ed” utilizes engineering and design theory to solve problems. Although Cal U has had some type of “technology” teacher preparation courses in its curriculum since 1889, the current tech ed program is ranked among the best in the country. In a national study reported in The Tech Teacher, national data indicate that Pennsylvania is a powerhouse in technology education, producing 27 percent of all tech ed teachers in the United States. Cal U accounted for 15 percent of those teachers. Dr. Stanley Komacek, a professor of technology education, says Cal U not only has one of the largest tech ed teacher programs in the country, but also one of the strongest student bodies. The University’s student club, TEAC (Technology Ed Association of Cal), regularly competes in engineering design and problem-solving competitions, and its members earn national championships.

“Technological literacy is a critical competence in today’s workforce,” says Komacek. “That is why technology education is growing in importance in K-12 education. Today’s students must be technologically literate if we expect them to be successful in tomorrow’s workforce.” In his technology education classes at South Park Middle School, alumnus Josh Cramer ’05 challenges students to think critically and utilize engineering and design processes to solve problems. Through partnerships with local companies, including Kennametal and Westinghouse Electric, Cramer brings young engineers into his classroom to talk with students about how technology skills are used in the real world. “We do a lot of projects, and they have a lot of fun. But in the end, it’s about problem solving,” he says. “If I get one future engineer out of each class and one person to support that engineer, I’d feel really successful.” Cramer sees technology education moving from the high school and middle school to the elementary level. This trend, coupled with the retirement of an estimated 586 tech ed teachers in Pennsylvania schools by 2015, makes the employment outlook excellent for Cal U’s technology education students. It also ensures Cal U will continue to sit at the head of the class when it comes to educating future educators. ■ By Lindy Kravec, a Peters Township-based writer

JOB OPPORTUNITIES The Pennsylvania Center for Workforce Information and Analysis (www.pawork stats.state.pa.us) projects that these occupations will have the greatest number of openings for workers through 2014:

1. Food Preparation/Service 2. Management 3. Health Care (Practitioners/technicians) 4. Health Care Support 5. Personal Care/Service 6. Education, Training and Library Services 7. Transportation and Material-moving 8. Building and Grounds Cleaning/Maintenance 9. Food and Beverage Service 10. Motor Vehicle Operations

Josh Cramer ’05 (left) teaches technology classes at South Park Middle School. Joining him is student teacher Brad Kszastowski.

4 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 5 ■


STRENGTHENING THE WORKFORCE

Taking Care of Pennsylvania Cal U offers full range of nursing programs, from entry-level to master’s degree

W

e often think of nurses as the ones who tend to playground injuries at school, check vital signs in a doctor’s office and dispense medications in the hospital. Yet these skilled practitioners are responsible for saving lives and improving patient outcomes like no other health care professionals. As their role becomes broader and increasingly more important, the demand for nurses grows — and Cal U is helping to meet that demand with a continuum of degree programs. According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, there is an unprecedented shortage of registered nurses. Although RNs currently account for 2.9 million jobs, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects there will be 587,000 new jobs for registered nurses in the period from 2006–2016, one of the largest growth rates among all occupations. Pennsylvania’s Center for Workforce Information and Analysis projects the need for about 20 percent more registered nurses here in the commonwealth during that same time period. Associate professor Dr. Cheryl Hettman, chair of Cal U’s Department of Nursing, says the University is addressing that need through a number of exceptional nursing education offerings.

enjoy all the amenities available to both CCAC and Cal U students. At the end of their two-year program, students receive an Associate Degree in Nursing from CCAC, sit for the state nursing licensure examination, and enter the profession as registered nurses. As they begin working in the field, they also may return to Cal U for a completion program that provides an RN to BSN, or Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree.

Nurses today are being held to a higher level of accountability in every environment in which they work, Hettman says. “There’s a trend for hospitals to seek ‘magnet status,’ a credential that recognizes quality patient care and nursing excellence,” she explains. “Because of this, many hospitals now seek to hire only nurses with a BSN degree, or they are reimbursing their current staff if they return to school to complete their bachelor’s degree.”

6 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

cohort of students — from those like McForrester who would like to move into management and leadership roles to highly experienced nurse managers and administrators who work in diverse settings, such as acute care hospitals, primary care centers, home care agencies, skilled nursing facilities, industry and sales, and the military. “In order to have career mobility, it’s essential for nurses to continue their education,” Hettman says.

Blending theory and practice

‘‘

Great experiences come out of this program, and many people benefit from them.

’’

DR. CHERYL HETTMAN, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND DEPARTMENT OF NURSING CHAIR

Opening doors

Ready for work In an effort to meet the need for entry-to-practice RN positions, Cal U enjoys a cooperative relationship with Community College of Allegheny County. In this innovative program, CCAC nursing students may attend classes on the California campus and

In a landmark study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, registered nurse Linda Aiken, who holds a Ph.D., linked rates of surgical patient mortality at 168 Pennsylvania hospitals to whether nurses had bachelor’s degrees. Aiken noted that patient death rates were nearly twice as high at hospitals where fewer than 10 percent of the nurses held bachelor’s degrees as they were at hospitals where more than 70 percent did. A follow-up study conducted in 2008 confirmed these findings were true. Enrollment in Cal U’s RN-BSN program has grown steadily over the past five years, from about 100 students per year to more than 160 in the current class. The program is attractive to both new RNs and professionals who have been working for many years. They may continue their education without quitting their jobs by attending classes in the evenings on either the California or Southpointe campus, or at CCAC South in West Mifflin — another example of the cooperative relationship between Cal U and CCAC.

Michaelene McForrester, RN-BSN ’08, is enrolled in the new Master of Science in Nursing program at Cal U. The flexible, online format lets her plan study time around her work schedule at Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC.

“It’s going to open up so many doors for me, both professionally and financially,” says Benjamin Lego. A May ’08 graduate with an associate degree from a small college in central Pennsylvania, Lego currently works in the emergency room at The Uniontown Hospital in Uniontown, Pa. He is pursuing his RN-BSN at Cal U and hopes eventually to complete a master’s degree. Cal U’s upper-level nursing courses are highly competitive but flexible in nature. “The student body in our RN-BSN program is composed of working nurses who are very motivated and very dedicated,” Hettman says. “We set high expectations for them, and they meet them.” One sign of the success of Cal’s RN-BSN program is the feedback that comes from graduates and the institutions

where they are employed. Hettman is gratified when she hears how students use what they have learned in class to implement new protocols. “Great experiences come out of this program,” she says, “and many people benefit from them.” “The faculty in the RN-BSN program at Cal was wonderful,” declares Michaelene McForrester, RN-BSN ’08 and a staff nurse in the emergency room at Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC. “They are nurses, they’ve been on units in hospitals, and they know what we’re facing. They really get it.” McForrester is a member of the first class of Cal U’s new Master of Science in Nursing-Nursing Administration and Leadership program, which started in January. Offered completely online, the new MSN program attracts an eclectic

Dr. Mary O’Connor, coordinator of the MSN-Nursing Administration and Leadership program, explains its value. “This advanced degree blends health care and nursing principles and theories with practice, and will develop strong and visionary leaders who excel in all dimensions of nursing — from health care policy and finance to legal and ethical practice and the delivery systems of care. It is designed to prepare nurse administrators and leaders to respond effectively to today’s dynamic health care environment,” she says. “Leadership is part of every nurse’s role, and it is an essential part of the nurse administrator’s role,” O’Connor adds. “In the advanced practice role of nursing administration and leadership, graduates of the MSN program will be well prepared to make a difference in patient outcomes, staff preparation and job satisfaction, and retention of nurses.” Whether students choose the entry-to-practice curriculum, the RN-BSN program or the new MSN degree, they can be sure their Cal U experience will help them make a healthy contribution to Pennsylvania’s workforce. ■ By Lindy Kravec, a Peters Township-based writer

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 7 ■


STRENGTHENING THE WORKFORCE

Taking Care of Pennsylvania Cal U offers full range of nursing programs, from entry-level to master’s degree

W

e often think of nurses as the ones who tend to playground injuries at school, check vital signs in a doctor’s office and dispense medications in the hospital. Yet these skilled practitioners are responsible for saving lives and improving patient outcomes like no other health care professionals. As their role becomes broader and increasingly more important, the demand for nurses grows — and Cal U is helping to meet that demand with a continuum of degree programs. According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, there is an unprecedented shortage of registered nurses. Although RNs currently account for 2.9 million jobs, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects there will be 587,000 new jobs for registered nurses in the period from 2006–2016, one of the largest growth rates among all occupations. Pennsylvania’s Center for Workforce Information and Analysis projects the need for about 20 percent more registered nurses here in the commonwealth during that same time period. Associate professor Dr. Cheryl Hettman, chair of Cal U’s Department of Nursing, says the University is addressing that need through a number of exceptional nursing education offerings.

enjoy all the amenities available to both CCAC and Cal U students. At the end of their two-year program, students receive an Associate Degree in Nursing from CCAC, sit for the state nursing licensure examination, and enter the profession as registered nurses. As they begin working in the field, they also may return to Cal U for a completion program that provides an RN to BSN, or Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree.

Nurses today are being held to a higher level of accountability in every environment in which they work, Hettman says. “There’s a trend for hospitals to seek ‘magnet status,’ a credential that recognizes quality patient care and nursing excellence,” she explains. “Because of this, many hospitals now seek to hire only nurses with a BSN degree, or they are reimbursing their current staff if they return to school to complete their bachelor’s degree.”

6 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

cohort of students — from those like McForrester who would like to move into management and leadership roles to highly experienced nurse managers and administrators who work in diverse settings, such as acute care hospitals, primary care centers, home care agencies, skilled nursing facilities, industry and sales, and the military. “In order to have career mobility, it’s essential for nurses to continue their education,” Hettman says.

Blending theory and practice

‘‘

Great experiences come out of this program, and many people benefit from them.

’’

DR. CHERYL HETTMAN, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND DEPARTMENT OF NURSING CHAIR

Opening doors

Ready for work In an effort to meet the need for entry-to-practice RN positions, Cal U enjoys a cooperative relationship with Community College of Allegheny County. In this innovative program, CCAC nursing students may attend classes on the California campus and

In a landmark study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, registered nurse Linda Aiken, who holds a Ph.D., linked rates of surgical patient mortality at 168 Pennsylvania hospitals to whether nurses had bachelor’s degrees. Aiken noted that patient death rates were nearly twice as high at hospitals where fewer than 10 percent of the nurses held bachelor’s degrees as they were at hospitals where more than 70 percent did. A follow-up study conducted in 2008 confirmed these findings were true. Enrollment in Cal U’s RN-BSN program has grown steadily over the past five years, from about 100 students per year to more than 160 in the current class. The program is attractive to both new RNs and professionals who have been working for many years. They may continue their education without quitting their jobs by attending classes in the evenings on either the California or Southpointe campus, or at CCAC South in West Mifflin — another example of the cooperative relationship between Cal U and CCAC.

Michaelene McForrester, RN-BSN ’08, is enrolled in the new Master of Science in Nursing program at Cal U. The flexible, online format lets her plan study time around her work schedule at Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC.

“It’s going to open up so many doors for me, both professionally and financially,” says Benjamin Lego. A May ’08 graduate with an associate degree from a small college in central Pennsylvania, Lego currently works in the emergency room at The Uniontown Hospital in Uniontown, Pa. He is pursuing his RN-BSN at Cal U and hopes eventually to complete a master’s degree. Cal U’s upper-level nursing courses are highly competitive but flexible in nature. “The student body in our RN-BSN program is composed of working nurses who are very motivated and very dedicated,” Hettman says. “We set high expectations for them, and they meet them.” One sign of the success of Cal’s RN-BSN program is the feedback that comes from graduates and the institutions

where they are employed. Hettman is gratified when she hears how students use what they have learned in class to implement new protocols. “Great experiences come out of this program,” she says, “and many people benefit from them.” “The faculty in the RN-BSN program at Cal was wonderful,” declares Michaelene McForrester, RN-BSN ’08 and a staff nurse in the emergency room at Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC. “They are nurses, they’ve been on units in hospitals, and they know what we’re facing. They really get it.” McForrester is a member of the first class of Cal U’s new Master of Science in Nursing-Nursing Administration and Leadership program, which started in January. Offered completely online, the new MSN program attracts an eclectic

Dr. Mary O’Connor, coordinator of the MSN-Nursing Administration and Leadership program, explains its value. “This advanced degree blends health care and nursing principles and theories with practice, and will develop strong and visionary leaders who excel in all dimensions of nursing — from health care policy and finance to legal and ethical practice and the delivery systems of care. It is designed to prepare nurse administrators and leaders to respond effectively to today’s dynamic health care environment,” she says. “Leadership is part of every nurse’s role, and it is an essential part of the nurse administrator’s role,” O’Connor adds. “In the advanced practice role of nursing administration and leadership, graduates of the MSN program will be well prepared to make a difference in patient outcomes, staff preparation and job satisfaction, and retention of nurses.” Whether students choose the entry-to-practice curriculum, the RN-BSN program or the new MSN degree, they can be sure their Cal U experience will help them make a healthy contribution to Pennsylvania’s workforce. ■ By Lindy Kravec, a Peters Township-based writer

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 7 ■


STRENGTHENING THE WORKFORCE

OUTSIDERS’ OPINIONS

Raffle revs up scholarship fund

Alumni society offers chances on a red-hot Harley

Advisory board members share their professional expertise

B

ridging the gap between academic training and industry needs, advisory boards guide the growth and development of many programs at Cal U. These panels of experienced professionals offer their counsel in areas as different as Health Science, Legal Studies and robotics. Although a Cal U diploma is not required, many advisory board members are, in fact, alumni who volunteer in the spirit of Cal U for Life. The common goal of all members: to ensure real-world applications in degree programs, to enhance students’ employment opportunities, and to support those faculty members who seek out and use industry input. “From faculty to department chairs to college deans, we continue to be impressed with the caliber of people we work with at Cal U,” says David Landis, vice president for education and training at The Technology Collaborative, which partnered with Cal U’s Department of Applied Engineering and Technology (AET) to craft a high-schoolto-college program, then expanded the relationship. “They are willing contributors who show a sincere interest in projects that serve students, local industry and the region. They take industry input seriously and value the opportunity to work in partnership,” he says. The AET Department calls on its advisory boards when considering ways to keep programs relevant to industry needs and when designing programs.

C For example, board members who helped to launch the new Robotics Engineering Technology associate degree also provided input for the next stage of the tiered program, a four-year degree in Mechatronics Engineering Technology. The advisory board is part of NCRETE, the National Center for Robotics Engineering Technology Education. The 13 advisers represent a “solid mix” of industry, workforce training and academic professionals, says NCRETE director Anthony Rodi. “They see we have hard-working students who are learning applied skills,” he says. “Companies can be assured they will get trained people with transferable skills in Cal U graduates.” When advisory board members create internships, those students often become the “go-to people” when jobs are available, Rodi adds. Pedro Delgado of Rail Transit Consultants Inc. says he welcomes sharing his industry experience so that students are introduced to the details of real-life engineering problems. This practical experience helps students to think in real time, he says. Advisory boards also address accreditation needs. Many national accrediting agencies require detailed industry input and strong evidence that faculty have adjusted programs based on advice from their boards. For instance, Cal U’s bachelor’s degree in Computer Engineering Technology recently received accreditation by ABET’s Technology Accreditation Commission, in part because of the active role played by advisory board members. In fact, every bachelor’s program in AET — Electrical Engineering Technology, Computer Engineering Technology, Industrial Technology, Graphics and Multimedia, and Technology Education — is accredited, and each has its own advisory board functioning in a critical role with earning and maintaining accreditation. To stay on the cutting edge, the AET Department “looks outward, not inward,” says Paul Koontz ’78, NCRETE advisory board member and president of 484 Consulting LLC, a technology education company based in Medina, Ohio. “The faculty, staff and board constantly look to ensure that programs meet real industry needs.” ■ By Colleen C. Derda, a Pittsburgh-based writer

Pedro Delgado, engineer at Rail Transit Consultants in Penn, Pa.

8 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

al U students need scholarships hope to show it off again this spring — and the IA/TE Alumni Society at the International Technology is gearing up to help. Education Association’s national The nonprofit organization of conference in Charlotte, N.C. industrial arts and technology education Sixty cents of every dollar raised graduates is raffling off through the raffle will a 2010 Harley-Davidson go into the society’s Road King motorcycle endowed scholarship Cal gave me to boost its endowed fund, which is managed a lot more than scholarship fund. by the Foundation for “The goal is to give California University just academics. something back to of Pennsylvania. It gave me a California,” says Paul “People like Harleys, foundation for my Koontz ’78, president so the raffle gives us a of the alumni society. good opportunity to raise professional life. “Personally, Cal gave funds,” says Koontz, me a lot more than just a motorcycle rider for academics. It gave me 42 years. PAUL KOONTZ ’78, a foundation for my His Ohio-based PRESIDENT, IA/TE ALUMNI SOCIETY professional life, and business, 484 Consulting I want to help pass that LLC, specializes in opportunity along to others.” STEM-based educational products and A total of 5,000 tickets are available, services for elementary, secondary at a cost of $10 each. Every ticket has and career/technical schools, as well two numbers, doubling the chance to as colleges and universities involved win. The winning ticket will match the with science, technology, engineering Pennsylvania Lottery’s “Big 4” lottery and mathematics. numbers drawn on the evening of “The bike’s even red and black, May 3, 2010. The winner will be notified by LEADERS OF THE PACK certified mail. The holder of the President Angelo Armenti, Jr. and First Lady winning ticket must provide proof Barbara Armenti try out the Harley-Davidson of insurance and a valid driver’s Road King — painted Cal U red and black. license for registration purposes. Complete rules are posted online at www.cal-ia-te-alumni.org. The winner will be announced at a special event for society members, although he or she need not be present to win. Organizers are hoping the winner will ride the motorcycle in the 2010 Homecoming parade, sparking interest in a second fundraiser. Before it is wheeled into the winner’s garage, the red-and-black touring bike is scheduled to make several “road trips” to society events, traveling securely inside a covered trailer. The Harley made a December stop at an alumni event at the Carnegie Science Center, and society members

‘‘ ’’

Cal’s school colors,” Koontz says. Membership in the IA/TE Alumni Association is awarded automatically to anyone who earns certification or an undergraduate or graduate degree in industrial arts or technology education at Cal U. Faculty and retired faculty also are members. The society gives alumni a chance to network, both professionally and socially, and to stay in touch with the University, its faculty and students. The group also works to increase support for technology education and to provide scholarships. “As I’ve said many times, scholarships are Cal U’s greatest need,” says University President Angelo Armenti, Jr. “It’s great to see our alumni reaching out to help our current students. “Many of those alumni remember someone who was willing to lend them a hand during their own student days. Now they are using their creativity to ‘pay it forward’ — and they’re having a good time doing it.” For more information, please call 724-938-4085 or 724-938-4169. ■

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 9 ■


STRENGTHENING THE WORKFORCE

OUTSIDERS’ OPINIONS

Raffle revs up scholarship fund

Alumni society offers chances on a red-hot Harley

Advisory board members share their professional expertise

B

ridging the gap between academic training and industry needs, advisory boards guide the growth and development of many programs at Cal U. These panels of experienced professionals offer their counsel in areas as different as Health Science, Legal Studies and robotics. Although a Cal U diploma is not required, many advisory board members are, in fact, alumni who volunteer in the spirit of Cal U for Life. The common goal of all members: to ensure real-world applications in degree programs, to enhance students’ employment opportunities, and to support those faculty members who seek out and use industry input. “From faculty to department chairs to college deans, we continue to be impressed with the caliber of people we work with at Cal U,” says David Landis, vice president for education and training at The Technology Collaborative, which partnered with Cal U’s Department of Applied Engineering and Technology (AET) to craft a high-schoolto-college program, then expanded the relationship. “They are willing contributors who show a sincere interest in projects that serve students, local industry and the region. They take industry input seriously and value the opportunity to work in partnership,” he says. The AET Department calls on its advisory boards when considering ways to keep programs relevant to industry needs and when designing programs.

C For example, board members who helped to launch the new Robotics Engineering Technology associate degree also provided input for the next stage of the tiered program, a four-year degree in Mechatronics Engineering Technology. The advisory board is part of NCRETE, the National Center for Robotics Engineering Technology Education. The 13 advisers represent a “solid mix” of industry, workforce training and academic professionals, says NCRETE director Anthony Rodi. “They see we have hard-working students who are learning applied skills,” he says. “Companies can be assured they will get trained people with transferable skills in Cal U graduates.” When advisory board members create internships, those students often become the “go-to people” when jobs are available, Rodi adds. Pedro Delgado of Rail Transit Consultants Inc. says he welcomes sharing his industry experience so that students are introduced to the details of real-life engineering problems. This practical experience helps students to think in real time, he says. Advisory boards also address accreditation needs. Many national accrediting agencies require detailed industry input and strong evidence that faculty have adjusted programs based on advice from their boards. For instance, Cal U’s bachelor’s degree in Computer Engineering Technology recently received accreditation by ABET’s Technology Accreditation Commission, in part because of the active role played by advisory board members. In fact, every bachelor’s program in AET — Electrical Engineering Technology, Computer Engineering Technology, Industrial Technology, Graphics and Multimedia, and Technology Education — is accredited, and each has its own advisory board functioning in a critical role with earning and maintaining accreditation. To stay on the cutting edge, the AET Department “looks outward, not inward,” says Paul Koontz ’78, NCRETE advisory board member and president of 484 Consulting LLC, a technology education company based in Medina, Ohio. “The faculty, staff and board constantly look to ensure that programs meet real industry needs.” ■ By Colleen C. Derda, a Pittsburgh-based writer

Pedro Delgado, engineer at Rail Transit Consultants in Penn, Pa.

8 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

al U students need scholarships hope to show it off again this spring — and the IA/TE Alumni Society at the International Technology is gearing up to help. Education Association’s national The nonprofit organization of conference in Charlotte, N.C. industrial arts and technology education Sixty cents of every dollar raised graduates is raffling off through the raffle will a 2010 Harley-Davidson go into the society’s Road King motorcycle endowed scholarship Cal gave me to boost its endowed fund, which is managed a lot more than scholarship fund. by the Foundation for “The goal is to give California University just academics. something back to of Pennsylvania. It gave me a California,” says Paul “People like Harleys, foundation for my Koontz ’78, president so the raffle gives us a of the alumni society. good opportunity to raise professional life. “Personally, Cal gave funds,” says Koontz, me a lot more than just a motorcycle rider for academics. It gave me 42 years. PAUL KOONTZ ’78, a foundation for my His Ohio-based PRESIDENT, IA/TE ALUMNI SOCIETY professional life, and business, 484 Consulting I want to help pass that LLC, specializes in opportunity along to others.” STEM-based educational products and A total of 5,000 tickets are available, services for elementary, secondary at a cost of $10 each. Every ticket has and career/technical schools, as well two numbers, doubling the chance to as colleges and universities involved win. The winning ticket will match the with science, technology, engineering Pennsylvania Lottery’s “Big 4” lottery and mathematics. numbers drawn on the evening of “The bike’s even red and black, May 3, 2010. The winner will be notified by LEADERS OF THE PACK certified mail. The holder of the President Angelo Armenti, Jr. and First Lady winning ticket must provide proof Barbara Armenti try out the Harley-Davidson of insurance and a valid driver’s Road King — painted Cal U red and black. license for registration purposes. Complete rules are posted online at www.cal-ia-te-alumni.org. The winner will be announced at a special event for society members, although he or she need not be present to win. Organizers are hoping the winner will ride the motorcycle in the 2010 Homecoming parade, sparking interest in a second fundraiser. Before it is wheeled into the winner’s garage, the red-and-black touring bike is scheduled to make several “road trips” to society events, traveling securely inside a covered trailer. The Harley made a December stop at an alumni event at the Carnegie Science Center, and society members

‘‘ ’’

Cal’s school colors,” Koontz says. Membership in the IA/TE Alumni Association is awarded automatically to anyone who earns certification or an undergraduate or graduate degree in industrial arts or technology education at Cal U. Faculty and retired faculty also are members. The society gives alumni a chance to network, both professionally and socially, and to stay in touch with the University, its faculty and students. The group also works to increase support for technology education and to provide scholarships. “As I’ve said many times, scholarships are Cal U’s greatest need,” says University President Angelo Armenti, Jr. “It’s great to see our alumni reaching out to help our current students. “Many of those alumni remember someone who was willing to lend them a hand during their own student days. Now they are using their creativity to ‘pay it forward’ — and they’re having a good time doing it.” For more information, please call 724-938-4085 or 724-938-4169. ■

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 9 ■


wow! WEBSITE REACTION:

New ‘front door’ offers easy navigation and a distinctive look

C

alifornia University has a new digital front door — a website that raises the bar in terms of both function and style. With the help of BarkleyREI, a Pittsburgh-based interactive marketing agency, the website at www.calu.edu has been rebuilt completely with users in mind. Designed to be informative, functional and easy to navigate, it also delivers a “wow factor” that makes it a standout. “In this digital age, our website is the University’s primary marketing and recruitment tool,” says Angela Burrows, vice president for University Relations. “This is how many prospective students will form their first impression of Cal U. “In addition, the website must function well for everyone on our campus, as well as our alumni and other University friends. The challenge lay in meeting the needs of so many different stakeholders.”

10 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

Meanwhile, staff and freelance writers Video clips of Cal U students provide worked to update, rewrite and verify information about the buildings and the about 1,400 pages of information. activities inside. Photographers shot, labeled and uploaded News items are displayed in a carousel hundreds of still photos and video clips. at the bottom of the page. Feeds from As the final words and pictures were Facebook, Twitter and other social media assembled, Cal U’s own web team — sites are pulled into the page, and a supplemented by more than a dozen drop-down menu guides students, alumni work-study and graduate students — and University employees to portions began the painstaking process of of the website they use most often. constructing the new site, with help With the click of a mouse, visitors can The new website includes more than from the University’s Office of find a comprehensive calendar of campus 1,400 pages of information, plus hundreds Information Technology. events. Students can check their schedules of photographs and videos. Key to their work is a new content and grades. Parents soon will have their management system that should make it own information portal, with a message board where they easier to update web pages and keep the website fresh. can post questions or share experiences. Guidance counselors can use a secure, password-protected portal to track the Virtual Tourists application process for high school students who hope to Visitors who type www.calu.edu into their Internet attend Cal U. browsers will have a world of information at their fingertips. Throughout the site, videos show how the culture of “When they visit the homepage, the first thing people philanthropy and Cal U’s core values of integrity, civility will notice is the virtual tour,” says Chris Cox, account and responsibility make an impact on campus life. supervisor at BarkelyREI and project lead for the website “Pulling this all together was a massive undertaking,” redesign. Burrows says. “There is still some tweaking to be done, of “It isn’t meant to be just a pretty picture,” he adds. course, and the job of refreshing the website will be ongoing. “It’s grounded in the strategic business objective of “Overall, we are very pleased with the result. The showcasing Cal U’s vibrant campus and the physical new website is both appealing and functional, exactly transformation it’s undergone in recent years.” the balance we were hoping to achieve. This website was On the homepage, the University comes to life in created to serve the entire Cal U community. I hope it detailed illustrations based on photos of campus architecture. continues to fulfill that promise, now and in the future.” ■

Focus Groups The yearlong redesign project began with a thorough analysis of the original Cal U website by BarkleyREI. Then came “discovery sessions” with 19 focus groups from all corners of the campus. Prospective and current students, faculty, staff, administrators and alumni sat down with University Relations staff and a cross-disciplinary team led by user-experience specialists from BarkleyREI. In candid, informal sessions they explained their needs and created a “wish list” for the new site. “Everyone was looking for a useful website that accurately represents the University,” says Erica Deitzel, vice president of user experience at BarkleyREI. “The fact that the site needed an updated look-and-feel was obvious, but a larger need for better content came through loud and clear.” In addition, “President Armenti wanted Cal U to have a distinctive online presence. He wanted a site that would make people sit up and say, ‘Wow!’” After planning the site’s underlying architecture with Cal U and developing creative designs, BarkleyREI conducted “user tests” with groups of high school and college students. Their comments helped to fine-tune the site’s overall navigation, labeling and content organization, and confirmed their satisfaction with the site’s creative design. Students from the Global Online and Lifelong Learning programs participated in e-mail interviews that evaluated the website’s ease of use and overall appeal.

By Christine Kindl, communications director at Cal U

TV ads paint Cal U in a new light

T

elevision viewers will get a glimpse of the Cal U campus in two animated ads to be broadcast this year. “Animation sets Cal U’s advertising apart from other schools in the region,” says Craig Otto, partner and creative director at Dymun+Co., the Pittsburghbased advertising firm that developed the concept for the 30-second spots. “Our goal is to raise awareness about the University and to show what makes it so special — including its amazing campus.” As in Cal U’s previous awardwinning ads, voiceovers explain how the University’s core values help students prepare for a career and graduate with “a degree of character.” The new ads go one step further, illustrating Cal U’s natural and architectural beauty. In “Journey,” airing now, the riverside campus is “painted” onto the TV screen in a style resembling

watercolor. “Built,” due later this year, shows an architectural drawing taking shape around a student. Both advertisements “use the campus as a canvas for communicating the University’s core values,” Otto says. The scenes were animated by Little Fluffy Clouds, an award-winning animation studio in San Francisco. To ensure authenticity, husband-andwife team Betsy De Fries and Jerry van de Beek spent a full day walking the Quad, photographing students, even measuring building facades at Cal U. “Focus groups for our new website suggested showing the campus in our TV ads,” says Angela Burrows, Cal U’s vice president for University Relations. “I see both the website and the ads as an evolution of our brand — the core message is the same, but people are able to see how our campus has been transformed.”

“Cal’s investment in its students is instantly apparent when you see this beautiful campus,” Otto adds. “That’s what we wanted to show. I believe these ads will speak to alumni as well as they speak to prospective students.”

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 11 ■


wow! WEBSITE REACTION:

New ‘front door’ offers easy navigation and a distinctive look

C

alifornia University has a new digital front door — a website that raises the bar in terms of both function and style. With the help of BarkleyREI, a Pittsburgh-based interactive marketing agency, the website at www.calu.edu has been rebuilt completely with users in mind. Designed to be informative, functional and easy to navigate, it also delivers a “wow factor” that makes it a standout. “In this digital age, our website is the University’s primary marketing and recruitment tool,” says Angela Burrows, vice president for University Relations. “This is how many prospective students will form their first impression of Cal U. “In addition, the website must function well for everyone on our campus, as well as our alumni and other University friends. The challenge lay in meeting the needs of so many different stakeholders.”

10 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

Meanwhile, staff and freelance writers Video clips of Cal U students provide worked to update, rewrite and verify information about the buildings and the about 1,400 pages of information. activities inside. Photographers shot, labeled and uploaded News items are displayed in a carousel hundreds of still photos and video clips. at the bottom of the page. Feeds from As the final words and pictures were Facebook, Twitter and other social media assembled, Cal U’s own web team — sites are pulled into the page, and a supplemented by more than a dozen drop-down menu guides students, alumni work-study and graduate students — and University employees to portions began the painstaking process of of the website they use most often. constructing the new site, with help With the click of a mouse, visitors can The new website includes more than from the University’s Office of find a comprehensive calendar of campus 1,400 pages of information, plus hundreds Information Technology. events. Students can check their schedules of photographs and videos. Key to their work is a new content and grades. Parents soon will have their management system that should make it own information portal, with a message board where they easier to update web pages and keep the website fresh. can post questions or share experiences. Guidance counselors can use a secure, password-protected portal to track the Virtual Tourists application process for high school students who hope to Visitors who type www.calu.edu into their Internet attend Cal U. browsers will have a world of information at their fingertips. Throughout the site, videos show how the culture of “When they visit the homepage, the first thing people philanthropy and Cal U’s core values of integrity, civility will notice is the virtual tour,” says Chris Cox, account and responsibility make an impact on campus life. supervisor at BarkelyREI and project lead for the website “Pulling this all together was a massive undertaking,” redesign. Burrows says. “There is still some tweaking to be done, of “It isn’t meant to be just a pretty picture,” he adds. course, and the job of refreshing the website will be ongoing. “It’s grounded in the strategic business objective of “Overall, we are very pleased with the result. The showcasing Cal U’s vibrant campus and the physical new website is both appealing and functional, exactly transformation it’s undergone in recent years.” the balance we were hoping to achieve. This website was On the homepage, the University comes to life in created to serve the entire Cal U community. I hope it detailed illustrations based on photos of campus architecture. continues to fulfill that promise, now and in the future.” ■

Focus Groups The yearlong redesign project began with a thorough analysis of the original Cal U website by BarkleyREI. Then came “discovery sessions” with 19 focus groups from all corners of the campus. Prospective and current students, faculty, staff, administrators and alumni sat down with University Relations staff and a cross-disciplinary team led by user-experience specialists from BarkleyREI. In candid, informal sessions they explained their needs and created a “wish list” for the new site. “Everyone was looking for a useful website that accurately represents the University,” says Erica Deitzel, vice president of user experience at BarkleyREI. “The fact that the site needed an updated look-and-feel was obvious, but a larger need for better content came through loud and clear.” In addition, “President Armenti wanted Cal U to have a distinctive online presence. He wanted a site that would make people sit up and say, ‘Wow!’” After planning the site’s underlying architecture with Cal U and developing creative designs, BarkleyREI conducted “user tests” with groups of high school and college students. Their comments helped to fine-tune the site’s overall navigation, labeling and content organization, and confirmed their satisfaction with the site’s creative design. Students from the Global Online and Lifelong Learning programs participated in e-mail interviews that evaluated the website’s ease of use and overall appeal.

By Christine Kindl, communications director at Cal U

TV ads paint Cal U in a new light

T

elevision viewers will get a glimpse of the Cal U campus in two animated ads to be broadcast this year. “Animation sets Cal U’s advertising apart from other schools in the region,” says Craig Otto, partner and creative director at Dymun+Co., the Pittsburghbased advertising firm that developed the concept for the 30-second spots. “Our goal is to raise awareness about the University and to show what makes it so special — including its amazing campus.” As in Cal U’s previous awardwinning ads, voiceovers explain how the University’s core values help students prepare for a career and graduate with “a degree of character.” The new ads go one step further, illustrating Cal U’s natural and architectural beauty. In “Journey,” airing now, the riverside campus is “painted” onto the TV screen in a style resembling

watercolor. “Built,” due later this year, shows an architectural drawing taking shape around a student. Both advertisements “use the campus as a canvas for communicating the University’s core values,” Otto says. The scenes were animated by Little Fluffy Clouds, an award-winning animation studio in San Francisco. To ensure authenticity, husband-andwife team Betsy De Fries and Jerry van de Beek spent a full day walking the Quad, photographing students, even measuring building facades at Cal U. “Focus groups for our new website suggested showing the campus in our TV ads,” says Angela Burrows, Cal U’s vice president for University Relations. “I see both the website and the ads as an evolution of our brand — the core message is the same, but people are able to see how our campus has been transformed.”

“Cal’s investment in its students is instantly apparent when you see this beautiful campus,” Otto adds. “That’s what we wanted to show. I believe these ads will speak to alumni as well as they speak to prospective students.”

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 11 ■


Linda and Harry Serene have been active on behalf of Cal U since their respective terms as Student Government president. Now Linda ’64 is leading the Foundation for California University, and soon Harry ’65 will head the Alumni Association Board of Directors.

the hospital foundation board and was Because they are committed the first physician chosen as president to “paying it forward,” in 2004 the of the hospital’s board of directors. Serene family joined forces to create Although he has retired from an endowed scholarship to honor medical practice, Harry continues the legacy of their parents, Michael to play an active role as a member and Clara Serene. of the hospital board. Says Linda, “We like to be people While her husband tended to the who make good things happen for health care needs of the community, the right reason.” Linda seized the opportunity Fostering leadership to get involved in a host To that end, they of volunteer activities. recently announced the She has served on the Any university, formation of a Leadership boards of the Pittsburgh whether it’s a Institute at Cal U. Symphony Orchestra Under the direction of and Asbury Heights, a private or a Dr. Michael Hummel, not-for-profit, faith-based state-related dean of the College of retirement community institution, needs Liberal Arts, a select in Mt. Lebanon, Pa. alumni support number of high school Along with her and University students husband, she was an in order to will have the opportunity elder at Westminster become great. to cultivate leadership Presbyterian Church. skills at special training Linda also served programs. three terms as an elected DR. HARRY SERENE ’65 “Our work in member of the Upper St. student government at Clair School Board, one Cal U had such a significant influence of her favorite volunteer roles. on us, we’re hoping to give others a During her tenure, she worked similar experience through this new diligently to create a community Leadership Institute,” says Linda. educational foundation that has evolved Fostering leadership on many levels into the Community Foundation of has been among Linda’s goals since she Upper St. Clair, an organization that joined the Foundation board in 2004. supports programs and activities that As president of the Foundation, she enrich the lives of local residents. also is committed to making the “I feel so firmly that the single University’s endowment grow — and thing that has made America great is she is charging every board member public education,” Linda says. “I was to give and to attract new givers. always so proud of my involvement Harry echoes the need for increased with the Upper St. Clair schools, and alumni participation. with our association with California “Any university, whether it’s a University.” private or a state-related institution, For three generations the Serene needs alumni support in order to family has been involved with Cal U. become great,” he observes. In 1960, Harry’s father, Dr. Michael Although financial support is F. Serene, joined the faculty of the important, Harry urges alumni to University. All three of Harry’s brothers, become “emotionally connected” two of his sisters-in-law, his daughter to their alma mater. and son-in-law are proud alumni. “We want to see more alumni In 1978, the Cal U Alumni getting involved with current students Association presented the four Serene — being available, being supportive — brothers — three medical doctors and and serving as role models for future one Ph.D. — with the Meritorious alumni,” he adds. Achievement Award. In 1996, the Amy Lombard, executive director Foundation for California University of Alumni Relations and Annual Fund, presented the Serene family with its is confident those efforts will come prestigious Job Johnson Award for to fruition. excellence, innovation and “Dr. Serene has very strong community service.

‘‘

DYNAMIC DUO

PREPARED TO LEAD Alumni couple intends to make a difference for Cal U

F

Linda Serene ‘64, as president of the Student Government Association in 1964. 12 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

or Dr. Harry ’65 and Linda ’64 Serene, leadership isn’t an abstract concept. It’s a way of life. This dynamic couple honed their leadership skills as students at Cal U, then known as California State College. With a keen interest in student government and a penchant for getting involved, they found their paths crossing many times. Nearly 45 years later, they still share similar interests and passions — and tend to finish each other’s sentences. Linda explains that she and Harry met when she was a senior and president of the Student Government Association. Harry was a junior and vice president. Harry quickly points out that he succeeded her as president the following year. They both received the Outstanding Student Award during their senior year, Linda adds. Although Linda categorizes their undergraduate days as “a millennium ago,” she is delighted that she and Harry once again will be working in tandem leadership roles within the Cal U community.

Linda recently was named president of the board of directors of the Foundation for California University of Pennsylvania, and Harry looks forward to moving from his current position as vice president to president of the board of directors of the Alumni Association in July.

Community and professional service The energy, experience and vision the Serenes bring to their new positions is sure to have a substantial effect on the University. Over the years, they have taken an active role in the advancement of a number of professional and civic organizations. For 35 years, Harry practiced as a board-certified general surgeon at West Penn Hospital, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and St. Clair Hospital. In spite of his demanding schedule, he never lost track of his passion to serve. Harry employed his leadership skills as president of the St. Clair Hospital medical staff, chairman of the department of general surgery, and co-chairman of the medical ethics committee. He served on

leadership skills, and the ability to bring people together,” she says. “In addition, he is a very caring and compassionate person. Because of this, all of our alumni, regardless of class year, should respond to his appeal.” Harry believes the new Cal U for Life initiative can impress upon students the importance of keeping the University in their lives. “In the past, students didn’t realize they had a role after graduation,” he says. “I want to make sure they know that the University still needs them and wants them to stay involved.”

’’

After practicing surgery for 35 years Dr. Harry Serene ‘65 went on to become the president of the St. Clair Hospital medical staff.

Linda Serene ‘64 served three terms as a member of the Upper St. Clair School Board.

“Harry and I are celebrating our 40th wedding anniversary in 2010,” Linda adds. “Nothing makes us happier than doing something special for Cal U at this special time in our lives.” ■ By Lindy Kravec, a Peters Township-based writer

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 13 ■


Linda and Harry Serene have been active on behalf of Cal U since their respective terms as Student Government president. Now Linda ’64 is leading the Foundation for California University, and soon Harry ’65 will head the Alumni Association Board of Directors.

the hospital foundation board and was Because they are committed the first physician chosen as president to “paying it forward,” in 2004 the of the hospital’s board of directors. Serene family joined forces to create Although he has retired from an endowed scholarship to honor medical practice, Harry continues the legacy of their parents, Michael to play an active role as a member and Clara Serene. of the hospital board. Says Linda, “We like to be people While her husband tended to the who make good things happen for health care needs of the community, the right reason.” Linda seized the opportunity Fostering leadership to get involved in a host To that end, they of volunteer activities. recently announced the She has served on the Any university, formation of a Leadership boards of the Pittsburgh whether it’s a Institute at Cal U. Symphony Orchestra Under the direction of and Asbury Heights, a private or a Dr. Michael Hummel, not-for-profit, faith-based state-related dean of the College of retirement community institution, needs Liberal Arts, a select in Mt. Lebanon, Pa. alumni support number of high school Along with her and University students husband, she was an in order to will have the opportunity elder at Westminster become great. to cultivate leadership Presbyterian Church. skills at special training Linda also served programs. three terms as an elected DR. HARRY SERENE ’65 “Our work in member of the Upper St. student government at Clair School Board, one Cal U had such a significant influence of her favorite volunteer roles. on us, we’re hoping to give others a During her tenure, she worked similar experience through this new diligently to create a community Leadership Institute,” says Linda. educational foundation that has evolved Fostering leadership on many levels into the Community Foundation of has been among Linda’s goals since she Upper St. Clair, an organization that joined the Foundation board in 2004. supports programs and activities that As president of the Foundation, she enrich the lives of local residents. also is committed to making the “I feel so firmly that the single University’s endowment grow — and thing that has made America great is she is charging every board member public education,” Linda says. “I was to give and to attract new givers. always so proud of my involvement Harry echoes the need for increased with the Upper St. Clair schools, and alumni participation. with our association with California “Any university, whether it’s a University.” private or a state-related institution, For three generations the Serene needs alumni support in order to family has been involved with Cal U. become great,” he observes. In 1960, Harry’s father, Dr. Michael Although financial support is F. Serene, joined the faculty of the important, Harry urges alumni to University. All three of Harry’s brothers, become “emotionally connected” two of his sisters-in-law, his daughter to their alma mater. and son-in-law are proud alumni. “We want to see more alumni In 1978, the Cal U Alumni getting involved with current students Association presented the four Serene — being available, being supportive — brothers — three medical doctors and and serving as role models for future one Ph.D. — with the Meritorious alumni,” he adds. Achievement Award. In 1996, the Amy Lombard, executive director Foundation for California University of Alumni Relations and Annual Fund, presented the Serene family with its is confident those efforts will come prestigious Job Johnson Award for to fruition. excellence, innovation and “Dr. Serene has very strong community service.

‘‘

DYNAMIC DUO

PREPARED TO LEAD Alumni couple intends to make a difference for Cal U

F

Linda Serene ‘64, as president of the Student Government Association in 1964. 12 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

or Dr. Harry ’65 and Linda ’64 Serene, leadership isn’t an abstract concept. It’s a way of life. This dynamic couple honed their leadership skills as students at Cal U, then known as California State College. With a keen interest in student government and a penchant for getting involved, they found their paths crossing many times. Nearly 45 years later, they still share similar interests and passions — and tend to finish each other’s sentences. Linda explains that she and Harry met when she was a senior and president of the Student Government Association. Harry was a junior and vice president. Harry quickly points out that he succeeded her as president the following year. They both received the Outstanding Student Award during their senior year, Linda adds. Although Linda categorizes their undergraduate days as “a millennium ago,” she is delighted that she and Harry once again will be working in tandem leadership roles within the Cal U community.

Linda recently was named president of the board of directors of the Foundation for California University of Pennsylvania, and Harry looks forward to moving from his current position as vice president to president of the board of directors of the Alumni Association in July.

Community and professional service The energy, experience and vision the Serenes bring to their new positions is sure to have a substantial effect on the University. Over the years, they have taken an active role in the advancement of a number of professional and civic organizations. For 35 years, Harry practiced as a board-certified general surgeon at West Penn Hospital, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and St. Clair Hospital. In spite of his demanding schedule, he never lost track of his passion to serve. Harry employed his leadership skills as president of the St. Clair Hospital medical staff, chairman of the department of general surgery, and co-chairman of the medical ethics committee. He served on

leadership skills, and the ability to bring people together,” she says. “In addition, he is a very caring and compassionate person. Because of this, all of our alumni, regardless of class year, should respond to his appeal.” Harry believes the new Cal U for Life initiative can impress upon students the importance of keeping the University in their lives. “In the past, students didn’t realize they had a role after graduation,” he says. “I want to make sure they know that the University still needs them and wants them to stay involved.”

’’

After practicing surgery for 35 years Dr. Harry Serene ‘65 went on to become the president of the St. Clair Hospital medical staff.

Linda Serene ‘64 served three terms as a member of the Upper St. Clair School Board.

“Harry and I are celebrating our 40th wedding anniversary in 2010,” Linda adds. “Nothing makes us happier than doing something special for Cal U at this special time in our lives.” ■ By Lindy Kravec, a Peters Township-based writer

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 13 ■


A Celebration of Student Achievement — Winter

Commencement ’09

M

ore than 1,200 students were awarded degrees at Cal U’s 169th Commencement, held Dec. 18 for graduate students and Dec. 19 for undergraduates. University President Angelo Armenti Jr. welcomed students who completed their studies in August and in December, reminding the graduates to “return often and keep in touch with us.” Here are excerpts from the Commencement addresses delivered at those ceremonies. To read the complete text of the Commencement speakers’ remarks, or to see video of the graduate and undergraduate ceremonies, visit www.calu.edu and search for “commencement videos.”

Bryan Tolle

President Armenti

Julia Flowers

‘‘

‘Building blocks for life’

‘A remarkable gift’

‘Where dreams are made’

Richard Sabo ’56 retired three years ago as the assistant to the CEO of Lincoln Electric, an international design, development and manufacturing company for welding products. He and his wife, Gail, have established an endowment in honor of his parents, the Alex S. and Elizabeth Sabo Memorial Scholarship. Sabo, who addressed master’s degree candidates, was the 1990 winner of the Alumni Association’s W.S. Jackman Award of Distinction.

Carol Mitchell ’72, ’75 is a co-founder and president/CEO of Verland, an organization that provides housing and care for individuals with special needs. She received a Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa, at undergraduate Commencement.

Jerry R. Salandro ’70 is founder and CEO of Iris Technologies, which produces, sells and services PC-based control hardware and Windows-based software. The firm was the 2003 winner of the American Business Ethics Award for small companies. Salandro also is a motivational speaker and winner of the Alumni Association’s W.S. Jackman Award of Distinction for 2002. He spoke to undergraduates.

Today, my message will be more practical than profound, because experience has taught me that personal and professional relationships are the building blocks for a successful, meaningful life. … “As life becomes more complex, you may find that huge problems become manageable when they are broken into smaller segments. Fortunately, I had the opportunity to meet Dr. Stephen Covey when we both were speakers at Utah State University. We had a few hours for discussion on our return to Salt Lake City, which allowed me to learn one of his most valuable principles: ‘Begin with the end in mind.’ … “When you base your goals with the end in mind, there are usually several ways to achieve them. The difference between success and failure is execution, and that’s where the hard work comes in. “You, as California University graduates, come from a culture where hard work is expected and respected. Make up your mind to always do more than you are paid for. In today’s fragile economy, that may be the only form of guaranteed employment you will have. “A friend once told me that the road to success is always under construction; that’s why you must prepare constantly, manage your time wisely, and distinguish between the urgent and the important. Megan Hakey gives a wave. “There is a risk/reward ratio to be considered before every action, while persistence and patience are required because our nation’s recovery from this economic recession will be slow. … “The final thought for this evening: Learn as if you are going to live forever, and live as though you are going to die tomorrow.” Cheri McDowell (right) hugs her friend Aquene Zechender.

14 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

‘‘

Thirty-four years ago … right here, at age 30, having been a part-time commuter student, I received my master’s degree in education, the very degree that qualified me to become Verland’s leader, although I did not know that then. “As I look back, I can see clearly God’s hand in establishing Verland, which involved many significant miracles like this, and many more, right up to today. “The Verland story is a love story: The love of three women for three children who were severely intellectually disabled — Verlinda Chalfant, Andrew Hanzel and David W. Tresch, hence the name Verland. My part in this is that I fell in love with David in 1964 at Western Center in Canonsburg, Pa., when he was 9 and I was 19. Forty-five years later, we’re still together. “He is the reason Verland was started in 1978 … although it took two-and-a-half years, until January of 1981, to open our new $6.5 million facility with 10 homes in Sewickley on 13 acres of donated land, another awesome miracle. “Now Verland serves 222 individuals in 50 homes, employs 550 people and has a budget of $35 million. “David and his friends lived such inhumane lives in such appalling conditions at Western that I instinctively knew what Verland should be like. Today, all Verlanders live lives of dignity with the appropriate supports in beautiful, comfortable homes. … “We are in the business of helping people and doing good! And by doing good for others, we’ve become better people ourselves. … “I hope my life’s work gives enough credit to Cal U. I’ll continually strive to be more worthy of this special degree; it certainly is a remarkable Christmas gift, as well as a dream come true for me.”

Michael Sean Mosley points to a friend in the crowd.

‘‘

My town had no name. My street had no name. … You might say I came from nowhere. I (grew up) in a two-bedroom home with nine people in our family. … I had no idea how I’d ever think about going to college. But see, we live in America, where dreams are made. … “(Yet) America has been changing. It’s not only realizing an economic downturn now, we’re realizing an ethical downturn that began about two decades ago, when “personality” became the most important thing. … You know, it’s great to have a great personality, and I think you should! But if that’s the first thing on your mind, I think we’re missing the point. … “If a country has great integrity, it’s because we, as individuals, have great integrity, and we hold our leaders to that point of view. If the companies that we work for are honest, it’s because we, as individuals, are honest. “Graduates, … when you were born, your parents looked at you and said, “I want the best for you. I want you to have better than we have.” They may have not said it aloud, but they privately said that to themselves as they held you. That’s America — where dreams are made, and anything is possible. “So I implore you to be grateful for all the people who have come into your life: the teacher who said the right thing to unlock that idea in your head …; Mom and Dad, who wanted nothing but better for you, better than they have. When I think of my dad making $2,000 or $3,000 a year and my mother with seven children (and) no running water, I think, ‘All they wanted was for me to have a better life.’ … God bless all of you. I wish you the best career anyone could have.”

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 15 ■


A Celebration of Student Achievement — Winter

Commencement ’09

M

ore than 1,200 students were awarded degrees at Cal U’s 169th Commencement, held Dec. 18 for graduate students and Dec. 19 for undergraduates. University President Angelo Armenti Jr. welcomed students who completed their studies in August and in December, reminding the graduates to “return often and keep in touch with us.” Here are excerpts from the Commencement addresses delivered at those ceremonies. To read the complete text of the Commencement speakers’ remarks, or to see video of the graduate and undergraduate ceremonies, visit www.calu.edu and search for “commencement videos.”

Bryan Tolle

President Armenti

Julia Flowers

‘‘

‘Building blocks for life’

‘A remarkable gift’

‘Where dreams are made’

Richard Sabo ’56 retired three years ago as the assistant to the CEO of Lincoln Electric, an international design, development and manufacturing company for welding products. He and his wife, Gail, have established an endowment in honor of his parents, the Alex S. and Elizabeth Sabo Memorial Scholarship. Sabo, who addressed master’s degree candidates, was the 1990 winner of the Alumni Association’s W.S. Jackman Award of Distinction.

Carol Mitchell ’72, ’75 is a co-founder and president/CEO of Verland, an organization that provides housing and care for individuals with special needs. She received a Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa, at undergraduate Commencement.

Jerry R. Salandro ’70 is founder and CEO of Iris Technologies, which produces, sells and services PC-based control hardware and Windows-based software. The firm was the 2003 winner of the American Business Ethics Award for small companies. Salandro also is a motivational speaker and winner of the Alumni Association’s W.S. Jackman Award of Distinction for 2002. He spoke to undergraduates.

Today, my message will be more practical than profound, because experience has taught me that personal and professional relationships are the building blocks for a successful, meaningful life. … “As life becomes more complex, you may find that huge problems become manageable when they are broken into smaller segments. Fortunately, I had the opportunity to meet Dr. Stephen Covey when we both were speakers at Utah State University. We had a few hours for discussion on our return to Salt Lake City, which allowed me to learn one of his most valuable principles: ‘Begin with the end in mind.’ … “When you base your goals with the end in mind, there are usually several ways to achieve them. The difference between success and failure is execution, and that’s where the hard work comes in. “You, as California University graduates, come from a culture where hard work is expected and respected. Make up your mind to always do more than you are paid for. In today’s fragile economy, that may be the only form of guaranteed employment you will have. “A friend once told me that the road to success is always under construction; that’s why you must prepare constantly, manage your time wisely, and distinguish between the urgent and the important. Megan Hakey gives a wave. “There is a risk/reward ratio to be considered before every action, while persistence and patience are required because our nation’s recovery from this economic recession will be slow. … “The final thought for this evening: Learn as if you are going to live forever, and live as though you are going to die tomorrow.” Cheri McDowell (right) hugs her friend Aquene Zechender.

14 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

‘‘

Thirty-four years ago … right here, at age 30, having been a part-time commuter student, I received my master’s degree in education, the very degree that qualified me to become Verland’s leader, although I did not know that then. “As I look back, I can see clearly God’s hand in establishing Verland, which involved many significant miracles like this, and many more, right up to today. “The Verland story is a love story: The love of three women for three children who were severely intellectually disabled — Verlinda Chalfant, Andrew Hanzel and David W. Tresch, hence the name Verland. My part in this is that I fell in love with David in 1964 at Western Center in Canonsburg, Pa., when he was 9 and I was 19. Forty-five years later, we’re still together. “He is the reason Verland was started in 1978 … although it took two-and-a-half years, until January of 1981, to open our new $6.5 million facility with 10 homes in Sewickley on 13 acres of donated land, another awesome miracle. “Now Verland serves 222 individuals in 50 homes, employs 550 people and has a budget of $35 million. “David and his friends lived such inhumane lives in such appalling conditions at Western that I instinctively knew what Verland should be like. Today, all Verlanders live lives of dignity with the appropriate supports in beautiful, comfortable homes. … “We are in the business of helping people and doing good! And by doing good for others, we’ve become better people ourselves. … “I hope my life’s work gives enough credit to Cal U. I’ll continually strive to be more worthy of this special degree; it certainly is a remarkable Christmas gift, as well as a dream come true for me.”

Michael Sean Mosley points to a friend in the crowd.

‘‘

My town had no name. My street had no name. … You might say I came from nowhere. I (grew up) in a two-bedroom home with nine people in our family. … I had no idea how I’d ever think about going to college. But see, we live in America, where dreams are made. … “(Yet) America has been changing. It’s not only realizing an economic downturn now, we’re realizing an ethical downturn that began about two decades ago, when “personality” became the most important thing. … You know, it’s great to have a great personality, and I think you should! But if that’s the first thing on your mind, I think we’re missing the point. … “If a country has great integrity, it’s because we, as individuals, have great integrity, and we hold our leaders to that point of view. If the companies that we work for are honest, it’s because we, as individuals, are honest. “Graduates, … when you were born, your parents looked at you and said, “I want the best for you. I want you to have better than we have.” They may have not said it aloud, but they privately said that to themselves as they held you. That’s America — where dreams are made, and anything is possible. “So I implore you to be grateful for all the people who have come into your life: the teacher who said the right thing to unlock that idea in your head …; Mom and Dad, who wanted nothing but better for you, better than they have. When I think of my dad making $2,000 or $3,000 a year and my mother with seven children (and) no running water, I think, ‘All they wanted was for me to have a better life.’ … God bless all of you. I wish you the best career anyone could have.”

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 15 ■


ALUMNI S P O T L I G H T

Mentoring students, leading graduates

W

hen Jesse McLean Jr. graduated from Cal U in 1983, his dream was to work for the University. His defining moment, he says, came after the disappointment of not being hired. Instead of being disenchanted, McLean ’83, ’94 decided to work on initiatives to make an impact on the lives of students. He has, in effect, been working for the University ever since. McLean says he looks back on his student days as a tremendous opportunity for developing leadership skills. In fact, he considers his undergraduate years as a four-year internship. After earning his bachelor’s degree in social science, he received his master’s degree in regional

Videogame fan takes career to new level E

16 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

into the electronics realm. A co-worker’s former girlfriend and her husband were starting a new website called TeamXbox.com. In 2002, Semsey offered to travel with them to the E3 Expo, which Semsey calls “the mecca of the videogame industry.” He helped at their exhibitors booth, then followed up by building relationships with publishers and public relations representatives, at first volunteering his time “for the love of getting into the video gaming industry.” Eventually he was hired. At a later E3 Expo, Microsoft Game Studios offered him a job. Semsey and his wife, Jennifer ’97, decided to make the move to the Seattle area, where he worked as the studios’ global public relations manager, driving campaigns for

game titles such as “Gears of War,” “Mass Effect,” “Too Human,” “Crackdown,” “Lost Odyssey” and “Blue Dragon,” from 2006 to 2008. Meanwhile, a former co-worker “kept putting the bug in my ear” to go to EA SPORTS Tiburon. At yet another E3 Expo, Semsey connected with the public relations director for EA SPORTS and was hired in 2008. ”None of this would have been possible … if not for Cal,” Semsey says, reminiscing about being that kid in the basement who told his parents “I want to make videogames” and the Cal U professor who praised his writing. “You can’t plot out your life,” he says. “I’ve taken a lot of what I learned at Cal to further my career. I’m really happy about that.” ■

Province’s chapter of the year, with McLean recognized as adviser of the year, for 2006 and 2007. His latest leadership role at Cal U is as president of the African-American Alumni Society, encouraging graduates to give back to their alma mater. “I love the University. Why wouldn’t I?” McLean says. It is where he met his wife, Antoinette, and where his son Jesse III will graduate in May with a master’s degree in social work. And as president of the alumni group, he adds, “I know other people love the University, too.” “When you’re young, you think about going to school, but you don’t know where it’s going to take you or what’s going to happen,” he adds. “I did not realize until I started working that everything I learned and experienced at Cal would serve me and come into play. “I am immensely proud to be a graduate.” ■ By Cindy Cusic Micco, a Pittsburgh-based writer

His specialty: Alumni relations

I

ver since he was a kid playing Atari in his basement, Rob Semsey ’95 knew he wanted a career in videogames. Despite skepticism from his parents — “Get off the couch and go outside!” — he has prevailed. Now he is the senior public relations manager for EA SPORTS’ Tiburon studio in Orlando, Fla., overseeing promotions for titles that include the Madden NFL, NCAA Football, Tiger Woods PGA Tour, and EA SPORTS MMA franchises. His entry into the video gaming industry was serendipitous. Semsey, a native of Uniontown, Pa., says he attended Cal U because he knew its graphics communication program was highly regarded. That training led to several jobs in the print world, but he wanted to move

planning in 1994. McLean has worked for the past 25 years for nonprofit organizations serving children and families in the greater Pittsburgh area. Currently he is executive director of Every Child Inc., which offers a variety of services for birth, foster and adoptive families and children with special needs. But his heart has never left Cal U. In 1999, McLean worked with the University to develop the VULCAN summer program for middle school students, to give them a head start, academically and socially, on the coming school year. VULCAN stands for Vision, Understanding, Leadership, Civility, Academics and Nutrition. Through the years, McLean has encouraged and mentored those VULCAN students, 50 of whom are now Cal U graduates. McLean’s affiliation with the Zeta Eta chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Inc. at Cal U led to the fraternity being recognized as the East Central

owe Cal U a debt of gratitude,” James Stofan ’71 says simply. A new member of the California University Alumni Association board of directors, Stofan says he developed his interest in working in higher education while earning his undergraduate degree at Cal U. “I became involved in student activities, running concert series and other events, and this became my inspiration for attending graduate school and for all my future work.” Last year Stofan accepted a position as associate vice chancellor for alumni relations at

Vanderbilt University, in Nashville, Tenn., where he oversees outreach to 121,000 alumni and related programs. Prior to that, he was the highestranking executive for alumni affairs in the University of California system, where he coordinated more than 10 campus programs for alumni worldwide. With 27 years of experience in higher education — and in alumni relations, in particular — Stofan says he is looking forward to applying his expertise to Cal U. As a board member, he intends to contribute to strategic planning, working on

the Alumni Association’s roadmap for the future, and other initiatives. Ever mindful of how individuals shape the future, Stofan remembers a former professor from his undergraduate days on campus. “Joe Dochinez helped me get involved and think about my future,” he says, recalling the former California mayor who graduated from Cal in 1951 and still is active in alumni affairs. “James brings a unique perspective to the board, having worked in higher education for many years, specifically in alumni relations,” says Amy Lombard, executive director of Alumni Relations and Annual Fund at Cal U. “His insight and experiences will be valuable resources to us as we continue to expand our programs.” ■ By Colleen Derda, a Pittsburgh-based writer

By Cindy Cusic Micco, a Pittsburgh-based writer

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 17 ■


ALUMNI S P O T L I G H T

Mentoring students, leading graduates

W

hen Jesse McLean Jr. graduated from Cal U in 1983, his dream was to work for the University. His defining moment, he says, came after the disappointment of not being hired. Instead of being disenchanted, McLean ’83, ’94 decided to work on initiatives to make an impact on the lives of students. He has, in effect, been working for the University ever since. McLean says he looks back on his student days as a tremendous opportunity for developing leadership skills. In fact, he considers his undergraduate years as a four-year internship. After earning his bachelor’s degree in social science, he received his master’s degree in regional

Videogame fan takes career to new level E

16 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

into the electronics realm. A co-worker’s former girlfriend and her husband were starting a new website called TeamXbox.com. In 2002, Semsey offered to travel with them to the E3 Expo, which Semsey calls “the mecca of the videogame industry.” He helped at their exhibitors booth, then followed up by building relationships with publishers and public relations representatives, at first volunteering his time “for the love of getting into the video gaming industry.” Eventually he was hired. At a later E3 Expo, Microsoft Game Studios offered him a job. Semsey and his wife, Jennifer ’97, decided to make the move to the Seattle area, where he worked as the studios’ global public relations manager, driving campaigns for

game titles such as “Gears of War,” “Mass Effect,” “Too Human,” “Crackdown,” “Lost Odyssey” and “Blue Dragon,” from 2006 to 2008. Meanwhile, a former co-worker “kept putting the bug in my ear” to go to EA SPORTS Tiburon. At yet another E3 Expo, Semsey connected with the public relations director for EA SPORTS and was hired in 2008. ”None of this would have been possible … if not for Cal,” Semsey says, reminiscing about being that kid in the basement who told his parents “I want to make videogames” and the Cal U professor who praised his writing. “You can’t plot out your life,” he says. “I’ve taken a lot of what I learned at Cal to further my career. I’m really happy about that.” ■

Province’s chapter of the year, with McLean recognized as adviser of the year, for 2006 and 2007. His latest leadership role at Cal U is as president of the African-American Alumni Society, encouraging graduates to give back to their alma mater. “I love the University. Why wouldn’t I?” McLean says. It is where he met his wife, Antoinette, and where his son Jesse III will graduate in May with a master’s degree in social work. And as president of the alumni group, he adds, “I know other people love the University, too.” “When you’re young, you think about going to school, but you don’t know where it’s going to take you or what’s going to happen,” he adds. “I did not realize until I started working that everything I learned and experienced at Cal would serve me and come into play. “I am immensely proud to be a graduate.” ■ By Cindy Cusic Micco, a Pittsburgh-based writer

His specialty: Alumni relations

I

ver since he was a kid playing Atari in his basement, Rob Semsey ’95 knew he wanted a career in videogames. Despite skepticism from his parents — “Get off the couch and go outside!” — he has prevailed. Now he is the senior public relations manager for EA SPORTS’ Tiburon studio in Orlando, Fla., overseeing promotions for titles that include the Madden NFL, NCAA Football, Tiger Woods PGA Tour, and EA SPORTS MMA franchises. His entry into the video gaming industry was serendipitous. Semsey, a native of Uniontown, Pa., says he attended Cal U because he knew its graphics communication program was highly regarded. That training led to several jobs in the print world, but he wanted to move

planning in 1994. McLean has worked for the past 25 years for nonprofit organizations serving children and families in the greater Pittsburgh area. Currently he is executive director of Every Child Inc., which offers a variety of services for birth, foster and adoptive families and children with special needs. But his heart has never left Cal U. In 1999, McLean worked with the University to develop the VULCAN summer program for middle school students, to give them a head start, academically and socially, on the coming school year. VULCAN stands for Vision, Understanding, Leadership, Civility, Academics and Nutrition. Through the years, McLean has encouraged and mentored those VULCAN students, 50 of whom are now Cal U graduates. McLean’s affiliation with the Zeta Eta chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Inc. at Cal U led to the fraternity being recognized as the East Central

owe Cal U a debt of gratitude,” James Stofan ’71 says simply. A new member of the California University Alumni Association board of directors, Stofan says he developed his interest in working in higher education while earning his undergraduate degree at Cal U. “I became involved in student activities, running concert series and other events, and this became my inspiration for attending graduate school and for all my future work.” Last year Stofan accepted a position as associate vice chancellor for alumni relations at

Vanderbilt University, in Nashville, Tenn., where he oversees outreach to 121,000 alumni and related programs. Prior to that, he was the highestranking executive for alumni affairs in the University of California system, where he coordinated more than 10 campus programs for alumni worldwide. With 27 years of experience in higher education — and in alumni relations, in particular — Stofan says he is looking forward to applying his expertise to Cal U. As a board member, he intends to contribute to strategic planning, working on

the Alumni Association’s roadmap for the future, and other initiatives. Ever mindful of how individuals shape the future, Stofan remembers a former professor from his undergraduate days on campus. “Joe Dochinez helped me get involved and think about my future,” he says, recalling the former California mayor who graduated from Cal in 1951 and still is active in alumni affairs. “James brings a unique perspective to the board, having worked in higher education for many years, specifically in alumni relations,” says Amy Lombard, executive director of Alumni Relations and Annual Fund at Cal U. “His insight and experiences will be valuable resources to us as we continue to expand our programs.” ■ By Colleen Derda, a Pittsburgh-based writer

By Cindy Cusic Micco, a Pittsburgh-based writer

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 17 ■


ALUMNI N E W S GREETINGS FROM THE ALUMNI OFFICE!

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ere at the Michael and Julia Kara Alumni House, we are looking ahead to another exciting Alumni Weekend, coming up June 5–6.

The classes of 1960 and 1985 will hold their milestone 50th and 25th reunions, and as always, all alumni are welcome to attend. In addition, the Alumni Board of Directors’ annual meeting and the Alumni Association Awards Luncheon will be held during the weekend. Also, please make plans to join us for the President’s Gala at the Omni William Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh. The President’s Gala includes dinner, dancing and fun — and proceeds benefit student scholarships. I encourage you play an active role in the annual Alumni Association board of directors election process. (See details at right.) In August, we will hold our fifth annual Alumni Couples Weekend, which recognizes and celebrates the many alumni couples who met here at Cal U. In addition, we are eagerly planning for our Oct. 16 Homecoming, and we hope that many of our alumni and friends will return to campus for that annual event. Be sure to save the date! Please check the upcoming alumni calendar of events in this issue of the Cal Review and regularly at our website, www.calu.edu/alumni. I encourage you to log on to our new online community at www.calu.edu/alumni. You can receive a permanent e-mail address; update your information; add your name to the online alumni directory; receive Under the Towers, our monthly e-newsletter; and much more. These services are available to our alumni and senior students! Please plan to attend one or more of these upcoming events as a way to reconnect with former classmates and meet new friends. As always, we enjoy your feedback and welcome the opportunity to hear from you. Call the office, e-mail us, or stop by the Michael and Julia Kara Alumni House anytime you are on campus. I would be happy to show you the many changes at your alma mater, and look forward to sharing these exciting times with you!

Amy Lombard Executive Director, Office of Alumni Relations and Annual Fund

18 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

alumni calendar MARCH

A CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

Tampa Area Chapter Gathering — March 14 3 p.m. at Hattricks sports bar, Tampa, Fla. Visit with fellow graduates from the Tampa area and watch the Pittsburgh Penguins hockey game.

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SEEKS NOMINEES FOR ITS BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Pittsburgh Area Chapter Gathering — March 30 Pittsburgh Indoor Sports Arena, Harmarville, Pa. Enjoy fellowship and a guest speaker.

Philadelphia Accepted Student Reception — April 6 Renaissance Philadelphia Hotel Airport, Philadelphia, Pa. Hosted by the Philadelphia Chapter, the event begins with an alumni-only reception at 6 p.m. in the Lounge. At 7 p.m., alumni mingle with accepted students and their parents, sharing their Cal U experiences with the incoming freshmen.

BACKGROUND Nominations are now being sought from alumni interested in being recommended to stand for election to the board of directors of the California University of Pennsylvania Alumni Association. Elections will take place in the spring of 2010, with eight open seats to be filled.

Orange County Alumni Gathering — April 8 Join fellow alumni at the Center Club in Costa Mesa, Calif., for an event hosted by Fred Gladney ’71. Did you know there are more than 100 Cal U alumni in Orange County alone? Please join us to hear updates about your alma mater and socialize with fellow alumni.

Interested alumni may self-nominate, or others may submit information on their behalf. Individuals interested in being recommended must submit their nomination form to the Nominating Committee for Board Members (NCB) so as to be received no later than March 19, 2010.

A P RIL

The NCB will screen the candidates according to guidelines listed below and found in the Alumni Association bylaws, and will forward the names of recommended candidates to the Alumni Association board for its approval. Approved candidates will then stand for election by the membership of the Alumni Association.

Harrisburg Accepted Student Reception — April 8 Sheraton Harrisburg Hershey Hotel, Harrisburg, Pa. Hosted by the Harrisburg Chapter, the alumni-only reception begins at 6 p.m. in the Lounge. At 7 p.m., alumni share their Cal U memories with incoming freshmen and their parents. Red & Black Affair Extraordinaire — April 11 Join us for the fourth annual luncheon and fashion show sponsored by the Alumni Association. Ticket price is $45; proceeds benefit the Alumni Association Scholarship Fund. Last year's fundraiser brought in more than $20,000. For details, contact Alumni Association board president Rosemary Bucchianeri at barbaradr301@hotmail.com or First Lady Barbara Armenti at armenti_b@calu.edu. Cal Pride Weekend — April 16–17 7 p.m. April 16: This year’s Lifetime Achievement Award winner will deliver the keynote address in the Natali Student Center. During the day, a number of Cal U alumni will speak to students in their classes. 9 a.m. April 17: Prospective students and their parents may attend an Academic Open House and Alumni Panel Discussion in Steele Hall Mainstage Theatre. Also: Individual College Awards are presented to outstanding alumni from the College of Science and Technology, the College of Education and Human Services, the College of Liberal Arts and the School of Graduate Studies & Research. Cal Gals Biannual Meeting — April 22 Booker Great Room, Kara Alumni House. At noon, join this group of retired teachers as they reminisce and help to support student scholarships for future teachers. Fayette County Chapter Gathering (date to be announced) Bud Murphy’s Sports Bar and Restaurant, Connellsville, Pa. Socialize with fellow graduates from Fayette County. Somerset County Alumni Gathering — April 29 Inn at Georgian Place, near Somerset, Pa. Meet fellow alumni from Somerset County for an evening of fellowship and fun.

MAY New York City Regional Alumni Gathering (date to be announced) Check your monthly Under the Towers e-newsletter for updates to these events. For more information about alumni events, contact the Office of Alumni Relations & Annual Fund at 724-938-4418 or alumni@calu.edu. Join the Alumni Association’s NEW online community at http://alumni.calu.edu.

SPEAK UP! WE’RE LISTENING... What do you think of the Cal U Review? The editor and staff want to know. Is there a feature you enjoy — or one you don’t? A topic you’d like to read more about? To share your thoughts, send an e-mail to revieweditor@calu.edu, or drop us a line at: Cal U Review, Box 31, California University of Pennsylvania, 250 University Drive, California, PA 15419-1394.

Those individuals elected to board seats as a result of the spring 2010 election cycle will be installed at the Alumni Association annual meeting on June 5.

QUALIFICATIONS FOR CANDIDACY In evaluating an individual’s qualifications to stand for election to the board of directors of the Alumni Association, the NCB shall emphasize the following: • A knowledge of and commitment to the mission and goals of California University of Pennsylvania; • A record of experience and achievement since graduation in his/her chosen field; • Leadership and consensus-building skills; • A willingness to represent all alumni in providing counsel to the University; • A commitment to serve the University on a wide variety of issues encountered in its planning and operations; • A willingness to commit a significant amount of time and energy necessary for effective service; • A history of active involvement with the University; • A significant contribution to public, educational or charitable endeavors; please include philanthropic giving history. NOMINATION PROCESS Individuals interested in being considered for nomination to the board should complete a nomination form and an essay on qualifications and return them, along with a color photograph, to the Alumni Relations Office by March 19, 2010. The Nominating Committee for Board Members will review the information that is submitted and develop a slate of recommended candidates. This slate will be presented to the Alumni Association board of directors for its approval at its spring 2010 meeting. All California University alumni will be eligible to vote either by e-mail or mail ballot.

ELECTION NOMINATION FORM California University of Pennsylvania Alumni Office 250 University Ave. California, PA 15419

Please attach to this form a brief essay (500 words or less) that addresses the following qualifications: • A knowledge of and commitment to the mission and goals of California University of Pennsylvania; • A record of experience and achievement since graduation in his/her chosen field; • Leadership and consensus-building skills; • A willingness to represent all alumni in providing counsel to the University; • A commitment to serve the University on a wide variety of issues encountered in its planning and operations; • A willingness to commit a significant amount of time and energy necessary for effective service; • A history of active involvement with the University; • A significant contribution to public, educational or charitable endeavors. Please return this form, your essay, and your photograph by March 19, 2010.

NAME / CLASS YEAR

ADDRESS

CITY

TELEPHONE

STATE

ZIP

E-MAIL

EMPLOYER/OCCUPATION

Upon recommendation by the NCB and approval by the Alumni Association Board of Directors, your personal information (above), your essay and color photograph will be included in the official ballot materials distributed to all alumni prior to the election. WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 19 ■


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FOCUS O N T H E S C H O O L O F G R A D U AT E S T U D I E S A N D R E S E A R C H

CADAVER LAB Students get a firsthand look at the anatomy of the human body

California University of Pennsylvania

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1

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overview

of the SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH Dean:

Dr. John R. Cencich Graduate Program Coordinators

Dr. Thomas West Athletic Training

Dr. Arshad Chawdhry Business Administration

Dr. Ralph Belsterling Communication Disorders

Dr. John Patrick Community Agency Counseling

Dr. Christine Peterson Early Childhood Education

Professor Jane Bonari Elementary Education

Dr. Barry McGlumphy Exercise Science and Health Promotion: Performance Enhancement and Injury Prevention

Dr. Charles P. Nemeth Legal Studies

Dr. Joseph Zisk Master of Arts Teaching

Dr. Mary O’Connor Master of Science in Nursing – Nursing Administration and Leadership

Dr. Katherine Mitchem Mentally and Physically Handicapped Education

Dr. Lizbeth Gillette Administrative Principals Program Superintendent Letter of Eligibility

Dr. Connie Armitage Reading Specialist Program

Almost two years have passed since I came to the School of Graduate Studies and Research, and I continue to be impressed with the level and quality of teaching, service and research in which our faculty and staff are engaged. In the accompanying pages you will read about some of the amazing things that are happening at Cal U, such as the use of cadavers in our Athletic Training program, the audiology services that are provided for the Special Olympics, and the interesting people working in our Psychology Clinic. Research is also very important at Cal U, and in this issue we have highlighted a significant grant from the Office of Naval Research relating to advanced panoramic sensing devices. As a leader in the University’s research mission, the Graduate School undertook a number of initiatives this year. We have made more graduate assistants available to work directly in research-related activities with our professor-scientists; we have engaged professional grant writers to assist our faculty and staff; and we have continued to collaborate with the Office of the President and the Faculty Professional Development Committee to offer the annual Grant Writer’s Fellowship. All of these efforts, and certainly those of my colleagues before me, have paid off. This year, through our Office of Grants and Contracts, we established the Million Dollar Achiever’s Award and recognized 11 members of the University community who have managed more than $1 million each in sponsored research. Whether it is teaching, service or research, the focus of all our activities is, quite naturally, on our students. Together with all Global Online programs, the School of Graduate Studies and Research has more than 2,000 students whose academic disciplines touch upon nearly all aspects of the University. This year Cal U was ranked No. 2 in the nation for the quality of its online programs. I have already had the pleasure of witnessing three distinguished groups of these graduate students receive their hoods and diplomas and enter the professional world as masters in their respective fields with new ideas for tackling serious, real-world problems. We are indeed fortunate to have graduate students who recognize the satisfaction and duty of putting others first, and we are proud to call them alumni of California University of Pennsylvania.

F R O M

T H E

DEAN

Sincerely,

Dr. Grafton Eliason School Counseling

Dr. Kirk John School Psychology

Dr. Norma Thomas Social Work

Dr. Taunya Tinsley Sports Counseling

Dr. Robert Taylor Sport Management

Dr. Glen Hider Technology Education 2

John R. Cencich, J.S.D. Interim Dean, School of Graduate Studies and Research

Where the dead teach the living IN CAL U’s CADAVER LAB, STUDENTS STUDY ANATOMY FIRSTHAND

Dr. Thomas West, left, director of the Graduate Athletic Training program, joins biology professor Dr. Edwin Zuchelkowski inside the cadaver lab in Hamer Hall.

ehind a locked door in Hamer Hall, three human cadavers lie on covered metal tables in a cool, windowless room. They represent an unusual learning opportunity for students in the Graduate Athletic Training program, and for undergraduates and graduate students studying health science, biology, forensic science or to be a physical therapy assistant. Master’s degree candidates in athletic training — health care professionals focused on the prevention, care, treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries — have worked with cadavers since the program’s inception in 1991, says program director Dr. Thomas West, chair of the Department of Health Science. As part of their post-professional training, the graduate students make

careful dissections, revealing the intricacies of human anatomy. They focus primarily on the extremities, examining the cadavers from shoulders to fingertips, hips to toes — the body parts athletes are most likely to injure. “They get to look at anatomical structures and see how the muscles, ligaments and bones all function together,” West says. “We can talk about an ACL injury, for example, and here they can actually see the (anterior cruciate) ligament in the knee. “The amount of learning our students gain in this class is so important to their professional growth.” Biology professor Dr. Edwin Zuchelkowski teaches the graduate class each summer, and in spring and fall he occasionally takes his undergraduate anatomy classes into the lab. The secure room is unlocked for lessons in health

science and forensic science, too. In all, the cadavers help to teach more than 200 students each year. “At the start of each course, we remind students to be respectful,” West says. “These are people who chose to donate their bodies to science. We have to respect them and their bodies.” The cadaver lab has a separate climate control and air-handling system, with alarms that sound if the airconditioning fails. Heavy aprons hang on a closet door, anatomical charts are propped against a wall and boxes of rubber gloves are stacked on a counter. The specially preserved cadavers now in the lab were purchased last summer from Marshall University in Huntingdon, W.Va., and transported to Cal U by a local funeral director. Next summer, the funeral home staff will collect every bit of tissue, so each body can be cremated in total and the ashes returned to the provider. The remains are then interred or conveyed to the decedent’s family. Students and professors never know the names of those individuals who ultimately arrive in the cadaver lab, but their presence makes an indelible impression. When West polls alumni, they often describe the cadaver class as the program’s most memorable course, as well as the most challenging. “The students are somewhat hesitant at first, especially if they have never seen a preserved body before,” Zuchelkowski says. “But by the end of the first week, they are enjoying the class. They appreciate the chance to actually see what they have only read or heard about, and to better understand the conditions they are treating.” ■

By Christine Kindl, communications director at Cal U

3


overview

of the SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH Dean:

Dr. John R. Cencich Graduate Program Coordinators

Dr. Thomas West Athletic Training

Dr. Arshad Chawdhry Business Administration

Dr. Ralph Belsterling Communication Disorders

Dr. John Patrick Community Agency Counseling

Dr. Christine Peterson Early Childhood Education

Professor Jane Bonari Elementary Education

Dr. Barry McGlumphy Exercise Science and Health Promotion: Performance Enhancement and Injury Prevention

Dr. Charles P. Nemeth Legal Studies

Dr. Joseph Zisk Master of Arts Teaching

Dr. Mary O’Connor Master of Science in Nursing – Nursing Administration and Leadership

Dr. Katherine Mitchem Mentally and Physically Handicapped Education

Dr. Lizbeth Gillette Administrative Principals Program Superintendent Letter of Eligibility

Dr. Connie Armitage Reading Specialist Program

Almost two years have passed since I came to the School of Graduate Studies and Research, and I continue to be impressed with the level and quality of teaching, service and research in which our faculty and staff are engaged. In the accompanying pages you will read about some of the amazing things that are happening at Cal U, such as the use of cadavers in our Athletic Training program, the audiology services that are provided for the Special Olympics, and the interesting people working in our Psychology Clinic. Research is also very important at Cal U, and in this issue we have highlighted a significant grant from the Office of Naval Research relating to advanced panoramic sensing devices. As a leader in the University’s research mission, the Graduate School undertook a number of initiatives this year. We have made more graduate assistants available to work directly in research-related activities with our professor-scientists; we have engaged professional grant writers to assist our faculty and staff; and we have continued to collaborate with the Office of the President and the Faculty Professional Development Committee to offer the annual Grant Writer’s Fellowship. All of these efforts, and certainly those of my colleagues before me, have paid off. This year, through our Office of Grants and Contracts, we established the Million Dollar Achiever’s Award and recognized 11 members of the University community who have managed more than $1 million each in sponsored research. Whether it is teaching, service or research, the focus of all our activities is, quite naturally, on our students. Together with all Global Online programs, the School of Graduate Studies and Research has more than 2,000 students whose academic disciplines touch upon nearly all aspects of the University. This year Cal U was ranked No. 2 in the nation for the quality of its online programs. I have already had the pleasure of witnessing three distinguished groups of these graduate students receive their hoods and diplomas and enter the professional world as masters in their respective fields with new ideas for tackling serious, real-world problems. We are indeed fortunate to have graduate students who recognize the satisfaction and duty of putting others first, and we are proud to call them alumni of California University of Pennsylvania.

F R O M

T H E

DEAN

Sincerely,

Dr. Grafton Eliason School Counseling

Dr. Kirk John School Psychology

Dr. Norma Thomas Social Work

Dr. Taunya Tinsley Sports Counseling

Dr. Robert Taylor Sport Management

Dr. Glen Hider Technology Education 2

John R. Cencich, J.S.D. Interim Dean, School of Graduate Studies and Research

Where the dead teach the living IN CAL U’s CADAVER LAB, STUDENTS STUDY ANATOMY FIRSTHAND

Dr. Thomas West, left, director of the Graduate Athletic Training program, joins biology professor Dr. Edwin Zuchelkowski inside the cadaver lab in Hamer Hall.

ehind a locked door in Hamer Hall, three human cadavers lie on covered metal tables in a cool, windowless room. They represent an unusual learning opportunity for students in the Graduate Athletic Training program, and for undergraduates and graduate students studying health science, biology, forensic science or to be a physical therapy assistant. Master’s degree candidates in athletic training — health care professionals focused on the prevention, care, treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries — have worked with cadavers since the program’s inception in 1991, says program director Dr. Thomas West, chair of the Department of Health Science. As part of their post-professional training, the graduate students make

careful dissections, revealing the intricacies of human anatomy. They focus primarily on the extremities, examining the cadavers from shoulders to fingertips, hips to toes — the body parts athletes are most likely to injure. “They get to look at anatomical structures and see how the muscles, ligaments and bones all function together,” West says. “We can talk about an ACL injury, for example, and here they can actually see the (anterior cruciate) ligament in the knee. “The amount of learning our students gain in this class is so important to their professional growth.” Biology professor Dr. Edwin Zuchelkowski teaches the graduate class each summer, and in spring and fall he occasionally takes his undergraduate anatomy classes into the lab. The secure room is unlocked for lessons in health

science and forensic science, too. In all, the cadavers help to teach more than 200 students each year. “At the start of each course, we remind students to be respectful,” West says. “These are people who chose to donate their bodies to science. We have to respect them and their bodies.” The cadaver lab has a separate climate control and air-handling system, with alarms that sound if the airconditioning fails. Heavy aprons hang on a closet door, anatomical charts are propped against a wall and boxes of rubber gloves are stacked on a counter. The specially preserved cadavers now in the lab were purchased last summer from Marshall University in Huntingdon, W.Va., and transported to Cal U by a local funeral director. Next summer, the funeral home staff will collect every bit of tissue, so each body can be cremated in total and the ashes returned to the provider. The remains are then interred or conveyed to the decedent’s family. Students and professors never know the names of those individuals who ultimately arrive in the cadaver lab, but their presence makes an indelible impression. When West polls alumni, they often describe the cadaver class as the program’s most memorable course, as well as the most challenging. “The students are somewhat hesitant at first, especially if they have never seen a preserved body before,” Zuchelkowski says. “But by the end of the first week, they are enjoying the class. They appreciate the chance to actually see what they have only read or heard about, and to better understand the conditions they are treating.” ■

By Christine Kindl, communications director at Cal U

3


School psychology clinic offers evaluation

Research partnership puts Cal U on the radar High-technology project links University, business and government

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Graduate students learn by working with individuals of all ages Dr. Kirk John, coordinator of the master’s-level school psychology program, and clinic supervisor Dr. Elizabeth Mason

W

hile California University’s School Psychology Clinic works to train future school psychologists, it also serves students of all ages who need evaluations to qualify for special services in their schools. People come to the clinic for a variety of reasons. For the child struggling to learn, an evaluation could identify a learning disorder that calls for extra help in the classroom. Other students might be deemed gifted, which qualifies them for a school-based enrichment program. Some parents bring their children to the School Psychology Clinic for a second opinion, explains Dr. Kirk John, coordinator of the master’s-level school psychology program. Since 1988, the clinic has offered a variety of psycho-educational services to the public and to the University community while providing a training facility for graduate students in school psychology. Students from age 2 through adulthood visit the clinic for “a wide variety of referral reasons, from school readiness to learning and behavior problems to gifted (identification) to vocational pursuits,” says Dr. Elizabeth Mason, director and supervisor of the clinic. “In our clinic, the graduate student/ intern school psychologists get their best experiences in evaluation and dealing with difficult cases, and writing comprehensive reports with suggestions for research-based, data-driven interventions,” says Mason, who has 33 years in the field. 4

“We serve the students in the school psychology program with practicums and internship experiences,” Mason says, “and we serve the University community and the (western Pennsylvania) area with school psychological services.” Once tests and evaluations are completed, the clinic staff shares the results with the students and their parents, if the client is younger than 18, and then offers recommendations. For some students, the results could mean they are entitled to special education services in their schools. For a preschooler, the evaluation might determine kindergarten readiness. “There was one mother who brought her boy in when he was 7 years old, because of attention and behavior problems and for gifted determination,” Mason recalls. “She subsequently brought him back every year for 12 years, through his application for college, to update his progress and needs.” Psycho-educational testing in the private sector can be expensive, costing hundreds of dollars, explains John. The clinic charges only $80 for its battery of tests, and Cal U students receive free evaluations. “It provides a benefit for Cal U students and the public in general,” he says. “The clinic provides a community service.”

Graduate students studying to become school psychologists make about 150 evaluations a year under the supervision of Cal U’s faculty, which includes licensed psychologists and state-certified school psychologists. “Faculty members have a lot of experience. Some are still active in the field, so students get cutting-edge information,” says John, who has 32 years of experience. “Like all fields, it keeps changing. We have to keep up to date. “The clinic provides graduate students with the opportunity to put what they learned in the classroom into practice. It offers invaluable opportunities and experiences for graduate students.” ■ By Cindy Cusic Micco, a Pittsburgh-based writer

hen you think of top-tier research universities, California University of Pennsylvania may not immediately come to mind. But Jeffrey Sumey, an assistant professor in the Department of Applied Engineering and Technology, says Cal U can “run with the big boys” when it comes to engineering technology research. For more than three years, Sumey has been involved in a partnership with Augusta Systems, a high-tech company headquartered in Morgantown, W.Va., helping to design and develop technology for specific military tasks. The research conducted under the auspices of the Office of Naval Research (ONR) is technologically sensitive, but the success of their collaboration is not. Sumey and Augusta Systems are currently in the third phase of a multiphased project with ONR. Their research for phases one and two already has moved from the drawing board to reality. “The project involves advanced panoramic sensor technologies, 360-degree lens systems and sophisticated computer processes to create something to be used to assist American soldiers overseas and to protect civilians at home,” explains Sumey. “It’s really exciting to be a part of something this important.” U.S. Rep. John P. Murtha helped to secure funding for the program. “It was tremendously important for the business partner to leverage the research capabilities of a State System (of Higher Education) school to gain access to cutting-edge technology,” Sumey says. “Since Congressman Murtha is such a strong supporter of Cal U, he backed the project and helped it come to fruition.” One of the fringe benefits of this government-sponsored grant is the ability to involve students in the research process. Although there are no graduatelevel engineering technology programs at Cal U, Sumey and his department

identify top-caliber undergraduates to help with the research. Every semester in the past, Sumey has tapped a top senior Computer Engineering Technology student for a work-study job. This semester, he has selected Jesse Josephic, a Computer Science major. In addition, says Dr. John Cencich, interim dean of the School of Graduate Studies and Research, a graduate assistant is being identified Assistant Professor Jeffrey Sumey with his ‘computer on wheels’ mobile to provide other robotic test platform: “It’s exciting to be part of something this important.” relevant support for this research team. “This is the type of cutting-edge The potential for more publicresearch undertaken by our outstanding private-government partnerships in the group of professor-scientists that makes future appears great as the University’s us all proud. We are committed to reputation in the field of technology providing support in any way we can.” continues to grow. “When Professor Sumey invited me Sumey notes that the Robotics to participate in this research, I was Corridor Project in 2007 also was honored”, Josephic says. “I’ve had other funded through the ONR, along with work-study jobs, like tutoring in the the National Science Foundation and Math Lab. All else pales compared to a consortium of industry, government, this. This is real industry work, and foundation and education partners. I’m excited to be a part of it.” He also utilized grants from the The research offers students the Department of Defense to help develop experience of a lifetime. Not only do the curriculum for the University’s they have an opportunity to become Robotics Engineering Technology involved in cutting-edge projects — program. something that will enhance their Sumey is excited about the prospects resumé and their marketability after for the future. graduation — they also have a chance “Cal U is really on the move,” he to see firsthand how private industry, says. “I can’t wait to see what’s next.” ■ a public university and the government By Lindy Kravec, a Peters Township-based writer can work together for the common good. 5


School psychology clinic offers evaluation

Research partnership puts Cal U on the radar High-technology project links University, business and government

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Graduate students learn by working with individuals of all ages Dr. Kirk John, coordinator of the master’s-level school psychology program, and clinic supervisor Dr. Elizabeth Mason

W

hile California University’s School Psychology Clinic works to train future school psychologists, it also serves students of all ages who need evaluations to qualify for special services in their schools. People come to the clinic for a variety of reasons. For the child struggling to learn, an evaluation could identify a learning disorder that calls for extra help in the classroom. Other students might be deemed gifted, which qualifies them for a school-based enrichment program. Some parents bring their children to the School Psychology Clinic for a second opinion, explains Dr. Kirk John, coordinator of the master’s-level school psychology program. Since 1988, the clinic has offered a variety of psycho-educational services to the public and to the University community while providing a training facility for graduate students in school psychology. Students from age 2 through adulthood visit the clinic for “a wide variety of referral reasons, from school readiness to learning and behavior problems to gifted (identification) to vocational pursuits,” says Dr. Elizabeth Mason, director and supervisor of the clinic. “In our clinic, the graduate student/ intern school psychologists get their best experiences in evaluation and dealing with difficult cases, and writing comprehensive reports with suggestions for research-based, data-driven interventions,” says Mason, who has 33 years in the field. 4

“We serve the students in the school psychology program with practicums and internship experiences,” Mason says, “and we serve the University community and the (western Pennsylvania) area with school psychological services.” Once tests and evaluations are completed, the clinic staff shares the results with the students and their parents, if the client is younger than 18, and then offers recommendations. For some students, the results could mean they are entitled to special education services in their schools. For a preschooler, the evaluation might determine kindergarten readiness. “There was one mother who brought her boy in when he was 7 years old, because of attention and behavior problems and for gifted determination,” Mason recalls. “She subsequently brought him back every year for 12 years, through his application for college, to update his progress and needs.” Psycho-educational testing in the private sector can be expensive, costing hundreds of dollars, explains John. The clinic charges only $80 for its battery of tests, and Cal U students receive free evaluations. “It provides a benefit for Cal U students and the public in general,” he says. “The clinic provides a community service.”

Graduate students studying to become school psychologists make about 150 evaluations a year under the supervision of Cal U’s faculty, which includes licensed psychologists and state-certified school psychologists. “Faculty members have a lot of experience. Some are still active in the field, so students get cutting-edge information,” says John, who has 32 years of experience. “Like all fields, it keeps changing. We have to keep up to date. “The clinic provides graduate students with the opportunity to put what they learned in the classroom into practice. It offers invaluable opportunities and experiences for graduate students.” ■ By Cindy Cusic Micco, a Pittsburgh-based writer

hen you think of top-tier research universities, California University of Pennsylvania may not immediately come to mind. But Jeffrey Sumey, an assistant professor in the Department of Applied Engineering and Technology, says Cal U can “run with the big boys” when it comes to engineering technology research. For more than three years, Sumey has been involved in a partnership with Augusta Systems, a high-tech company headquartered in Morgantown, W.Va., helping to design and develop technology for specific military tasks. The research conducted under the auspices of the Office of Naval Research (ONR) is technologically sensitive, but the success of their collaboration is not. Sumey and Augusta Systems are currently in the third phase of a multiphased project with ONR. Their research for phases one and two already has moved from the drawing board to reality. “The project involves advanced panoramic sensor technologies, 360-degree lens systems and sophisticated computer processes to create something to be used to assist American soldiers overseas and to protect civilians at home,” explains Sumey. “It’s really exciting to be a part of something this important.” U.S. Rep. John P. Murtha helped to secure funding for the program. “It was tremendously important for the business partner to leverage the research capabilities of a State System (of Higher Education) school to gain access to cutting-edge technology,” Sumey says. “Since Congressman Murtha is such a strong supporter of Cal U, he backed the project and helped it come to fruition.” One of the fringe benefits of this government-sponsored grant is the ability to involve students in the research process. Although there are no graduatelevel engineering technology programs at Cal U, Sumey and his department

identify top-caliber undergraduates to help with the research. Every semester in the past, Sumey has tapped a top senior Computer Engineering Technology student for a work-study job. This semester, he has selected Jesse Josephic, a Computer Science major. In addition, says Dr. John Cencich, interim dean of the School of Graduate Studies and Research, a graduate assistant is being identified Assistant Professor Jeffrey Sumey with his ‘computer on wheels’ mobile to provide other robotic test platform: “It’s exciting to be part of something this important.” relevant support for this research team. “This is the type of cutting-edge The potential for more publicresearch undertaken by our outstanding private-government partnerships in the group of professor-scientists that makes future appears great as the University’s us all proud. We are committed to reputation in the field of technology providing support in any way we can.” continues to grow. “When Professor Sumey invited me Sumey notes that the Robotics to participate in this research, I was Corridor Project in 2007 also was honored”, Josephic says. “I’ve had other funded through the ONR, along with work-study jobs, like tutoring in the the National Science Foundation and Math Lab. All else pales compared to a consortium of industry, government, this. This is real industry work, and foundation and education partners. I’m excited to be a part of it.” He also utilized grants from the The research offers students the Department of Defense to help develop experience of a lifetime. Not only do the curriculum for the University’s they have an opportunity to become Robotics Engineering Technology involved in cutting-edge projects — program. something that will enhance their Sumey is excited about the prospects resumé and their marketability after for the future. graduation — they also have a chance “Cal U is really on the move,” he to see firsthand how private industry, says. “I can’t wait to see what’s next.” ■ a public university and the government By Lindy Kravec, a Peters Township-based writer can work together for the common good. 5


Cal U celebrates

‘MILLION DOLLAR ACHIEVERS’ 11 GRANT WRITERS REACH CAREER-TOTAL BENCHMARK Eleven faculty and staff members have written grants totaling $1 million or more during their careers. They were honored recently at the 2008–2009 Grant Writers Recognition Ceremony for their work. Cheryl Vogrig, director of the Office of Grants and Contracts, emphasizes the impact of grant activity at Cal U. During the 2008–2009 fiscal year, 109 proposals were submitted, totaling $11.7 million, she says. Of those, 67 new awards were received, totaling $4.5 million. The office is administering 100 active projects totaling $5.6 million. Here is a list of the achievers and a summary of their work:

MICHAEL J. BRNA, director, Library of Congress

ANTHONY RODI, director, National Center for

Teaching with Primary Sources. The Library of Congress TPS at Cal U provides pre-service and in-service teacher professional development that focuses on using the Library’s digitized primary sources to enrich classroom instruction.

Robotics Engineering Technology (NCRETE) and MICHAEL AMRHEIN, NCRETE assistant director. Phase 3 of the NCRETE initiative, funded by the U.S. Army Night Vision Lab through Penn State University Electro-Optics Center, builds on efforts between Cal U and Carnegie Mellon University to create a center to house robotics educational materials. This phase emphasized delivery of the Robotics Engineering Technology Associate degree in fall 2009. A highlight of Phase 4 is a four-year Mechatronics Engineering Technology degree, along with expanded robotics camps, competitions, teacher training and educational outreach.

DEBBIE GRUBB, assistant director, Cal U in the High School. The U.S. Department of Education, through the Pennsylvania Department of Education, funded Tech Prep 2008–2009, and the Southwestern Tech Prep Consortium was created to develop and implement a secondary and post-secondary vocational program to prepare participants for more highly skilled occupations.

JOANN RODRIGUEZ-NAESER, director, Student STANLEY KOMACEK, Office of the Provost/ Academic Affairs. Grants, including $810,000 from the National Science Foundation, have focused on technology education and meeting workforce development needs in fields related to science, technology, engineering and math.

KEVIN KOURY, dean, College of Education and Human Services. Two federal grants were awarded for the Kid Tools Support System (kidtools.missouri.edu), a library of tools for children with learning disabilities and/or behavioral problems, and one was used to test a program to help students with behavioral disabilities. Two Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education grants allowed Cal U students to do field work in the Philadelphia School District.

ELLIE NESSER, executive director, Southpointe Center. Through the Workforce Economic Development Network of Pennsylvania, grant money is used to help more than 200 companies in southwestern Pennsylvania access funds for workforce training. Cal U has trained more than 33,000 employees in topics ranging from computer skills and lean manufacturing to leadership and customer service.

Support Services. U.S. Department of Education funding for Student Support Services programs provides counseling, tutoring and remedial services to educationally and economically disadvantaged university students.

GARY SEELYE , director, Upward Bound. U.S. Department of Education funding has allowed the TRIO Upward Bound program to provide disadvantaged high school students from Fayette and Greene counties with the academic skills and motivation necessary to succeed in post-secondary education. NANCY SKOBEL, director, Women’s Center. The Hand-in-Hand: Bringing Families to School project, funded by the U.S. Department of Education, provides childcare tuition to parents who are pursuing graduate or undergraduate degrees.

DEBORAH WOJCIK, director, Government Agency Coordination Office. Grants from the Defense Logistics Agency and the Sarah Scaife Foundation help GACO assist businesses with obtaining government contracts and subcontracts.

Professor, students screen athletes at Special Olympics

TEAM PROVIDES AUDIOLOGY TESTS, HEARING AIDS

A

fter Dr. Ralph Belsterling volunteered to conduct hearing screenings at the first national Special Olympics in 2006, he was hooked. “Once I started, I didn’t want to stop,” says Belsterling, an associate professor in the Department of Communication Disorders and clinical director for the Healthy Hearing program of Pennsylvania. “It’s very rewarding at many different levels, both professionally and personally,” he adds, “especially since I have a sister with Down syndrome.” Now Belsterling is passing his enthusiasm along to his students. He takes them to Special Olympics events to help with the screenings, and so they can learn how to serve people with intellectual disabilities. Special Olympics launched its Healthy Athletes initiative in 1997 to help the athletes improve their health and fitness. The initiative also assists health care professionals in learning about the athletes’ special needs, making them more confident and comfortable in caring for this underserved population. People with intellectual disabilities have a 40 percent greater risk for health problems, and health care professionals often are not trained or experienced in caring for them, according to the Special Olympics website. Belsterling is part of the movement to change that. A year ago he served as an international volunteer and health care trainer at the 2009 Special Olympics World Winter Games in Boise, Idaho. About 1,000 athletes received hearing screenings, and some were fitted for hearing aids on the spot. “The testing we do is rather quick; it’s an 8-minute process,” says Belsterling. For this test, the athlete does not need to respond. By using state-of-the-art equipment, the testers can pick up on various problems, such as excessive earwax or fluid in the ear. Additional testing is provided for athletes with more serious hearing issues. “There was a group from Libya where all the athletes were deaf. We fit the whole team with hearing aids,” Belsterling recalls. “It’s wonderful to see their reactions when you turn on their hearing aids.” The hearing aids provided to athletes from Third World countries were solar-powered and designed to last for several years, because the recipients often find it difficult to obtain standard batteries and supplies. Some athletes at the Games already had hearing aids, but they were not working properly. “Hearing aids are like glasses,” Belsterling explains.

It’s very rewarding at many

different levels, both professionally and personally.

DR. RALPH BELSTERLING, GRADUATE COORDINATOR, DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION DISORDERS

“They need adjustments over time ... and maintenance.” In July, Belsterling will travel to Lincoln, Neb., for the Special Olympics 2010 USA National Games, where more than 3,000 athletes are expected to compete in events that range from aquatics to flag football to volleyball. Belsterling also coordinates the Healthy Hearing program in Pennsylvania, which involves audiologists and students from around the state. Cal U students are always well represented. These programs include the Special Olympics Pennsylvania summer games at Penn State University in State College and the fall games at Villanova University near Philadelphia. “We teach the students how to do screenings and how to interact with the intellectually disabled population,” Belsterling says. “Once they do it, they’re often hooked for life, too! They’re always asking to volunteer... even after they graduate.” ■ By Cindy Cusic Micco, a Pittsburgh-area writer

By Wendy Mackall, assistant communications director at Cal U

6

7


Cal U celebrates

‘MILLION DOLLAR ACHIEVERS’ 11 GRANT WRITERS REACH CAREER-TOTAL BENCHMARK Eleven faculty and staff members have written grants totaling $1 million or more during their careers. They were honored recently at the 2008–2009 Grant Writers Recognition Ceremony for their work. Cheryl Vogrig, director of the Office of Grants and Contracts, emphasizes the impact of grant activity at Cal U. During the 2008–2009 fiscal year, 109 proposals were submitted, totaling $11.7 million, she says. Of those, 67 new awards were received, totaling $4.5 million. The office is administering 100 active projects totaling $5.6 million. Here is a list of the achievers and a summary of their work:

MICHAEL J. BRNA, director, Library of Congress

ANTHONY RODI, director, National Center for

Teaching with Primary Sources. The Library of Congress TPS at Cal U provides pre-service and in-service teacher professional development that focuses on using the Library’s digitized primary sources to enrich classroom instruction.

Robotics Engineering Technology (NCRETE) and MICHAEL AMRHEIN, NCRETE assistant director. Phase 3 of the NCRETE initiative, funded by the U.S. Army Night Vision Lab through Penn State University Electro-Optics Center, builds on efforts between Cal U and Carnegie Mellon University to create a center to house robotics educational materials. This phase emphasized delivery of the Robotics Engineering Technology Associate degree in fall 2009. A highlight of Phase 4 is a four-year Mechatronics Engineering Technology degree, along with expanded robotics camps, competitions, teacher training and educational outreach.

DEBBIE GRUBB, assistant director, Cal U in the High School. The U.S. Department of Education, through the Pennsylvania Department of Education, funded Tech Prep 2008–2009, and the Southwestern Tech Prep Consortium was created to develop and implement a secondary and post-secondary vocational program to prepare participants for more highly skilled occupations.

JOANN RODRIGUEZ-NAESER, director, Student STANLEY KOMACEK, Office of the Provost/ Academic Affairs. Grants, including $810,000 from the National Science Foundation, have focused on technology education and meeting workforce development needs in fields related to science, technology, engineering and math.

KEVIN KOURY, dean, College of Education and Human Services. Two federal grants were awarded for the Kid Tools Support System (kidtools.missouri.edu), a library of tools for children with learning disabilities and/or behavioral problems, and one was used to test a program to help students with behavioral disabilities. Two Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education grants allowed Cal U students to do field work in the Philadelphia School District.

ELLIE NESSER, executive director, Southpointe Center. Through the Workforce Economic Development Network of Pennsylvania, grant money is used to help more than 200 companies in southwestern Pennsylvania access funds for workforce training. Cal U has trained more than 33,000 employees in topics ranging from computer skills and lean manufacturing to leadership and customer service.

Support Services. U.S. Department of Education funding for Student Support Services programs provides counseling, tutoring and remedial services to educationally and economically disadvantaged university students.

GARY SEELYE , director, Upward Bound. U.S. Department of Education funding has allowed the TRIO Upward Bound program to provide disadvantaged high school students from Fayette and Greene counties with the academic skills and motivation necessary to succeed in post-secondary education. NANCY SKOBEL, director, Women’s Center. The Hand-in-Hand: Bringing Families to School project, funded by the U.S. Department of Education, provides childcare tuition to parents who are pursuing graduate or undergraduate degrees.

DEBORAH WOJCIK, director, Government Agency Coordination Office. Grants from the Defense Logistics Agency and the Sarah Scaife Foundation help GACO assist businesses with obtaining government contracts and subcontracts.

Professor, students screen athletes at Special Olympics

TEAM PROVIDES AUDIOLOGY TESTS, HEARING AIDS

A

fter Dr. Ralph Belsterling volunteered to conduct hearing screenings at the first national Special Olympics in 2006, he was hooked. “Once I started, I didn’t want to stop,” says Belsterling, an associate professor in the Department of Communication Disorders and clinical director for the Healthy Hearing program of Pennsylvania. “It’s very rewarding at many different levels, both professionally and personally,” he adds, “especially since I have a sister with Down syndrome.” Now Belsterling is passing his enthusiasm along to his students. He takes them to Special Olympics events to help with the screenings, and so they can learn how to serve people with intellectual disabilities. Special Olympics launched its Healthy Athletes initiative in 1997 to help the athletes improve their health and fitness. The initiative also assists health care professionals in learning about the athletes’ special needs, making them more confident and comfortable in caring for this underserved population. People with intellectual disabilities have a 40 percent greater risk for health problems, and health care professionals often are not trained or experienced in caring for them, according to the Special Olympics website. Belsterling is part of the movement to change that. A year ago he served as an international volunteer and health care trainer at the 2009 Special Olympics World Winter Games in Boise, Idaho. About 1,000 athletes received hearing screenings, and some were fitted for hearing aids on the spot. “The testing we do is rather quick; it’s an 8-minute process,” says Belsterling. For this test, the athlete does not need to respond. By using state-of-the-art equipment, the testers can pick up on various problems, such as excessive earwax or fluid in the ear. Additional testing is provided for athletes with more serious hearing issues. “There was a group from Libya where all the athletes were deaf. We fit the whole team with hearing aids,” Belsterling recalls. “It’s wonderful to see their reactions when you turn on their hearing aids.” The hearing aids provided to athletes from Third World countries were solar-powered and designed to last for several years, because the recipients often find it difficult to obtain standard batteries and supplies. Some athletes at the Games already had hearing aids, but they were not working properly. “Hearing aids are like glasses,” Belsterling explains.

It’s very rewarding at many

different levels, both professionally and personally.

DR. RALPH BELSTERLING, GRADUATE COORDINATOR, DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION DISORDERS

“They need adjustments over time ... and maintenance.” In July, Belsterling will travel to Lincoln, Neb., for the Special Olympics 2010 USA National Games, where more than 3,000 athletes are expected to compete in events that range from aquatics to flag football to volleyball. Belsterling also coordinates the Healthy Hearing program in Pennsylvania, which involves audiologists and students from around the state. Cal U students are always well represented. These programs include the Special Olympics Pennsylvania summer games at Penn State University in State College and the fall games at Villanova University near Philadelphia. “We teach the students how to do screenings and how to interact with the intellectually disabled population,” Belsterling says. “Once they do it, they’re often hooked for life, too! They’re always asking to volunteer... even after they graduate.” ■ By Cindy Cusic Micco, a Pittsburgh-area writer

By Wendy Mackall, assistant communications director at Cal U

6

7


‘MORE FUN THAN JUST READING’

Instructional designer enhances eCollege presentations

C

al U’s online learners may not know Jon Kallis, although thousands have seen his work. As the instructional designer for the Office of Web-Based Programs, he operates behind the scenes. Kallis administers eCollege, a learning management system used to deliver coursework over the Internet to students across the globe. Kallis keeps the system running smoothly, so students can complete their assignments wherever and whenever they choose.

He follows Quality Matters guidelines to ensure best practices for distance education. He works with the Office for Students with Disabilities to make online classes accessible and appropriate for students with special needs. Kallis also helps Cal U professors integrate audio, video and even social media into their online lessons. In all but a handful of Cal U’s Global Online programs, learners log in through eCollege. Students on campus may take an online course with this learning

California University of Pennsylvania The School of Graduate Studies and Research 250 University Avenue Phone: 724-938-4187 Fax: 724-938-5712 E-mail: gradschool@calu.edu www.calu.edu/graduate A proud member of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. Integrity, Civility, Responsibility

platform or find that a face-to-face class has an eCollege component. In any case, most online learners appreciate the difference between text-only PowerPoint slides and a lesson enhanced with sound and moving images. “It’s more fun than just reading text,” says Kallis, who holds a bachelor’s degree in information systems management from Duquesne University and a master’s in multimedia technology from Cal U. “I’ve received a lot of positive feedback through our professors. The presentations aren’t static, and students like that.” Nearly 60 professors used eCollege during the fall 2009 semester. And these online educators are tech-savvy, Kallis says. “They ask about new buzzwords — wikis, blogs, podcasts and things like that. One professor is trying to figure out a way to use Twitter in his classes.” Kallis keeps up with technology trends and shows educators how to capitalize on them. “Like Twitter, these innovations pop up out of nowhere,” he says. “Students are using them. Our professors want to grab students’ attention and make integrating these interactive elements into their coursework worthwhile.” ■


ALUMNI N E W S GREETINGS FROM THE ALUMNI OFFICE!

H

ere at the Michael and Julia Kara Alumni House, we are looking ahead to another exciting Alumni Weekend, coming up June 5–6.

The classes of 1960 and 1985 will hold their milestone 50th and 25th reunions, and as always, all alumni are welcome to attend. In addition, the Alumni Board of Directors’ annual meeting and the Alumni Association Awards Luncheon will be held during the weekend. Also, please make plans to join us for the President’s Gala at the Omni William Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh. The President’s Gala includes dinner, dancing and fun — and proceeds benefit student scholarships. I encourage you play an active role in the annual Alumni Association board of directors election process. (See details at right.) In August, we will hold our fifth annual Alumni Couples Weekend, which recognizes and celebrates the many alumni couples who met here at Cal U. In addition, we are eagerly planning for our Oct. 16 Homecoming, and we hope that many of our alumni and friends will return to campus for that annual event. Be sure to save the date! Please check the upcoming alumni calendar of events in this issue of the Cal Review and regularly at our website, www.calu.edu/alumni. I encourage you to log on to our new online community at www.calu.edu/alumni. You can receive a permanent e-mail address; update your information; add your name to the online alumni directory; receive Under the Towers, our monthly e-newsletter; and much more. These services are available to our alumni and senior students! Please plan to attend one or more of these upcoming events as a way to reconnect with former classmates and meet new friends. As always, we enjoy your feedback and welcome the opportunity to hear from you. Call the office, e-mail us, or stop by the Michael and Julia Kara Alumni House anytime you are on campus. I would be happy to show you the many changes at your alma mater, and look forward to sharing these exciting times with you!

Amy Lombard Executive Director, Office of Alumni Relations and Annual Fund

18 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

alumni calendar MARCH

A CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

Tampa Area Chapter Gathering — March 14 3 p.m. at Hattricks sports bar, Tampa, Fla. Visit with fellow graduates from the Tampa area and watch the Pittsburgh Penguins hockey game.

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SEEKS NOMINEES FOR ITS BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Pittsburgh Area Chapter Gathering — March 30 Pittsburgh Indoor Sports Arena, Harmarville, Pa. Enjoy fellowship and a guest speaker.

Philadelphia Accepted Student Reception — April 6 Renaissance Philadelphia Hotel Airport, Philadelphia, Pa. Hosted by the Philadelphia Chapter, the event begins with an alumni-only reception at 6 p.m. in the Lounge. At 7 p.m., alumni mingle with accepted students and their parents, sharing their Cal U experiences with the incoming freshmen.

BACKGROUND Nominations are now being sought from alumni interested in being recommended to stand for election to the board of directors of the California University of Pennsylvania Alumni Association. Elections will take place in the spring of 2010, with eight open seats to be filled.

Orange County Alumni Gathering — April 8 Join fellow alumni at the Center Club in Costa Mesa, Calif., for an event hosted by Fred Gladney ’71. Did you know there are more than 100 Cal U alumni in Orange County alone? Please join us to hear updates about your alma mater and socialize with fellow alumni.

Interested alumni may self-nominate, or others may submit information on their behalf. Individuals interested in being recommended must submit their nomination form to the Nominating Committee for Board Members (NCB) so as to be received no later than March 19, 2010.

A P RIL

The NCB will screen the candidates according to guidelines listed below and found in the Alumni Association bylaws, and will forward the names of recommended candidates to the Alumni Association board for its approval. Approved candidates will then stand for election by the membership of the Alumni Association.

Harrisburg Accepted Student Reception — April 8 Sheraton Harrisburg Hershey Hotel, Harrisburg, Pa. Hosted by the Harrisburg Chapter, the alumni-only reception begins at 6 p.m. in the Lounge. At 7 p.m., alumni share their Cal U memories with incoming freshmen and their parents. Red & Black Affair Extraordinaire — April 11 Join us for the fourth annual luncheon and fashion show sponsored by the Alumni Association. Ticket price is $45; proceeds benefit the Alumni Association Scholarship Fund. Last year's fundraiser brought in more than $20,000. For details, contact Alumni Association board president Rosemary Bucchianeri at barbaradr301@hotmail.com or First Lady Barbara Armenti at armenti_b@calu.edu. Cal Pride Weekend — April 16–17 7 p.m. April 16: This year’s Lifetime Achievement Award winner will deliver the keynote address in the Natali Student Center. During the day, a number of Cal U alumni will speak to students in their classes. 9 a.m. April 17: Prospective students and their parents may attend an Academic Open House and Alumni Panel Discussion in Steele Hall Mainstage Theatre. Also: Individual College Awards are presented to outstanding alumni from the College of Science and Technology, the College of Education and Human Services, the College of Liberal Arts and the School of Graduate Studies & Research. Cal Gals Biannual Meeting — April 22 Booker Great Room, Kara Alumni House. At noon, join this group of retired teachers as they reminisce and help to support student scholarships for future teachers. Fayette County Chapter Gathering (date to be announced) Bud Murphy’s Sports Bar and Restaurant, Connellsville, Pa. Socialize with fellow graduates from Fayette County. Somerset County Alumni Gathering — April 29 Inn at Georgian Place, near Somerset, Pa. Meet fellow alumni from Somerset County for an evening of fellowship and fun.

MAY New York City Regional Alumni Gathering (date to be announced) Check your monthly Under the Towers e-newsletter for updates to these events. For more information about alumni events, contact the Office of Alumni Relations & Annual Fund at 724-938-4418 or alumni@calu.edu. Join the Alumni Association’s NEW online community at http://alumni.calu.edu.

SPEAK UP! WE’RE LISTENING... What do you think of the Cal U Review? The editor and staff want to know. Is there a feature you enjoy — or one you don’t? A topic you’d like to read more about? To share your thoughts, send an e-mail to revieweditor@calu.edu, or drop us a line at: Cal U Review, Box 31, California University of Pennsylvania, 250 University Drive, California, PA 15419-1394.

Those individuals elected to board seats as a result of the spring 2010 election cycle will be installed at the Alumni Association annual meeting on June 5.

QUALIFICATIONS FOR CANDIDACY In evaluating an individual’s qualifications to stand for election to the board of directors of the Alumni Association, the NCB shall emphasize the following: • A knowledge of and commitment to the mission and goals of California University of Pennsylvania; • A record of experience and achievement since graduation in his/her chosen field; • Leadership and consensus-building skills; • A willingness to represent all alumni in providing counsel to the University; • A commitment to serve the University on a wide variety of issues encountered in its planning and operations; • A willingness to commit a significant amount of time and energy necessary for effective service; • A history of active involvement with the University; • A significant contribution to public, educational or charitable endeavors; please include philanthropic giving history. NOMINATION PROCESS Individuals interested in being considered for nomination to the board should complete a nomination form and an essay on qualifications and return them, along with a color photograph, to the Alumni Relations Office by March 19, 2010. The Nominating Committee for Board Members will review the information that is submitted and develop a slate of recommended candidates. This slate will be presented to the Alumni Association board of directors for its approval at its spring 2010 meeting. All California University alumni will be eligible to vote either by e-mail or mail ballot.

ELECTION NOMINATION FORM California University of Pennsylvania Alumni Office 250 University Ave. California, PA 15419

Please attach to this form a brief essay (500 words or less) that addresses the following qualifications: • A knowledge of and commitment to the mission and goals of California University of Pennsylvania; • A record of experience and achievement since graduation in his/her chosen field; • Leadership and consensus-building skills; • A willingness to represent all alumni in providing counsel to the University; • A commitment to serve the University on a wide variety of issues encountered in its planning and operations; • A willingness to commit a significant amount of time and energy necessary for effective service; • A history of active involvement with the University; • A significant contribution to public, educational or charitable endeavors. Please return this form, your essay, and your photograph by March 19, 2010.

NAME / CLASS YEAR

ADDRESS

CITY

TELEPHONE

STATE

ZIP

E-MAIL

EMPLOYER/OCCUPATION

Upon recommendation by the NCB and approval by the Alumni Association Board of Directors, your personal information (above), your essay and color photograph will be included in the official ballot materials distributed to all alumni prior to the election. WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 19 ■


NOMINATION forAPPOINTMENT

to the

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY

FORUM COMMITTEES

Alumni are encouraged to nominate themselves or alumni colleagues for appointment to committees of the California University Forum. Two (2) alumni seats are available on each committee listed below. The Executive Committee shall appoint these members. Appointments are for a term of three (3) years. Deadline for nominations is March 26, 2010.

To make a nomination: 1. Nominee must be an alumna/ alumnus of California University. 2. Self-nominations are permitted. 3. Multiple nominations are permitted. This form may be duplicated. 4. Please indicate committees by order of preference. 5. Complete the nomination form and forward to the address listed below. For more information about the California University Forum, visit www.calu.edu.

NOMINATION FOR APPOINTMENT FORM California University of Pennsylvania Mrs. Dana Turcic, recording secretary Campus Box 99 250 University Avenue California, PA 15419

Individual is to be nominated for the following committee(s). (Indicate order of preference: 1,2,3, etc., if applicable.)

NAME OF INDIVIDUAL TO BE NOMINATED (please print)

____ Athletic Advisory Committee

___________________________________________________________________________

____ Budget Committee ____ Communications Committee

NOMINATION SUBMITTED BY:

____ Core Values Committee

___________________________________________________________________________

____ Safety & Social Equity Committee

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY

FORUM COMMITTEES

____ Technology Committee

MEDALLION OF DISTINCTION AWARDED President Angelo Armenti, Jr. presents the University’s Medallion of Distinction award to Dolores ‘Dolly’ Rozzi ’64 at a luncheon in the Kara Alumni House. The award is presented to alumni who have distinguished themselves and brought credit to the University through their professional and personal achievements. After a successful career in government in Washington, D.C., Rozzi served as Cal U’s first special assistant to the President for Equal Employment and Educational Opportunity. A native of Stockdale, Pa., Rozzi now is president of an AARP chapter near her home in Huntingdon, W.Va., and she is known as a humorous and motivational speaker.

20 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

____ Planning & Priorities Committee

CAL POINT of PRIDE

Coover Hall Designed in the Colonial Revival style, the building now known as Coover Hall was one of the first to be constructed after California became a state-owned institution. Built to house 12 training shops as well as classrooms, the slate-roofed structure originally was called the Industrial Arts Building. It bears the name of longtime faculty member Shriver Coover, the University’s first chair of the Industrial Arts Department. Engraved over the door are the dates 1939–1989. Today Coover Hall houses modern classrooms, laboratories and studios.

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 21 ■


CAMPUS C L I P S ‘Inkwell’ e-zine adds blog, Facebook page

Pre-service teachers display tri-fold posters to showcase highlights of their student-teaching experience.

Student teachers showcase their work Education majors put on an impressive display of their professional achievements during Cal U’s first Student Teacher Showcase at the end of the fall semester. Using tri-fold posters, the 120 participants were asked to produce highlights from their student-teaching experiences this semester, emphasizing their professionalism, their effect on students’ learning using data, and their understanding of standards and standards-driven instruction. Faculty, other students, and other professionals, including those who may be interested in filling teaching positions in their districts, were among those who viewed the presentations and talked with the student-teachers. “We’re actually killing about 17 birds with one stone with this event, including using it as a recruitment opportunity,” said Dr. Daniel Engstrom, acting associate dean of the College of Education and Human Services. He noted that current students who have not yet done their student-teaching will have an opportunity to see what kind of work will be required of them. Also, he said, “faculty will be reviewing the posters, and we’ll use that data to see how Cal U is doing at educating the educators.”

22 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

Author discusses activism Diane Wilson, a fourth-generation shrimp-boat captain, environmental activist and author, described her battles with corporate polluters when the American Democracy Project at Cal U explored environmentalism and issues advocacy in November. Her lecture to a capacity crowd in Steele Hall Mainstage Theatre followed two daytime panels that drew nearly 200 students and faculty members to the Natali Student Center. Cal U faculty members Dr. David Argent and Dr. Elizabeth Jones moderated the panels. Wilson is author of An Unreasonable Woman: A True Story of Shrimpers, Politicos, Polluters and the Fight for Seadrift, Texas. Her visit to Cal U took place more than two weeks after she began a hunger strike in advance of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Diane Wilson

Students who produced the most recent version of The Inkwell, Cal U’s online literary magazine, have created a blog and a Facebook page chronicling their work. The blog, at http://inkwellclass.blog spot.com, was created by the photography team of the Publishing the Magazine class, which has produced The Inkwell since 2005. The Facebook page, developed by the magazine’s poetry team and updated by other class members, can be reached by searching “Cal U Inkwell 2009” on Facebook’s commercial website at http://www.facebook.com. The class’s page should be the first item that pops up from the search; it is listed as an Entertainment and Arts group. Any member of the Facebook community can join the group. Previous editions of The Inkwell can be viewed at http://sai.calu.edu/inkwell.

‘Transitions’ continues Transitions: Photographs by Robert Creamer, an exhibition created by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service in collaboration the National Museum of Natural History, is on display through April 27 in Manderino Gallery, on the third floor of Manderino Library. In creating the works for this stunning exhibition, Creamer traded his camera for a flatbed scanner. His compositions use flora and fauna that are placed directly on the scanner in aesthetic arrangements or suspended over it. The resulting detail is eerily lifelike and yet incredibly expressive. This exhibition also features a video by Jeannie Yoon that explores Creamer’s scanning and printing techniques. All SITES exhibitions at Cal U are open to the public. Gallery hours and other information is available online at www.calu.edu/sites. For more information, call exhibitions coordinator Walter Czekaj at 724-938-5244 or e-mail czekaj@calu.edu.

Tom Dusenberry, president of Robinica, introduces the Roboni-i interactive gaming system.

Cal U is Robot Central To highlight its multi-faceted work in robotics, Cal U hosted the worldwide launch of a next-generation robotic gaming system this fall. Robotics teams from more than a dozen western Pennsylvania high schools joined Cal U students as Robonica, a South Africa-based toy manufacturer, introduced the Roboni-i line of interactive, robotic toys. The product launch was held in conjunction with the Western Pennsylvania VEX Robotics Clean Sweep Competition, an annual contest that asks teams of students to design, build and operate their own agile robots. Cal U’s RC Club members, along with VEX Robotics competitors and other students, were among the first in the world to experience Roboni-i, a fully programmable, two-wheeled robot vehicle with 16 sensors. The Robonica group showcased the toy one day later at Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, where Cal U is an educational partner in the roboworldTM exhibition.

Rankings are based on accreditation, tuition cost, number of students and faculty, student-to-faculty ratio, graduation rate and retention rate, all derived from the latest data compiled by the National Center for Education Statistics, part of the U.S. Department of Education. The rankings also consider student feedback. Cal U’s Global Online program has been growing rapidly. Compared to 2008–09, undergraduate enrollment increased by 11 percent this year, and graduate enrollment is 21 percent higher. Global Online offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees as well as certificate programs. Cal U is a preferred provider of online education for soldiers, who connect to Global Online through the GoArmyEd.com portal.

Accreditations accumulate Cal U’s Department of Art and Design has received five-year accreditation from NASAD, the National Association of Schools of Art and Design. Founded in 1944, NASAD is a national accrediting agency whose nearly 300 professional members include colleges, universities and independent

schools of art, design and related disciplines. Accreditation affirms that standards of academic quality and integrity are being met. Eight years ago, the Department of Art and Design enrolled about 65 students in its bachelor’s degree program in art. Today, it counts more than 200 students majoring in programs that lead to a B.A. in art, a B.S. in graphic design, a B.F.A. in fine art or a B.S.Ed. in art education. The bachelor’s degree program in Industrial Technology was re-accredited by ATMAE, the Association of Technology, Management and Applied Engineering. Founded in 1967, the ATMAE is recognized as the premier professional association accrediting industrial technology programs in colleges, universities and technical institutes. Industrial technology is primarily involved with the management, operation and maintenance of complex technological systems. Cal U’s program, housed in the Eberly College of Science and Technology, prepares students for technical and management-oriented careers in business, industry, education and government.

Cal U: No. 2 for online education A nationwide study of online schools has ranked California University of Pennsylvania No. 2 for its Internet-based degree programs. The Top 25 Online Colleges study was conducted by SR Education Group, an educational resource provider based in Kirkland, Wash. The study appears on its flagship site, Guide to Online Schools (www.guidetoonlineschools.com).

Creativity 101 More than 250 middle school and high school students visited Cal U for an ‘Art and Writing Encounter,’ a series of workshops designed to jump-start creative thinking in advance of the Scholastic Art And Writing Awards program. Scholastic Inc.’s nationwide program, now in its 87th year, offers awards and scholarships for creative teens. Cal U hosted the regional program, including a show and awards celebration, for the first time this year.

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 23 ■


NOMINATION forAPPOINTMENT

to the

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY

FORUM COMMITTEES

Alumni are encouraged to nominate themselves or alumni colleagues for appointment to committees of the California University Forum. Two (2) alumni seats are available on each committee listed below. The Executive Committee shall appoint these members. Appointments are for a term of three (3) years. Deadline for nominations is March 26, 2010.

To make a nomination: 1. Nominee must be an alumna/ alumnus of California University. 2. Self-nominations are permitted. 3. Multiple nominations are permitted. This form may be duplicated. 4. Please indicate committees by order of preference. 5. Complete the nomination form and forward to the address listed below. For more information about the California University Forum, visit www.calu.edu.

NOMINATION FOR APPOINTMENT FORM California University of Pennsylvania Mrs. Dana Turcic, recording secretary Campus Box 99 250 University Avenue California, PA 15419

Individual is to be nominated for the following committee(s). (Indicate order of preference: 1,2,3, etc., if applicable.)

NAME OF INDIVIDUAL TO BE NOMINATED (please print)

____ Athletic Advisory Committee

___________________________________________________________________________

____ Budget Committee ____ Communications Committee

NOMINATION SUBMITTED BY:

____ Core Values Committee

___________________________________________________________________________

____ Safety & Social Equity Committee

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY

FORUM COMMITTEES

____ Technology Committee

MEDALLION OF DISTINCTION AWARDED President Angelo Armenti, Jr. presents the University’s Medallion of Distinction award to Dolores ‘Dolly’ Rozzi ’64 at a luncheon in the Kara Alumni House. The award is presented to alumni who have distinguished themselves and brought credit to the University through their professional and personal achievements. After a successful career in government in Washington, D.C., Rozzi served as Cal U’s first special assistant to the President for Equal Employment and Educational Opportunity. A native of Stockdale, Pa., Rozzi now is president of an AARP chapter near her home in Huntingdon, W.Va., and she is known as a humorous and motivational speaker.

20 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

____ Planning & Priorities Committee

CAL POINT of PRIDE

Coover Hall Designed in the Colonial Revival style, the building now known as Coover Hall was one of the first to be constructed after California became a state-owned institution. Built to house 12 training shops as well as classrooms, the slate-roofed structure originally was called the Industrial Arts Building. It bears the name of longtime faculty member Shriver Coover, the University’s first chair of the Industrial Arts Department. Engraved over the door are the dates 1939–1989. Today Coover Hall houses modern classrooms, laboratories and studios.

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 21 ■


CAMPUS C L I P S ‘Inkwell’ e-zine adds blog, Facebook page

Pre-service teachers display tri-fold posters to showcase highlights of their student-teaching experience.

Student teachers showcase their work Education majors put on an impressive display of their professional achievements during Cal U’s first Student Teacher Showcase at the end of the fall semester. Using tri-fold posters, the 120 participants were asked to produce highlights from their student-teaching experiences this semester, emphasizing their professionalism, their effect on students’ learning using data, and their understanding of standards and standards-driven instruction. Faculty, other students, and other professionals, including those who may be interested in filling teaching positions in their districts, were among those who viewed the presentations and talked with the student-teachers. “We’re actually killing about 17 birds with one stone with this event, including using it as a recruitment opportunity,” said Dr. Daniel Engstrom, acting associate dean of the College of Education and Human Services. He noted that current students who have not yet done their student-teaching will have an opportunity to see what kind of work will be required of them. Also, he said, “faculty will be reviewing the posters, and we’ll use that data to see how Cal U is doing at educating the educators.”

22 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

Author discusses activism Diane Wilson, a fourth-generation shrimp-boat captain, environmental activist and author, described her battles with corporate polluters when the American Democracy Project at Cal U explored environmentalism and issues advocacy in November. Her lecture to a capacity crowd in Steele Hall Mainstage Theatre followed two daytime panels that drew nearly 200 students and faculty members to the Natali Student Center. Cal U faculty members Dr. David Argent and Dr. Elizabeth Jones moderated the panels. Wilson is author of An Unreasonable Woman: A True Story of Shrimpers, Politicos, Polluters and the Fight for Seadrift, Texas. Her visit to Cal U took place more than two weeks after she began a hunger strike in advance of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Diane Wilson

Students who produced the most recent version of The Inkwell, Cal U’s online literary magazine, have created a blog and a Facebook page chronicling their work. The blog, at http://inkwellclass.blog spot.com, was created by the photography team of the Publishing the Magazine class, which has produced The Inkwell since 2005. The Facebook page, developed by the magazine’s poetry team and updated by other class members, can be reached by searching “Cal U Inkwell 2009” on Facebook’s commercial website at http://www.facebook.com. The class’s page should be the first item that pops up from the search; it is listed as an Entertainment and Arts group. Any member of the Facebook community can join the group. Previous editions of The Inkwell can be viewed at http://sai.calu.edu/inkwell.

‘Transitions’ continues Transitions: Photographs by Robert Creamer, an exhibition created by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service in collaboration the National Museum of Natural History, is on display through April 27 in Manderino Gallery, on the third floor of Manderino Library. In creating the works for this stunning exhibition, Creamer traded his camera for a flatbed scanner. His compositions use flora and fauna that are placed directly on the scanner in aesthetic arrangements or suspended over it. The resulting detail is eerily lifelike and yet incredibly expressive. This exhibition also features a video by Jeannie Yoon that explores Creamer’s scanning and printing techniques. All SITES exhibitions at Cal U are open to the public. Gallery hours and other information is available online at www.calu.edu/sites. For more information, call exhibitions coordinator Walter Czekaj at 724-938-5244 or e-mail czekaj@calu.edu.

Tom Dusenberry, president of Robinica, introduces the Roboni-i interactive gaming system.

Cal U is Robot Central To highlight its multi-faceted work in robotics, Cal U hosted the worldwide launch of a next-generation robotic gaming system this fall. Robotics teams from more than a dozen western Pennsylvania high schools joined Cal U students as Robonica, a South Africa-based toy manufacturer, introduced the Roboni-i line of interactive, robotic toys. The product launch was held in conjunction with the Western Pennsylvania VEX Robotics Clean Sweep Competition, an annual contest that asks teams of students to design, build and operate their own agile robots. Cal U’s RC Club members, along with VEX Robotics competitors and other students, were among the first in the world to experience Roboni-i, a fully programmable, two-wheeled robot vehicle with 16 sensors. The Robonica group showcased the toy one day later at Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh, where Cal U is an educational partner in the roboworldTM exhibition.

Rankings are based on accreditation, tuition cost, number of students and faculty, student-to-faculty ratio, graduation rate and retention rate, all derived from the latest data compiled by the National Center for Education Statistics, part of the U.S. Department of Education. The rankings also consider student feedback. Cal U’s Global Online program has been growing rapidly. Compared to 2008–09, undergraduate enrollment increased by 11 percent this year, and graduate enrollment is 21 percent higher. Global Online offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees as well as certificate programs. Cal U is a preferred provider of online education for soldiers, who connect to Global Online through the GoArmyEd.com portal.

Accreditations accumulate Cal U’s Department of Art and Design has received five-year accreditation from NASAD, the National Association of Schools of Art and Design. Founded in 1944, NASAD is a national accrediting agency whose nearly 300 professional members include colleges, universities and independent

schools of art, design and related disciplines. Accreditation affirms that standards of academic quality and integrity are being met. Eight years ago, the Department of Art and Design enrolled about 65 students in its bachelor’s degree program in art. Today, it counts more than 200 students majoring in programs that lead to a B.A. in art, a B.S. in graphic design, a B.F.A. in fine art or a B.S.Ed. in art education. The bachelor’s degree program in Industrial Technology was re-accredited by ATMAE, the Association of Technology, Management and Applied Engineering. Founded in 1967, the ATMAE is recognized as the premier professional association accrediting industrial technology programs in colleges, universities and technical institutes. Industrial technology is primarily involved with the management, operation and maintenance of complex technological systems. Cal U’s program, housed in the Eberly College of Science and Technology, prepares students for technical and management-oriented careers in business, industry, education and government.

Cal U: No. 2 for online education A nationwide study of online schools has ranked California University of Pennsylvania No. 2 for its Internet-based degree programs. The Top 25 Online Colleges study was conducted by SR Education Group, an educational resource provider based in Kirkland, Wash. The study appears on its flagship site, Guide to Online Schools (www.guidetoonlineschools.com).

Creativity 101 More than 250 middle school and high school students visited Cal U for an ‘Art and Writing Encounter,’ a series of workshops designed to jump-start creative thinking in advance of the Scholastic Art And Writing Awards program. Scholastic Inc.’s nationwide program, now in its 87th year, offers awards and scholarships for creative teens. Cal U hosted the regional program, including a show and awards celebration, for the first time this year.

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 23 ■


Mutual benefits PARTNERSHIPS RAISE CAL U’S PROFILE, AND MORE

T

win sisters Tiffany and Mindy Juha, who have been skating since they were 3, want people to know: Cal U has hockey. Thanks to a blossoming partnership between the University and the Pittsburgh Penguins, word is getting around. Tiffany is a center on the club hockey team, and Mindy plays defense. Along with other members of the men’s and women’s teams, they are being featured in Cal U ads running all season long in IceTime, the game-day program distributed to fans at all home games. “A lot of people act surprised when they hear that we play hockey at Cal,” says Tiffany, a senior majoring in criminal justice. “Really, we just want people to know that there is a women’s hockey team at Cal U,” adds Mindy, a senior elementary education major. Tiffany’s ad has been published; the ad featuring Mindy is scheduled to run later this season. Cal U marketing director Craig Butzine says the Penguins partnership, along with agreements with the Carnegie Science Center and the Pittsburgh Steelers, is part of a broad strategy to increase visibility for the University. “In addition to spending advertising dollars to build awareness, we are always looking to increase internship opportunities for our students and raise more money for scholarships,” he says.

Scoring scholarships and internships Recently, Penguins merchandise — three autographed sticks, three signed jerseys and a game-day experience complete with a Zamboni ride — was put up for bid in an auction at www.pittsburgh penguins.com to

Senior Tiffany Juha, a forward on the Cal U women’s hockey team, is among the students featured in ads seen by Pittsburgh Penguins fans.

raise money for the general scholarship fund at Cal U. “The mutual goal with Cal U and the Penguins is to raise funds for an endowed scholarship,” Butzine says. “Our students will benefit, and the Penguins name will be associated with it.

It’s an example of the kinds of mutually beneficial partnerships we are constantly trying to create. We can get our name out there, and they can also reach a broader fan base.” Some of those potential new fans, no doubt, were excited to see Pens left winger Pascal Dupuis and Iceburgh, the team’s mascot, when they both dropped by campus to welcome new students before the first Vulcan football game of the season. Cal U is also a sponsor of the Pittsburgh Penguins at 105.9 HD-2, a recently launched high-definition radio station. Two Cal U students, Sammy Jo Popovich and Brian Miller, interned for the live portion of the show, which airs weekdays from 9 a.m. to noon. The program is co-hosted by alumnus Tom Grimm ’95. Popovich, a senior communication studies major who finished her internship Dec. 1, worked with the Penguins’ public relations department to compile player information for the show. She also worked with the corporate sales department on game nights. “It was a good experience to work with a professional sports organization,” Popovich says. “I think Brian and I maybe paved the way for other students to have a good experience interning here, as well.” Miller, a senior majoring in sports management, keeps track of injuries, players’ tendencies and the team line-up for the radio show. “I’ve learned that communication is vital to success in any career you pursue,” he says.

Senior Sammy Jo Popovich, a communication studies major, completed an internship with the Penguins’ public relations department. Michael Valoski ‘07, ‘08 (right) discusses robotics with teachers during a Weekend Workshop event at roboworldTM. Valoski is the Mechatronics Research Lab manager for NCRETE, the National Center for Robotic Engineering Technology Education, based at Cal U.

Robotics partnership At the Carnegie Science Center of Pittsburgh, the roboworldTM exhibition is another example of the “value-added” partnerships Cal U seeks. Cal U launched a new associate degree program in Robotics Engineering Technology in fall 2009. It also is home to the third-largest technology education program in the United States. The University is taking the lead in robotics education through NCRETE, the National Center for Robotics Engineering Technology Education, which is developing the nation’s first two-tier associate and bachelor’s degree program in robotics and mechatronics. “We share a commitment to STEM education,” Butzine says of courses and programs related to science, technology, engineering and math. “The Carnegie Science Center has younger students who visit, which interests us, and we have older students on campus, which interests them. They were especially interested in having students who could run their workshops.” As part of the partnership, which includes Cal U signage throughout the Science Center, the University has been presenting “Cal U Saturdays” in the exhibition’s Robot Workshop, a space within roboworldTM that gives visitors a more in-depth robotics experience. “We are grateful and fortunate to have strong partners like Cal U involved in the development and programming of roboworldTM,” says Science Center co-director Ron Baillie. “Putting college students currently studying robotics in

the exhibit to help visitors understand this complex topic is a win-win for both the Science Center and Cal U. Our visitors have access to Cal U students working in robotics, and Cal U students gain the experience of presenting their current work and research to the public.” Cal U sponsored the Science Center’s 2009 Science Summer Camps, and Cal U undergraduates will have the opportunity for internships at the Science Center, where they will maintain and repair robots in the roboworldTM exhibit.

Mike Wagner

‘Mutual synergies’ A newer relationship with the Pittsburgh Steelers also is starting to pay off. Cal U has done advertising with the team, which has, in turn, provided memorabilia that the school will use at various upcoming fundraisers. Mike Wagner, a safety for the Steelers during the 1970s, was the guest speaker at Mission Day XI in November, which invited the Cal U community to present ideas and share dialogue about the new Cal U for Life initiative. “You build synergies and then other opportunities tend to come up,” Butzine says. “For example, our Vulcan band got to play at the Minnesota Vikings game at Heinz Field earlier in the season and then sit in the stands to watch the game. It was nice for our students to get that kind of opportunity.” The Penguins recently allowed members of the Cal U men’s and women’s hockey teams to use space near the Penguins’ home ice at Mellon Arena to raise money for the Mario Lemieux Foundation, which supports cancer research. “Rather than just have an organization sell us something like ad space, we look for opportunities to help each other grow,” Butzine says of the marketing approach. “Whenever possible, we want to make sure it’s not just one-sided.” ■ By Wendy Mackall, assistant communications director at Cal U

24 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 25 ■


Mutual benefits PARTNERSHIPS RAISE CAL U’S PROFILE, AND MORE

T

win sisters Tiffany and Mindy Juha, who have been skating since they were 3, want people to know: Cal U has hockey. Thanks to a blossoming partnership between the University and the Pittsburgh Penguins, word is getting around. Tiffany is a center on the club hockey team, and Mindy plays defense. Along with other members of the men’s and women’s teams, they are being featured in Cal U ads running all season long in IceTime, the game-day program distributed to fans at all home games. “A lot of people act surprised when they hear that we play hockey at Cal,” says Tiffany, a senior majoring in criminal justice. “Really, we just want people to know that there is a women’s hockey team at Cal U,” adds Mindy, a senior elementary education major. Tiffany’s ad has been published; the ad featuring Mindy is scheduled to run later this season. Cal U marketing director Craig Butzine says the Penguins partnership, along with agreements with the Carnegie Science Center and the Pittsburgh Steelers, is part of a broad strategy to increase visibility for the University. “In addition to spending advertising dollars to build awareness, we are always looking to increase internship opportunities for our students and raise more money for scholarships,” he says.

Scoring scholarships and internships Recently, Penguins merchandise — three autographed sticks, three signed jerseys and a game-day experience complete with a Zamboni ride — was put up for bid in an auction at www.pittsburgh penguins.com to

Senior Tiffany Juha, a forward on the Cal U women’s hockey team, is among the students featured in ads seen by Pittsburgh Penguins fans.

raise money for the general scholarship fund at Cal U. “The mutual goal with Cal U and the Penguins is to raise funds for an endowed scholarship,” Butzine says. “Our students will benefit, and the Penguins name will be associated with it.

It’s an example of the kinds of mutually beneficial partnerships we are constantly trying to create. We can get our name out there, and they can also reach a broader fan base.” Some of those potential new fans, no doubt, were excited to see Pens left winger Pascal Dupuis and Iceburgh, the team’s mascot, when they both dropped by campus to welcome new students before the first Vulcan football game of the season. Cal U is also a sponsor of the Pittsburgh Penguins at 105.9 HD-2, a recently launched high-definition radio station. Two Cal U students, Sammy Jo Popovich and Brian Miller, interned for the live portion of the show, which airs weekdays from 9 a.m. to noon. The program is co-hosted by alumnus Tom Grimm ’95. Popovich, a senior communication studies major who finished her internship Dec. 1, worked with the Penguins’ public relations department to compile player information for the show. She also worked with the corporate sales department on game nights. “It was a good experience to work with a professional sports organization,” Popovich says. “I think Brian and I maybe paved the way for other students to have a good experience interning here, as well.” Miller, a senior majoring in sports management, keeps track of injuries, players’ tendencies and the team line-up for the radio show. “I’ve learned that communication is vital to success in any career you pursue,” he says.

Senior Sammy Jo Popovich, a communication studies major, completed an internship with the Penguins’ public relations department. Michael Valoski ‘07, ‘08 (right) discusses robotics with teachers during a Weekend Workshop event at roboworldTM. Valoski is the Mechatronics Research Lab manager for NCRETE, the National Center for Robotic Engineering Technology Education, based at Cal U.

Robotics partnership At the Carnegie Science Center of Pittsburgh, the roboworldTM exhibition is another example of the “value-added” partnerships Cal U seeks. Cal U launched a new associate degree program in Robotics Engineering Technology in fall 2009. It also is home to the third-largest technology education program in the United States. The University is taking the lead in robotics education through NCRETE, the National Center for Robotics Engineering Technology Education, which is developing the nation’s first two-tier associate and bachelor’s degree program in robotics and mechatronics. “We share a commitment to STEM education,” Butzine says of courses and programs related to science, technology, engineering and math. “The Carnegie Science Center has younger students who visit, which interests us, and we have older students on campus, which interests them. They were especially interested in having students who could run their workshops.” As part of the partnership, which includes Cal U signage throughout the Science Center, the University has been presenting “Cal U Saturdays” in the exhibition’s Robot Workshop, a space within roboworldTM that gives visitors a more in-depth robotics experience. “We are grateful and fortunate to have strong partners like Cal U involved in the development and programming of roboworldTM,” says Science Center co-director Ron Baillie. “Putting college students currently studying robotics in

the exhibit to help visitors understand this complex topic is a win-win for both the Science Center and Cal U. Our visitors have access to Cal U students working in robotics, and Cal U students gain the experience of presenting their current work and research to the public.” Cal U sponsored the Science Center’s 2009 Science Summer Camps, and Cal U undergraduates will have the opportunity for internships at the Science Center, where they will maintain and repair robots in the roboworldTM exhibit.

Mike Wagner

‘Mutual synergies’ A newer relationship with the Pittsburgh Steelers also is starting to pay off. Cal U has done advertising with the team, which has, in turn, provided memorabilia that the school will use at various upcoming fundraisers. Mike Wagner, a safety for the Steelers during the 1970s, was the guest speaker at Mission Day XI in November, which invited the Cal U community to present ideas and share dialogue about the new Cal U for Life initiative. “You build synergies and then other opportunities tend to come up,” Butzine says. “For example, our Vulcan band got to play at the Minnesota Vikings game at Heinz Field earlier in the season and then sit in the stands to watch the game. It was nice for our students to get that kind of opportunity.” The Penguins recently allowed members of the Cal U men’s and women’s hockey teams to use space near the Penguins’ home ice at Mellon Arena to raise money for the Mario Lemieux Foundation, which supports cancer research. “Rather than just have an organization sell us something like ad space, we look for opportunities to help each other grow,” Butzine says of the marketing approach. “Whenever possible, we want to make sure it’s not just one-sided.” ■ By Wendy Mackall, assistant communications director at Cal U

24 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 25 ■


COACH FINDS GYMNASTICS GOLD About the Frederick Douglass Institute Frederick Douglass was a former slave, author, statesman and adviser to President Abraham Lincoln. He visited the Cal U campus Nov. 20, 1885.

Dr. Nathaniel Frederick II the 2009-2010 Frederick Douglass Scholar and assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies.

In addition to the Frederick Douglass Visiting Scholar Program, which is in its seventh year, the institute plans events for Black History Month and Women’s History Month, and organizes the annual Hip-Hop Conference. The institute also conducts the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Essay Contest, which is open to all Cal U students, and encourages advocacy and leadership development.

Professional development starts here Frederick Douglass Institute offers minority scholars real-world experience

A

bove all, Dr. Nathaniel Frederick II considers himself a teacher. “I like that I can share what I know with my students,” says Frederick, the 2009-2010 Frederick Douglass Scholar and assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies. “I want them to be able to say, ‘I never saw it like that before.’” Frederick, 29, is a graduate of Penn State University, where he earned a master’s degree in media studies and a Ph.D. in mass communication. He attended Claflin University in his hometown of Orangeburg, S.C., for his bachelor’s degree in mass communication. The Frederick Douglass Institute Visiting Scholar Program allows new scholars from underrepresented groups to gain teaching and research experience while exploring employment opportunities within the University. Cal U provides financial support, professional development activities and mentoring to each scholar. “One of the reasons I chose this program was the professional development aspect. I went straight through graduate 26 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

school, and I had this feeling that I wanted this transitional experience,” Frederick says. Each post-doctoral scholar must teach three courses in his or her discipline, present recent research, participate in campus activities and be involved in diversity initiatives. Frederick is teaching public speaking, Media and Society, and Media Criticism this academic year. His research focuses on how AfricanAmericans have used media to address social justice issues, particularly during the civil rights era. His doctoral dissertation explored the role of gospel singers in the civil rights movement from 1945 to 1960. Among his subjects: Bill Pinckney of the Drifters and Margaret Allison of the Angelic Gospel Singers, both of whom died in 2008. “Gospel artists had radio as a platform and music as a voice to disseminate information about what was happening in society. And when they toured, they had freedom to talk about what was happening in other towns and cities,” Frederick says. “So I interviewed gospel singers

and radio announcers about whether they thought their actions were activism. Some did, some didn’t, but they all had interesting things to say.” Frederick says the Visiting Scholar Program has given him the ideal framework to develop his teaching skills and learn to balance classroom responsibilities with research commitments and university activities. “This is my first full-time teaching job, so I was a little nervous going in,” he says. “But Dr. Greg Spicer, who is the department chair, has been my mentor and has been very supportive of me. I’m grateful to him and the students for being so welcoming.” “The idea of the Visiting Scholar Program is to give the scholar a real feel for what it’s like in a university setting,” says Kelton Edmonds, director of the Frederick Douglass Institute and assistant professor in the Department of History and Political Science. Edmonds was the Frederick Douglass Scholar in 2005-2006. “You have a lot of support. Even if you don’t stay on here, you really get a feel for what it’s like, yet the teaching burden isn’t that heavy,” Edmonds says. “I think it’s one of the better programs in the country.” ■ By Wendy Mackall, assistant communications director at Cal U

Fourth-generation alumnus credits confidence to Cal U

B

rant Lutska ’93 is quick to praise his Cal U education and his Mon Valley upbringing for paving his path to success — a route that has led to national recognition as a gymnastics competitor and coach. A respected educator and administrator, as well as a coach, Lutska relocated to New Jersey in 2000 after teaching for eight years in Monessen, Pa., where he graduated from high school. He now is the media supervisor for the Monroe School District and coach for the girls’ gymnastics team at Bishop George Ahr High School in Woodbridge, N.J. Lutska’s passion for the sport began at BG’s Gymnastics in Monessen, which his family now owns. Bishop Ahr was on the verge of dropping its gymnastics program before Lutska stepped in. In nine seasons he has guided the Trojans to an astonishing 88-2 cumulative record, with eight divisional, county and sectional titles. Bishop Ahr won five consecutive New Jersey state championships, from 2003 to 2007. Lutska was inducted into the high school’s Hall of Fame in 2008 and has received several national and statewide coach of the year honors.

A former competitor at the national level, Lutska is a nationally rated judge for USA and NCAA Gymnastics. He even has assigned judges for NCAA championship competitions. Through his websites, he continues to promote the sport and supplement his income by offering online lesson planning for gymnastics schools — as well as a line of leotards. Lutska represents the fourth generation of his family to attend Cal U, where he studied early childhood and special education. He also holds graduate degrees in educational administration and information technology. “My experience at Cal U provided me with a strong foundation to work well with kids,” he says. “People always ask me where I went to school, because I am so prepared. Cal does an excellent job of producing outstanding teachers.” Lutska, who lives in Perth Amboy, N.J., praised elementary education faculty members John Vargo and Dr. Caryl Sheffield. “Professor Vargo was phenomenal and helped me develop as a teacher,” he says. “Dr. Sheffield is the one who turned me on to computers and

eventually information technology, which I use every day.” Lutska says he remains close with many college friends, including fellow Theta Xi fraternity brothers Tony Mauro ’92, ’93 and Jason Minnitti ’91. He was Minnitti’s best man and introduced Mauro to his wife, Jennifer. In addition to keeping up with friends, Lutska keeps tabs on the University when he returns to the Mon Valley. “Whenever I come home and visit my sister in Newell, I always go to the top of the hill and just look down on the campus,” he says. “I am amazed. Dr. Armenti has really grabbed the bull by the horns. What a great place Cal is.” A gifted speaker who travels around the country to conduct motivational and educational presentations about gymnastics, Lutska credits Cal U and the Mon Valley for instilling his self-confidence. He believes that positive reinforcement and believing in yourself are essential traits for both team and personal success. “I love the Mon Valley and the people who hold onto family values,” says Lutska. “I truly believe Cal U played a major part in making me the person I am today.” ■ By Bruce Wald ’85, Cal U information writer.

Lutska ‘93: ‘I love the Mon Valley.’ WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 27 ■


COACH FINDS GYMNASTICS GOLD About the Frederick Douglass Institute Frederick Douglass was a former slave, author, statesman and adviser to President Abraham Lincoln. He visited the Cal U campus Nov. 20, 1885.

Dr. Nathaniel Frederick II the 2009-2010 Frederick Douglass Scholar and assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies.

In addition to the Frederick Douglass Visiting Scholar Program, which is in its seventh year, the institute plans events for Black History Month and Women’s History Month, and organizes the annual Hip-Hop Conference. The institute also conducts the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Essay Contest, which is open to all Cal U students, and encourages advocacy and leadership development.

Professional development starts here Frederick Douglass Institute offers minority scholars real-world experience

A

bove all, Dr. Nathaniel Frederick II considers himself a teacher. “I like that I can share what I know with my students,” says Frederick, the 2009-2010 Frederick Douglass Scholar and assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies. “I want them to be able to say, ‘I never saw it like that before.’” Frederick, 29, is a graduate of Penn State University, where he earned a master’s degree in media studies and a Ph.D. in mass communication. He attended Claflin University in his hometown of Orangeburg, S.C., for his bachelor’s degree in mass communication. The Frederick Douglass Institute Visiting Scholar Program allows new scholars from underrepresented groups to gain teaching and research experience while exploring employment opportunities within the University. Cal U provides financial support, professional development activities and mentoring to each scholar. “One of the reasons I chose this program was the professional development aspect. I went straight through graduate 26 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

school, and I had this feeling that I wanted this transitional experience,” Frederick says. Each post-doctoral scholar must teach three courses in his or her discipline, present recent research, participate in campus activities and be involved in diversity initiatives. Frederick is teaching public speaking, Media and Society, and Media Criticism this academic year. His research focuses on how AfricanAmericans have used media to address social justice issues, particularly during the civil rights era. His doctoral dissertation explored the role of gospel singers in the civil rights movement from 1945 to 1960. Among his subjects: Bill Pinckney of the Drifters and Margaret Allison of the Angelic Gospel Singers, both of whom died in 2008. “Gospel artists had radio as a platform and music as a voice to disseminate information about what was happening in society. And when they toured, they had freedom to talk about what was happening in other towns and cities,” Frederick says. “So I interviewed gospel singers

and radio announcers about whether they thought their actions were activism. Some did, some didn’t, but they all had interesting things to say.” Frederick says the Visiting Scholar Program has given him the ideal framework to develop his teaching skills and learn to balance classroom responsibilities with research commitments and university activities. “This is my first full-time teaching job, so I was a little nervous going in,” he says. “But Dr. Greg Spicer, who is the department chair, has been my mentor and has been very supportive of me. I’m grateful to him and the students for being so welcoming.” “The idea of the Visiting Scholar Program is to give the scholar a real feel for what it’s like in a university setting,” says Kelton Edmonds, director of the Frederick Douglass Institute and assistant professor in the Department of History and Political Science. Edmonds was the Frederick Douglass Scholar in 2005-2006. “You have a lot of support. Even if you don’t stay on here, you really get a feel for what it’s like, yet the teaching burden isn’t that heavy,” Edmonds says. “I think it’s one of the better programs in the country.” ■ By Wendy Mackall, assistant communications director at Cal U

Fourth-generation alumnus credits confidence to Cal U

B

rant Lutska ’93 is quick to praise his Cal U education and his Mon Valley upbringing for paving his path to success — a route that has led to national recognition as a gymnastics competitor and coach. A respected educator and administrator, as well as a coach, Lutska relocated to New Jersey in 2000 after teaching for eight years in Monessen, Pa., where he graduated from high school. He now is the media supervisor for the Monroe School District and coach for the girls’ gymnastics team at Bishop George Ahr High School in Woodbridge, N.J. Lutska’s passion for the sport began at BG’s Gymnastics in Monessen, which his family now owns. Bishop Ahr was on the verge of dropping its gymnastics program before Lutska stepped in. In nine seasons he has guided the Trojans to an astonishing 88-2 cumulative record, with eight divisional, county and sectional titles. Bishop Ahr won five consecutive New Jersey state championships, from 2003 to 2007. Lutska was inducted into the high school’s Hall of Fame in 2008 and has received several national and statewide coach of the year honors.

A former competitor at the national level, Lutska is a nationally rated judge for USA and NCAA Gymnastics. He even has assigned judges for NCAA championship competitions. Through his websites, he continues to promote the sport and supplement his income by offering online lesson planning for gymnastics schools — as well as a line of leotards. Lutska represents the fourth generation of his family to attend Cal U, where he studied early childhood and special education. He also holds graduate degrees in educational administration and information technology. “My experience at Cal U provided me with a strong foundation to work well with kids,” he says. “People always ask me where I went to school, because I am so prepared. Cal does an excellent job of producing outstanding teachers.” Lutska, who lives in Perth Amboy, N.J., praised elementary education faculty members John Vargo and Dr. Caryl Sheffield. “Professor Vargo was phenomenal and helped me develop as a teacher,” he says. “Dr. Sheffield is the one who turned me on to computers and

eventually information technology, which I use every day.” Lutska says he remains close with many college friends, including fellow Theta Xi fraternity brothers Tony Mauro ’92, ’93 and Jason Minnitti ’91. He was Minnitti’s best man and introduced Mauro to his wife, Jennifer. In addition to keeping up with friends, Lutska keeps tabs on the University when he returns to the Mon Valley. “Whenever I come home and visit my sister in Newell, I always go to the top of the hill and just look down on the campus,” he says. “I am amazed. Dr. Armenti has really grabbed the bull by the horns. What a great place Cal is.” A gifted speaker who travels around the country to conduct motivational and educational presentations about gymnastics, Lutska credits Cal U and the Mon Valley for instilling his self-confidence. He believes that positive reinforcement and believing in yourself are essential traits for both team and personal success. “I love the Mon Valley and the people who hold onto family values,” says Lutska. “I truly believe Cal U played a major part in making me the person I am today.” ■ By Bruce Wald ’85, Cal U information writer.

Lutska ‘93: ‘I love the Mon Valley.’ WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 27 ■


SPORTS R O U N D U P

Vulcans enjoy post-season play THREE NCAA REGIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS AND MANY INDIVIDUAL AWARDS HIGHLIGHT AN EXCEPTIONAL FALL SPORTS SEASON FOOTBALL The Vulcans rolled to a fifth straight Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference West title and third consecutive NCAA Division II Super One Regional championship. After a 0-2 start, the team won 11 of its final 13 games to reach the national semifinals for the third consecutive season. Over the past three years, Cal U has compiled a 36-7 overall record, and the Vulcans take a 20-game divisional win streak into 2010. Since 2005 Cal has won 30 of its last 32 PSAC-West games under eighth-year head coach John Luckhardt (68-28). Cal U placed a league-high 17 players on the all-conference all-star unit. Senior defensive lineman Willie Walker was named the PSAC-West Defensive Player of the Year, and freshman defensive back Rontez Miles received PSAC-West Freshman of the Year accolades.

WOMEN’S SOCCER Cal U’s women’s soccer team made its initial appearance in the post-season, winning its first PSAC-West title and advancing to the PSAC semifinals before receiving the program’s first NCAA Division II tournament bid. The Vulcans then reeled off three straight victories to win the NCAA Division II Atlantic Regional before being eliminated in the national quarterfinals. The team finished with a school-best 19-6-1 overall record. A program-high five Vulcans received all-conference honors. Highlighting the individual honors were senior forward Amanda Heister and third-year head coach Al Alvine, who received the PSAC-West player and coach of the year honors, respectively.

SPORTS SHORTS

Sam Regney kicks it.

Freshman Chris Werner was the men’s cross country team’s top finisher in the final three races, including finishing 25th of 149 runners at the NCAA Division II Atlantic Regional Championships and earning all-conference recognition with an eighth-place finish at the PSAC meet.

Freshman Niki Keno (in white) goes after the ball.

Kelsey Russo makes a play. The Vulcan football team prepares to take the field in a game with Saginaw Valley. Sara McMullen tries a dig.

VOLLEYBALL Under the direction of second-year head coach Stephanie Burner, the women’s volleyball team finished 2009 with a 36-6 overall record and won its third consecutive PSAC championship, its fourth in five years. The team also won its third straight NCAA Division II Atlantic Regional championship and made its fourth trip to the NCAA Elite Eight. Cal U went 19-0 in PSAC-West competition while compiling a 111-12 cumulative record. Senior outside hitter Joanna Nist was selected the PSAC-West Player of the Year and was one of a league-high four Vulcans tapped for All-PSAC recognition. Nist and senior setter Renata da Silva also earned Daktronics Division II Second-Team All-America honors. Quarterback Josh Portis prepares to pass.

28 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010

The women’s tennis team completed the fall portion of its 2009–2010 season by winning three dual matches and two impressive titles at the PSAC Individual Championships. Sophomore Alina Stanila won the singles crown, and juniors Nina Kowalski and Laurie Navarro won the doubles title. Behind top-five finishes by sophomore Paul Babashanian (third) and senior Bryan Bustamante (tie for fourth), the men’s golf team finished in a tie for second at the PSAC Championships. The Vulcans also won the Allegheny (Pa.) Invitational. Bad weather prevented the women’s golf team from defending its 2008 PSAC championship: The state tournament will now be contested this spring. The women did win the Robert Morris Colonial Classic title this fall with freshmen Maria Lopez and Lorena Aranda leading the way by finishing fourth and fifth, respectively.

Players (from left) Rontez Miles, Shawn Anderson and Erik Harris at Fayetteville State.

Freddie Bacco races downfield.

Erin Kling was named the PSAC Women’s Cross Country Freshman of the Year after she earned all-conference honors (13th) and placed 17th overall in a field of more than 150 runners at the NCAA Division II Atlantic Regional Championships. Kling was the top finisher among all freshmen competing at both the PSAC and NCAA regional events this year. She captured her first individual title at the Penn State-Behrend Invitational in only her second college race.

The men’s soccer team was unable to repeat as conference champion, but the Vulcans did achieve a 12-7 season. Four players earned all-conference recognition, including seniors Justin Taucher, Mike Luecke and Nick Helbig, and junior goalkeeper Derek Yobbi. ■ By Bruce Wald ’85, Cal U information writer

Renata da Silva

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 29 ■


WOMEN’S SOCCER Cal U’s women’s soccer team made its initial appearance in the post-season, winning its first PSAC-West title and advancing to the PSAC semifinals before receiving the program’s first NCAA Division II tournament bid. The Vulcans then reeled off three straight victories to win the NCAA Division II Atlantic Regional before being eliminated in the national quarterfinals. The team finished with a school-best 19-6-1 overall record. A program-high five Vulcans received all-conference honors. Highlighting the individual honors were senior forward Amanda Heister and third-year head coach Al Alvine, who received the PSAC-West player and coach of the year honors, respectively.

SPORTS SHORTS

Sam Regney kicks it.

Erin Kling was named the PSAC Women’s Cross Country Freshman of the Year after she earned all-conference honors (13th) and placed 17th overall in a field of more than 150 runners at the NCAA Division II Atlantic Regional Championships. Kling was the top finisher among all freshmen competing at both the PSAC and NCAA regional events this year. She captured her first individual title at the Penn State-Behrend Invitational in only her second college race. Freshman Chris Werner was the men’s cross country team’s top finisher in the final three races, including finishing 25th of 149 runners at the NCAA Division II Atlantic Regional Championships and earning all-conference recognition with an eighth-place finish at the PSAC meet.

Freshman Niki Keno (in white) goes after the ball.

Kelsey Russo makes a play.

Sara McMullen tries a dig.

The women’s tennis team completed the fall portion of its 2009–2010 season by winning three dual matches and two impressive titles at the PSAC Individual Championships. Sophomore Alina Stanila won the singles crown, and juniors Nina Kowalski and Laurie Navarro won the doubles title. Behind top-five finishes by sophomore Paul Babashanian (third) and senior Bryan Bustamante (tie for fourth), the men’s golf team finished in a tie for second at the PSAC Championships. The Vulcans also won the Allegheny (Pa.) Invitational. Bad weather prevented the women’s golf team from defending its 2008 PSAC championship: The state tournament will now be contested this spring. The women did win the Robert Morris Colonial Classic title this fall with freshmen Maria Lopez and Lorena Aranda leading the way by finishing fourth and fifth, respectively.

VOLLEYBALL Under the direction of second-year head coach Stephanie Burner, the women’s volleyball team finished 2009 with a 36-6 overall record and won its third consecutive PSAC championship, its fourth in five years. The team also won its third straight NCAA Division II Atlantic Regional championship and made its fourth trip to the NCAA Elite Eight. Cal U went 19-0 in PSAC-West competition while compiling a 111-12 cumulative record. Senior outside hitter Joanna Nist was selected the PSAC-West Player of the Year and was one of a league-high four Vulcans tapped for All-PSAC recognition. Nist and senior setter Renata da Silva also earned Daktronics Division II Second-Team All-America honors.

The men’s soccer team was unable to repeat as conference champion, but the Vulcans did achieve a 12-7 season. Four players earned all-conference recognition, including seniors Justin Taucher, Mike Luecke and Nick Helbig, and junior goalkeeper Derek Yobbi. n By Bruce Wald ’85, Cal U information writer

Renata da Silva

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 29 n


PAYING IT F O R W A R D

PLANNED GIVING

An ally for emerging leaders

Pay it forward, and keep the income

Alumna encourages young adults to share time, talent

W

It was no surprise that James turned hat does it take to become to public service after completing her a leader? Intelligence? undergraduate program at Cal U and Perhaps. Determination? earning a master’s degree at Duquesne No doubt. Energy? Most certainly. University. Cynthia James ’02 embodies all of “Dr. Armenti had a profound influence these qualities, plus a strong spirit on me,” James says. “I think of integrity of service. as something you do when no one is As executive director of Public Allies watching. President Armenti embodies Pittsburgh, James strives to instill these that philosophy. What’s same qualities in other more, my parents were young people. As she always active in the reaches out to other community — they set a young Cal U alumni, perfect example for me.” James demonstrates Early in her career, the power of “paying it James worked for the forward” by sharing federal government. one’s time and talent. “I was bored,” she Founded in Washington, admits. “I asked myself, D.C., in 1992, Public Allies ‘What do I do for free promotes innovative on my own time?’ leadership practices that That’s when I realized meet the demands of I loved to volunteer — changing times. Its primary I think of integrity to make a difference goal is to train young as something by helping others.” people who want to step She joined the up, take responsibility you do when Coro Center for Civic and make a career out of no one is watching. Leadership, where making a difference. she was responsible for James herself is an overseeing part-time advocate of social change CYNTHIA JAMES ’02 programs. Within two through responsible months James was leadership. She had promoted to coordinate new extensive leadership experience as an partnerships with the Public Allies undergraduate at Cal U, where she held program, a job she relishes to this day. office in a variety of organizations, Every year in the Pittsburgh office, including the Student Government James and her staff seek out young, Association, Student Activities Board, diverse and dynamic individuals to Black Student Union and the University participate in intense 10-month paid Ethics Committee. apprenticeships with local nonprofit James was inducted into the Order organizations. of Omega for her service to her sorority, To date, three Cal U alumni have Zeta Phi Beta, and Cal U President participated in the program, contributing Angelo Armenti, Jr. presented her their time and talent in turn. with the Student Leadership Award.

“ ”

30 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

“At Public Allies, we believe we provide people with an opportunity to shine,” says James. “Our apprentices train hard and work hard. There’s a huge learning curve when these young men and women go into public service,” she adds. “Universities don’t usually provide experiential learning, but at Public Allies, they learn integrity and how to be accountable in a very real — and very rigorous — way.” More than 80 percent of the alumni of the national Public Allies program stay in the nonprofit sector. Some have run for public office; others are making a difference in cultural organizations, youth groups and other community organizations. According to James, working for Public Allies is an inspiration on many levels. “President Barack Obama was one of the founding board members of Public Allies,” she says, “and I actually hold the same position in Pittsburgh that Michelle Obama had in Chicago.” Although Public Allies receives federal funding through AmeriCorps, James is quick to note that the success of the Pittsburgh office is tied directly to the support it receives from Coro. Located in the same offices on the South Side of Pittsburgh, Public Allies benefits from Coro’s strengths. “Public Allies is very fortunate to have the resources, the training, the reputation of Coro behind it,” James says. ■ By Lindy Kravec, a Peters Township-based writer

A

gift that returns life-long payments to the giver is an idea often associated with wealthy philanthropists and high finance. The fact that it can be done with amounts such as $10,000 or more makes such an arrangement practical as a financial tool, as well as a way to support California University in estate planning. Cal U encourages you to do both with a Charitable Gift Annuity. Think of it like peanut butter and jelly — part charitable gift and part annuity, the combination is a delicious way to meet several goals. During the giver’s lifetime, generous payments are distributed based on age and interest factors. It is an income that: • Cannot be outlived. • Can extend to surviving spouses or heirs. • Will not fluctuate with the market. • Attractively returns a tax-free portion of principal. It is an income that appreciated securities can create, deferring taxation of capital gains. The Charitable Gift element also creates a substantial and immediate income tax advantage for the portion not returned as income.

A sampling of annuity rates appears at right. Your exact age(s) may not be shown but can be input at the Cal U website, www.calu.edu. Use the search box to reach the “calculator” on the pages for “Legacy and Planned Giving.” You also may contact Gordon Core, director of planned giving, to receive the income and deduction estimates by e-mail or U.S. mail even more conveniently. He can be reached by e-mail at core@calu.edu or by telephone at 724-938-5985. Can your next CD renewal benefit Cal U students, include these advantages and “pay it forward,” too? ■

Think of it like peanut butter and jelly — part charitable gift and part annuity.

Charitable Gift Annuity Sample rates for participant couples*

%

YOUNGER AGE

OLDER AGE

RATE

60

61– 62

4.7

62

62– 63

4.8

63

63– 68

4.9

65

66– 70

5.0

66

70– 74

5.1

68

68– 70

5.1

70

72– 75

5.3

72

73– 75

5.4

74

81– 84

5.8

76

83– 84

6.0

80

82– 83

6.3

82

85– 86

6.7

84

87– 88

7.1

*Individual rates cannot be estimated from these samples.

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 31 ■


PAYING IT F O R W A R D

PLANNED GIVING

An ally for emerging leaders

Pay it forward, and keep the income

Alumna encourages young adults to share time, talent

W

It was no surprise that James turned hat does it take to become to public service after completing her a leader? Intelligence? undergraduate program at Cal U and Perhaps. Determination? earning a master’s degree at Duquesne No doubt. Energy? Most certainly. University. Cynthia James ’02 embodies all of “Dr. Armenti had a profound influence these qualities, plus a strong spirit on me,” James says. “I think of integrity of service. as something you do when no one is As executive director of Public Allies watching. President Armenti embodies Pittsburgh, James strives to instill these that philosophy. What’s same qualities in other more, my parents were young people. As she always active in the reaches out to other community — they set a young Cal U alumni, perfect example for me.” James demonstrates Early in her career, the power of “paying it James worked for the forward” by sharing federal government. one’s time and talent. “I was bored,” she Founded in Washington, admits. “I asked myself, D.C., in 1992, Public Allies ‘What do I do for free promotes innovative on my own time?’ leadership practices that That’s when I realized meet the demands of I loved to volunteer — changing times. Its primary I think of integrity to make a difference goal is to train young as something by helping others.” people who want to step She joined the up, take responsibility you do when Coro Center for Civic and make a career out of no one is watching. Leadership, where making a difference. she was responsible for James herself is an overseeing part-time advocate of social change CYNTHIA JAMES ’02 programs. Within two through responsible months James was leadership. She had promoted to coordinate new extensive leadership experience as an partnerships with the Public Allies undergraduate at Cal U, where she held program, a job she relishes to this day. office in a variety of organizations, Every year in the Pittsburgh office, including the Student Government James and her staff seek out young, Association, Student Activities Board, diverse and dynamic individuals to Black Student Union and the University participate in intense 10-month paid Ethics Committee. apprenticeships with local nonprofit James was inducted into the Order organizations. of Omega for her service to her sorority, To date, three Cal U alumni have Zeta Phi Beta, and Cal U President participated in the program, contributing Angelo Armenti, Jr. presented her their time and talent in turn. with the Student Leadership Award.

“ ”

30 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

“At Public Allies, we believe we provide people with an opportunity to shine,” says James. “Our apprentices train hard and work hard. There’s a huge learning curve when these young men and women go into public service,” she adds. “Universities don’t usually provide experiential learning, but at Public Allies, they learn integrity and how to be accountable in a very real — and very rigorous — way.” More than 80 percent of the alumni of the national Public Allies program stay in the nonprofit sector. Some have run for public office; others are making a difference in cultural organizations, youth groups and other community organizations. According to James, working for Public Allies is an inspiration on many levels. “President Barack Obama was one of the founding board members of Public Allies,” she says, “and I actually hold the same position in Pittsburgh that Michelle Obama had in Chicago.” Although Public Allies receives federal funding through AmeriCorps, James is quick to note that the success of the Pittsburgh office is tied directly to the support it receives from Coro. Located in the same offices on the South Side of Pittsburgh, Public Allies benefits from Coro’s strengths. “Public Allies is very fortunate to have the resources, the training, the reputation of Coro behind it,” James says. ■ By Lindy Kravec, a Peters Township-based writer

A

gift that returns life-long payments to the giver is an idea often associated with wealthy philanthropists and high finance. The fact that it can be done with amounts such as $10,000 or more makes such an arrangement practical as a financial tool, as well as a way to support California University in estate planning. Cal U encourages you to do both with a Charitable Gift Annuity. Think of it like peanut butter and jelly — part charitable gift and part annuity, the combination is a delicious way to meet several goals. During the giver’s lifetime, generous payments are distributed based on age and interest factors. It is an income that: • Cannot be outlived. • Can extend to surviving spouses or heirs. • Will not fluctuate with the market. • Attractively returns a tax-free portion of principal. It is an income that appreciated securities can create, deferring taxation of capital gains. The Charitable Gift element also creates a substantial and immediate income tax advantage for the portion not returned as income.

A sampling of annuity rates appears at right. Your exact age(s) may not be shown but can be input at the Cal U website, www.calu.edu. Use the search box to reach the “calculator” on the pages for “Legacy and Planned Giving.” You also may contact Gordon Core, director of planned giving, to receive the income and deduction estimates by e-mail or U.S. mail even more conveniently. He can be reached by e-mail at core@calu.edu or by telephone at 724-938-5985. Can your next CD renewal benefit Cal U students, include these advantages and “pay it forward,” too? ■

Think of it like peanut butter and jelly — part charitable gift and part annuity.

Charitable Gift Annuity Sample rates for participant couples*

%

YOUNGER AGE

OLDER AGE

RATE

60

61– 62

4.7

62

62– 63

4.8

63

63– 68

4.9

65

66– 70

5.0

66

70– 74

5.1

68

68– 70

5.1

70

72– 75

5.3

72

73– 75

5.4

74

81– 84

5.8

76

83– 84

6.0

80

82– 83

6.3

82

85– 86

6.7

84

87– 88

7.1

*Individual rates cannot be estimated from these samples.

WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 31 ■


MILESTONES Dr. John M. Cornish II ’73, ’86,

’93 has been named executive director of Riverview Intermediate Unit 6 in Clarion, Pa.

100 CANDLES Frederick Feldman ’33 celebrated his 100th birthday on Nov. 13, 2009.

As a student at California he was captain of the basketball team; he was named to the University’s Athletic Hall of Fame in 2003. For 40 years, Feldman taught health and physical education and coached junior high basketball in the Monessen (Pa.) School District. He joined the Army in 1943 and served in European operations in England, Scotland, Belgium, France, Holland and Germany. He is a member of the American Legion, Jewish War Veterans and Veterans of Foreign Wars. Frederick has lived at the Southwestern Veterans Center in Pittsburgh, Pa., for five years.

60s James M. Mowry ’65 lives in Pass

Christian, Miss. Warren D. Ferry ’67 of Warren

D. Ferry P.C., has been named a Pennsylvania Super Lawyer for 2009 by the editors of Law & Politics Magazine. It is the second time he has received this honor. Warren is a 1973 graduate of the Duquesne University School of Law and is board certified in civil trial law. He practices throughout western Pennsylvania from his office in Butler, Pa. He and his wife, Marion Laffey, live in Butler. Peggy Woods Thomas ’68 is a

teacher and lives in Pittsburgh, Pa.

70s

of substance abuse services for Alternative Care. She and her husband, James, live in Raeford, N.C. Rosemary Novotny ’78 of

Smithfield, Pa., won the Fayette County (Pa.) Chamber of Commerce Educator of the Year Award for the Albert Gallatin School District.

Robert Wargo ’95 is living in

Bridgeville, Pa.

Mark Stubblefield ’01 is returning

Joe Szejk ’95 is a vice president for

to Burlington, Iowa, as the athletic trainer for the Burlington Bees, a Class A affiliate of the Kansas City Royals. Before taking this position, he spent one year each with teams in Burlington and Wilmington, both in North Carolina.

live in Scottdale, Pa.

enrollment services and marketing for the College of Saint Mary. He and his wife, Brandy Hustava Szejk ’95, live in Omaha, Neb.

David “Coach” Wilson ’78 was

named Educator of the Year by the Juvenile Detention Centers Association of Pennsylvania. He is a gym teacher at Allegheny Intermediate Unit’s Shuman Center School. He lives on the North Side of Pittsburgh, Pa. He is married with three children.

80s

his position with the Northern Arapaho Tribe. He and his wife, Pixie, live in Lander, Wyo.

Joel C. Folman ’80, ’81, a water pollution biologist for the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, has been recognized by Cambridge Who’s Who for demonstrating dedication, leadership and excellence in stream restoration. Joel, who majored in environmental science at Cal U, has six years of experience as a water pollution biologist and 18 years of service as a surface mine conservation inspector for the DEP. Cambridge Who’s Who is an exclusive membership organization that recognizes and empowers executives, professionals and entrepreneurs throughout the world. Every major industry is represented by its 400,000 active members.

Jeff Choura ’75 has been

Janet Fleischer Rahimi-Pugliesi ’82

re-elected to the Chartiers Valley (Pa.) School Board. He has been on the board for 25 years.

is employed in the social work field and lives in Baltimore, Md.

William L. Ashton ’71 has been

appointed to the board of directors of Sucampo Pharmaceuticals. He is the founding dean of the Mayes College of Healthcare Business and Policy at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, Pa. He also serves on the boards of Neogenix Oncology, a privately held company; the National Osteoporosis Foundation; and Friends of the National Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health. Charlie Burns ’71 is a teacher.

He lives in Wyoming, Pa. Bruce Kline ’73 is retired from

John H. Allen Jr. ’77 has been

named chief information officer for Holzer Consolidated Health Systems, based in Gallipolis, Ohio. Prior to joining HCHS, he was the chief information officer at Memorial Health Care System in Fremont, Ohio. 32 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

Karen Majernik Clawson ’82 is teaching science at Wellington High School in Palm Beach County, Fla. Her husband, Larry, was named principal at Palm Beach Gardens this past September. The Clawsons have been living in Lake Worth, Fla., since 1989. They have two teenage children: Corey

is a sophomore at the University of Florida-Gainesville, and Mia is a junior at Park Vista High School.

is a teacher in the Acton Boxborough Regional School District. She and her husband, George ’68, live in Shrewsbury, Mass.

Robert Rudge ’83 is at home in

Brian Brooks ’96 is a teacher

Bethel Park, Pa.

who lives in Ridge, N.Y. He played football while at Cal U.

Jean Wurdeman ’83 is the new

chief financial officer of ChappellRoberts in Tampa, Fla. She will manage the company’s finance, administration and operations teams. She also will handle all aspects of financial reporting, business analysis and agency forecasting. Previously, she was CFO for Pegasus Transtech in Tampa.

Dr. Wendy Redmond ’96 has been

named the new health commissioner of the Coshocton (Ohio) City Health Department. She lives near West Lafayette, Ohio, with her husband and three children. Jeffrey E. Solomon ’97 has

manager for Possibilities Counseling Services. She and her husband, Burr, live in Bernard, Maine.

been elected principal of South Allegheny (Pa.) High School. He is currently principal at the district’s middle school, a position he has held since 2006. He is enrolled in the Superintendent Letter of Eligibility program at Cal U. He and his wife, Nicole, have a daughter, Giavanna, and are expecting another.

Sister Ellen McClure ’86 has been

Michael Allen ’97 is teaching at

Daniel Gabler ’70, ’84 is a retired

U.S. Air Force officer. He and his wife, Elaine, live in Burgettstown, Pa. Jennifer Hare Shaw ’85 is a case

Kent State University in Ohio as a research assistant while pursuing his doctorate.

named vice president of mission integration by Kenmore Mercy Hospital in Kenmore, N.Y. Sister Ellen is responsible for the mission, ethics, spiritual care and community benefit functions of the organization and in promoting and integrating the mission, vision and values of daily life in the hospital.

Joseph Augustine ’98 is a prevention specialist with the Fayette County (Pa.) Drug and Alcohol Commission Inc. He and his wife, Amy ’02, live in California, Pa.

James Coode ’88 is an attorney

William Bates ’98 was elected

in the law office of James Martin Coode. He and his wife, Tia, live in Martinsburg, W.Va.

the new principal of Herndon High School, in Virginia. He had been the assistant principal at the school since 2007.

Charles Geyer ’89, the principal at Connellsville Junior High East, was recently honored by the Fayette County (Pa.) Chamber of Commerce as an Educator of the Year.

90s Kyle Tate ’92 is a U.S. Air Force

officer. He lives in San Antonio, Texas. Thomas D. McCracken ’93 lives in Martinez, Ga., with his wife, Jill. David ’93 and Juliann Krobert Sepesy ’92 are at home in

Robinson Township, Pa.

Alan Petko ’01, ’03 is in the

multimedia technology field for Penn State Hershey Medical Center. He and his wife, Jessica ’02, reside in Hummelstown, Pa.

Mark ’94 and Christine Sipos ’94

Denise Whitehead Roadman ’96 Deborah Greig Fike ’77 is director

00s

Cpt. James Tyrpin ’98 has retired

from the U.S. Army. He lives in Scenery Hill, Pa., with his wife, Patricia, who is a major in the Army and is serving in Kuwait. Monica Sullivan ’99 is retiring as

principal of Plymouth Whitemarsh High School, in Plymouth Meeting, Pa., part of the Colonial School District outside of Philadelphia. She joined the district in the 2002–2003 school year. Prior to joining Colonial, Sullivan served more than three years as principal at Mt. Lebanon (Pa.) High School, near Pittsburgh.

Allison Leslie Frye ’02 is a dental assistant with Dr. James Ramsay. She and her husband, Patrick, live in Greensburg, Pa. Rebecca Babilya Frank ’02 is an

art teacher at Jefferson-Morgan Elementary School. She and her husband, Frank ’05, live in Rices Landing, Pa. Matthew Pitzarella ’02, director

of public affairs for Range Resources Corp., received the Edward J. DeVoge Horizon Award from the Washington County Chamber of Commerce for leadership in the business community and commitment to Washington County. Wesley Cates ’02 is a running back

with the Saskatchewan Roughriders of the CFL, the Canadian Football League. The team recently lost to the Montreal Alouettes in the Grey Cup, the league’s championship game. Corey Francis ’04 is an accountant

with Manheim Auto Auctions. Corey resides in Roswell, Ga. Erin Delfert Hosfield ’05 is a

tattoo artist for Kyklops Tattoo. She and her husband, James, live in Pittsburgh, Pa. William Lamar ’05, ’07 is an

audio-visual technician at the Community College of Allegheny County-South Campus. He and his wife, Lauren Horner Lamar ’07, live in Pittsburgh, Pa. Lauren is a receptionist/front officer manager at Carnegie Mellon University. Robert Tarpey ’05 has been

named the athletic trainer for the New Hampshire Fisher Cats, the Double-A affiliate of the Toronto Blue Jays of Major League Baseball. Travis Lewis ’06 is a physician’s

assistant/athletic trainer. He lives in Butler, Pa., with his wife, Tanya. Jarred Lynn Burns ’06 is a detective in the special investigations unit of the Bloomington (Ind.) Police Department.

Scott Bryer ’06 is the new principal at Donegal and Norvelt elementary schools in the Mt. Pleasant Area School District. He lives in Rostraver Township, Pa., with his wife and three sons. Christine ’07 and Adam Cox ’08

live in Charleroi, Pa. Christine is a medical assistant for Valley Women’s Health. Sandra J. Henry ’07 works for

Aetna and lives in Washington, Pa. Jody Rutten ’07 of Carrollton, Ohio, works in the area of outdoor education with the Ohio FFA Camp Muskingum. Arlene Buchowski DiFiore ’07 is a special education teacher with the Agora Cyber Charter School. She and her husband, Paul, live in Pittsburgh, Pa. Yvonne Lyon ’07 is a caseworker for Washington County Children and Youth Services. She lives in Washington, Pa. Nathan Galiyas ’07 is a teacher in the Montour School District. He lives in McKees Rocks, Pa. Mindi D’Auria ’07 is an athletic trainer at Chestnut Hill College. She lives in Philadelphia, Pa. Thomas Shultz ’08 is a teacher

Eric Chessen ’08, founder of

William Gehrlein ’05 and Jennifer

Autism Fitness, Long Island, N.Y., recently spoke at a conference in Cranberry Township, Pa., sponsored by ABOARD, an autism advocacy and educational group. Eric has built a physical education program for children on the autism spectrum that focuses on five basic movements to help them maintain their strengths and overcome their deficits.

Morton were married July 10, 2009, in Canonsburg, Pa. William is a social studies and language arts teacher at Boyce Middle School in the Upper St. Clair School District. Jennifer is human resources manager at Associates in Rehabilitation Management Inc. in Green Tree, Pa.

Doug Harrison ’08 of Winter Park,

Fla., is a student at Full Sail University. He is pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree in recording arts and would like to pursue a career in the fields of entertainment and business communications. He has an associate degree in recording arts from Full Sail University and an Associate of Science degree from Cal U. Josh Clair ’08 lives in Ephrata, Pa. Matt Antoine ’09 has received the Men’s Skeleton Athlete of the Year, Men’s Skeleton Athlete Choice Award and Skeleton Rookie of the Year at a recent gala hosted by the U.S. Bobsled and Skeleton Federation. He is the No. 1-ranked member of Team USA and is ranked eighth in the world in the downhill sledding sport. Melissa Woy ’09 lives in

in the Connellsville Area School District. He lives in Jefferson Hills, Pa.

Meyersdale, Pa.

Fame Frezzell ’08 lives in Lemont

Bryan Herber ’09 is at home

Furnace, Pa. Steve Zurbach ’08 is a technology education teacher in the North Allegheny School District. He lives in Pittsburgh, Pa. Nadine Hawk ’08 is a data

processing coordinator for DeSales University. She lives in Bethlehem, Pa. Kevin McKiernan ’08 has been hired as assistant principal at West Allegheny (Pa.) High School. For the past seven years, he has been a social studies teacher in the Northgate (Pa.) School District, where he also serves as high school basketball coach. Ethan Turon ’08 is the manager and main designer at Hundred Acres Manor, a haunted house in South Park, Pa. Michael Allen ’08 is a graduate student at Kent State University in Ohio. He was appointed as a research assistant last year and has been assigned to teach two physical geography classes this academic year.

in New Stanton, Pa. Christopher Lee ’09 resides

in Point Marion, Pa. Melissa Rife ’09 lives in

Roscoe, Pa.

MARRIAGES Jeffrey Patrick Smith ’00 and Heidi Renee Hawk were united in marriage May 2, 2009 in Clarion, Pa. The bride is a certified court stenographer for Adelman Reporters in Gibsonia. The groom has a bachelor’s degree in elementary education and is working toward his master’s degree. He is employed as a Title I math teacher for PA Leadership Charter School in Harmar. The couple resides in Aspinwall, Pa. Thomas Stimaker Jr. ’00 and Nicole Skrimcovsky were married July 18, 2009 in Fredericksburg, Va. Thomas is a sixth-grade science teacher in the King George School District. Nicole is a morning show co-host and news anchor with WFLS radio. The couple lives in Fredericksburg, Va.

Mark A. Medve ’05 and Pamela

Calabrese ’05 were married June 20, 2009, in Washington, Pa. The groom is employed by Consol Energy at Bailey Mine. The bride is pursuing a master’s degree in education with elementary certification. The couple lives in Daisytown, Pa. Kenneth Perkins ’05 and Sara

Ponteous of St. Cloud, Fla., were married June 20, 2009, in McClellandtown (Pa.) The bride is employed at Valencia Community College in Kissimmee, Fla. The groom works for the St. Cloud Middle School. Nicholas Weightman ’07 and

Erin Flaherty were married July 3, 2009, in Penn Hills, Pa. Nicholas is an assistant store manager with Walmart in Parkersburg, W.Va. The couple lives in Belpre, Ohio. Jeremy Cummings ’09 and Michelle Tabaj ’00 were married

Dec. 31, 2008. The groom is a registered nurse with Excela Health. The bride is a social worker. They live in Dunbar Township, Pa. Ashley Gardner ’07 of Vanderbilt,

Pa., and Michael Goodman of New Stanton, Pa., were married Oct. 17, 2009. Ashley is employed in sales with Image Time. Michael is a plant operator with the Unity Township Municipal Authority. The couple lives in New Stanton. Bethany Childs ’07 and Liam Kelly ’07 were united marriage

on July 18, 2009. Bethany is a marketing manager for Platinum Brands, Inc., and Liam is a project engineer for Atlantic Builder Group. The couple is living in Baltimore, Md. Nicholas Weightman ’07 and Erin

Flaherty were united marriage on July 3, 2009, in Penn Hills. They live in Belpre, Ohio. Emily S. Jones ’08 and Bradley

D. Martin were married Oct. 10, 2009 in Montoursville, Pa. Emily works for Lycoming Physical Therapy, Montoursville. Bradley works for Dan Gardner Construction, Hughesville. Following a trip to Cocoa Beach, Fla., they are living in Muncy, Pa. WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 33 ■


MILESTONES Dr. John M. Cornish II ’73, ’86,

’93 has been named executive director of Riverview Intermediate Unit 6 in Clarion, Pa.

100 CANDLES Frederick Feldman ’33 celebrated his 100th birthday on Nov. 13, 2009.

As a student at California he was captain of the basketball team; he was named to the University’s Athletic Hall of Fame in 2003. For 40 years, Feldman taught health and physical education and coached junior high basketball in the Monessen (Pa.) School District. He joined the Army in 1943 and served in European operations in England, Scotland, Belgium, France, Holland and Germany. He is a member of the American Legion, Jewish War Veterans and Veterans of Foreign Wars. Frederick has lived at the Southwestern Veterans Center in Pittsburgh, Pa., for five years.

60s James M. Mowry ’65 lives in Pass

Christian, Miss. Warren D. Ferry ’67 of Warren

D. Ferry P.C., has been named a Pennsylvania Super Lawyer for 2009 by the editors of Law & Politics Magazine. It is the second time he has received this honor. Warren is a 1973 graduate of the Duquesne University School of Law and is board certified in civil trial law. He practices throughout western Pennsylvania from his office in Butler, Pa. He and his wife, Marion Laffey, live in Butler. Peggy Woods Thomas ’68 is a

teacher and lives in Pittsburgh, Pa.

70s

of substance abuse services for Alternative Care. She and her husband, James, live in Raeford, N.C. Rosemary Novotny ’78 of

Smithfield, Pa., won the Fayette County (Pa.) Chamber of Commerce Educator of the Year Award for the Albert Gallatin School District.

Robert Wargo ’95 is living in

Bridgeville, Pa.

Mark Stubblefield ’01 is returning

Joe Szejk ’95 is a vice president for

to Burlington, Iowa, as the athletic trainer for the Burlington Bees, a Class A affiliate of the Kansas City Royals. Before taking this position, he spent one year each with teams in Burlington and Wilmington, both in North Carolina.

live in Scottdale, Pa.

enrollment services and marketing for the College of Saint Mary. He and his wife, Brandy Hustava Szejk ’95, live in Omaha, Neb.

David “Coach” Wilson ’78 was

named Educator of the Year by the Juvenile Detention Centers Association of Pennsylvania. He is a gym teacher at Allegheny Intermediate Unit’s Shuman Center School. He lives on the North Side of Pittsburgh, Pa. He is married with three children.

80s

his position with the Northern Arapaho Tribe. He and his wife, Pixie, live in Lander, Wyo.

Joel C. Folman ’80, ’81, a water pollution biologist for the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, has been recognized by Cambridge Who’s Who for demonstrating dedication, leadership and excellence in stream restoration. Joel, who majored in environmental science at Cal U, has six years of experience as a water pollution biologist and 18 years of service as a surface mine conservation inspector for the DEP. Cambridge Who’s Who is an exclusive membership organization that recognizes and empowers executives, professionals and entrepreneurs throughout the world. Every major industry is represented by its 400,000 active members.

Jeff Choura ’75 has been

Janet Fleischer Rahimi-Pugliesi ’82

re-elected to the Chartiers Valley (Pa.) School Board. He has been on the board for 25 years.

is employed in the social work field and lives in Baltimore, Md.

William L. Ashton ’71 has been

appointed to the board of directors of Sucampo Pharmaceuticals. He is the founding dean of the Mayes College of Healthcare Business and Policy at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, Pa. He also serves on the boards of Neogenix Oncology, a privately held company; the National Osteoporosis Foundation; and Friends of the National Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health. Charlie Burns ’71 is a teacher.

He lives in Wyoming, Pa. Bruce Kline ’73 is retired from

John H. Allen Jr. ’77 has been

named chief information officer for Holzer Consolidated Health Systems, based in Gallipolis, Ohio. Prior to joining HCHS, he was the chief information officer at Memorial Health Care System in Fremont, Ohio. 32 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■

Karen Majernik Clawson ’82 is teaching science at Wellington High School in Palm Beach County, Fla. Her husband, Larry, was named principal at Palm Beach Gardens this past September. The Clawsons have been living in Lake Worth, Fla., since 1989. They have two teenage children: Corey

is a sophomore at the University of Florida-Gainesville, and Mia is a junior at Park Vista High School.

is a teacher in the Acton Boxborough Regional School District. She and her husband, George ’68, live in Shrewsbury, Mass.

Robert Rudge ’83 is at home in

Brian Brooks ’96 is a teacher

Bethel Park, Pa.

who lives in Ridge, N.Y. He played football while at Cal U.

Jean Wurdeman ’83 is the new

chief financial officer of ChappellRoberts in Tampa, Fla. She will manage the company’s finance, administration and operations teams. She also will handle all aspects of financial reporting, business analysis and agency forecasting. Previously, she was CFO for Pegasus Transtech in Tampa.

Dr. Wendy Redmond ’96 has been

named the new health commissioner of the Coshocton (Ohio) City Health Department. She lives near West Lafayette, Ohio, with her husband and three children. Jeffrey E. Solomon ’97 has

manager for Possibilities Counseling Services. She and her husband, Burr, live in Bernard, Maine.

been elected principal of South Allegheny (Pa.) High School. He is currently principal at the district’s middle school, a position he has held since 2006. He is enrolled in the Superintendent Letter of Eligibility program at Cal U. He and his wife, Nicole, have a daughter, Giavanna, and are expecting another.

Sister Ellen McClure ’86 has been

Michael Allen ’97 is teaching at

Daniel Gabler ’70, ’84 is a retired

U.S. Air Force officer. He and his wife, Elaine, live in Burgettstown, Pa. Jennifer Hare Shaw ’85 is a case

Kent State University in Ohio as a research assistant while pursuing his doctorate.

named vice president of mission integration by Kenmore Mercy Hospital in Kenmore, N.Y. Sister Ellen is responsible for the mission, ethics, spiritual care and community benefit functions of the organization and in promoting and integrating the mission, vision and values of daily life in the hospital.

Joseph Augustine ’98 is a prevention specialist with the Fayette County (Pa.) Drug and Alcohol Commission Inc. He and his wife, Amy ’02, live in California, Pa.

James Coode ’88 is an attorney

William Bates ’98 was elected

in the law office of James Martin Coode. He and his wife, Tia, live in Martinsburg, W.Va.

the new principal of Herndon High School, in Virginia. He had been the assistant principal at the school since 2007.

Charles Geyer ’89, the principal at Connellsville Junior High East, was recently honored by the Fayette County (Pa.) Chamber of Commerce as an Educator of the Year.

90s Kyle Tate ’92 is a U.S. Air Force

officer. He lives in San Antonio, Texas. Thomas D. McCracken ’93 lives in Martinez, Ga., with his wife, Jill. David ’93 and Juliann Krobert Sepesy ’92 are at home in

Robinson Township, Pa.

Alan Petko ’01, ’03 is in the

multimedia technology field for Penn State Hershey Medical Center. He and his wife, Jessica ’02, reside in Hummelstown, Pa.

Mark ’94 and Christine Sipos ’94

Denise Whitehead Roadman ’96 Deborah Greig Fike ’77 is director

00s

Cpt. James Tyrpin ’98 has retired

from the U.S. Army. He lives in Scenery Hill, Pa., with his wife, Patricia, who is a major in the Army and is serving in Kuwait. Monica Sullivan ’99 is retiring as

principal of Plymouth Whitemarsh High School, in Plymouth Meeting, Pa., part of the Colonial School District outside of Philadelphia. She joined the district in the 2002–2003 school year. Prior to joining Colonial, Sullivan served more than three years as principal at Mt. Lebanon (Pa.) High School, near Pittsburgh.

Allison Leslie Frye ’02 is a dental assistant with Dr. James Ramsay. She and her husband, Patrick, live in Greensburg, Pa. Rebecca Babilya Frank ’02 is an

art teacher at Jefferson-Morgan Elementary School. She and her husband, Frank ’05, live in Rices Landing, Pa. Matthew Pitzarella ’02, director

of public affairs for Range Resources Corp., received the Edward J. DeVoge Horizon Award from the Washington County Chamber of Commerce for leadership in the business community and commitment to Washington County. Wesley Cates ’02 is a running back

with the Saskatchewan Roughriders of the CFL, the Canadian Football League. The team recently lost to the Montreal Alouettes in the Grey Cup, the league’s championship game. Corey Francis ’04 is an accountant

with Manheim Auto Auctions. Corey resides in Roswell, Ga. Erin Delfert Hosfield ’05 is a

tattoo artist for Kyklops Tattoo. She and her husband, James, live in Pittsburgh, Pa. William Lamar ’05, ’07 is an

audio-visual technician at the Community College of Allegheny County-South Campus. He and his wife, Lauren Horner Lamar ’07, live in Pittsburgh, Pa. Lauren is a receptionist/front officer manager at Carnegie Mellon University. Robert Tarpey ’05 has been

named the athletic trainer for the New Hampshire Fisher Cats, the Double-A affiliate of the Toronto Blue Jays of Major League Baseball. Travis Lewis ’06 is a physician’s

assistant/athletic trainer. He lives in Butler, Pa., with his wife, Tanya. Jarred Lynn Burns ’06 is a detective in the special investigations unit of the Bloomington (Ind.) Police Department.

Scott Bryer ’06 is the new principal at Donegal and Norvelt elementary schools in the Mt. Pleasant Area School District. He lives in Rostraver Township, Pa., with his wife and three sons. Christine ’07 and Adam Cox ’08

live in Charleroi, Pa. Christine is a medical assistant for Valley Women’s Health. Sandra J. Henry ’07 works for

Aetna and lives in Washington, Pa. Jody Rutten ’07 of Carrollton, Ohio, works in the area of outdoor education with the Ohio FFA Camp Muskingum. Arlene Buchowski DiFiore ’07 is a special education teacher with the Agora Cyber Charter School. She and her husband, Paul, live in Pittsburgh, Pa. Yvonne Lyon ’07 is a caseworker for Washington County Children and Youth Services. She lives in Washington, Pa. Nathan Galiyas ’07 is a teacher in the Montour School District. He lives in McKees Rocks, Pa. Mindi D’Auria ’07 is an athletic trainer at Chestnut Hill College. She lives in Philadelphia, Pa. Thomas Shultz ’08 is a teacher

Eric Chessen ’08, founder of

William Gehrlein ’05 and Jennifer

Autism Fitness, Long Island, N.Y., recently spoke at a conference in Cranberry Township, Pa., sponsored by ABOARD, an autism advocacy and educational group. Eric has built a physical education program for children on the autism spectrum that focuses on five basic movements to help them maintain their strengths and overcome their deficits.

Morton were married July 10, 2009, in Canonsburg, Pa. William is a social studies and language arts teacher at Boyce Middle School in the Upper St. Clair School District. Jennifer is human resources manager at Associates in Rehabilitation Management Inc. in Green Tree, Pa.

Doug Harrison ’08 of Winter Park,

Fla., is a student at Full Sail University. He is pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree in recording arts and would like to pursue a career in the fields of entertainment and business communications. He has an associate degree in recording arts from Full Sail University and an Associate of Science degree from Cal U. Josh Clair ’08 lives in Ephrata, Pa. Matt Antoine ’09 has received the Men’s Skeleton Athlete of the Year, Men’s Skeleton Athlete Choice Award and Skeleton Rookie of the Year at a recent gala hosted by the U.S. Bobsled and Skeleton Federation. He is the No. 1-ranked member of Team USA and is ranked eighth in the world in the downhill sledding sport. Melissa Woy ’09 lives in

in the Connellsville Area School District. He lives in Jefferson Hills, Pa.

Meyersdale, Pa.

Fame Frezzell ’08 lives in Lemont

Bryan Herber ’09 is at home

Furnace, Pa. Steve Zurbach ’08 is a technology education teacher in the North Allegheny School District. He lives in Pittsburgh, Pa. Nadine Hawk ’08 is a data

processing coordinator for DeSales University. She lives in Bethlehem, Pa. Kevin McKiernan ’08 has been hired as assistant principal at West Allegheny (Pa.) High School. For the past seven years, he has been a social studies teacher in the Northgate (Pa.) School District, where he also serves as high school basketball coach. Ethan Turon ’08 is the manager and main designer at Hundred Acres Manor, a haunted house in South Park, Pa. Michael Allen ’08 is a graduate student at Kent State University in Ohio. He was appointed as a research assistant last year and has been assigned to teach two physical geography classes this academic year.

in New Stanton, Pa. Christopher Lee ’09 resides

in Point Marion, Pa. Melissa Rife ’09 lives in

Roscoe, Pa.

MARRIAGES Jeffrey Patrick Smith ’00 and Heidi Renee Hawk were united in marriage May 2, 2009 in Clarion, Pa. The bride is a certified court stenographer for Adelman Reporters in Gibsonia. The groom has a bachelor’s degree in elementary education and is working toward his master’s degree. He is employed as a Title I math teacher for PA Leadership Charter School in Harmar. The couple resides in Aspinwall, Pa. Thomas Stimaker Jr. ’00 and Nicole Skrimcovsky were married July 18, 2009 in Fredericksburg, Va. Thomas is a sixth-grade science teacher in the King George School District. Nicole is a morning show co-host and news anchor with WFLS radio. The couple lives in Fredericksburg, Va.

Mark A. Medve ’05 and Pamela

Calabrese ’05 were married June 20, 2009, in Washington, Pa. The groom is employed by Consol Energy at Bailey Mine. The bride is pursuing a master’s degree in education with elementary certification. The couple lives in Daisytown, Pa. Kenneth Perkins ’05 and Sara

Ponteous of St. Cloud, Fla., were married June 20, 2009, in McClellandtown (Pa.) The bride is employed at Valencia Community College in Kissimmee, Fla. The groom works for the St. Cloud Middle School. Nicholas Weightman ’07 and

Erin Flaherty were married July 3, 2009, in Penn Hills, Pa. Nicholas is an assistant store manager with Walmart in Parkersburg, W.Va. The couple lives in Belpre, Ohio. Jeremy Cummings ’09 and Michelle Tabaj ’00 were married

Dec. 31, 2008. The groom is a registered nurse with Excela Health. The bride is a social worker. They live in Dunbar Township, Pa. Ashley Gardner ’07 of Vanderbilt,

Pa., and Michael Goodman of New Stanton, Pa., were married Oct. 17, 2009. Ashley is employed in sales with Image Time. Michael is a plant operator with the Unity Township Municipal Authority. The couple lives in New Stanton. Bethany Childs ’07 and Liam Kelly ’07 were united marriage

on July 18, 2009. Bethany is a marketing manager for Platinum Brands, Inc., and Liam is a project engineer for Atlantic Builder Group. The couple is living in Baltimore, Md. Nicholas Weightman ’07 and Erin

Flaherty were united marriage on July 3, 2009, in Penn Hills. They live in Belpre, Ohio. Emily S. Jones ’08 and Bradley

D. Martin were married Oct. 10, 2009 in Montoursville, Pa. Emily works for Lycoming Physical Therapy, Montoursville. Bradley works for Dan Gardner Construction, Hughesville. Following a trip to Cocoa Beach, Fla., they are living in Muncy, Pa. WINTER 2010 CAL U REVIEW 33 ■


MILESTONES

continued from page 33

ENGAGEMENTS Daniel Schomer ’93 and Jessica Custer are engaged to be married. Daniel is an electronics technician for Sony, near Mt. Pleasant, Pa. Jessica is an office manager for Beer, Ream & Co. P.C. of Somerset, Pa. An April 2010 wedding is being planned. Carissa Knouse ’01 and Jason Colangelo are planning a July 2010 wedding. Carissa is a physical therapist assistant/athletic trainer with Medstar Health, National Rehabilitation Hospital Outpatient Regional Rehab in Baltimore, Md. Jason is a computer technician for Harford County Public Schools and the head women’s volleyball coach at Harford Community College, both in Bel Air, Md. Kira Maffeo ’02 and Drew Billow have announced their engagement. Kira is a kindergarten teacher in Phoenix, Ariz. Drew is an assistant golf professional at Moon Valley Country Club in Phoenix. The couple is planning a June 2010 wedding in Scottsdale, Ariz. Gregory Lee Nestor ’06 and

Amy Jo Wheeler are planning a May 2010 wedding. Gregory is employed at WTOV-TV in Steubenville, Ohio, as a production technician. Amy

JUST THE

FAX NAME

is an admitting and registration clerk at Ohio Valley Medical Center in Wheeling, W.Va. Amber Kearns ’06 and Daryl

Lamoreau are engaged to be married in September 2010. Amber is an administrative assistant for Trumball Corp. Jimmy Tucker ’09 and Emily Karcher are engaged to be married. Jimmy is a social studies teacher at Trinity High School in Washington, Pa. Emily is a physician’s assistant at Family Practice in Boswell, Pa. They are planning a June 2010 wedding.

ANNIVERSARIES Debbie Shartzer Johnston ’02 and her husband, Thomas, celebrated their four-year anniversary on Oct. 8, 2009, with a trip to the Inner Harbor in Baltimore, Md.

approximately 1 minute before the kickoff of the Pittsburgh Steelers’ sixth Super Bowl win. Georgia is named after every relative who has attended Cal U except her great-grandma Rapp, who owned the Newsstand. Georgia is the granddaughter of Betty Jean Roberts Roadman ’67 and the late and former president of Cal U, Dr. George H. Roadman. She is also greatgranddaughter to the late and former Music Department chair, Dr. William L. Dovenspike. Gina Zelina ’00 and Chuck Michael ’02, ’07 announce the birth of their daughter, Amelia Maree, born on September 3, 2009. The family resides in Mather, Pa. Shaun ’01 and Kathryn Geubtner Martinec ’00, ’01

BIRTHS George W. ’68

and Denise Whitehead Roadman ’96 and

big brother Grady are excited to announce the birth of Georgia Emmijean Helene Anne Roadman. She was born on Feb. 1, 2009,

announce the birth of their son, Lane Shaun, on July 30, 2009. He joins twin sisters Ava and Sophia, 2. The family lives in Pittsburgh, Pa. Shaun owns two online businesses, and Kathryn is a stay-at-home mom.

IN MEMORIUM Marlene Dubois Anderson (staff) Mitchell M. Bailey Sr. ’53 Melissa Ann Spudich Baker ’06 Adolph Barczuk ’50 Bruce A. Bartolotta ’76 William “Bill” Christy ’67 Mary Jean Cicconi ’53 (professor emerita) Marilynn Bartoletti Comet ’63 Deborah DeMarco ’73 James C. Dolnack ’61 James R. Frederick ’37 Elaine Campbell Heckler ’61 Walter R. Kline ’68 Raymond T. Kyle (maintenance staff) Alvera Litsky ’55 Emily Galuppo Maykovich ’31 John McCloskey ’39 Jean Santariello Mene ’64 Darlene Shaffer Phillips ’85 Helen McShane Riva ’27 William E. Sargent ’53 Lorraine Siegel ’74 Andrew F. Timko Jr. ’58 Michael E. Vayansky ’63 Jean Ellen Underwood Zemany ’40

Send your Milestones news or address changes by fax to 724-938-5932, by mail to Alumni Relations, P.O. Box 668, California, PA 15419, or by e-mail to alumni@calu.edu. Questions? Call 724-938-4418.

MAIDEN NAME

CLASS YEAR

PHONE

E-MAIL ADDRESS

MAY WE LIST YOUR E-MAIL ON OUR WEB SITE?

OCCUPATION

EMPLOYER

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Information will be published as space and deadlines allow. Please indicate on another sheet what activities or sports you participated in while you were a student. We welcome photographs. Please do not send computer printouts or low resolution digital photos, as they will not reproduce well in this magazine.

Stay connected to the Cal U Alumni Association’s online community! Your personal ID number is on this magazine’s mailing label.

34 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■


MILESTONES

continued from page 33

ENGAGEMENTS Daniel Schomer ’93 and Jessica Custer are engaged to be married. Daniel is an electronics technician for Sony, near Mt. Pleasant, Pa. Jessica is an office manager for Beer, Ream & Co. P.C. of Somerset, Pa. An April 2010 wedding is being planned. Carissa Knouse ’01 and Jason Colangelo are planning a July 2010 wedding. Carissa is a physical therapist assistant/athletic trainer with Medstar Health, National Rehabilitation Hospital Outpatient Regional Rehab in Baltimore, Md. Jason is a computer technician for Harford County Public Schools and the head women’s volleyball coach at Harford Community College, both in Bel Air, Md. Kira Maffeo ’02 and Drew Billow have announced their engagement. Kira is a kindergarten teacher in Phoenix, Ariz. Drew is an assistant golf professional at Moon Valley Country Club in Phoenix. The couple is planning a June 2010 wedding in Scottsdale, Ariz. Gregory Lee Nestor ’06 and

Amy Jo Wheeler are planning a May 2010 wedding. Gregory is employed at WTOV-TV in Steubenville, Ohio, as a production technician. Amy

JUST THE

FAX NAME

is an admitting and registration clerk at Ohio Valley Medical Center in Wheeling, W.Va. Amber Kearns ’06 and Daryl

Lamoreau are engaged to be married in September 2010. Amber is an administrative assistant for Trumball Corp. Jimmy Tucker ’09 and Emily Karcher are engaged to be married. Jimmy is a social studies teacher at Trinity High School in Washington, Pa. Emily is a physician’s assistant at Family Practice in Boswell, Pa. They are planning a June 2010 wedding.

ANNIVERSARIES Debbie Shartzer Johnston ’02 and her husband, Thomas, celebrated their four-year anniversary on Oct. 8, 2009, with a trip to the Inner Harbor in Baltimore, Md.

approximately 1 minute before the kickoff of the Pittsburgh Steelers’ sixth Super Bowl win. Georgia is named after every relative who has attended Cal U except her great-grandma Rapp, who owned the Newsstand. Georgia is the granddaughter of Betty Jean Roberts Roadman ’67 and the late and former president of Cal U, Dr. George H. Roadman. She is also greatgranddaughter to the late and former Music Department chair, Dr. William L. Dovenspike. Gina Zelina ’00 and Chuck Michael ’02, ’07 announce the birth of their daughter, Amelia Maree, born on September 3, 2009. The family resides in Mather, Pa. Shaun ’01 and Kathryn Geubtner Martinec ’00, ’01

BIRTHS George W. ’68

and Denise Whitehead Roadman ’96 and

big brother Grady are excited to announce the birth of Georgia Emmijean Helene Anne Roadman. She was born on Feb. 1, 2009,

announce the birth of their son, Lane Shaun, on July 30, 2009. He joins twin sisters Ava and Sophia, 2. The family lives in Pittsburgh, Pa. Shaun owns two online businesses, and Kathryn is a stay-at-home mom.

IN MEMORIUM Marlene Dubois Anderson (staff) Mitchell M. Bailey Sr. ’53 Melissa Ann Spudich Baker ’06 Adolph Barczuk ’50 Bruce A. Bartolotta ’76 William “Bill” Christy ’67 Mary Jean Cicconi ’53 (professor emerita) Marilynn Bartoletti Comet ’63 Deborah DeMarco ’73 James C. Dolnack ’61 James R. Frederick ’37 Elaine Campbell Heckler ’61 Walter R. Kline ’68 Raymond T. Kyle (maintenance staff) Alvera Litsky ’55 Emily Galuppo Maykovich ’31 John McCloskey ’39 Jean Santariello Mene ’64 Darlene Shaffer Phillips ’85 Helen McShane Riva ’27 William E. Sargent ’53 Lorraine Siegel ’74 Andrew F. Timko Jr. ’58 Michael E. Vayansky ’63 Jean Ellen Underwood Zemany ’40

Send your Milestones news or address changes by fax to 724-938-5932, by mail to Alumni Relations, P.O. Box 668, California, PA 15419, or by e-mail to alumni@calu.edu. Questions? Call 724-938-4418.

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34 CAL U REVIEW WINTER 2010 ■


WINTER

2010

CALU REVIEW

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At dusk the Booker Towers take on a dramatic appearance as they mark the entrance to Cal U. Nearby, the granite column of Untitled I, by sculptor Thomas Sternal, greets campus visitors.

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Winter 2010 - Cal U Review  

If you're a California University graduate, the Cal U Review is your magazine. Find out what's been happening on campus, read about other Ca...