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2013 SUMMER COLLEGE

SUMMER COURSES TO ADVANCE YOUR EDUCATION AND YOUR CAREER.

BUILDING CHARACTER. BUILDING CAREERS.

CALU


WELCOME TO

SUMMER COLLEGE 2013 REGISTRATION BEGINS JANUARY 21, 2013 SMALL CLASSES DEDICATED FACULTY UP-TO-THE-MINUTE TECHNOLOGY MANY ONLINE COURSES HOUSING AVAILABLE EASY TRANSFER OF CREDITS OVER 100 UNDERGRADUATE COURSES OVER 100 GRADUATE COURSES

Cal U offers the perfect fit for students looking to gain additional credits. To make the most of your summer classes, be certain to take the following steps. >


REGISTER ONLINE AT WWW.CALU.EDU THROUGH THE VIP PORTAL OR Walk or mail your course registration card to the Office of Academic Affairs in Dixon 122 beginning January 21, 2013. You may also e-mail from your Cal U e-mail account to summer@calu.edu. Registration will continue until course cancellations are made. See calendar on page 7 for more information. You must be registered and have paid tuition before you can attend class(es). APPLY FOR FINANCIAL AID Refer to page 52. For questions regarding financial aid, call 724-938-4415. PAY YOUR BILL ON TIME Refer to page 47. For questions regarding your bill, call 724-938-4431. OBTAIN A CALCARD California University of Pennsylvania

CALU

The CalCard is your University identification and library access. CalCards are obtained at the information desk

Questions? Comments? Don’t guess at the answer.

in the Natali Student Center. This card also allows

Give our team a call and we will give you the

STUDENT

STUDENT

JOHN SMITH 395599607969633

you access to the fitness center, Vulcan Theatre, and

information you need to know. Call 724-938-4407 or

various University activities and services. You may also

e-mail us at summer@calu.edu.

JANE DOE 395599607969633

CALU

California University of Pennsylvania

STUDENT JOHN SMITH 395599607969633

add shop dollars to this card for food services and

Withdraw from your class(es) if you decide not to

other purchases. For more

attend California University. Failure to submit written

information, call

notice of withdrawal will result in a failing grade and

724-938-4300.

a financial liability. Although you should check with your instructor, academic adviser, or academic

PARKING ON CAMPUS

department before you withdraw from a course, a

Anyone parking on campus must have a parking

discussion with them will not get your course dropped.

permit or use the paid parking garage located behind

If you register for class(es) and then decide not to

Manderino Library. For more information regarding

attend California University it is your responsibility to

parking, please visit www.calu.edu/parking or call

initiate the proper paperwork. Do not assume that you

the Department of Parking & Transportation at

will be dropped from the class(es) for nonpayment

724-938-4677.

or because your financial aid was not approved. Withdrawals are processed based on the date they

Summer Registration is now online. If you do not

are received. Please come to the Office of Academic

have Internet access, you may still register by mail

Records, Room 122 in Dixon Hall, to complete the

with the registration card on the inside back cover of

appropriate paperwork or you may also email from Cal

this brochure, or in person at the Office of Academic

U e-mail account to summer@calu.edu. Begin the

Affairs. You may also e-mail from your Cal U e-mail

process as soon as possible, it may save you money

account to summer@calu.edu. For more information,

(refer to refund policy on page 50). Once 67% of class

refer to page 63.

time has elapsed you may no longer withdraw.

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SUMMER COLLEGE 3


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4 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA

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Building Directory Key to Campus Map A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z AA BB CC DD EE FF GG HH I I JJ KK LL MM NN

Kara Alumni House (KAR) Eberly Hall (EBE) Frich Hall (FRI) Old Main (OMN) South Hall (SOU) Dixon Hall (DIX) Ascent of Humanity Watkins Hall (WAT) New Science Hall (NSC) Vulcan Hall (VUL) Maintenance Annex C (MAC) Ceramics Lab (CER) The Quad Herron Hall (HER) Heating Plant (HPL) Coover Hall (COO) Noss Hall (NOS) Pollock Building (POL) Helsel Hall (HSL) Keystone Hall (KEY) Emeriti Fountain Steele Hall (STE) Basketball / Tennis Courts Hamer Hall (HAM) (Pool & Gymnasium) Convocation Center Booker Towers Duda Hall (DUA) Manderino Library (MAN) Azorsky Hall (AZO) Carter Hall (CAR—Downey-Garafolo, Health & Wellness Center, Multicultural Center Residence Hall A (RHA) & Honors Hall Johnson Hall (JOH) Residence Hall B (RHB) & Residence Life Offices Natali Student Center (NAT) Residence Hall E (RHE) Residence Hall C (RHC) Gallagher Hall (GAL) Morgan Hall (MOR) Maintenance Annex A (MAA) Manderino Parking Garage

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SUMMER COLLEGE 5


Table of

Contents

Helpful Information

Main Campus – Graduate Courses (cont.)

Welcome.................................................................. 2–3 University Map............................................................. 4 Summer 2012 Academic Calendar............................. 7 Student Services and Activities.................................. 8 Frequently Asked Questions................................10-12 General Education Information...........................45-48 Withdrawal Dates...................................................... 58 Important Telephone Numbers................................ 58

First Five-Week Courses.......................................... 30 Second Five-Week Courses...................................... 30 Ten-Week Courses.................................................... 30

Course Information

Payment Information

Distance Education............................................ 13 Web-Based Course Information.................. 13-16 Main Campus – Undergraduate Courses Undergraduate Course Information......................... 17 Internships............................................................18-19 Field Trips/Field Experiences..............................20-21 Special Session Courses......................................22-23 First Five-Week Courses.......................................... 24 Second Five-Week Courses...................................... 24 Ten-Week Courses...............................................25-26

Off-Campus Center

Course Descriptions Undergraduate Course Descriptions............... 31–41 Graduate Course Descriptions......................... 42–45 General Education Summer Courses............... 45–48

Billing Dates and Information................................ 49 Refund Information................................................. 50 Tuition and Fee Charts..................................... 51–53 Financial Aid Information................................. 54–57

Admission Information Graduate Admission Procedure............................. 28 Undergraduate Admission Procedure................... 59 4 Ways to Register.................................................. 60 Undergraduate Admission Application.............61-62

Southpointe............................................................... 27

Registration

Main Campus – Graduate Courses

Registration Form..........................Inside Back Cover

Graduate Course Information................................... 28 Special Session Courses........................................... 29

Descriptions for all courses, including special session topics start on page 31. Changes to this Summer 2013 catalog will be made on California University of Pennsylvania’s website, www.calu.edu

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6 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA


Summer 2013 Academic Calendar January 21, 2013

July 4, 2013

Summer College 2013 Registration Begins Online, by mail, e-mail from Cal U e-mail account to summer@calu.edu, or in the Office of Academic Affairs, 122 Dixon Hall.

Independence Day — No classes will be held

(Registration procedures are listed on page 60.)

Second Five-Week and July Special Session Cancellation Decisions

May 15 -17, 2013 Special Session Cancellation Decisions

May 20, 2013 Special Session Classes Begin May 20, 2013, and run at various times throughout May, June, July and August 2013. (Undergraduate special session courses start on page 20. Graduate special session courses start on page 29.)

May 27, 2013

on Thursday, July 4, 2013.

July 10–12, 2013* July 13, 2013 First Five-Week Session Ends

July 15, 2013 Second Five-Week Session Begins (Undergraduate Second Five-Week classes start on page 24. Graduate Second Five-Week classes are on page 30.) Last date to withdraw from Second Five-Week class is 4 p.m. on August 6, 2013.

Memorial Day — No classes will be held.

August 17, 2013

June 5-7, 2013*

Ten-Week and Second Five-Week Session Classes End

First Five-Week, Ten-Week Cancellation Decisions

June 10, 2013 First Five-Week and Ten-Week Sessions Begin (Undergraduate First Five-Week classes start on page 24. Undergraduate Ten-Week classes are on page 25. Graduate First Five-Week, Second Five-Week, and Ten-Week classes are

* Cancellation decisions will be made the week before every session starts. If your class is cancelled you will be contacted (phone

on page 30. Last date to withdraw from First Five-Week class is

numbers in the student information system

4 p.m. on July 2, 2013. Last date to withdraw from Ten-Week class

are used to make calls).

is 4 p.m. on July 25, 2013.

Grades may be viewed online at www.calu.edu by following the steps listed below: • Log in to VIP Portal • Enter your Cal U Student ID Number and password • Click the “Academic Info Tab” • Click Student Grades If you do not have access to the Web, please contact the Office of Academic Records at 724-9384434 to request your grade report. They will mail you a copy. Note: Your grade report is not an official transcript. An official transcript may be requested for a fee of $3.00 from the Office of Academic Records.

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SUMMER COLLEGE 7


Student Services and Activities Bookstore Natali Student Center Mon.–Fri., 8 a.m.–4 p.m. (subject to change) Call 724-938-4324 Campus Ministry Student Center, Room 143 For more information, please call 724-938-4573 Campus Visits/Campus Tours Office of Admissions Dixon Hall, Second Floor Mon.–Fri., 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. 724-938-4404, 1-888-412-0479 Career Services Eberly Science and Technology Center Room 230 Mon.–Fri., 8 a.m.–4 p.m. 724-938-4413 Commuter Center and Services First level of Student Center Mon.–Thur., 7:30 a.m.–10 p.m. Fri., 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m. 724-938-4021 CUTV (California University Television) Student Center, Media Suite, Room 160 For more information, please call 724-938-5823, J.R. Wheeler, Ext: 5823 or e-mail wheeler@calu.edu. Herron Recreation and Fitness Center Mon.–Fri., 10 a.m.–8 p.m. Closed Weekends 724-938-5907 Information Desk Lobby of Natali Student Center Mon.–Fri., 8 a.m.–4 p.m. 724-938-4300 Instructional Computing Facility (ICF) Noss Hall, Second Floor During Semester Break: Mon.–Thur., 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Summer 2013 Regular Session Hours: Mon.–Thur., 8 a.m.–10 p.m. Fri., 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Please access spider.calu.edu for operation hours for the ICF. 724-938-4335

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8 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA

Internship Center Eberly Hall 230 Mon.–Fri., 8 a.m.–4 p.m. 724-938-1578 Director: Tracie Beck Library Louis L. Manderino Library Call or check the library home page, www.library.calu.edu 724-938-4091 Mathematics Lab Noss 115 Hours are availability of tutor. 724-938-5893 Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD) Azorsky Building–105 8 a.m.–4 p.m. For more information, please call 724-938-5781. osdmail@calu.edu Student Exchange Program/Cultural Experiences Abroad Carter Hall–Multicultural Center Mon.–Fri., 8 a.m.–4 p.m. 724-938-1599 Veterans Affairs Carter Hall–G35 Mon.–Fri., 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Evening hours by appointment. 724-938-4076

Don’t forget to get your CalCard! The CalCard Office is located at the Information Desk on the lower level of the Natali Student Center. Mon.–Fri., 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Phone: 724-938-4300

Vulcan Theatre Second level of Student Center Hours of operation vary. Contact Natali Student Center Information Desk at 724-938-4300. Women’s Center Carter Hall–G45 Mon.–Fri., 8 a.m.–4 p.m. sai.calu.edu/womenscenter 724-938-5857 Cal U Writing Center Provides free one-to-one writing consultations and resources to all Cal U students. Noss 110 Hours vary. Kurt Kearcher, 724-938-4336 writingctr@calu.edu WCAL 91.9 FM (California Radio Station) Student Center, Media Suite Room 160 For more information, please call 724-938-5823, J.R. Wheeler, Ext. 5823 or e-mail wheeler@calu.edu. Office of Web-Based Programs Southpointe Center 135 Technology Drive Canonsburg, PA 15317 Mon.–Fri., 8 a.m.–4 p.m. 724-938-5958 or 1-866-595-6348

E-mail: calcard@calu.edu Website: www.calu.edu/currentstudents/student-services/calcard/ Your CalCard can be used for a variety of services: • Transit

• Library

• Meals

• Event Admission

• Fitness Center

• Entertainment

• Building Access

• Shop Dollars

• Temporary cards

See website or CalCard brochure for complete details


The Suite Life

Cal U has taken the lead in responding to the needs of today’s students, and we’ve completely redesigned our concept of residence life. Gone are the long hallways, cramped shared bedrooms and group bathrooms. Most students share a bathroom with only one other person and never more than three others. All residence halls are air conditioned and have state-of-theart sprinkler systems. Although the halls are co-educational by floor or by wing all suites are same-sex. Cal U provides a nonsmoking environment in all residence halls on campus. The six on-campus residence halls for men and women feature a variety of suite options. AMOUNG YOUR OPTIONS ARE:

EVERY RESIDENCE HALL PROVIDES: • Recreation room • Kitchen • Vending area • TV room with big screen television • TV cable with free Beyond Basic service • Free local phone, caller ID, distinctive ringing, 3-way calling • CAT-6 internet connection • Microwave • Laundry facilities • Computer lab • CalCard usage • Carpeting throughout • 24-hour digital video cameras at entrances and exits • Controlled access through CalCard and key • All residence halls are non smoking • Emergency phones at front entrances

• a two-person suite with a shared bedroom and bath • a four-person suite with private bedrooms, shared bath and central living room area • a four-person suite with private bedrooms, two shared baths and central living room area • a four-person suite with two shared bedrooms and one shared bath

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SUMMER COLLEGE 9


Frequently Asked Questions How do I read a course description? The course listings are arranged to correspond to the information requested on the registration form. Simply follow across the page from left to right and record the data on the registration form. What does TBA mean? TBA means to be announced. For courses with a TBA listing, contact the professor or the department office for further information. How do I cancel my registration? To cancel a course registration you must notify the Office of Academic Records in person, or in writing by mail, or e-mail from Cal U e-mail account to summer@calu.edu. The amount of your refund will be determined by the date that the notice is received (see refund information on page 50). Leaving a course, or not attending, without written notification does not constitute an official cancellation/withdrawal and will result in the assignment of an F grade and financial liability for tuition and fees. How do I drop a class? Students wishing to drop a course may do so online through the VIP Portal until the first day class begins by following the steps listed below. This process can also be done by completing a schedule adjustment form and returning it to the Office of Academic Records (by mail, e-mail from Cal U email account to summer@calu.edu, or in person). You may drop a class online up to the first day of that class without financial or academic penalty. After class starts you must drop the class at the Office of Academic Records. The official drop date, for refund purposes, is determined by the date the schedule adjustment form is received. If you decide you don’t want to remain registered for a class after the first day of that class you must follow the procedure for withdrawing from a course (refer to page 58). There is a financial, and possibly an academic penalty, for withdrawals. The official Drop/Add Period is the first day of each session. To drop a course online at www.calu.edu, follow the steps listed below: • Log in to VIP Portal • Enter your Cal U Student ID Number and your password • Click the “Academic Info Tab”” • Choose “Drop/Add Classes” • Choose the Summer 2013 term from the drop down menu • Select the drop down box for course you would like to drop/submit You cannot drop your entire schedule online. That must be done in the office of Academic Records.

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10 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA

If I don’t pay my bill by the due date, will I be dropped from my classes? Don’t assume you have been dropped from your classes for nonpayment! Once you are registered for a class, you have incurred a financial obligation. If you choose not to attend, you must officially withdraw in writing (see page 58 for more information on the refund policy). You will be responsible for the bill if you do not officially cancel your registration. Am I eligible for a refund if I withdraw from a class? Depending on the date of the withdrawal, you may or may not be eligible for a partial refund. Please see the chart on page 50. For more specific information, contact the Office of the Bursar at 724-938-4431. How do I add a class? To add a class you must complete an Add Form at the Office of Records, 122 Dixon Hall, e-mail from your Cal U e-mail account to summer@calu.edu or go on-line at www.calu.edu through the VIP Portal to add the course. Online registration will be daily 7 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. (note: times may vary due to occasional system upgrades). If you are adding a class online, follow the steps listed below: • Log in to www.calu.edu and click VIP Portal • Enter your Cal U Student ID Number and password • Click the “Academic Info Tab”” • Choose “Drop/Add Classes” • Choose the Summer 2012 term from the drop down menu • Enter the CRN numbers of the sections you have selected/submit How do I get into a closed section? If the course you wish to add is closed, contact the Office of Academic Affairs at 724-938-4407 or e-mail summer@calu.edu, with the information on the course and request permission to register. How long do I have to withdraw from class? Once 67% of class time has elapsed, you may no longer withdraw. Are there any restrictions on courses I may take during Summer College? Some courses have prerequisites. These are listed in the course descriptions found near the end of the brochure.


Are there a maximum number of credits I can take during the summer? The maximum number of undergraduate credits you can take in the summer is 18 without a signed overload form. However, you will also need an overload form if you would like to take more than 9 credits at any one time (or in overlapping sessions). You may obtain this form from the Office of Academic Records or any of the undergraduate college deans’ offices. How do I challenge a course for credit? • Obtain a Course Challenge Form from the Academic Records Office, Room 122, Dixon Hall • Obtain written permission from the chairperson of the department that offers the course • Register for the course and pay tuition and fees for the course • Only grades of P (Pass) or F (Fail) will be recorded­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ • For more information, contact the Academic Records Office at 724-938-4434 How do I audit a class? Auditing a class means that you will receive no grade or credit for the course being audited. To audit a course you need to complete the Authorization to Audit Form, which can be obtained from the Office of Academic Records by calling 724-938-4434. This must be done prior to the start of the class. Can I repeat a course? Yes, any course taken at California University may be repeated. Only the later grade will be counted in the student’s quality-point average (QPA). The original grade will remain on the transcript. How do I register or apply for admission? See pages 59–63 for specific information on registration and admission procedures.

Additional policies and procedures can be found in the University catalog. For more information, contact the Office of Academic Affairs at 724-938-4407 or e-mail us at summer@calu.edu.

I am a student at another university. Are there special arrangements I need to make to take a class at California University of Pennsylvania? Yes, in order to take classes at Cal U you must apply through the Office of Academic Affairs as a visiting student. A completed application and $25 nonrefundable fee are required before a course registration can be processed. This fee is waived if you have taken classes at Cal U or have paid the fee within the past three years. An application for undergraduate admission can be found online at www.calu.edu or on pages 61–62. An application for graduate school admission can be found on our website at www.calu.edu/graduate. You may also apply online at www.calu.edu.

May I attend Summer College if I am a high school student? If you have completed the sophomore year of high school and are enrolled in a college preparatory curriculum you may be eligible for admission to Cal U through our High School Early Admit Program. You must have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.00 for the past two years and have taken one of three standardized tests; PSAT, SAT or ACT. Contact the Office of Continuing Education for current test score requirements. If you meet the qualifications listed, you need to complete the admission application form, pay the $25 nonrefundable fee, submit your official high school transcript and the completed Authorization for High School Students form. Visit us at www.calu.edu for more details. Look under “Information for: Prospective Students” and you will see the Office of Continuing Education link on the left side. How can I arrange for a campus tour? Contact the Office of Admissions at 724-938-4404, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.–4 p.m., or the Welcome Center at 724-938-1626. Where do I purchase my textbooks for classes? The Cal U Student Bookstore, located on the second level of the Natali Student Center, offers a variety of services. You can purchase new or used text books, and you may even pre-order books before the first week of class. The Cal U Student Bookstore also offers a variety of other items for purchase. For more information, please call 724-938-4324, or access the Student Bookstore online through the Cal U home page at www.calu.edu. What is the grade appeal process? The grade appeal process can be found in the University catalog. How do I appeal a non-academic decision related to Summer College? To appeal a non-academic decision regarding Summer College enrollment, you must submit to the Office of Continuing Education a dated and signed appeal in writing within 30 days after the start date of the course (dated and signed) to the Office of Lifelong Learning. Appeals received after August 17, 2013 classes, will not be accepted. All appeals will be forwarded to the Executive Director of Summer College who will give them to a committee for decision. The student will be notified of the final decision by the Office of Academic Affairs. Can I register for summer classes if I have been academically dismissed from Cal U? Any student who has been academically dismissed and wishes to attend Summer College at California University of PA must be re-admitted by the Office of Student Retention and Success, 103 Noss Hall, 724-938-1523. Attach a copy of your re-admission letter to your registration card and bring or mail to the Office of Academic Affairs, 301 Dixon Hall.

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SUMMER COLLEGE 11


How do I arrange for housing? Housing is available by contacting the Office of Student Housing at 724-938-4444. A housing contract will need to be completed. Meal options are also available. How do I get a transcript? To obtain a transcript of academic activity at California University of PA, contact the Office of Academic Records, Room 122, Dixon Hall, 724-938-4434, 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Monday–Friday. The fee for a transcript is $3.00. Are recreational facilities available? Yes! Your student fees give you access to a wide variety of University recreational facilities. Contact the Recreational Center at 724-938-5907 for more information. What do I need to do if I am graduating in August? Undergraduate and graduate students eligible to graduate in August 2013 must apply for graduation at the office of their dean before Friday, June 21, 2013. Graduation is not automatic. Eligible students must apply in order to graduate. Failure to apply by June 21, 2013 may result in a delay in graduation. Is there a specific process that I must follow to register for an internship? Yes! Students wishing to register for the first internship session of the summer (May 20 through July 27, 2013) must do so before May 13, 2013. For the second internship session of the summer (June 10 through August 17, 2013) must do so before June 3, 2013. In order to become registered for your internship, you must complete an online internship application/student agreement through InternLink. For more information, please contact the Internship Center at 724-938-1578. What is a distance learning course? Distance learning classes are offered in two ways. They can be Web-based or offered as live, interactive, and site-to-site using fullmotion compressed videoconferencing equipment. The instructor varies his/her presentation point throughout the course. You may register for either site location for the videoconferencing classes. Web-based classes are identified by a W in the section code of the course. Are additions or changes made to the summer schedule? The University reserves the right to postpone, limit enrollment, cancel, split, or combine classes and change instructors and class locations when necessary. Information on courses that have been added or deleted from the schedule after publication may be obtained from the Office of Academic Affairs (724-938-4407), or check the website www.calu.edu through the VIP Portal.

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12 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA

What happens when a course I registered for is cancelled? Summer College classes are not guaranteed to run. If a course does not have sufficient enrollment, it is cancelled during the week prior to the first class meeting. Registered students will be contacted by phone between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. and given the option of choosing another class or receiving a refund. Phone numbers in the student information system will be used to make cancellation calls. Please make sure that your phone number in this system is correct. You can check your information on the web at www.calu.edu. • Log in to www.calu.edu • Enter VIP Portal with your Cal U Student ID Number and password • Click Registration Status • Choose “View Addresses and phones” • Update address and phone (at bottom of form) • Make changes • Click the “Submit” button Where can I obtain information about disability accommodations? California University of PA welcomes otherwise qualified students with disabilities. The University recognizes its responsibility to these students and is committed to providing reasonable accommodations to ensure access and participation as guided by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Requests for accommodation should be submitted directly to the Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD). Students requesting accommodations must provide OSD with documentation to substantiate the request. Students with disabilities follow the same admission procedures and standards as required by the California University of PA Admissions Office for all students. Questions regarding admission procedures and acceptance status should be directed to the Admissions Office at 724-938-4404. For information regarding OSD and reasonable accommodations, visit the OSD website, sai.calu.edu/osd, or contact OSD at 724-938-5781 or e-mail osdmail@calu.edu.


Distance Education Courses These courses utilize VTEL Technology in which the course is delivered live at one site and on video conference equipment at the other site. For more information regarding distance education courses, refer to the course listing for the session the class is to be held. Code/Code #/Title ACC 711 Managerial Accounting ACC 711 Managerial Accounting SPT TBA Roberts, Clyde

Section 01

Crs 3 S1 20132

Session 10wk 3

Days R 10wk

Start 5:30 PM R

End 9:30 PM

Bldg EBE

Rm 120 5:30 PM

Instructor Roberts, Clyde

CRN# 20131 9:30 PM

Web Courses The following courses will be offered online. For course requirements, contact the Instructor via email. All Students must use their CAL U email and User ID account. Contact the Office of Academic Affairs for general questions at 724-938-4407. Contact the Graduate School at 724-938-4187 or the Office of Web Based Programs at 724-938-5958. Billing Dates/Refunds for Web-Based Courses: The published start/end dates will be used to calculate billing dates and refund amounts for all web-based courses, regardless of when the actual class work was begun or finished. Code/Code #/Title Section ACC 200 Financial Accounting W1 ARB 101 Elementary Arabic I W1 ARB 102 Elementary Arabic II W1 ART 109 Landmarks of World Art W1 ATE 340 Sports Nutrition W1 ATE 705 EvidenceBased Pract in AthTrng W1 ATE 800 Res Meth in Allied Health Science W1 BUS 100 Intro to Business W1 BUS 242 Business Law I W1 BUS 342 Bus Society & Government W1 CED 788 Special Topics Gambling Addict W1 CIS 110 Intro to Information Systems W1 CMD 108 Nature of Language W1 COM 101 Oral Communication W1 COM 275 Art of Film W1 COM 332 Radio/TV News W1 COM 378 Special Topics in Communication W1 CSC 101 Personal Productivity Software W1 CSC 101 Personal Productivity Software W2 CSC 201 Internet Concepts W1 DMA 092 Intro Algebra W1 EAS 100 Intro to Earth Science W1 EAS 100 Intro to Earth Science W2 EAS 131 Intro Envir Geology W1 EAS 150 Intro to Geology W1 EAS 163 Intro Oceanography W1 ECE 707 Leadshp Mgmt in Early Child Se W1 ECO 102 Economics for Elem Ed W1 ECO 201 Intro Micro W1 ECO 202 Intro Macro W1 ECO 716 Applied Economic Analysis W1 EDE 701 Dev Organized Curriculum W1 EDP 600 Stat Methods W1 ENG 101 English Comp I W1 ENG 217 Sci & Tech Writ W1 ESP 210 SpEd Found Collab W1 ESP 610 Spec Ed Foundations Collab W1 ESP 610 Spec Ed Foundations Collab W2

Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Session E-mail 10wk mendola_e@calu.edu May khalil@calu.edu July khalil@calu.edu 10wk persinger@calu.edu 10wk lyles@calu.edu June dicesaro@calu.edu June west_t@calu.edu 10wk roberts@calu.edu 10wk schwerha@calu.edu 10wk schwerha@calu.edu 10wk May delorenzo@calu.edu 10wk bonfant@calu.edu 10wk 10wk foil@calu.edu 10wk cumings@calu.edu 10wk jasko@calu.edu May kovalchick@calu.edu July rodi@calu.edu July chen@calu.edu July boukaabar@calu.edu 10wk kauffman@calu.edu 10wk kauffman@calu.edu 10wk fredrick@calu.edu 10wk fredrick@calu.edu 10wk kauffman@calu.edu 10wk 1st hettler@calu.edu May hettler@calu.edu July cole@calu.edu 10wk cole@calu.edu 10wk June sovak@calu.edu 10wk kearcher@calu.edu 10wk pathak@calu.edu 2nd 1st 2nd

Instructor Edward Mendola Odeese Khalil Odeese Khalil Persinger, Cynthia Ayanna Lyles Shelly DiCesaro Thomas West Clyde Roberts Joseph Schwerha Joseph Schwerha Staff Gary Delorenzo Barbara Bonfanti Staff Sylvia Foil Rick Cumings Susan Jasko Lisa Kovalchick Anthony Rodi Weifeng Chen Kaddour Boukaabar Chad Kauffman Chad Kauffman Kyle Fredrick Kyle Fredrick Chad Kauffman Staff Paul Hettler Paul Hettler Ismail Cole Ismail Cole Staff Melissa Sovak Kurt Kearcher Pratul Pathak Staff Staff Staff

CRN # 20110 20031 20332 20192 20035 20305 20306 20112 20113 20115 20197 20187 20215 20361 20223 20224 20225 20185 20186 20188 20184 20062 20063 20064 20065 20066 20333 20343 20117 20118 20133 20093 20303 20359 20108 20089 20088 20091

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SUMMER COLLEGE 13


Web Courses (cont.) Code/Code #/Title ESP ESP ESP ESP FIN FRE GEO GEO GEO GEO GEO HIS HIS HIS HIS HSC ITE ITE JUS JUS JUS JUS JUS JUS JUS LAW LAW LEA MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MGT MGT MGT MGT MGT MGT MGT MKT MKT MKT MSE MSE MSE MSE MSE MSE MSE MSE MUS PHI POS POS PSY PSY PSY

.

612 701 739 743 711 101 100 102 205 277 325 101 308 325 350 115 305 341 305 376 399 429 487 488 495 340 420 100 100 110 120 130 181 191 225 281 282 300 301 352 371 402 452 742 300 401 421 645 646 651 652 653 654 655 656 100 200 102 300 100 211 216

Evid Based Practice Elem Incl Intro to Behav Anal Fld Exp Sem Sp Ed Navigating SocWrld: ASD Corporate Finance Elem French I Intro to Geography Geographic Systems for Elem Ed World Cities/Geo Tour Casinos & Gaming Entertainment Geography Europe US History to 1877 History American Constitution History of American Women Adolf Hitler Current Health Issues OSHA General Industrial Safety Quality Control International Criminal Justice Criminal Procedure Selected Topics: Media Violence Terrorism Computer Forensics Cyber Crime Investigation Res Methods In Justice Studies Family Law Law and Conflict Resolution Introduction to Leadership Fund of Math Applications of Math Elementary Topics in Math I Elementary Topics in Math II College Algebra College Trig Business Statistics Calculus I Calculus II Principles of Management Organized Behavior Human Resource Mgmt Mgt Informat System Strategic Mgt Hum Res Str & Plng Human Resource Mgt Principles of Marketing Marketing Mgmt Consumer Behavior Tech in 7-12 Education Assesments and Interv 7 - 12 Methods of English Methods of Mathematics Methods of Science Meth Soc Stud Teach Meth Art Teach K-12 Meth For Lang Teach Intro to Music World Religions American Govt for Elem Ed Public Policy General Psychology Social Psychology Child Psych to Age 4

14 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA

Section W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1

Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 3

Session

E-mail

10wk 10wk 1st 2nd 10wk chawdhry@calu.edu 10wk randall@calu.edu 10wk mueller@calu.edu 1st mueller@calu.edu 10wk ryan@calu.edu 10wk ryan@calu.edu 10wk wickham@calu.edu 10wk edmonds_k@calu.edu 10wk madden@calu.edu 10wk tuennerman@calu.edu 10wk slaven@calu.edu 10wk harman@calu.edu 10wk kolick@calu.edu 10wk thompson_jm@calu.edu 10wk cencich@calu.edu 10wk 10wk sweitzer@calu.edu 10wk alkhattar@calu.edu 10wk hsieh@calu.edu May hsieh@calu.edu 10wk alkhattar@calu.edu 10wk 10wk 10wk hummel@calu.edu May hess@calu.edu May hess@calu.edu May boukaabar@calu.edu July novak@calu.edu May williams@calu.edu July Junes@calu.edu May benbourenane@calu.edu May benbourenane@calu.edu July benbourenane@calu.edu 10wk michaels@calu.edu 10wk michaels@calu.edu 10wk brown@calu.edu 10wk 10wk serafin@calu.edu 10wk serafin@calu.edu 10wk brown@calu.edu 10wk lazorchak@calu.edu 10wk larosa@calu.edu 10wk larosa@calu.edu 10wk hoover_m@calu.edu 10wk hepner@calu.edu 10wk 10wk hess@calu.edu 10wk 10wk 10wk mohney@calu.edu 10wk monroe@calu.edu 10wk ikach@calu.edu 10wk shaffer_n@calu.edu 1st blumberg@calu.edu 10wk blumberg@calu.edu 10wk rosengart@calu.edu 10wk regeth@calu.edu 10wk rosengart@calu.edu

Instructor

CRN #

Staff Staff Staff Staff Arshad Chawdhry Mary Randall Thomas Mueller Thomas Mueller Susan Ryan Susan Ryan Thomas Wickham Kelton Edmonds Sean Madden Laura Tuennerman Michael Slaven Chris Harman David Kolick John Thompson John Cencich Staff Emily Sweitzer Aref Al-Khattar Raymond Hsieh Raymond Hsieh Aref Al-Khattar Staff Staff Michael Hummel Barbara Hess Barbara Hess Kaddour Boukaabar George Novak Paul Williams Leandro Jones Mohamed Benbourenane Mohamed Benbourenane Mohamed Benbourenane John Michaels John Michaels Burrell Brown Staff Louise Serafin Louise Serafin Burrell Brown Shirley Lazorchak Richard LaRosa Richard LaRosa Marcia Hoover Keith Hepner Staff Barbara Hess Staff Staff Susan Mohney Connie Monroe Yugo Ikach Nancy Shaffer Melanie Blumberg Melanie Blumberg Carrie Rosengart Rebecca Regeth Carrie Rosengart

20099 20101 20210 20090 20134 20032 20067 20341 20068 20320 20069 20005 20001 20003 20002 20034 20045 20044 20060 20012 20013 20014 20015 20016 20017 20167 20168 20357 20176 20177 20178 20179 20180 20181 20182 20183 20189 20121 20122 20123 20124 20125 20126 20135 20128 20175 20129 20143 20144 20137 20138 20139 20140 20141 20142 20136 20006 20342 20004 20076 20078 20077


Web Courses (cont.) Code/Code #/Title PSY PSY PSY PSY PSY PSY PTA RES RSP SOC SOC SOW SPN SPN THE WST WST

305 311 702 712 713 796 110 800 706 315 317 303 101 102 100 200 340

Psych Personality Psy of Gender Roles Psychopathology of Childhood Adv Psych Learning Psy Growth Develop Res Sem Sch Psych Intro to Pathology Methods in Research Tch Rdg Adult Litercy Social Minorities Sociology Sub Use & Abuse Human Sex & Society Elem Spanish I Elem Spanish II Intro to the Theatre Intro to Women Studies International Violence Women

Section W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1

Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Session

E-mail

10wk adair@calu.edu 10wk regeth@calu.edu 10wk bloomquist@calu.edu 10wk john_k@calu.edu 10wk bloomquist@calu.edu 10wk john_k@calu.edu May dusi@calu.edu 10wk 10wk 10wk larsen@calu.edu 10wk 10wk May gonzalez@calu.edu July gonzalez@calu.edu 10wk odonnell@calu.edu 10wk mcclintock@calu.edu 10wk mcclintock@calu.edu

Instructor

CRN #

Holiday Adair Rebecca Regeth Angela Bloomquist Kirk John Angela Bloomquist Kirk John Jodi Dusi Staff Staff Elizabeeth Larsen Staff Staff Arcides Gonzalez Arcides Gonzalez William O’Donnell Marta McClintock-Comeaux Marta McClintock-Comeaux

20079 20080 20081 20082 20083 20086 20201 20214 20211 20019 20020 20037 20029 20030 20028 20022 20344

* MGT 371 Mgt. Information System requires students to have Microsoft® Office 2007 package on their computers with MS Word, Excel and Powerpoint.

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SUMMER COLLEGE 15


Important Information for Online Students All online instructors use California University e-mail accounts to correspond with their students. Please go to www.calu.edu, click on Quick Links, then click and “Get Your Campus Network Username.” Follow the instructions to obtain your Campus Network User ID (username) and password. All e-mail from professors regarding online courses will be delivered to Cal U e-mail accounts.

Desire2Learn Desire2Learn (D2L) is the online learning tool used at California University of Pennsyvania http://d2l.calu.edu/ This site contains all updated information in regards to D2L.

• Once logged in to VIP, click the Academic Info tab. Inside this tab you will find a large Desire2Learn button. Click the button to enter D2L. Your courses will appear in the “My Courses” widget. You will not be able to access your course until the first day of class. Alternate Login:

http://www.calu.edu/

In the event that VIP is down or you have difficulty with VIP, we have an alternate access point for Desire2Learn: https://calu.desire2learn.com/

• Click on VIP in the left hand menu.

You will use the same login credentials listed above.

• Your username will be the first part of your Cal U student e-mail address. Example: If abc1234@calu.edu is your e-mail, your username is: abc1234

System Check for technical requirements: https://calu.desire2learn.com/d2l/tools/system_ check/systemcheck.asp?ou=6618

To login:

• Your password is the same as your Cal U student e-mail address.

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16 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA


Undergraduate

Course Information

Summer College 2013 Special Sessions See pages 20 for Undergraduate dates.

First Five-Week Session June 10 to July 13, 2013 Last day to withdraw from a First Five-Week class is July 2, 2013, by 4 p.m.

Ten-Week Session June 10 to August 17, 2013 Last day to withdraw from a Ten-Week class is July 25, 2013, by 4 p.m.

Second Five-Week Session July 15 to August 17, 2013 Last day to withdraw from a Second Five-Week class is August 6, 2013, by 4 p.m. Once 67% of class time has elapsed you may no longer withdraw. Register online at www.calu.edu through VIP Portal Daily 7 a.m.–11:30 p.m. (Times may vary due to occasional system upgrades)

OR Register at the Office of Academic Records 122 Dixon Hall Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Phone: 724-938-4407 Fax: 724-938-5832

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SUMMER COLLEGE 17


Internship and Practicum Classes You must have a completed admit-to-close section (add/drop) form to register for an internship or practicum. The registration and the payment due dates are May 13, 2013, for internships beginning May 20, 2013 and June 3, 2013, for internships beginning June 10, 2013. You may not register on-line for internships or practicum classes. QUESTIONS? Contact the Internship Center at 724-938-1578 or internctr@calu.edu. CODE/CODE #/TITLE SECTION ACC 491 Accounting Intern X1 ANT 329 Anthropology Internship X1 ART 329 Art Internship X1 BIO 492 Bio & Env Sci Intern X1 BUS 492 Business Internship X1 CED 790 Counseling Internship X1 CET 495 CET Internship X1 CET 495 CET Internship X2 CHE 410 Chemistry Intern X1 COM 459 Comm Stud Intrnshp X1 COM 459 Comm Stud Intrnshp X2 COM 459 Comm Stud Intrnshp X3 COM 459 Comm Stud Intrnshp X4 CSC 419 Internship X1 EDE 322 Education Services Internship X1 EET 495 EET Internship X1 EET 495 EET Internship X2 EET 495 EET Internship X3 ENG 419 Intern Prof Writing X1 FIN 492 Finance Internship X1 GCM 495 GCM Internship X1 GCM 495 GCM Internship X2 GCM 495 GCM Internship X3 GEO 479 Internship X1 GEO 479 Internship X2 GTY 440 Internship X1 HIS 329 Internship History X1 ITE 495 Ind Tech Internship X1 ITE 495 Ind Tech Internship X2 ITE 495 Ind Tech Internship X3 ITE 495 Ind Tech Internship X4 JUS 498 Justice Studies Internship X1 LEA 397 Leadership Studies Internship X1 LST 492 Liberal Arts Internship X1 MAT 419 Math Internship X1 MFL 481 Modern Languages Intern Intent X1 MGT 492 Management Internship X1 MKT 492 Marketing Internship X1 MUS 488 Music Tech Internship X1 NMT 495 Nano Manuf Tech Intrnship X1 PGM 125 PGM Internship I X1 PGM 225 PGM Internship II X1 PGM 325 PGM Internship III X1 PGM 425 Senior Internship X1 PGM 435 Capstone Internship X1 POS 329 Intern Poli Sci X1 PSY 469 Psych Internship X1 PSY 774 Intern School Psych X1 PTA 150 Clinical Intern I X1 PTA 150 Clinical Intern I X2 SOC 429 Sociology Internship X1 SPT 499 Internship in Sport Management X1 TED 495 TED Internship X1 TED 795 Tech Education Internship X1 WST 430 Women’s Studies Internship X1

.

18 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA

SESSION Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern Intern

INSTRUCTOR David Jones Staff Greg Harrison David Argent David Jones Jeffrey Samide Ghassan Salim Jeffrey Sumey Staff James Carter Susan Jasko James Carter Susan Jasko George Novak Staff James Means Jeffrey Sumey Ghassan Salim Staff Arshad Chawdhry Joseph Schickel Susan Urbine Mark Bronakowski Thomas Mueller Harrison Pinckney Mary Hart Staff John Thompson Jaroslav Vaverka Larry Horath David Kolick Staff Staff Staff George Novak Staff David Jones David Jones Staff Staff Justin Barroner Justin Barroner Vanessa MacKinnon Vanessa MacKinnon Vanessa MacKinnon Staff Holiday Adair Elizabeth Mason Jodi Dusi Scott Hargraves Staff Roy Yarbrough Glenn Hider Laura Hummel Staff

SPECIAL DATES June 10 -August 17 May 20 - July 27 June 10 - August 17 May 20 - July 27 June 10 - August 17 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 June 10 - August 17 June 10 - August 17 June 10 - August 17 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 June 10 - August 17 May 20 - July 27 June 10 - August 17 May 20 - July 27 June 10 - August 17 June 10 - August 17 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 June 10 - August 17 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 June 10 - August 17 June 10 - August 17 June 10 - August 17 June 10 - August 17 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 June 10 - August 17 May 20 - July 27 June 10 - August 17 June 10 - August 17 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 May 20 - July 27 June 10 - August 17 June 10 - August 17 June 10 - August 17 May 20 - July 27 June 10 - August 17 June 10 - August 17 June 10 - August 17

CRN # 20111 20206 20193 20011 20114 20198 20046 20047 20328 20219 20220 20221 20222 20191 20092 20048 20049 20052 20329 20120 20050 20053 20054 20070 20071 20202 20073 20051 20055 20056 20057 20018 20330 20331 20190 20360 20127 20130 20322 20339 20315 20316 20317 20318 20319 20072 20074 20075 20326 20327 20021 20237 20058 20059 20023


Step-by-Step For-Credit Internship Process Take the following steps to ensure you receive credit for your internship:

1. Analyze yourself. Identify your skills, define your career goals, and determine what you want to gain from an internship.

2. Contact your faculty advisor to determine your eligibility. (Such as prerequisites completed, department grade point average requirement, etc.). You can also discuss possible internship placements.

7. Complete the five on-line orientations required for interns. See the Internship Center webpage for details. 8. Complete the on-line application and student agreement. An application and student agreement are available on InternLink. Fill out all of the necessary information and click “Finish.” The application will then be automatically e-mailed to the necessary individuals for approvals. You will then be registered for your internship through Academic Affairs.

3. If you plan to use financial aid,  contact the Financial Aid Office for assistance (Complete your FAFSA [www.fafsa.ed.gov] form as early as possible!)

4. Create a student profile with the

Internship Center’s InternLink system at www.myinterfase.com/cup/student/home.aspx. Through InternLink, you can view posted internships, upload your resume so employers can view it, visit the electronic resource library, and complete your on-line internship application.

5. Complete your resume and cover letter. Visit Career Services for resources to

help you and to schedule a resume and cover letter review and mock interview. Once you are satisfied, upload your resume into your InternLink student profile.

6. Gather information and locate an internship site. Talk to faculty, students,

family and friends about internship possibilities. Contact the Internship Center. Research sites to determine the availability of internships and contact persons. Once you have identified a possible site, discuss this with your faculty advisor. NOTE: Some departments identify sites and place students rather than students finding internships on their own. Check with your adviser.

9. Register.

The registration and the payment due dates for Summer 2013 are as follows:

Students wishing to register for the first internship session of the summer (May 14 through July 21, 2013) must do so before May 7, 2013.

Students wishing to register for the second internship session of the summer (June 11 through August 18, 2013) must do so before June 4, 2013.

 Finalize arrangements. Agree on start 10.

and end dates, how many hours per week or semester you will work, and what duties and responsibilities are expected of you.

If you have any questions or need assistance, Contact Tracie L. Beck, Internship Center Director, at 724-938-1578, or beck_t@calu.edu

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SUMMER COLLEGE 19


Special Offerings Summer 2013 Undergraduate Field Trips/Field Experience EARTH Science Field Trips EAS 492 Field Course in Geology – May 28 - June 12 CRN: 20213

A field course focusing on regional geology of the Desert Southwest, including, but not limited to California, Arizona, Nevada, and Utah. Within a regional context, students will study the geologic form and history of areas including Long Valley Caldera, Grand Canyon, and Zion and Bryce Canyons. Students will gain experience mapping volcanoes, folds, faults, and igneous intrusions. They will visit sites of geologic interest with features including fossils, hot springs, glaciers, and slot canyons. Prerequisite: EAS 150, Introduction to Geology & permission from instructor (space is limited). Additional travel costs apply. Contact the instructor at fredrick@calu.edu.

EAS 436 Field Methods in Earth Science – Two Week Storm Chase – May 28-June 8 CRN: 20358

An organized, two-week storm-chase through the Great Plains of the United States. This course provides the student with opportunities to study meteorological and especially severe weather phenomena and characteristics, on site. Students will apply concepts learned in class to real-time forecasting and observations in the field. Cost of the course is normal tuition and fees, plus an additional special fee to be determined two weeks prior to departure. Prerequisite: EAS 240, Meteorology & permission from instructor (space is limited). For course requirements, contact the instructor via e-mail at gill@calu.edu or at 724-938-1677.

Summer 2013 - Costa Rica Tropical Biology Tentative dates: May 20 – May 29, 2013 ENS 480 X1 – Topics in Tropical Biology (3 credits, Meiss) CRN: 20340 Location: : La Salva, Costa Rica Program Summary: During this 10 day trip, students will explore the unique ecology and biodiversity of a tropical rainforest and other tropical ecosystems. • Costa Rican Culture and Language: Learn about the country’s fascinating history, culture and language. • Costa Rican Ecosystems: Learn about tropical rainforests, cloud forests and agriculture. Students will see the and study the biodiversity of plants and animals found in this lush environment.

Costs: • Program fee: $1,500 (includes room and board, ground transport, and all entrance fees and activity costs within Costa Rica) • Round trip airfare: ~$800.00 (exact cost to be determined at time of booking) • Cal U tuition for 3 credits of off-campus instruction • Incidentals: passport/visa fees, textbooks, personal equipment, spending money, etc.

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20 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA


Summer 2013 - Master of Arts in Applied Criminology Study Abroad Scotland Yard GRA 820: Graduate Studies Abroad : Six Credit hours* Dates: July 13 – 22, 2013 Instructor: Dr. Cencich

CRN # 20363

This course is designed for graduate* students enrolled in the M.A. in Applied Criminology Program. Students will travel to London on a 10-day field trip with the professor where they will have the opportunity to work directly with New Scotland Yard (London Metropolitan Police) and observe many aspects of British policing and criminal justice. Students will have educational visits to Parliament (House of Lords and House of Commons), the famous Old Bailey’s Court, the crime sites of the infamous “Jack the Ripper,” Blackfriars, Newgate Prison, the Inns of Court, the Royal Courts of Justice, and other venues, which are subject to change. Students will be required to participate in a two-day, on campus, academic orientation to the course that will include lectures, presentations, and group assignments. Upon return, students will be required to write a comprehensive, graduate-level “Summary—Reaction” paper following APA style. Students will also be required to participate in group presentations with an emphasis on the British criminal justice system (from comparative analysis perspectives) in an academic forum. Interested graduate students in the Applied Criminology program are required to contact the program coordinator, Dr. Elizabeth Larsen, for approval at Larsen@calu.edu. *Undergraduate students (senior status and within their final semester, prior to graduation) may be able to enroll with the permission of the Department and subject to availability. Interested seniors should contact the professor, Dr. John Cencich at Cencich@calu.edu for more information and the Department Chair, Dr. Emily Sweitzer at sweitzer@calu.edu, for approval. Costs for air transport, lodging, food, and other expenses will be in addition to University tuition and fees.

Summer 2013 - Special Session Field Experience Courses Must have current Act 151, Act 34 and Act 114 clearances (if your clearances expire before May 2013, renew them now) • Clearances must be current the first day of class EDU 501 Urban Field Experience: EDU 501 X1 Pittsburgh School District: Elementary Education and Special Education K-6 Dr. Armitage Key #20307 This three-credit course is for undergraduate or graduate students in education who want to experience teaching in the Pittsburgh City Schools. It can fulfill the requirement for a field experience course or the Multicultural Education Course. In this two-week field experience students will participate in an assigned city school all day, each day, beginning on Monday May 20 and ending on Friday, May 31, 2013. Students will assist the classroom teacher in several ways, such as assisting individuals, small groups, and whole groups. In addition, students will be required to plan and teach a minimum of three lessons. This is a closed course. To register you must complete an application, submit copies of clearances and a completed ADD FORM. Students seeking K-6 placements: Pick up the Application Form that includes directions and further information from the Bulletin Board outside Keystone 308 and return completed packets to Dr. Armitage via the Early, Elementary and Special Education Department (Keystone 302) Contact person: Dr. Armitage, Armitage@calu.edu (K-6 elementary placements)

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SUMMER COLLEGE 21


Undergraduate Special Session Classes Beginning in May 2013 ANT 101 Arch Field School I May 20 - June 21 Section: 01, Crs:V CRN: 20205 MWF 8 a.m. Nass, John Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013 ARB 101 Elementary Arabic I May 20 - July 6 Section: W1, Crs: 3 CRN: 20031 TBA Khalil, Odeese Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013

EAS 436 Field Meth III Earth Science May 28 - June 8 Section: X1, Crs:3 CRN: 20358 TBA 4 p.m. Gill, Swarndeep Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/20/203

BIO 226 Basic Micro Biology May 20 - June 21 Section: 1A, Crs:4 CRN:20207 MTWR 8 a.m.-10:05 a.m. Boehm, David FRI100 Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013

ECO 201 Intro Micro May 20 - July 6 Section: W1, Crs: 3 CRN: 20117 TBA Hettler, Paul Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013

BIO 226 Basic Micro Biology Lab May 20 - June 21 Section: 1B, Crs:0 CRN: 20208 MTWR 10:15 a.m.-12:20 p.m. Boehm, David FRI 111 Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013

ENS 480 Topics in Field Biology May 20 - June 1 Section: X1, Crs:3 CRN: 20340 TBA Meiss, Sarah Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013

CHE 101 Gen Chemistry I May 20 - June 14 Section: 01, Crs: 4 CRN: 20199 MTWRF 8:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Woznack, NSC 112 Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013 CIS 110 Intro to Information Systems May 20 - July 6 Section: W1, Crs: 3 CRN: 20187 TBA DeLorenzo, Gary Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013

JUS 488 Cyber Crime Investigation May 20 - August 23 Section: W1, Crs:3 CRN: 20016 TBA Hsieh, Raymond Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013

CSC 101 Personal Productivity Software May 20 - July 6 Section: W1, Crs: 3 CRN: 20185 TBA Kovalchick, Lisa Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013

MAT 110 Applications of Math May 20 - July 6 Section: W1, Crs: 3 CRN: 20177 TBA Hess, Barbara Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013

MAT 120 Elementary Topics in Math I May 20 - July 6 Section: W1, Crs:3 CRN: 20178 TBA Boukaabar, Kaddour Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013

MAT 181 College Algebra May 20 - July 6 Section: W1, Crs: 3 CRN:20180 TBA Williams, Paul Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013

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22 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA

EAS 492 Field Course Geology May 28 - June 12 Section: X1, Crs: 3 CRN: 20213 TBA Fredrick, Kyle Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/20/203

MAT 100 Fund of Math May 20 - July 6 Section: W1, Crs: 3 TBA Hess, Barbara Billing: 5/7/2013

CRN:20176 Due: 5/13/2013


Beginning in May 2013 (cont.) MAT 225 Business Statistics May 20 - July 6 Section: W1, Crs: 3 CRN: 20182 TBA Benbourenane, Mohamed Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013 MAT 281 Calculus I May 20 - July 6 Section: W1, Crs: 3 CRN: 20183 TBA Benbourenane, Mohamed Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013 PHY 121 General Physics I May 20 - June 14 Section: 01, Crs:4 CRN: 20200 MTWR 8:20 a.m.-12:40 p.m. Yasmin, Kausar NSC 134 Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013 PTA 110 Intro to Pathology May 27 - June 14 Section: W1, Crs:2 CRN: 20201 TBA Dusi, Jodi Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/20/203 SPN 101 Elem Spanish I May 20 - July 6 Section: W1, Crs: 3 CRN: 20029 TBA Gonzalez, Arcides Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013

Beginning in June 2013 PHY 122 General Physics II June 17 - July 12 Section: 01 Crs:4 CRN: 20314 MTWR 8:20 AM-12:40 PM Yasmin, Kausar NSC 134 Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 6/10/2013

Beginning in July 2013 ARB 102 Elementary Arabic II July 8 - August 23 Section: W1, Crs: 3 CRN: 20332 Khalil, Odeese Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 7/1/2013 CSC 101 Personal Productivity Software July 8 - August 23 Section: W2, Crs: 3 CRN: 20186 TBA Rodi, Anthony Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 7/1/2013 MAT 282 Calculus II July 8 - August 23 Section: W1, Crs:3 CRN: 20189 TBA Benbourenane, Mohamed Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 7/1/2013 SPN 102 Elem Spanish II July 8 - August 23 Section: W1, Crs: 3 CRN: 20030 TBA Gonzalez, Arcides Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 7/1/2013 CSC 201 Internet Concepts July 8 - August 23 Section: W1, Crs: 3 CRN: 20188 TBA Chen, Weifeng Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 7/1/2013 DMA 092 Intro Algebra July 8 - August 23 Section: W1, Crs: 3 CRN: 20184 TBA Boukaabar, Kaddour Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 7/1/2013 ECO 202 Intro Macro July 8 - August 23 Section: W1, Crs: 3 CRN: 20118 TBA Cole, Ismail Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 7/1/2013 MAT 130 Elementary Topics in Math II July 8 - August 23 Section: W1, Crs: 3 CRN: 20179 TBA Novak, George Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 7/1/2013 MAT 191 College Trig July 8 - August 23 Section: W1, Crs: 3 TBA Junes, Leandro Billing: 5/7/2013

CRN: 20181 Due: 7/1/2013

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SUMMER COLLEGE 23


First Five-Weeks – Undergraduate Code/Code #/Title

Section

Crs

Days

Start

End

Bldg

Rm

Instructor

CRN #

ART & DESIGN ART 382 Ceramics Studio

01

3

MTWR

10:10 AM

12:25 PM

VUL

100

(724) 938-4182

Richard Miecznikowski

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE BIO 103 Continuing Issues in Biology BIO 125 General Botany BIO 125 General Botany

01 1A 1B

3 4 MTWR 0 MTWR

5:00 PM 8:00 AM 10:15 AM

8:45 PM 10:05 AM 12:20 PM

FRI FRI FRI

202 303 309

(724) 938-4200

Louise Nicholson Robert Whyte Robert Whyte

BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS ECO 102 Economics for Elem Ed FIN 301 Financial Mgmt

W1 01

1 3

TBA MW

TBA 5:30 PM

TBA 9:30 PM

TBA WAT

TBA 110

1A 1B 01

4 0 4

MTWR MTWR MTWR

8:00 AM 10:15 AM 4:30 PM

10:05 AM 12:30 PM 8:10 PM

NSC NSC NSC

112 214 134

COM 101 Oral Communication

01

3

TR

5:00 PM

8:45 PM

MOR

204

EDU 333 Tech in Teaching & Learning 01

3

TR

8:30 AM

12:15 PM

KEY

400

W1

1

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

W1

1

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

20226

(724) 938-4135 20310

(724) 938-4180

Thomas Mueller

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE POS 102 American Govt for Elem Ed

(724) 938-4170

Marcia Hoover

EARTH SCIENCE GEO 102 Geographic Systems for Elem Ed

20169 20170 20173

Dencil Backus

EARLY MIDDLE AND SPECIAL ED

20343 20119

(724) 938-4147

Matthew Price Matthew Price William Dieterle

COMMUNICATION STUDIES

20334 20009 20010

(724) 938-4371

Paul Hettler Arshad Chawdhry

CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS CHE 331 Organ Chemistry I CHE 331 Organ Chemistry I PHY 101 College Physics I

20313

20341

(724) 938-4054

TBA

Melanie Blumberg

Rm

Instructor

20342

Second Five-Weeks – Undergraduate Code/Code #/Title

Section

Crs

Days

Start

End

Bldg

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE BIO 120 General Zoology BIO 120 General Zoology

1A 1B

4 0

MTWR MTWR

8:00 AM 10:15 AM

10:05 AM 12:20 PM

FRI FRI

100 209

Summer Arrigo-Nelson Summer Arrigo-Nelson

01 01 01

3 1 4

MTWR MTWR MTWR

8:00 AM 10:15 AM 4:30 PM

10:10 AM 12:30 PM 8:10 PM

NSC NSC NSC

112 214 134

Matthew Price Matthew Price William Dieterle

01

3

TR

5:00 PM

8:45 PM

MOR

240

Macdonald Kale

W1

3

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

Staff

01

3

MW

5:00 PM

8:45 PM

KEY

211

Staff

01

3

MW

1:00 PM

4:45 PM

HAM

146

Mary Popovich

CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS CHE 341 Organic Chemistry II CHE 342 Organic Chemistry II Lab PHY 202 College Physics II

.

24 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA

20089

(724) 938-4070

HEALTH SCIENCE HSC 315 First Aid & Personal Safety

20227

(724) 938-4135

ENGLISH ENG 100 English Language Skills

20171 20172 20174

(724) 938-4170

EARLY MIDDLE AND SPECIAL ED ESP 210 SpEd Found Collab

20007 20008

(724) 938-4147

COMMUNICATION STUDIES COM 250 Oral Com Management

CRN #

(724) 938-4200

20109

(724) 938-4562 20036


Ten-Weeks – Un­dergraduate Code/Code #/Title

Section

Crs

Days

Start

End

Bldg

Rm

Instructor

CRN #

APPLIED ENGINEERING & TECH ITE 305 OSHA General Industrial Safety W1 ITE 341 Quality Control W1

3 3

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

(724) 938-4085

David Kolick John Thompson

ART & DESIGN ART 109 Landmarks of World Art

W1

3

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

(724) 938-4182

Persinger, Cynthia

BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS ACC 200 Financial Accounting BUS 100 Intro to Business BUS 242 Business Law I BUS 342 Bus Society & Government MGT 300 Principles of Management MGT 301 Organized Behavior MGT 352 Human Resource Mgmt MGT 371 Mgt Information System MGT 402 Strategic Mgt MGT 452 Hum Res Str & Plng MKT 300 Principles of Marketing MKT 401 Marketing Mgmt MKT 421 Consumer Behavior

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

Edward Mendola Clyde Roberts Joseph Schwerha Joseph Schwerha John Michaels John Michaels Burrell Brown Staff Louise Serafin Louise Serafin Shirley Lazorchak Richard LaRosa Richard LaRosa

W1

3

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

Barbara Bonfanti

W1 W1 W1

3 3 3

TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA

Sylvia Foil Rick Cumings Susan Jasko

COM 378 Special Topics in Communications

01 01 01

3 3 3 3

TBA T T M

TBA 5:00 PM 1:00 PM 5:00 PM

TBA 8:45 PM 4:45 PM 8:45 PM

TBA TBA KEY 402 KEY 404 KEY 106

Staff Connie Monroe Staff Staff

W1 W2 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1

3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

Chad Kauffman Chad Kauffman Kyle Fredrick Kyle Fredrick Chad Kauffman Thomas Mueller Susan Ryan Susan Ryan Thomas Wickham

W1 W1

3 3

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

Pratul Pathak Carole Waterhouse

W1 W1

3 3

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

Ayanna Lyles Chris Harman

3 3 3 3 3

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

Kelton Edmonds Sean Madden Laura Tuennerman Michael Slaven Melanie Blumberg

ECE 707 Leadership Mgmt in Early Child Se W1 EDU 350 Supporting the English Language ESP 311 Assessment & Pos Behav Intrven

GEO 277 Casinos & Gaming Entertainment

GEO 325 Geography Europe

20108 20359

(724) 938-4562

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE HIS 101 US History to 1877 HIS 308 His Am Constitution HIS 325 History of American Women HIS 350 Adolf Hitler POS 300 Public Policy

20062 20063 20064 20065 20066 20067 20068 20320 20069

(724) 938-4070

HEALTH SCIENCE ATE 340 Sports Nutrition HSC 115 Current Health Issues

20333 20312 20311 20098

(724) 938-4180

ENGLISH ENG 217 Sci & Tech Writ ENG 101 English Comp I

20223 20224 20225

(724) 938-4135

EARTH SCIENCE EAS 100 Intro to Earth Science EAS 100 Intro to Earth Science EAS 131 Intro Envir Geology EAS 150 Intro to Geology EAS 163 Intro Oceanography GEO 100 Intro to Geography GEO 205 World Cities/Geo Tour

20215

(724) 938-4170

EARLY MIDDLE AND SPECIAL ED EDU 310 Teaching Multicultural Society

20110 20112 20113 20115 20121 20122 20123 20124 20125 20126 20128 20175 20129

(724) 938-4175

COMMUNICATION STUDIES COM 275 Art of Film COM 332 Radio/TV News

20192

(724) 938-4371

W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1

COMMUNICATION DISORDERS CMD 108 Nature of Language

20045 20044

W1 W1 W1 W1 W1

20035 20034

(724) 938-4054 20005 20001 20003 20002 20004

.

SUMMER COLLEGE 25


Ten-Weeks — Undergraduate (cont.) Code/Code #/Title

Section

Crs

Days

Start

End

Bldg

Rm

Instructor

JUSTICE LAW AND SOCIETY JUS 305 International Criminal Justice

JUS 376 Criminal Procedure JUS 399 Selected Topics: Media Violence

JUS 429 Terrorism JUS 487 Computer Forensics JUS 495 Res Methods In Justice Studies

LEA 100 Introduction to Leadership SOC 315 Social Minorities SOC 317 Sociology Sub Use & Abuse

W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1 W1

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

W1

3

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

W1

3

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

PHI 200 World Religions

W1

3

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

3 3

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

W1 W1 W1 W1 W1

3 3 3 3 3

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

W1

3

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

W1

3

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

WST 340 International Violence Women

.

26 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA

W1 W1

3 3

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

TBA TBA

(412) 467-1348 20167 20168

(724) 938-4100 20076 20078 20077 20079 20080

(724) 938-5910 20037

(724) 938-4220

William O’Donnell

WOMEN’S STUDIES WST 200 Intro to Women Studies

20006

Staff

THEATRE THE 100 Intro to the Theatre

(724) 938-4250

Carrie Rosengart Rebecca Regeth Carrie Rosengart Holiday Adair Rebecca Regeth

SOCIAL WORK SOW 303 Human Sex & Society

20136

Staff Staff

PSYCHOLOGY PSY 100 General Psychology PSY 211 Social Psychology PSY 216 Child Psych to Age 4 PSY 305 Psych Personality PSY 311 Psy of Gender Roles

(724) 938-4242

Nancy Shaffer

PROFESSIONAL STUDIES LAW 340 Family Law W1 LAW 420 Law and Conflict Resolution W1

20032

Yugo Ikach

PHILOSOPHY

20060 20012 20013 20014 20015 20017 20357 20019 20020

(724) 938-4246

Mary Randall

MUSIC MUS 100 Intro to Music

(724) 938-4424

John Cencich Staff Emily Sweitzer Aref Al-Khattar Raymond Hsieh Aref Al-Khattar Michael Hummel Elizabeeth Larsen Staff

MODERN LANGUAGES AND CULTURES FRE 101 Elem French I

CRN #

20028

(724) 938-4168

Marta McClintock-Comeaux 20022 Marta McClintock-Comeaux 20344


Off-campus Centers Course Information Summer 2013 Students may register on-line at www.calu.edu through the VIP Portal, fax or mail their registration, or register in person at each site.

Southpointe Registration Southpointe courses are offered at California University Southpointe Center, 135 Technology Drive, Southpointe Industrial Park, Canonsburg, Pa.

Current Southpointe Students

Current Southpointe students may register for Summer College beginning January 21, 2013, online or in person at the Office of Academic Records, Dixon 122.

New Students Planning to Attend Southpointe

New students must first apply for admission to California University. Please contact the Admissions office at 724-938-4404 for more information. Applications for Summer College are now being accepted.

Graduate Classes at Southpointe Ten-Weeks Code/Code #/Title

Section

Crs

Days

Start

End

Bldg

Rm

Instructor

CRN #

BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS ACC 711 Managerial Accounting

S1

3

R

05:30 PM

09:30 PM

SPT

TBA

(724) 938-4371

Clyde Roberts

20132

.

SUMMER COLLEGE 27


Graduate School

Course Information

Summer College 2013 Register online at www.calu.edu through the VIP Portal. Daily 7 a.m.–11:30 p.m. (Times may vary due to occasional system upgrades.)

Once 67% of class time has elapsed you may no longer withdraw.

Graduate School Office: 724-938-4187 Global Online Office: 724-938-5958 Toll Free Number: 1-866-595-6348 Are you interested in a web-based program? The Cal U Global Online programs are delivered over the Internet, so that students can logon and complete their school work when it’s convenient for them. The asynchronous format allows students the freedom to fit classes into their busy lifestyle, and to work at home, in the office or at any time day or night. If you have questions about Global Online programs, please call the office or e-mail at calugo@calu.edu.

Online Degrees Bachelor of Science Degrees – Sports Management: Wellness & Fitness – BA in Arabic Language and Culture

Master’s Degrees Exercise Science & Health Promotion – Wellness & Fitness – Performance Enhancement & Injury Prevention – Rehabilitation Sciences – Sport Psychology Legal Studies – Homeland Security – Law and Public Policy – Criminal Justice Sports Management – Sports Management Studies – Intercollegiate Athletic Administration – Sports Counseling

.

28 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA

Masters of Arts in Teaching – Advanced Studies in Secondary Education (Certified teachers only) Masters of Education – K-12 Principal – Technology Education – Early Childhood Education – English as a Second Language – National Board Teacher Certification Preparation – Science, Tecnology, Engineering and Math STEM Masters of Science in Nursing – Administration and Leadership Master of Arts Social Science: Applied Criminology Certificate – Superintendent’s letter of Eligibility K-12 – Sports Counseling – Intercollegiate Athletic Administration – Early Childhood Education – Arabic – Spanish for Business – Spanish for Law Enforcement Post Master’s Certificates – Wellness & Fitness – Performance Enhancement & Injury Prevention – Rehabilitation Sciences – Sport Psychology You must be an admitted graduate student in good standing to be eligible to register for Summer 2013 classes. Prospective students who need information about programs, admission requirements, or application procedures should consult the graduate Web page at www.calu.edu/graduate. If you are a prospective student interested in information about online programs, please call the office at 1-866-595-6348 or e-mail at calugo@cal.edu. Current graduate students who need information about candidacy, comprehensive exams, graduation checkout, or any other academic matters should refer to the Graduate Web page at www.calu.edu/graduate. Call the Graduate Office at 724-938-4187 or e-mail gradschool@calu.edu for more information.


Graduate Special Session Courses Beginning in May 2013 EDU 501 Fld Exp in Urban Center May 20 - June 1 Section: X1, Crs: 3 CRN: 20307 MTWRF Armitage, Connie Billing : 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013

ESP 503 Assess/Prescriptive Teaching May 20 - June 21 Section: 01, Crs: 3 CRN: 20209 MW 5:00 PM 8:45 PM Staff, KEY 102 Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/13/2013

Beginning in June 2013 ATE 705 EvidenceBased Pract in AthTrng June 3 - July 6 Section : W1, Crs:3 CRN: 20305 TBA DiCesaro, Shelly Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/28/2013 ATE 800 Res Meth in Allied Health Sci June 3 - July 6 Section: W1, Crs:3 CRN:20306 TBA West, Thomas Billing : 5/7/2013 Due: 5/28/2013 CMD 703 Fluency Disorders June 24 - July 11 Section: 01, Crs: 3 CRN: 20216 MTWR 8:00 AM 12:00 PM Bonfanti, Barbara MOR 276C Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 6/17/2013

EDP 600 Stat Methods June 3 - July 6 Section: W1, Crs: 3 TBA Sovak, Melissa Billing: 5/7/2013

CRN: 20303 Due: 5/28/2013

RSP 703 Pract Diag Case St June 17 - July 24 Section: 01, Crs: 3 CRN: 20308 MTWRF 8:00 AM-10:10 AM Peterson, Christine KEY 327 Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 6/10/2013 RSP 704 Pr Remedial Cs Stud June 17 - July 24 Section: 01, Crs: 3 CRN: 20309 MTWRF 10:15 AM-12:25 PM Peterson, Christine KEY 327 Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 6/10/2013

CMD 785 Seminar Speech Path June 3 - June 20 Section: 01, Crs: 3 CRN: 20217 MTWR 8:00 AM-12:00 PM Skwarecki, Robert MOR 276C Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 5/28/2013

Beginning in July 2013 ATE 700 Human Gross Anatomy July 8 - August 10 Section: 01, Crs:V CRN: 20304 MTWR 8:00 AM-12:25 PM Zuchelkowski, HAM 142 Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 7/1/2013

CMD 713 Appl Sp Dx Proced July 15 - August 1 Section: 01, Crs: 3 CRN: 20218 MTWR 8:00 AM-12:00 PM Carlino, Nancy MOR 276C Billing: 5/7/2013 Due: 7/8/2013

.

SUMMER COLLEGE 29


First Five Weeks Code/Code #/Title

Section

Crs

Days

Start

End

Bldg

Rm

EARLY, MIDDLE, AND SPECIAL EDUCATION ESP 610 Spec Ed Foundations Collab W1 3 TBA TBA TBA ESP 739 Fld Exp Sem Sp Ed W1 3 TBA TBA TBA

Instructor Staff Staff

CRN # (724) 938-4135 20088 20210

Second Five Weeks Code/Code #/Title

Section

Crs

Days

Start

End

Bldg

Rm

EARLY, MIDDLE, AND SPECIAL EDUCATION ESP 610 Spec Ed Foundations Collab W2 3 TBA TBA TBA ESP 743 Navigating SocWrld: ASD W1 3 TBA TBA TBA

Instructor Staff Staff

CRN # (724) 938-4135 20091 20090

Ten-Weeks — Graduate Code/Code #/Title

Section

Crs

Days

Start

End

Bldg

Rm

Instructor

CRN #

BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS 724) 938-4371 ACC 711 Managerial Accounting 01 3 R 5:30 PM 9:30 PM EBE 120 Clyde Roberts 20131 ACC 711 Managerial Accounting S1 3 R 5:30 PM 9:30 PM SPT TBA Clyde Roberts 20132 ECO 716 Applied Economic Analysis W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Ismail Cole 20133 FIN 711 Corporate Finance W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Arshad Chawdhry 20134 MGT 742 Human Resource Mgt W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Burrell Brown 20135 COUNSELOR EDUCATION (724) 938-4123 CED 785 Research Methods in Counseling 01 3 R 5:00 PM 9:30 PM KEY 404 Grafton Eliason 20194 CED 786 Career Counseling 01 3 M 5:00 PM 9:30 PM KEY 419 John Patrick 20195 CED 787 Integr Collabor and Consult 01 3 W 5:00 PM 9:30 PM KEY 419 Elizabeth Gruber 20196 CED 788 Special Topics Gambling Addict W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Staff 20197 EARLY MIDDLE AND SPECIAL ED EDE 701 Develop Organized Curriculum W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Staff ELE 711 Tchg & Assessment in Mathematics 01 3 T 5:00 PM 8:45 PM KEY 300A Staff ELE 718 Tch & Assment-Expressive Arts 01 3 W 5:00 PM 8:45 PM KEY 327 Staff ESP 612 Evidenced Based Practice Elem Incl W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Staff ESP 622 Adv Evidence Based Prac Prek-8 01 3 R 5:00 PM 8:45 PM KEY 106 Staff ESP 701 Intro to Behav Anal W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Staff RSP 706 Tch Rdg Adult Literacy W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Staff

(724) 938-4135 20093 20095 20096 20099 20100 20101 20211

GRADUATE STUDIES RES 800 Methods in Research W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Staff

(724) 938-4187 20214

PSYCHOLOGY (724) 938-4100 PSY 702 Psychopathology of Childhood W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Angela Bloomquist 20081 PSY 712 Adv Psych Learning W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Kirk John 20082 PSY 713 Psy Growth Develop W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Angela Bloomquist 20083 PSY 720 Neuropsychology 01 3 M 5:30 PM 9:30 PM MOR 311 Elizabeth Mason 20084 PSY 721 Tests Measurements 01 3 T 5:30 PM 9:30 PM MOR 329 Elizabeth Mason 20085 PSY 796 Res Sem Sch Psych W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Kirk John 20086 SECONDARY EDUCATION (724) 938-4140 MSE 645 Tech in 7-12 Education W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Marcia Hoover 20143 MSE 646 Assesments and Interv 7 - 12 W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Keith Hepner 20144 MSE 651 Methods of English W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Staff 20137 MSE 652 Methods of Mathematics W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Barbara Hess 20138 MSE 653 Methods of Science W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Staff 20139 MSE 654 Meth Soc Stud Teach W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Staff 20140 MSE 655 Meth Art Teach K-12 W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Susan Mohney 20141 MSE 656 Meth For Lang Teach W1 3 TBA TBA TBA Connie Monroe 20142 SOCIAL WORK SWK 821 Sw Interv Subab/Adc 01 3 T 5:00 PM 9:00 PM KEY 211 Staff

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30 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA

(724) 938-5910 20061


Undergraduate Course Descriptions ACCOUNTING — ACC ACC 200. FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING. The fundamentals of accounting concepts and procedures for sole proprietors, partnerships, and corporations. The interpretation and use of financial statements and other relevant accounting information will be emphasized. (3 crs.) ACC 491. ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP. Practicum with public accounting firms, government, or industry. Prerequisites: 18 credits in accounting and permission of instructor. (Repeatable; Variable crs.; a maximum of 12 credits may be used toward a baccalaureate degree.) ANT — ANTHROPOLOGY ANT 101. ARCHAEOLOGY FIELD SCHOOL. An introduction to archaeological procedures by participation in the excavation of a site, this course provides the opportunity for students to be involved in all phases of an archaeological excavation, from initial preparation of the site for excavation through the processing of artifacts at the campus archaeological laboratory. (3-6 crs., summer only) ANT 329. ANTHROPOLOGY INTERNSHIP. Learning new ideas and skills, as well as applying those already learned in class, is the objective of an internship. Internships are conducted under the guidance of both an onsite and a campus supervisor. Internships are a means for exploring career opportunities. (Variable crs.) ARB — ARABIC ARB 101. ELEMENTARY ARABIC I This is the beginner level in Arabic. This course covers and emphasizes the development of the basic skills of the Arabic language and includes instruction in basic pronunciation, comprehension, communication, and grammar. Students will also become acquainted with the culture of the Arab world and establish a solid foundation for more advanced courses in Arabic. Prerequisite: None (3 crs.) ARB 102. ELEMENTARY ARABIC II Elementary Arabic II is the continuation of Elementary Arabic I. This course continues to introduce students to the people and culture of the Arabic-speaking world. Students will become familiar with Arabic grammar and language structure. They will have maximum opportunity to use the different language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Students will develop greater competency in understanding MSA in both its written and spoken forms and in producing the language in writing and speech. This course will have a greater emphasis on active vocabulary learning, proper grammatical application and on developing the ability to use the language in real-world everyday situations. Prerequisite: ARB 101 or equivalent (3 crs.) ART — ART ART 109. LANDMARKS OF WORLD ART. An introduction to the major movements in art which

helped shape Western civilization, this course is a survey of historical and contemporary approaches to painting, sculpture and architecture. (3 crs.) ART 329. ART INTERNSHIP. Supervised experience provides the specific technical skills used in the art world outside the classroom and studio, e.g., mounting exhibits, techniques of art restoration, graphic arts production techniques, and promoting arts and cultural events. (Variable crs.) ART 382. CERAMICS STUDIO. An introductory exploration of clay through hand building techniques and the potter’s wheel. Students examine the various forms and functions of the ceramic vessel. The course focuses on forming processes and the glazing and firing of pieces made in the studio. (3 crs.) ATHLETIC TRAINING — ATE ATE 340. SPORTS NUTRITION. This course covers nutrition and its applications to health and sports and is designed to provide the student with a sound nutritional background so that sound decisions may be made concerning all aspects of nutrition. Additionally, specific nutritional techniques used to improve athletic performance are addressed. (3 crs.) BIOLOGY — BIO BIO 103. CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN BIOLOGY. Basic biological principles are applied to the understanding of current social-biological problems and how these relate to an individual’s personal life. Topics included are human sexuality, nutrition, health and disease, evolution, behavior, and the diversity of life. Three lecture-hours weekly. For students not majoring in Biology. (3 crs.) BIO 120. GENERAL ZOOLOGY. A comprehensive survey of the animal kingdom, the course places an emphasis on evolutionary relationships and the interrelationships of animals with their environments. Laboratory study of representative members of the major phyla is included. Three lecture-hours and three laboratoryhours weekly. Prerequisite: BIO 115. (4 crs.) BIO 125. GENERAL BOTANY. This course is a survey of form and function of the major plant groups as well as the bacteria, algae, water molds, slime molds and fungi within the overall framework of a modern phylogenetic system of classification. Three lecturehours and three laboratory-hours weekly. (4 crs.) BIO 226. BASIC MICROBIOLOGY. This course provides a survey of the prokaryotic and the medically important concepts of microbiology, including microbial control, acquisition of disease, and disease prevention and control. Prerequisites: This course is for students who are enrolled in a nursing program, or have obtained permission of the instructor. Three lecture-hours and three laboratory-hours weekly. (4 crs.) Fall and Summer

.

SUMMER COLLEGE 31


BIO 492. BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE INTERNSHIP. Student interns are placed with an organization or institution which most nearly approximates their goals for employment. The intent of the internship is to provide students with practical work experience in an environment in which they will be dealing with practical problems requiring real solutions in a relatively short time frame. Advisor and department chairperson approval is required before course enrollment. A total of 6 credits may be applied toward graduation in the following manner: A maximum of 3 credits may be applied to an appropriate core area in the Biology curriculum. In the Environmental Studies and Pre-Professional programs, a maximum of 3 credits can be applied to the related electives area. In addition, a maximum of 3 credits may be applied to the free electives area in the general education requirement of any program. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and permission of the department (Variable: 1-12 crs BUSINESS — BUS BUS 100. INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS. This course provides background and insight into business organizations. It covers a variety of basic business concepts. The course focuses on major issues that affect today’s organizations, such as domestic and global environments, corporate social responsibilities and ethics, managing businesses, people in organizations, marketing principles, accounting and financial issues, and information technology. Students will learn the many areas involved in operating a business in today’s society and explore how businesses influence and interact with the social, political, legal, economic, technical, cultural, and global external environments. (3 crs.) BUS 242. BUSINESS LAW I. A study of commercial law as it relates to contracts, agency, and criminal and constitutional law pertaining to business. (3 crs.) BUS 342. BUSINESS, SOCIETY AND GOVERNMENT. A survey of the historical and contemporary relationship between government and business in the United States. Special emphasis is given to the developments of the past two decades. Prerequisite: MGT 300 or permission of instructor. (3 crs.) BUS 492. BUSINESS INTERNSHIP. The student is placed with a business firm, bank, government agency, or nonprofit organization for on-the-job and/ or counseling experience. It offers a practical training ground for students that supplements academic training by permitting them to address actual problems in a real business environment. Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of instructor. (Repeatable; Variable crs.; a maximum of 12 credits may be used toward a baccalaureate degree.) COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY — CET CET 495. COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY INTERNSHIP. Student interns work with professionals in a computer engineering technology-related field to apply their understanding of computer hardware and software. The intent of the internship is to provide the student with practical

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32 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA

work experience solving actual problems in a dynamic environment, yielding enhanced job opportunities upon graduation. Upper-level class standing and permission of the instructor, the department chair, and the dean are required before course enrollment. CHEMISTRY — CHE CHE 101. GENERAL CHEMISTRY I. An introductory course for majors and non-majors. Topics covered include atomic structure, bonding, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, solutions, and the gaseous state. Three class-hours and three laboratory-hours each week. Prerequisites: High school chemistry or CHE familiarity with algebraic manipulations and simple graphing is expected. (4 crs.) CHE 331. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I. An introduction to the basic principles that govern the reactions of carbon-based compounds. Particular emphasis is placed on introduction of the basic functional groups and their structural and stereochemical properties. An introduction to reactions of functional groups, including alkanes, alkyl halides, alcohols, alkenes, alkynes, and conjugated systems through study of reaction mechanisms, molecular modeling, and synthesis. Students are introduced to and trained in important purification techniques and instrumentation used for characterizing molecules. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: CHE 101, CHE 102. (4 crs.) Summer and fall. CHE 341 AND CHE 342 LAB. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II. A continuation of the study of organic functional groups. The student continues study of the properties, reactions and mechanistic evaluations of important functional groups, including aromatics, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amides and amines. Organic synthesis is introduced as a means toward interconversion of functional groups. Theory and interpretation of infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry as a means to determining molecular structure is also introduced. Students will also be trained in design, implementation and report of experiments through an independent project. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: CHE 101, CHE 102, and CHE 331. (4 crs.) CHE 410. CHEMISTRY INTERNSHIP. The student is provided an opportunity to work in an industrial or nonprofit research laboratory. This practical training is intended to supplement the academic program. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and permission of the department. (Variable: 1-12 crs.) CMD — COMMUNICATION DISORDERS CMD 108. NATURE OF LANGUAGE. This is a course about both the history and current use of language. A major focus of this course is to analyze the various components of language: phonetics, phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, and the written representation. The sociocultural influence (dialects, accents) of language is also discussed. A comparison is made between human and animal languages. Lastly, language function is compared with brain structure. (3 crs.) .


COMMUNICATIONS — COM COM 101. ORAL COMMUNICATION. This course is designed to develop the knowledge and skill necessary for preparing and presenting extemporaneous speeches to accomplish informative and persuasive goals on issues of civil, political, or cultural importance. Course topics include audience analysis, research, organization, language use, and delivery that facilitate effective communication with audiences. (3 crs.) COM 250. ORAL COMMUNICATION: MANAGEMENT. Develop an awareness of, and an appreciation for, communication in the business world; preparing and presenting oral reports and speeches designed especially for persons who function in organizations, businesses, or industries. (3 crs.) COM 275. THE ART OF FILM. This course provides an introduction to the study of film and covers fundamental concepts in the history, aesthetics, style, technique, and critical interpretation of film. The course emphasizes the filmmaker as a creative artist. (3 crs.) COM 459. COMMUNICATION STUDIES INTERNSHIP. Opportunities for practical, professional communication work and field experiences in various off-campus settings. Internships are to be jointly administered by an on-site supervisor and the departmental internship supervisor. (Variable crs.)

develop a student’s proficiency in web page design and publishing. Students will learn HTML (the language of the world wide web). Students will utilize various techniques to produce a personal web page and may work in groups to produce a small web-site. Prerequisite: Windows Experience. (3 crs.) CSC 419. INTERNSHIP. This course is designed for the computer science major who is seeking work experience in the computer science area. This intern experience will enable students to apply their knowledge of computers in the real workplace. The internship will provide the student with the valuable computer experience that should enhance the student’s job opportunities upon graduation. Prerequisite: Students should have completed 64 credits with a good QPA plus have sufficient background to meet the needs of the particular internship in which they will be participating. (Variable crs.) EARTH SCIENCE — EAS EAS 100. INTRODUCTION TO EARTH SCIENCE. This introductory course is designed to acquaint the student with the four general areas of earth science: astronomy, geology, meteorology, and oceanography. The course consists of two hours of lecture and one hour of lab work. (3 crs.)

COM 332. RADIO AND TELEVISION WRITING: NEWS. A study in the writing of news, commentary and documentary scripts for radio and television, this course also focuses on the press conference. Prerequisites: COM 141 or COM 142 or permission of instructor. (3 crs.)

EAS 131. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY. This course deals with the interaction between man and his geologic environment. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of basic geologic principles and case studies of some of the classic examples of environmental problems. Laboratory exercises and problems are an integral part of the course. This is intended as a survey course and a student needs only a limited background in geology. (3 crs.)

COM 378. SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION. Seeks to increase understanding of the management of public relations campaigns by integrating communication theory with professional practice. Special attention is given to techniques for designing, implementing and evaluating effective campaign strategies for clients. Prerequisites: COM 203 and COM 303 (3 crs.)

EAS 150. INTRODUCTION TO GEOLOGY. A survey course intended primarily for the non-science major. Topics considered include the make-up of the earth, internal and external processes that occur within or on the earth, rocks and minerals, fossils, earth’s origin and evolution, and the origin and evolution of life on this planet. Laboratory work is an integral part of the course. (4 crs.)

COMPUTING SCIENCES — CSC

EAS 163. INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY. An introductory course in the study of the four main branches of oceanography: (1) geology of the oceanic basins (origins of the oceans, structure and geomorphology of the ocean’s floor, methods of investigation); (2) chemistry of the oceans’ waters; (3) physics of the oceans (currents, waves, tides, etc.); (4) biology of the oceans (marine plants and animals). No preliminary studies required, but previous course work in EAS 100 or EAS 150 recommended. (3 crs.)

CSC 101. PERSONAL PRODUCTIVITY SOFTWARE. This course provides a structured laboratory experience designed to develop and enhance a student’s proficiency in using selected Windows microcomputer application software packages. Prerequisite: None (3 crs.) CIS 110. INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION SYSTEMS. This course is an introductory study of information systems and their technology. Major topics include the role and value of information systems, hardware and software used in information technology, managing information and data resources, and decision making in developing information systems. Prerequisite: None. (3 crs.) CSC 201. INTERNET CONCEPTS. Approved UCC 2.2006. This hands-on course will develop proficiency using systems running Windows XP, will introduce the student to all facets of the Internet, and will

EAS 175. FIELD COURSE IN EARTH SCIENCE I. This course provides the student with opportunities to study meteorological, climatological, geological and oceanographic phenomena in situ; to apply the scientific method; to acquire critical thinking skills by examining earth features and processes and anthropogenic effects on selected natural phenomena; to understand the value of selected earth processes and features; and to quantify natural phenomena. Students will participate in an excursion. (3 crs.)

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EAS 492. FIELD COURSE IN GEOLOGY. This course provides advanced geology students with opportunities to study geology in situ. Field trips to classic and less well-known sites will be incorporated with lectures, data collection and scientific reporting. Laboratory exercises will reflect field experiences. (Variable crs.) ECONOMICS — ECO ECO 102. ECONOMICS FOR ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJORS. This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of economic focusing on a basic understanding of the economic way of thinking.(1 cr) ECO 201. INTRODUCTORY MICROECONOMICS. An introduction to the market mechanism in a modern mixed economy; supply and demand analysis is applied to consumer markets as well as resource markets. (3 crs.) ECO 202. INTRODUCTORY MACROECONOMICS. An introduction to the determination of national income; problems of inflation and unemployment; international trade; and economic growth. Emphasis is placed on the roles of monetary and fiscal policy in the conduct of macroeconomic policy. Prerequisite: ECO 100 or ECO 201 is recommended. (3 crs.) EDUCATION — EDE/EDU EDE 322. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION SERVICES INTERNSHIP. This course introduces education services students to career opportunities of an educational nature, including child day care, classroom aides, docents, program planner, team-based trainer, exhibit development, Web design, and research. The students will complete an internship which is equivalent to 6 credits (approximately 20 hours per week), which could occur in settings such as libraries, museums, YMCA, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, local newspapers, and other settings. This course is for students who are interested in educational opportunities but are not seeking Pennsylvania teaching certification. Prerequisite 2.5 GPA; EDE 211 (6 crs.) Approved UCC 4.18.05. EDU 310. TEACHING IN A MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY. This course is designed to acquaint undergraduate students with basic concepts of multicultural education with emphasis on developing a culturally responsive classroom. The focus is on developing a classroom and school environment that enables all children, regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, language, religion, age, region, and disability, to achieve academic success. After an overview of leading multicultural education theories of James A. Banks, Paul Gorski, and others, students will study culture in the United States. Special emphasis will be placed on how each cultural element interacts with teaching and learning. Multicultural curricula and instructional strategies will also be addressed. This course will include self-examination of students’ values, beliefs, and stereotypical beliefs that must be addressed to assist all students’ success in school and understand one’s responsibility within a global society. (3 crs.) EDU 333. TECH IN TEACHING & LEARNING. This course provides the learner with fundamental concepts and skills that build a foundation for applying computer hardware and software in educational settings. This course focuses on computer as an object of instruction,

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a productivity tool, and an adjunct to instruction in the classroom. (3 crs) EDU 350. SUPPORTING ENGLISH IN THE CLASSROOM. This course examines research-based English Language Learner (ELL) teaching and learning methods in K-12 mainstream classrooms. The major theories of second language acquisition will be reviewed and their implications for the second language classroom will be discussed. The primary goals of this course are (a) to familiarize teacher candidates with major theoretical issues and researchbased methods in second language learning in formal and informal situations; (b) to provide teacher candidates with opportunities to develop communication strategies that will support their students learning; (c) to assist teacher candidates in becoming skillful at making appropriate teaching decisions that will nurture language learning among culturally and linguistically diverse students, in order to promote and increase academic achievement in the classrooms. Prerequisites: SEC 150 or TED 100 or EDE 200 or ECE 200 or ESP 301 (3 crs) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY — EET EET 495. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY INTERNSHIP. Upon acceptance to an internship site, the student will work with an electrical engineer and/or an electronic technician inspecting, maintaining, calibrating, testing, analyzing, assembling, modifying, or designing various types of electronic devices. Programs of instruction will vary, but the student will be provided with practical work experience in a dynamic environment in which they will be dealing with actual problems requiring practical solutions. Advisor, department chairperson, and college dean approval is required before course enrollment. Prerequisite: Upperlevel standing. (4 crs.) Fall, spring, and summer. ENGLISH — ENG ENG 100. ENGLISH LANGUAGE SKILLS. This beginning course provides guided practice in writing and reading, with emphasis on the interrelationship of reading, thinking and writing. English Language Skills stresses fundamental principles of and attitudes toward writing, as well as how to put these principles and attitudes into practice. It emphasizes the ability to read correctly and to organize material effectively and, by adherence to the innate logic of language (revealed in its rules of grammar, syntax, punctuation and vocabulary choice), to express ideas clearly and precisely. (3 crs.) ENG101. ENGLISH COMP I. Composition I is a sequel to English Language Skills. It provides guided practice in writing, with emphasis on thoughtful analysis of subject matter, clear understanding of the writing situation, flexible use of rhetorical strategies and development of stylistic options, particularly those related to an understanding of a variety of purposes and voices. ENG 101 continues the development of the essential writing, reading and thinking skills stressed in ENG 100. (3 crs.) ENG 217. SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL WRITING I. An introduction to the specific techniques used in the preparation of reports and other scientific documents, the course is recommended for science and technology majors. Prerequisite ENG 101 (3 crs.)


ENG 419. INTERNSHIP IN PROFESSIONAL WRITING. An internship is a 120-hour, work-based and academic experience, emphasizing learning in a professional setting. Internships are supervised by both a work-site supervisor and a faculty supervisor and are designed to give the student a broad understanding of the particular writing and professional practices of the internship sites. The faculty member assigns the grade. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 (3 crs.) ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES — ENS ENS 480. TOPICS IN FIELD BIOLOGY. A specialized off-campus residential program which emphasize ecology, behavior and the natural history of organisms in their natural environments. Students will be trained in a variety of methods used in field biology and have the opportunity to contribute to original research projects. Program focus will vary, depending on the length of the course and the site at which the course is offered. Course may be repeated as the topic/site changes. Class-hours variable, depending on program length and prerequisites will be set by individual instructors. Instructor permission required to register. Prerequisites: Junior standing. (1-6 crs.) SPECIAL EDUCATION — ESP ESP 210 SPED FOUND COLLAB. This course is designed to provide information and skills necessary for accommodating exceptional learners in a variety of school arrangements. The primary focus is foundations and characteristics of special education and students with exceptionalities and collaboration/consultation for the successful inclusion of students with exceptionalities into the inclusionary classroom ESP 311. ASSESSMENT AND POSITIVE BEHAVIOR INTERVENTION. This course is required for all education or related services majors and is intended to provide future teachers with the fundamental knowledge, skills, and disposition: how to administer, score, and interpret both norm-referenced and criterion-referenced assessment devices; how to design appropriate learning environments to promote positive learning and reduce interfering behaviors; and how to design and implement schoolwide and classroom positive behavior interventions and supports. Co-requisite: ESP 210 (3 crs.) FINANCE — FIN FIN 301. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT. The study of financial analysis, planning and control, including: time value of money, risk and returns, working capital management, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and other selected subjects. Advanced techniques of financial analysis are employed. Prerequisite: MAT 181 and, ACC 200 or ACC 201. (3 crs.) FIN 492. FINANCE INTERNSHIP. On the completion of this course, the student should be able to see how the knowledge acquired in the finance courses is applied in real-world situations. It provides students with the opportunity to translate academic principles to real-world situations and to test their career interests. It will also enable students to determine what additional skills are needed to be successful in the workplace. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (Repeatable; variable credits; a maximum of 12 credits may be used toward a baccalaureate degree.)

FRENCH CULTURE — FRE FRE 101. ELEMENTARY FRENCH I. For the student without previous knowledge of French. The development of the fundamentals of correct idiomatic French. Instruction in basic audio-lingual comprehension, sentence structure, reading, writing, and speaking. Classroom instruction is supplemented by laboratory study and practice. Three class-hours each week and one hour language laboratory per week. (3 crs.) GRAPHICS AND MULTIMEDIA — GCM GCM 495. GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS INTERNSHIP. Student interns are placed with an organization that most nearly approximates employment goals. If this is not possible, students are placed in some type of graphics environment that is available at the time. The intent of the internship is to provide students with practical work experience in an environment in which they will be dealing with real problems requiring real solutions in a relatively short time frame. Advisor and department chairperson approval is required before course enrollment. This is a repeatable course and may be taken as follows: Students may earn up to 6 credits of internship. Prerequisite: Upperlevel standing. (1-6 crs.) Fall, spring and summer. GEOGRAPHY — GEO GEO 100. INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHY. Introduces students to regional differences throughout the world in terms of landforms, climates, soils, and vegetation as well as population characteristics and economic activities. Representative areas, such as western Europe, Russia, Japan, and Latin America, are developed. (3 crs.) GEO 102. GEOGRAPHIC SYSTEMS FOR ELEMENTARY ED. The geography component focuses on basic geographic literacy, physical characteristics of places and regions, human characteristics of places and regions, and the interactions between places and people. Co-requisites: ECO 102 and POS 102 (1 cr.) GEO 205. WORLD CITIES/GEOGRAPHY OF TOURISM. The geography of tourism in selected cities of the world with an emphasis on form and function. Topics include an analysis of resources for tourism, the organization of related land-use patterns, and developmental processes. (3 crs.) GEO 277. CASINOS & GAMING ENTERTAINMENT. Casinos and gaming entertainment are a growing sector of the tourism and hospitality industries. This course examines the history and development of gaming and casino operations. Managerial, technical, and operational concepts of casinos and gaming entertainment will be reviewed. Other topics will include regulatory issues and implications for game protection. Within a global context, the socio-cultural, environmental, and economic impacts of casinos and gaming entertainment will be examined. Responsible gaming operations andmanagement will be emphasized. GEO 325. GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE. A study of forces which have shaped the human landscape of western Europe. National and regional disparities ranging from land relief and climate to social and economic phenomena are studied. (3 crs.)

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GEO 479. INTERNSHIP. The internship provides the student with the opportunity to apply classroom theory to realistic, professional-level situations. It is intended to give the student a concentrated practical experience in a professional organization. The concepts and experiences acquired in the classroom are honed and fine-tuned at this level to prepare students for their career undertaking. (Variable crs.) GERONTOLOGY — GTY GTY 440. INTERNSHIP. Opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to practice through placement in agency or institution serving older people. Internship sites include senior centers, nursing homes, adult day centers, independent- and assisted-living facilities, area agencies on aging, and others. GTY 100, 200, 300, 305, and senior standing. (6-12 crs.) HISTORY — HIS HIS 101. HISTORY OF THE U.S. TO 1877. American history from the Pilgrims to the age of modern industry: the Colonial heritage, American Revolution, the emergence of a new nation, westward expansion, Civil War and postwar Reconstruction. (3 crs.). HIS 308. HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN CONSTITUTION. The growth of the American constitutional system, with special emphasis on those aspects of constitutional growth that relate closely to the fundamental structure of American government and social order. (3 crs.) HIS 325. HISTORY OF AMERICAN WOMEN. A study of women’s lives in America from the Colonial era until the present, this course places special emphasis on non-elite women, whose lives have often been hidden or devalued in the annals of history. Topics explored include reform, abolition, political activism, working conditions and contemporary issues. (3 crs.) HIS 329. HISTORY INTERNSHIP. Application of historical methodologies to various professional environments, under faculty supervision. (Variable crs.) Fall, spring and summer. HIS 350. ADOLF HITLER. The philosophical and psychological elements that led to the rise of National Socialism, and its impact upon the Western world. (3 crs.) HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION — HSC HSC 115. CURRENT HEALTH ISSUES. This course is designed to convey information concerning the individual’s role in establishing a healthful lifestyle as well as encouraging a sense of responsibility about that role. The current health framework encompasses topics, such as basic fitness and nutrition, the prevention of disease, as well as a focus on healthful living. Topics will be covered in lecture and interactive sessions by the instructor and the health student. (3 crs.) HSC 315 FIRST AID AND PERSONAL SAFETY First Aid and Personal Safety is a course designed to convey information to understand the cause-effect, prevention

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and treatment of emergency situations. This course is recommended to all students, especially students in the teacher education program. Two year certification if offered by the American Heart Association. (3 crs.) INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY — ITE ITE 305. OSHA GENERAL INDUSTRIAL SAFETY. The purpose of the course is to provide instruction to entry-level workers and students on general safety and health. The course will be offered either as a traditional in-class or an online teaching environment. Students enrolled in the traditional class/course (face-to-face) are eligible for an OSHA 30-hour General Industry Outreach Training card. Those enrolled in the online version of the course are not eligible. This course emphasizes hazard identification, avoidance and control. Topics covered include the following: introduction to OSHA, the OSHA Act/General Duty clause, inspections, citations and penalties, recordkeeping, walking and working surfaces, means of egress and fire protection, electrical hazards, personal protective equipment, respiratory protection, hearing protection, machine guarding, hazard communication, chemical safety, lockout/tagout, confined space hazards, welding, brazing and cutting hazards, asbestos awareness, hazardous materials, industrial hygiene, and ergonomics. (3 crs.) ITE 341. QUALITY CONTROL. An introduction to the methods used in analyzing quality control. Topics include a study of the fundamentals of statistics and probability, the construction and use of control and attribute charts, the definition and use of acceptance criteria, and the use of computers in modern quality control operations. An overview of the role of the quality control department of a manufacturing facility will be presented. (3 crs.) Summer. ITE 495. MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY INTERNSHIP. Student interns are placed with an Industrial organization which most nearly approximates their goals for employment. The intent of the internship is to provide students with practical work experience in an environment in which they will be dealing with practical problems requiring real solutions in a relatively short time frame. Advisor and Department Chairperson approval is required before course enrollment. This is a repeatable course and may be taken as follows: Students may take up to 6 credits. The extra credit may be used as a free elective or for a credit deficiency due to other program changes. Prerequisite: Upper Level Standing. (1–6 crs.) Fall, Spring & Summer JUSTICE, LAW & SOCIETY — JUS JUS 305. INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL JUSTICE. This course compares and contrasts the criminal justice system of the United States with the systems of other countries on a substantive and procedural basis. It provides a thorough examination of other cultural models of law and justice so that differences in justice processing and definition become apparent. Emphasis is placed on international policing, international crimes and international courts. (3 crs.) JUS 376. CRIMINAL PROCEDURE. This procedural law course includes a review of the law of arrests, search and seizure; the making of bail; adjudication; pretrial and posttrial activities; and the nature


of plea bargaining. Substantial emphasis is given to the constitutional protections afforded through the Bill of Rights, particularly the 1st, 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th and 14th. The course deals extensively with case law applications of these principles and the role of judge and jurist in the crafting of criminal process standards. Prerequisite: JUS 101 or permission of the instructor. (3 crs.) JUS 399. SELECTED TOPICS IN LAW AND JUSTICE. (Media Violence) A focused examination of an emerging and dynamic problem or issue in the study and practice of criminal justice. Special subject matter not ordinarily covered in the existing curricula can be presented by interested faculty. Examples include, but are not limited to, alternative punishment schemes, euthanasia and mercy killing, civil disobedience and the rule of law, minorities in the justice system, affirmative action policy, police use of force, and women in criminal justice. (3 crs.) JUS 429. TERRORISM. Examines current terrorism, its origins and ideological bases, with particular attention to its relation to political institutions and the criminal justice process. Specific attention is given methods and means of the terrorist, motivations and modus operandi trends, and predictability and law enforcement’s multifaceted reactions to its many devious forms. Legislative efforts to curb the scourge of terrorism are also highlighted. (3 crs.) JUS 487. COMPUTER FORENSICS. This course is designed to expose students to legal and technical aspects of computer forensics. The methods of the collection, preservation, analysis and presentation of digital evidence will be presented to properly conduct a computer forensics investigation. The focus of this course will be on how law enforcement obtains electronic evidence, maintaining the evidentiary chain, as well as the legal aspects of the search and seizures of computers and related materials. Prerequisite: JUS 105 or permission of the instructor. (3 crs.) JUS 495. RESEARCH METHODS IN JUSTICE STUDIES. A criminal justice exploration of the specialized methods and sources of legal and justice research in these areas: justice publications and resources, case collections, computerassisted research, constitutional materials, legal history, legal periodicals, legislative history, practice and procedure, and social science materials related to law. Application of legal research strategies will be required. (3 crs.) Seniors only. JUS 498. JUSTICE STUDIES INTERNSHIP. An on-site, experiential learning experience where students work at a variety of justice agencies for academic credit is the central aim of the internship program. Intern locations have included government agencies, police departments, prisons, federal and state law enforcement, private security firms, judicial clerkships, legal offices, and legal research concerns. Interns must complete a self-evaluation, perform a series of exercises and assignments, author a log diary and a paper outlining the internship experience, work 45 hours per internship credit, and present an acceptable recommendation from the internship supervisor upon completion of the experience. Attendance at internship seminars for the department is required. (Variable crs.)

LAW — LEGAL STUDIES OPTION LAW 340 FAMILY LAW The purpose of this course is to give legal assistants a better understanding of domestic relations law and to show students how those laws governing family situations are applied. The content of the course covers such areas as formation of the marital relationship, dissolution, child custody and support, adoption, abortion, paternity, domestic violence, child neglect, and surrogacy. Participants will also draft pleadings and documents relevant to family practice. (3 crs.) LAW 420 LAW AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION This course provides students with an in-depth understanding of alternate forms of dispute resolution outside courtroom litigation. These alternate forms include mediation, negotiation and arbitration. It incorporates a community service experience in mediation allowing students a unique opportunity to apply theories, concepts and skills learned in the classroom to practical experiences in serving others in the community. The course provides students with a thorough and complete approach to understanding the psychological dimensions to conflict diagnosis. It also provides guidelines to evaluate and develop strategies and tactics to address interpersonal conflict. It also provides a comprehensive survey of all ADR processes. (3 crs.) LEADERSHIP STUDIES — LEA LEA100. INTRODUCTION TO LEADERSHIP. This course is required for the leadership studies minor. It is an introduction into the definition of leadership and the ways in which leadership can exert itself. In addition to exploring examples of leadership in a wide variety of settings, students will engage in interactive exercises aimed at developing and understanding their personal leadership styles. (3 crs.) LEA 397. LEADERSHIP STUDIES INTERNSHIP. The internship offers opportunities for practical professional work and field experiences in various off-campus settings. Internships are to be jointly administered by an on-site supervisor and a Leadership Studies-approved faculty member. (6 crs.) MATHEMATICS — MAT DMA 092. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA. Designed to aid the student in the transition from arithmetic to algebra, this course can be used to satisfy the prerequisite for elementary topics in Math I and II (MAT 120 and 130), College Algebra (MAT 181), and Statistics (MAT215 and 225). Topics will include operations on integers and polynomials, factoring and linear equations, and radicals. This course may not be used as a natural science elective. This course does not earn credit toward graduation. Prerequisite: Must pass Part A of the University math placement test (11 or higher) or SAT-Math 440 or higher. (3 crs.) MAT 100. FUNDAMENTALS OF MATHEMATICS. Sets and their language; numeration systems and their properties; topics in elementary number theory; mathematical systems and their properties; logic; topics in plane geometry; topics in descriptive statistics. This course is presented from a problem-solving, critical-thinking perspective. Prerequisite: Must pass Part A of the placement exam. (3 crs.)

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MAT 110. APPLICATIONS OF MATH. This course will provide the student with an applicationoriented mathematics curriculum. Students will use cooperative learning to solve real-world problems using technology and multimedia resources. The course will be taught from a student discovery and investigative standpoint incorporating the use of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Principles and Standards for School Mathematics. The topics covered include statistics, circuits, probability, linear programming, and dynamic programming. Prerequisites: Must pass Part A of the placement exam. (3 crs.) MAT 120. ELEMENTARY TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS I. This is the first course in a sequence designed for prospective elementary education majors. The content covered includes problem-solving, sets, concepts of logic, binary operations, systems of numeration, number theory, rational numbers, real numbers, measurement, and use of calculators and computers. Prerequisite: DMA 092 or high school algebra. (3 crs.) MAT 130. ELEMENTARY TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS II. This is the second course of a sequence of two mathematics courses specifically designed for prospective elementary education majors. The content covered includes basic algebraic work with equations and inequalities in one unknown, systems of equations, metric and nonmetric geometry, coordinate geometry, introduction of statistics and probability, problem-solving, and computer use. Prerequisite: 100 or higher level math course. (3 crs.) MAT 181. COLLEGE ALGEBRA. Fundamental operations; factoring and fractions, exponents and radicals; functions and graphs; equations and inequalities; systems of equations. Prerequisite: DMA 092 or pass math proficiency test. (3 crs.) MAT 191. COLLEGE TRIGONOMETRY. A thorough development of trigonometry. This course includes both circular and right-triangle geometry, evaluation of trigonometric functions, graphing trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, analyses of trigonometric graphs, verifying trigonometric identities, solutions of trigonometric equations, and applications of trigonometry. Prerequisite: MAT 181 or passing score on the University mathematics placement exam. (3 crs.) MAT 225. BUSINESS STATISTICS. Statistical techniques relevant to business applications. Primary emphasis is placed upon identification of appropriate statistical methods to use, proper interpretation and appropriate presentation of results. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability concepts, the normal probability distribution, estimation techniques, tests of hypotheses, simple and multiple linear regression. Statistical software is used to implement many of the statistical methods. Prerequisite: MAT 181 or passing score on the University mathematics placement exam or consent of the instructor. (3 crs.) MAT 281. CALCULUS I. A study of modeling, functions, limits, and continuity; the derivative; applications of the derivative. Prerequisite: MAT 181 and MAT 191 or MAT 199 (3 crs.)

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MAT 282. CALCULUS II. Introduction to integration; fundamental theorem of integral calculus; applications of the integration; integration techniques, L’Hopital’s rule, improper integrals, hyperbolic functions. Prerequisite: MAT 281. (3 crs.) MAT 419. MATH INTERNSHIP. This course is designed for the BA in Mathematics majors who are seeking work experience in the Mathematics area. This intern experience will enable students to apply their knowledge of Mathematics in the real workplace. The internship will provide students with the valuable experience in the applications of Mathematics that should enhance their job opportunities upon graduation. Prerequisite: Students should have completed 64 credits with a good GPA plus have sufficient background to meet the needs of the particular internship in which they will be participating. (3 crs.) MANAGEMENT — MGT MGT 300. PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT. This course provides background and insight into the human factors involved in the day-to-day and long-term operations of an organization. It is built on the four management functions necessary for success in any type (profit or nonprofit) organization. The course focuses on major issues that affect today’s managers, such as global environment, corporate social responsibilities and ethics, organizational culture, employee empowerment, and employee diversity. Although the course concentrates on human interaction within organizations, it also explores an organization’s influence on the social, political, legal, economic, technical, cultural, and global external environments, and how those external environments, in turn, affect the operations of the organization.(3 crs.) MGT 301. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR. A study of the theory, research, and practice of individual and group behavior in organizations to better understand and manage people at work. The course focuses on describing, understanding, and explaining individual and group behavior in organizations with emphasis given to managing or influencing that behavior to increase organizational effectiveness. (3 crs.) MGT 352. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT. Decision-making and analyses of major management problems that arise in manpower planning, recruitment, selection, development, compensation, and appraisal of employees in various organizations. (3 crs.) MGT 371. MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS. This course provides background and insight into the information systems that business professionals and other organizations rely on. It concentrates on computerbased information systems that use various information technologies. This course illustrates how the field of information systems encompasses many complex technologies, abstract behavioral concepts, and specialized applications in countless business areas, such as marketing, human resource management, finance, accounting, and operations. (3 crs.)


MGT 402. STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT. A capstone course for all business majors requiring students to integrate and apply multidisciplinary knowledge and skills in formulating, implementing, and evaluating organizational strategies. Case analysis method predominates. MGT 452. HUMAN RESOURCE STRATEGY AND PLANNING. This course examines organizational human resources management from a strategic perspective. The key focus is on exploring HR planning and strategy concepts, developing an understanding of the related analytical tools, and determining how these concepts and tools can be used to enhance an organization’s competitive position. (3 crs.) MGT 492. MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP. On the completion of the course, the student should be able to see how the knowledge acquired in the management courses is applied in real-world situations. It provides students with an opportunity to translate academic principles to real-world situations and to test their career interests. It will also enable students to determine what additional skills are needed to be successful in the workplace. (Repeatable; variable crs; a maximum of 12 credits can be used toward the completion of a baccalaureate degree.) MARKETING — MKT MKT 300. PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING. An introduction to basic principles of marketing management. Other topics covered are selecting target markets, developing marketing mixes, functions of marketing management. (3 crs.) MKT 401. MARKETING MANAGEMENT. Description and analysis of the nature, strategies and techniques of marketing management. Prerequisite: MKT 300, and at least 6 more credits in marketing. (3 crs.) MKT 421. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR. This course integrates the disciplines of psychology, anthropology, economics, and sociology with marketing to explain, understand, and predict consumer decisions. This is achieved by exploring both the theoretical and practical implications of: (1) individual behavior variables such as motivation, learning, perception, personality, and attitudes; (2) group influences such as family, culture, social class, and reference group behavior; and (3) consumer decision processes such as cognitive dissonance, brand loyalty, new product adoption, and risk reduction. Prerequisite: MKT 300. (3 crs.) MKT 492. MARKETING INTERNSHIP. On the completion of the course, students should be able to see how the knowledge acquired in the marketing courses is applied in real-world situations. It provides students with an opportunity to translate academic principles to realworld situations and to test their career interests. It will also enable students to determine what additional skills are needed to be successful in the workplace. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (Repeatable; variable crs.; a maximum of 12 credits may be used toward the completion of a baccalaureate degree.)

MUSIC — MUS MUS 100. INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC. Exposes the student to the various historical, analytical, and aesthetic elements of music, thereby providing an opportunity to broaden and enrich personal enjoyment. This exposure to music is made through the use of visual aids, audio and video recordings, and concerts. (3 crs.) MUS 488. MUSIC TECH INTERNSHIP. This course offers the student the opportunity for practical, professional recording work and field experiences in various on-and off-campus settings. Internships are to be jointly administered by an on-site supervisor and a departmental internship supervisor. (2 crs.) PROFESSIONAL GOLF MANAGEMENT — PGM PGM 125. PGM INTERNSHIP I. This course introduces the student to proper golf course management techniques, including daily expectations while working on a golf course and proper protocol. This course also provides the student with the unique professional educational experience by combining theoretical and hands-on training. The course will be completed at a recognized PGA facility chosen in conjunction with the faculty and the student. The student will spend a minimum of 360 hours or 12 weeks at the field site in order to satisfactorily complete this requirement. (1 cr.) Summer. Approved UCC 4.03.06. PGM 225. PGM INTERNSHIP II. This course exposes the student to proper golf course management techniques, including daily expectations while working on a golf course and proper protocol. This course also provides the student with the unique professional educational experience by combining theoretical and hands-on training. The course will be completed at a recognized PGA facility chosen in conjunction with the faculty and the student. The student will spend a minimum of 360 hours or 12 weeks at the field experience site in order to satisfactorily complete this requirement. (1 cr.) Summer. Approved UCC 4.03.06. PGM 325. PGM INTERNSHIP III. This course exposes the student to proper golf course management techniques, including daily expectations while working on a golf course and proper protocol. This course also provides the student with the unique professional educational experience by combining theoretical and hands-on training. The course will be completed at a recognized PGA facility chosen in conjunction with the faculty and the student. The student will spend a minimum of 360 hours or 12 weeks at the field experience site in order to satisfactorily complete this requirement. (1 cr.) Summer. Approved UCC 4.03.06. PGM 435. CAPSTONE INTERNSHIP IN PROFESSIONAL GOLF MANAGEMENT. This course is a part of the professional golf management student’s capstone experience. Students will be assigned to an internship site based on their unique educational needs and experience. Internship students will work directly with PGA golf professionals in one or more work settings. (6 crs.) Summer.

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PHILOSOPHY — PHI PHI 200. WORLD RELIGIONS. The study of the seven world religions, including their origins and doctrines. (3 crs.) PHYSICS — PHY PHY 101. COLLEGE PHYSICS I. Introductory physics. Vectors, mechanics, energy, momentum, conservation principles and oscillatory motion. Five hours combined lecture and laboratory each week. Prerequisite: MAT 281. (4 crs.) PHY 121. GENERAL PHYSICS I. An introductory non-calculus course dealing with mechanics and heat. Three class-hours and three laboratory-hours each week. Prerequisite: MAT 181. (4 crs.) PHY 202. COLLEGE PHYSICS II. A continuation of College Physics I. Heat and thermodynamics, hydrostatics, waves and acoustics, electricity, and an introduction to magnetism and ac circuits. Five hours combined lecture and laboratory each week. Prerequisite: PHY 101, MAT 282. (4 crs.) POLITICAL SCIENCE — POS POS 300. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC POLICY. Primarily in seminar fashion. Students present and discuss major ideas from assigned readings. Formal lectures are also scheduled when needed to present basic ideas and information. Recommended: POS 100 or POS 105. (3 crs.) POS 102. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT FOR ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJORS. This course provides an introduction to the major institutions and processes in the American political system, and addresses how attitudes and beliefs impact elections and policy. (1 cr.) POS 329. INTERNSHIP IN POLITICAL SCIENCE. Practical field experience to supplement academic work and develop professional competencies in research and communication skills. (Variable crs.) Fall, spring and summer. PSYCHOLOGY — PSY PSY 100. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. This course is an introduction to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. It explores topics such as the biological basis of behavior, research methods, learning, emotions, cognitive processes, perception, personality, abnormal behavior, and the treatment of mental disorders. Research as well as practical application is stressed. (3 crs.) PSY 211. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. The interaction between the individual and social groups within a cultural context: the individual in a social role, social groups and social institutions. The course will cover such topics as aggression, interpersonal attraction, group behavior, persuasion and helping behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 100. (3 crs.)

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PSY 216. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY: BIRTH TO AGE 4. The purpose of this course is to provide students with meaningful scientific information in understanding infants and children in providing practical principles for working with children. Special attention is given to the study of the relationship of the physical, emotional, cognitive and social growth from conception to age 4. (3 crs.) PSY 305. PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY. This course explores the essential factors that result in creating individual differences in human behavior and mental processes. Current theories and classical theories are studied to increase understanding of the development and structure of personality. The characteristics of the normal and the maladjusted personality are identified, with special concern for developmental patterns. Prerequisite: PSY 100 and junior standing. (3 crs.) PSY 311. PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER ROLES. Students explore how gender roles develop and how gender influences the daily lives of men and women. Aspects of life experience where gender plays an important role — including education, occupations, physical and mental health, politics, religion and the media — are explored. Multicultural and cross-cultural perspectives are integrated throughout the course. Prerequisite: PSY 100. (3 crs.) PSY 469. PSYCHOLOGY INTERNSHIPS. Students will be placed with professional psychological agencies. They will integrate, under supervision, theoretical knowledge and practical applications through the duties and responsibilities assigned to them by practicing psychologists. Eligibility requirements and procedures for application are available at the departmental office. Prerequisite: PSY 100, junior/senior standing and permission from chair. (1-6 crs.) PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT — PTA PTA 110. INTRO TO PATHOLOGY. This course examines the disease process on the cellular, histological, and systemic levels. Particular emphasis is placed on those pathologies commonly encountered by the physical therapist assistant in pediatric, geriatric, orthopedic, and neurologic patient populations. Prerequisite: Formal admission into the physical therapist assistant program. (2 crs.) Summer. PTA 150. PHYSICAL THERAPY CLINICAL INTERNSHIP. This introductory clinical internship provides the physical therapist assistant student with extensive observation of activities such as patient care, administration, quality assurance, and supervision of other supportive personnel. In addition, students begin to treat patients under the direction of the physical therapist using principles common to all procedures. Prerequisite: Formal admission into the physical therapist assistant program and completion of PTA100, PTA110, HSC 290, PTA230. (3 crs.) Summer.


SOCIOLOGY — SOC

SPT — SPORTS MANAGEMENT

SOC 315. SOCIAL MINORITIES. This course analyzes the dynamics of social minority status specific to ethnicity, racial classification and sexual orientation, and how minority status is socially constructed. Students will also examine societal responses to minority status and attempts to change this status. Finally, students will select one minority group in another country and compare it to one in the United States. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or permission of the instructor. (3 crs.)

SPT 425. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF SPORT. A study of the application of organizational theory to the understanding and management of sport organizations. (3 crs.)

SOC 317. SOCIOLOGY OF SUBSTANCE USE AND ABUSE. The sociology of substance use and abuse, as well as the approaches for treatment are covered. Special emphasis is given to alcohol and the more commonly abused drugs (e.g., nicotine, marijuana, cocaine). The course focuses on the social processes that influence substance abuse and the societal costs and consequences. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or permission of the instructor. (3 crs.) SOC 429. SOCIOLOGICAL INTERNSHIP. Designed to supplement the classroom studies of sociology majors with practical field experience, internships provide students not only with additional knowledge and skills, but with the opportunity to apply what was learned previously to on-site situations. Internships are intended to develop the major’s professional competencies in observational, analytical, and research skills. (6 crs.) SOCIAL WORK — SOW SOW 303. HUMAN SEXUALITY AND SOCIETY. Humans evolve as sexual beings from a continual interplay among biological, cultural, and psychosocial psychologically healthy relationships, making responsible sexual choices, protecting reproductive health, preventing sexual dysfunction and trauma. The course includes accurate information and open discussion regarding the ways in which sexuality contributes to, and is affected by, overall health and wellbeing. The course is designed to ensure students’ level of comfort with their own sexuality. Prerequisite: Junior status or instructor’s permission. (3 crs.) SPANISH — SPN SPN 101. ELEMENTARY SPANISH I. For the student without previous knowledge of Spanish who wishes to achieve a command of language fundamentals. Acquisition of speech skills in the classroom is reinforced in the language laboratory. Progressively greater emphasis is placed on reading and writing. Three class-hours and one hour language laboratory per week. (3 crs.) SPN 102. ELEMENTARY SPANISH II. This is a continuation of Spanish 101. Three class-hours and one language lab-hour per week. Prerequisite: SPN 101 or three to four years of high school Spanish. (3 crs.)

SPT 499. INTERNSHIP IN SPORT MANAGEMENT. This course is the sport management student’s capstone experience. Students will be assigned to an internship site based on their unique educational needs and experience. Internship students will work directly with sport management professionals in one or more work settings. (12 crs.) Spring and summer. THEATRE — THE THE 100. INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE. A study of the art and craft of theatre from play script to play production. The course surveys theatre history, literature, architecture, acting, directing, and design for the student who wants to know what goes on in theatre and what it means. Students can expect to participate in classroom performances. Fall and spring (3 crs.) WOMEN’S STUDIES — WST WST 200. INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN’S STUDIES. An overview of a fast-growing multidisciplinary field focusing on the effect of gender on human lives, including cultural beliefs about women’s nature, abilities, and role; the realities of women’s personal family, economic, and political lives; and the dynamics of change. Western, and especially U.S., materials predominate, but diverse situations of women internationally will be considered. (3 crs.) WST 340. INTERNATIONAL VIOLENCE FOCUSED ON WOMEN. Affords students an opportunity to explore issues of international violence such as honor killings, female genital mutilation/cutting, human trafficking, and genocide/rape in war. Students will analyze complex issues that arise between and within different countries and cultures. Students will explore how factors such as power, patriarchy, socialization, culture, religion, and gender for example, intermingle to create cultures that perpetuate violence across the world and specifically most often target girls and women. Students will also learn about the effects on individuals, families and societies and will explore prevention and interventions strategies that are utilized internationally to address these issues WST 430. INTERNSHIP IN WOMEN’S STUDIES. Provides practical experience in women’s studies related work. In consultation with the adviser, a student may seek placement in such situations as women’s centers, shelters, health clinics, political organizations, special interest organizations, or newspapers. Coursework may include individual student-instructor consultations, presentations, reading discussions, guest lectures, field trips, research, and experiential papers. (3 crs.)

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Graduate Course Descriptions ACC — ACCOUNTING ACC 711. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING. The use of accounting data for corporate financial planning and control. Topics include organization for control, profit planning, budgeting, relevant costing, return on investment, and administration of controllership functions in business organizations. (3 crs.) ATE — ATHLETIC TRAINING ATE 700. GROSS ANATOMY OF THE EXTREMITIES. The study of anatomical structures in the extremities of the human body, coupled with laboratory dissection of human cadavers. (4 crs.) ATE 705. EVIDENCE BASED PRACT IN ATHTRNG. This course provides students with an understanding of evidence based practice as it relates to the practice of athletic training. Students will examine how practice guidelines are created from systematic reviews of the literature and outcomes studies. The course will also provide students with an appreciation of the importance of evidence based practice in maximizing quality of patient care, seeking out and obtaining reimbursement, and enhancing clinical competence. (3 crs.) ATE 800. RESEARCH METHODS FOR ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES. The course studies the basic tenets of scientific research as they apply to the allied health fields. Topical discussions include development and limitation of a research problem, research methodology, basic principles of tests and measurements, the review of literature and library utilization, and writing the research document. (3 crs.) CED — COUNSELOR EDUCATION CED 785. RESEARCH METHODS IN COUNSELING This is a masters-level course in research methods and statistical analysis. The emphasis will be on the design, evaluation and interpretation of human research. Students will employ models for critically evaluating and evaluating research and/or program evaluation studies. The main goal will be for students to demonstrate an understanding of research methods, statistical analysis, needs assessment, and program evaluation. (3 crs.) CED 786. CAREER COUNSELING This course reviews the theory and process of giving career information and of counseling in school and agency settings. Topics include sources of career information, appraisal, classification of careers, career resources, career and vocational education, systems of career guidance, and theories of career development. (3 crs.) CED 787. INTEGRATION, COLLABORATION AND CONSULTATION This course is intended for students who are near the end of their programs. The purpose is to integrate the materials learned and to discuss the professional topics and practices of agency and school counselors. This is done by focusing

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on the counselor as an ethical practitioner. Prerequisite: concurrently with practicum or Clinical Field Experience. (3 crs.) CED: 788. CONTEMPORARY TOPICS IN COUNSELOR EDUCATION This is an advanced-level course, the purpose of which is to increase students’ understanding of contemporary topics, practices and problems relevant to counselors who work in school and agency settings. Students can expect to be proactive in researching and sharing information, as well as evaluating practices and policies for their efficacy in various settings. They will demonstrate their integration of this new knowledge into their prior learning as it relates to the counseling field through writing, discussion and presentations. (1-3 crs.) CED 790. COUNSELING INTERNSHIP This course provides advanced graduate students in counselor education with a supervised, on-the-job experience in an agency or school setting as a counselor trainee. Students will be on the site for a minimum of 300 hours (if registered for 3 credits) or 600 hours (if registered for 6 credits). Students who anticipate obtaining the Licensed Professional Counselor credential from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania will be required to complete 6 credits of internship in addition to the requirements of practicum (CED 711). Of the 600 hours, a minimum of 240 hours must be direct service work with clients. Students will receive a minimum of one-hour supervision per week by the on-site supervisor. In addition, students will be required to attend a group supervision class once a week where students will present cases. Ethical and legal issues will be discussed, and information shared. Prerequisites: CED 700 or 789, 702, 710, 724, candidacy, practicum and department permission. (3 or 6 crs) CMD — COMMUNICATION DISORDERS CMD 703. FLUENCY DISORDERS This course summarizes the various generations’ theory concerning why people stutter and what treatment is effective. The student learns to assess the multiple overt and covert symptoms of stuttering and to plan effective treatment. (3 crs.) CMD 712. APPLIED THERAPEUTIC PROCEDURES IN OUTPATIENT SETTING. The student participates in “hands-on” work with clients in the University Speech and Hearing Clinic. Under supervision, the student will provide therapy for one or more clients presenting with one of the following disorders: speech or language, stuttering, voice, delayed development, stroke, or others. (1-3 crs.) CMD 713. APPLIED DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY. The student participates in “hands-on” diagnostic (testing) work as a member of the diagnostic team. Under supervision, the student administers communication-based tests to clients from the community presenting with one or more of a wide variety of communication deficits. (1-3 crs.)


CMD 785. SEMINAR IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY The role of the speech-language pathologist as a diagnostician and intervention in disciplinary and interdisciplinary investigations, including counseling procedures, and organization of programs for various pathologies of speech and language, are considered. (3 crs.) ECO — ECONOMICS ECO 716. APPLIED ECONOMIC ANALYSIS. This course gives students practical skills in the application of economic principles to a variety of problems confronting business and government. The first half of the course reviews certain microeconomic principles that are then applied to real situations in which a private or public official must make a specific decision. This includes a diagnosis of the problem, analysis of the economic choices and development of a plan of action to help the enterprise or government agency reach a reasonable strategy or decision. The second section reviews macroeconomic principles that are used to gain understanding of the forces determining current business conditions, make macroeconomic forecasts and evaluate the effects on the economic and business environment of various macroeconomic and regulatory policies. (3 crs.) EDE — ELEMENTARY EDUCATION EDE 701. DEVELOPMENT AND ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM. Provides a complete understanding of the history, organizational patterns and resources available for the development of the school curriculum. Special emphasis is given to recent trends in elementary curriculum development. Students receive an introduction to the many facets of curriculum development. Varied opportunities are provided for the students to acquire comprehensive knowledge through papers and readings. (3 crs.) EDE 768. TEACHER EDUCATION INTERNSHIP The internship experience requires learners to participate in a supervised experience in an early childhood/preschool setting under the supervision of a sponsoring organization and the University. The number of hours will be dependent upon the learner’s prior experiences and may include up to 60 hours in an early childhood setting. Valid and current teacher clearances or clearances for your state are required. Individual internship locations will be arranged based on prior educational experiences and the educational program. (3 crs.) EDP — PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION EDP 600. STATISTICAL METHODS. This course introduces the student to statistical concepts and techniques that are essential for valid and reliable educational research. Emphasis is placed upon understanding the logic of various statistical inference procedures, their correct use and proper interpretation. Numerous descriptive and inferential statistical methods are covered including; box plots, stem and leaf displays, scatter diagrams, single sample t test, independent samples t test, related samples t test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, Mann Whitney U test, confidence intervals, correlations, multiple regression, one-way and twoway analysis of variance, analysis of variance for repeated measures designs, analysis of covariance and multivariate analysis of variance. At the conclusion of the course, the student is expected to be able to describe and critique the statistical methods used in published research studies and correctly apply the appropriate statistical methods in his or

her own research. The SPSS statistical package is extensively referenced throughout the course. (3 crs) ESP — SPECIAL EDUCATION ESP 503. ASSESSMENT AND PRESCRIPTIVE TEACHING. This course teaches students how to administer, score, and interpret both norm-referenced and criterion-referenced assessment devices and how to prescribe programs of remediation based on the results of these devices. (3 crs.) ESP 610. SPECIAL ED FOUNDATIONS COLLAB This course is designed to provide information and skills necessary for accommodating exceptional learners in a variety of school arrangements. The primary focus is foundations of special education and collaboration/ consultation for the successful inclusion of students with exceptionalities into the inclusionary classroom. ESP 612. EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE ELEM INCL. Evidence-Based Practices for Elementary Inclusion is offered to Elementary Education majors the semester prior to their student-teaching experience and is a methodology course for pre-service education teachers. The purpose of the course is to prepare elementary pre-service teachers to provide evidence-based language arts and math instruction to students with disabilities in inclusion settings. An emphasis is placed on results of research and proven methods of instruction for teaching beginning reading and math to children with learning difficulties. The course stresses a behavioral approach to teaching, as well as the development and implementation of intervention strategies for various populations of children with exceptionalities in inclusion settings. Additional topics include modifications and adaptations of materials, effective teaching, learning strategies, lesson planning, assessment, and individualized education programs. ESP 622. ADVANCED EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE PREK-8. The course is designed to provide future educators with knowledge of research based practices that may be employed in PK-8 in academic and nonacademic educational settings. The course will focus the future educator on techniques that will be beneficial for developing skills in core areas such as mathematics, language arts, science and social studies along with those skills that are necessary for navigating noninstructional periods. Specifically, this course will provide future educators with intensive, Tier 3, evidence-based interventions for students with exceptionalities. This course is a continuation of ESP 612 in that it provides more intensive, individualized teaching methods for those students who do not adequately respond to Tier 1 & 2 interventions. ESP 701. INTRODUCTION TO BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS. The basic learning principles of operant and classical conditioning, with the application of these principles to individuals with disabilities. (3 crs.) ESP 739. FIELD EXPERIENCE SEMINAR IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. A means for graduate students to obtain needed experiences with various groups of handicapped children, in such settings as an institution, a sheltered workshop, an activity center, a summer camp or a community MH/MR facility, or by doing a specific piece of research with a particular population of students. Specific requirements for individual graduate students are developed by those students and the supervising professor. (3 crs.)

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ESP 743 NAVIGATING THE SOCIAL WORLD: ASD. This seminar is designed to provide preparation in methods to enhance socialization, communication and imagination in diverse learners with ASD. The course merges the theoretical understanding of the “triad of impairments” as defining features of autism with practical modes of assessment and intervention. (3 crs.) FIN—FINANCE FIN 711. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT. An introduction to the role of financial manager in executive decision-making. Topics include valuation models, financial planning, analysis and control, capital budgeting, cost of capital, capital structure, and dividend policy. (3 crs.) MGT — MANAGEMENT MGT 731. INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS A survey of the legislation regulating employer-employee relations in the United States today and an examination of the relationships between workers and their managers. Special emphasis is given to collective bargaining, wage and hour requirements, equal opportunity regulations, and conflict resolution. (3 crs.) MSE — MASTERS OF ARTS IN TEACHING MSE 645. TEACHING IN 7 – 12 EDUCATION. The purpose of this couse is to help the teacher candidates learn how to effectively analyze, select, and integrate current educational technologies into the design, implementation and assessment of learning experiences to engage a diverse student population. Pre-requisite: MSE 644 (3 crs) Summer MSE 646. ASSESSMENTS AND INTERV 7 – 12. Part of this course is designed to provide insight into the design, implementation, and analysis of assessment instruments used in 7-12 education. The second part of this course is to allow the secondary education candidate to become aware of, and to gain experience in, the contemporary interventions that teachers use to prevent, minimize, or eliminate negative behaviors in the classroom. (3cr). Pre-requisite: MSE 644

PSY 720. NEUROPSYCHOLOGY. This course examines the biological basis of behavior. The central nervous system, in particular the brain, is studied in-depth. This course also presents the neuropsychological approach to the identification and education of children with learning disorders. (3 crs.) PSY 721. ADVANCED TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS. This course is designed to provide the graduate student with an understanding of the use of tests for diagnostic studies of children, adolescents, and adults in a diverse society. It explores the ways in which tests are constructed, evaluated, administered, and interpreted. In addition, the course provides a survey of some representative tests of achievement, aptitude, personality, intelligence, and occupational interests. Students also receive practice in administering, scoring and interpreting such tests through a practicum involving an evaluation of themselves and at least one other person. (3 crs.) PSY 796. SEMINAR IN THE ANALYSIS OF RESEARCH IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY. This course consists of an examination of current research in school psychology. Critical study and evaluation of empirical research findings applicable to selected topics from current editions of Best Practices in School Psychology are undertaken. The student develops skills in using current databases to access empirically based research reports, as well as the abilities to critically analyze and synthesize the content of these reports as it relates to situations and issues faced by the practitioner school psychologist. Students develop an understanding of the importance of using empirical data in making sound educational decisions. (3 crs.) RES — RESEARCH RES 800. METHODS IN RESEARCH This course explores the design and analysis of experimental and quasi-experimental research. It explores both quantitative and qualitative techniques. In addition to being able to design and undertake basic research, an outcome of this course is to develop effective consumers of the research literature. (3 crs.) RSP — READING SPECIALIST

PSY — PSYCHOLOGY PSY 702. PSYCHOPATHOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD. Intensive study of the cognitive, emotional and behavioral disorders in children and adolescents. Emphasis is on etiology, early recognition and approaches to treatment or intervention in schools. (3 crs.) PSY 712. ADVANCED PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING. This course examines the diverse, intricate process of learning. Behavioral and cognitive views of learning are emphasized with special attention being given to the educational implications of learning theory. (3 crs.) PSY 713. PSYCHOLOGY OF GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. This course explores how people grow and develop from infancy through old age. Physical growth patterns, along with emotional, intellectual, and social development are emphasized. Maturation, learning, and their interrelationships are also examined in terms of their implications for the home, school, and community.(3 crs.)

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RSP 703. PRACTICUM: DIAGNOSTIC CASE STUDIES. The purpose of this course is to provide practical experience with determining, in a holistic manner, a child’s reading needs, and making suggestions for individualized instruction for those needs in a case study format. Prerequisite: RSP 700 & RSP 702. (3 crs.) RSP 704. PRACTICUM: REMEDIAL CASE STUDIES. This course must be taken the semester immediately following the completion of RSP 703. The student applies knowledge of materials and methods gained in prerequisite classes to plan and implement a program of instructional intervention for a remedial reader. The course contains a seminar component in which the student utilizes modeling and communication skills to discuss and demonstrate plans for reading instruction with other students as well as with the practicing teacher. Prerequisites: RSP 700, RSP 702 & RSP 703. (3 crs.)


RSP 706. ADULT LITERACY. This course will expose the students to the point of view that the adult learner is a complex individual and has diverse needs, most of which have some bearing on any reading difficulties. Theories of the causes of adult illiteracy will be presented and diagnostic and remedial techniques will be given. (3 crs.) SWK — SOCIAL WORK SWK 821. DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE This course provides students with a substantive knowledge base and critical skills for planning to work in the addictions fields as well as for those who will encounter chemical dependency problems in their work with different age groups in the variety of arenas in which they practice. Prerequisite: second-year standing or program director approval. (3 crs.)

General Education California University of PA believes that a liberal education is essential for all students, regardless of the profession for which they may be preparing. The goals, objectives, and courses that comprise our General Education program are designed to provide students with the knowledge, understanding, and skills they will need to pursue their careers and lead productive and rewarding lives.

General Education Courses During Summer College The major categories for the General Education curriculum are: Building a Sense of Community.....................1 credit

Values............................................................ 3 credits

Critical Thinking Skills................................. 3 credits

Social Sciences............................................. 6 credits

Communication Skills (Public Speaking)..... 3 credits

Technological Literacy.................................. 6 credits

Mathematics................................................. 3 credits

Health and Wellness..................................... 3 credits

Natural Sciences...................................... 6-8 credits Humanities and Fine Arts............................. 6 credits Multicultural Awareness.............................. 3 credits The menu of courses for each General Education category can be found on pages 82-89 of the university undergraduate catalog.

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Critical Thinking Code / Section / Class ANT 101 Arch Fld School I ARB 101 Elementary Arabic I ARB 102 Elementary Arabic II FRE 101 Elem French I MAT 110 Applications of Math MAT 120 Elementary Topics in Math I MAT 130 Elementary Topics in Math II MAT 191 College Trig MAT 282 Calculus II PHY 121 General Physics I PHY 122 General Physics II SPN 101 Elem Spanish I SPN 102 Elem Spanish II

Session May May July 10wk May May July July July May June May July

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Session 10wk 1st 10wk 2nd 10wk

Location Web Main Web Main Web

Session May July 10wk 10wk 10wk May July 10wk

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Session May 2nd 1st May 10wk 10wk 10wk 1st May June 2nd

Location Field Experience Main Main Main Web Web Web Main Main Main Main

Fine Arts Code / Section / Class ART 382 Ceramics Studio COM 275 Art of Film MUS 100 Intro to Music THE 100 Intro to the Theatre

Health and Wellness Code / Section / Class ATE 340 Sports Nutrition BIO 103 Cont Issues in Bio HSC 115 Current Health Issues HSC 315 First Aid & Personal Safety SOW 303 Human Sex & Society

Humanities Code / Section / Class ARB 101 Elementary Arabic I ARB 102 Elementary Arabic II FRE 101 Elem French I MUS 100 Intro to Music PHI 200 World Religions SPN 101 Elem Spanish I SPN 102 Elem Spanish II THE 100 Intro to the Theatre

Lab Code / Section / Class ANT 101 Arch Fld School I BIO 120 General Zoology BIO 125 General Botany CHE 101 Gen Chemistry I EAS 100 Intro to Earth Sci EAS 150 Intro to Geology JUS 487 Computer Forensics PHY 101 College Physics I PHY 121 General Physics I PHY 122 General Physics II PHY 202 College Physics II

.

46 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA


Mathematics Code / Section / Class MAT 100 Fund of Math MAT 110 Applications of Math MAT 120 Elementary Topics in Math I MAT 130 Elementary Topics in Math II MAT 181 College Algebra MAT 191 College Trig MAT 225 Business Statistics MAT 281 Calculus I MAT 282 Calculus II

Session May May May July May July May May July

Location Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web

Session May July 10wk 10wk 10wk 10wk 10wk 10wk 10wk 10wk 10wk 10wk 10wk May July 10wk 10wk

Location Web Web Main Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web

Session 1st 2nd 1st May 10wk 10wk 10wk 10wk 1st May June 2nd

Location Main Main Main Main Web Web Web Web Main Main Main Main

Session 1st 2nd 10wk

Location Main Main Main

Multi-cultural Awareness Code / Section / Class ARB 101 Elementary Arabic I ARB 102 Elementary Arabic II EDU 310 Teaching Multicultural Society FRE 101 Elem French I GEO 205 World Cities/Geo Tour GEO 325 Geography Europe HIS 325 History of American Women JUS 305 International Criminal Justice JUS 429 Terrorism PHI 200 World Religions PSY 211 Social Psychology PSY 311 Psy of Gender Roles SOC 315 Social Minorities SPN 101 Elem Spanish I SPN 102 Elem Spanish II WST 200 Intro to Women Studies WST 340 International Violence Women

Natural Sciences Code / Section / Class BIO 103 Cont Issues in Bio BIO 120 General Zoology BIO 125 General Botany CHE 101 Gen Chemistry I EAS 100 Intro to Earth Sci EAS 131 Intro Envir Geology EAS 150 Intro to Geology EAS 163 Intro Oceanography PHY 101 College Physics I PHY 121 General Physics I PHY 122 General Physics II PHY 202 College Physics II

Public Speaking Code / Section / Class COM 101 Oral Communication COM 250 Oral Comm Managemnt EDU 350 Supporting the English Languag

.

SUMMER COLLEGE 47


Social Sciences Code / Section / Class ARB 101 Elementary Arabic I ARB 102 Elementary Arabic II BUS 100 Intro to Business CMD 108 Nature of Language ECO 102 Economics for Elem Ed FRE 101 Elem French I GEO 102 Geography Elem GEO 100 Intro to Geography GEO 205 Wld Cities/Geo Tour HIS 101 US Hist to 1877 JUS 429 Terrorism POS 102 Amer Govt for Elem Ed POS 300 Public Policy PSY 100 General Psychology PSY 211 Social Psychology SOC 317 Sociology Sub Use & Abuse SPN 101 Elem Spanish I SPN 102 Elem Spanish II WST 200 Intro to Women Studies WST 340 International Violence Women

Session May July 10wk 10wk 1st 10wk 5wk 10wk 10wk 10wk 10wk 1st 10wk 10wk 10wk 10wk May July 10wk 10wk

Location Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web

Session May May July 10wk 10wk 10wk 10wk

Location Web Web Web Web Web Web Web

Session May July 10wk 10wk 10wk 10wk 10wk 10wk May July 10wk

Location Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Web

Session 10wk 10wk Intern 10wk 10wk 10wk

Location Web Web Internship Web Web Web

Technological Literacy Code / Section / Class CIS 110 Intro to Information Systems CSC 101 Personal Productivity Software CSC 201 Internet Concepts ENG 217 Sci & Tech Writ ITE 341 Quality Control JUS 487 Computer Forensics MGT 371 Mgt Information System

Values Code / Section / Class ARB 101 Elementary Arabic I ARB 102 Elementary Arabic II EAS 131 Intro Envir Geology FRE 101 Elem French I ITE 305 OSHA General Industrial Safety PHI 200 World Religions PSY 211 Social Psychology SOC 315 Social Minorities SPN 101 Elem Spanish I SPN 102 Elem Spanish II WST 200 Intro to Women Studies

Writing Code / Section / Class ATE 340 Sports Nutrition COM 332 Radio/TV News EDE 322 Education Services Internship GEO 325 Geography Europe JUS 376 Criminal Procedure SPT 425 Organization & Admin of Sport

.

48 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA


Steps to Success 1. C  omplete and submit an application to California University of PA with payment of $25 application fee. 2. C  omplete and submit the “Free Application for Federal Student Aid” (FASFA) at www.fafsa. gov each year. The Federal School code for California University of PA is 003316. Listed below are the FAFSA forms you must file if you are attending the following semesters and wish to apply for federal financial aid. Semester

FAFSA Form

Tax Year

Summer 2013

2013-14 FAFSA

2012

Fall 2012 & Spring 2013

2013-14 FAFSA

2012

Please Note: All students should complete the required FAFSA form at least two months prior to the start of the semester you are applying for financial aid assistance.

3. Receive acceptance notification from California University of PA. 4. Register for courses online.

5.

 omplete Federal Direct Stafford Loan Entrance C Interview at Studentloans.gov and select “Entrance Counseling.” This only needs to be completed if you are a first time borrower at CAL U”

6. Complete Federal Direct Stafford Loan Master Promissory Note (MPN) a Studentloans.gov and select “Sign Master Promissory Note.” This only needs to be completed if you are a first time borrower. 7. Check Billing On-Line at https:vip.calu.edu. 8. If financial aid award is not sufficient to cover charges, payment of the difference must be made by the tuition due date. 9. Payments can be made via the web at https:vip.calu.edu. 10.  Refund checks for overpayment by financial aid are mailed via USPS within 14 days of credit balance (each semester).

Payment Information Summer 2013 Payment methods

• Students can authorize Parents or Guests and pay online by credit card or check at http://vip.calu.edu • Authorized Parent/Guest payments can be made online through the CalU Family/Parent portal at https://www.calu.edu/families-parents/portal • Telephone Bursar’s Office: 724-938-4431 • Mail payment: California University of Pennsylvania Bursar’s Office, Box 83 250 University Avenue California, PA 15419 Cal U will bill all students enrolled for the Summer 2013 term May 1, 2013, in order to offer a payment plan option. A three-pay payment plan with a $30.00 fee is available for all sessions of summer 2013. Enrollment is online through VIP. Receiving financing from an outside source (not listed on your billing statement)? Student needs to

submit official documentation of the award to the Bursar’s Office so that this award amount can be deducted from the total balance due and payment of any remaining balance or the amount required for a payment plan submitted. Applying for Financial aid? Financial Aid is NOT AWARDED for summer terms UNLESS THE STUDENT REQUESTS, in writing, by submitting a completed Summer 2013 Federal Direct Stafford Loan Application to the Financial Aid Office. Federal Direct Stafford Loans require minimum parttime enrollment per semester to meet eligibility requirements (6 credits for Undergraduate and 5 credits for Graduates). Decision about courses running or being cancelled is based on the number of students enrolled and paid. Classes may be cancelled if payment is not made by the published due date (See page 7). The Office of Academic Affairs determines if a class will be held or cancelled (See Page 7 in this brochure for more information on cancellation for each session.

.

SUMMER COLLEGE 49


Summer 2013 Tuition Refund Schedule The PASSHE Tuition and Fee Refund Schedule utilize the percentage of time a student is enrolled in the term. Students are eligible for 100% tuition and fee refund during the Drop Period of each term (8.5% of the term period). After the Drop Period, tuition is refunded for complete withdrawals only. To determine the tuition refund you may be eligible for, you need to know the total number of days in your term and the number of days you were enrolled (Monday through Friday only. Holidays do not count). The first class meeting is always at the 100% refund. CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA REFUND OF TUITION AND FEES FOR STUDENTS WHO DROP OR WITHDRAW FROM CLASSES SHORT (SUB-TERM) ACADEMIC SESSIONS Drop period (100% refund of tuition) equals LESS THAN 8.5% of the session and varies by length of session. COMPLETE WITHDRAWALS WITHIN SUB-TERM-Tuition refund ratios based on percentage of enrollment in sessions. PA Tech Fee and special fees associated with specific majors remain at 100 percent charge. Day of Session (Exclude Sat & Sun)

Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5 Day 6 Day 7 Day 8 Day 9 Day 10 Day 11 Day 12 Day 13 Day 14 Day 15 Day 16 Day 17 Day 18 Day 19 Day 20

2 wk

3 wk

4 wk

5 wk

6 wk

7 wk

8 wk

9 wk

10 wk

13 wk

100% 60% 40% 0%

100% 60% 50% 40% 0%

100% 80% 60% 50% 50% 40% 40% 0%

100% 100% 80% 60% 50% 50% 40% 40% 0%

100% 100% 80% 60% 60% 50% 50% 40% 40% 0%

100% 100% 80% 80% 60% 60% 50% 50% 50% 40% 40% 0%

100% 100% 100% 80% 80% 60% 60% 50% 50% 40% 40% 40%

100% 100% 100% 80% 80% 60% 60% 60% 50% 50% 50% 40% 40% 0%

100% 100% 100% 100% 80% 80% 60% 60% 60% 50% 50% 50% 40% 40% 40% 40% 0%

100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 80% 80% 60% 60% 60% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 40% 40% 40% 40% 0%

PASSHE Refund Policy

< 8.5% = 100%

8.51- 12.5% = 80%

12.51 – 19.44% = 60%

19.45 – 26.39% = 50%

26.40 – 33.33% = 40%

GT 33.33% = 0%

Monday through Friday Business Days (5 days per week) Refunds are made to the amount of the charge, not the amount that has been paid to date. Room adjustments may not follow this schedule. Contact Residence Life Office for more details. Board & Dine Dollar adjustments may not follow this schedule. Contact CalCard Office for more details. Financial aid recipients should refer to ‘refund/repayment policies’ on the Financial aid website. Please Note: The University Refund Policy does not adjust tuition and fees at the same percentage rate as Financial Aid’s Return of Title IV Funds Formula. Because of this, Federal Title IV Aid recipients who withdraw from the University during the first eight weeks of the semester may still owe a balance to the University.

.

50 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA


Tuition & Fee Summary

*

Summer 2013

Undergraduate Main Campus IN-STATE

OUT-OF-STATE

Credits

Tuition

Fees

Total

Tuition

Fees

Total

1

$268.00

$89.04

$357.04

$429.00

$102.68

$531.68

2

$536.00

$178.08

$714.08

$858.00

$205.36

$1,063.36

3

$804.00

$267.12

$1,071.12

$1,287.00

$308.04

$1,595.04

4

$1,072.00

$356.16

$1,428.16

$1,716.00

$410.72

$2,126.72

5

$1,340.00

$445.20

$1,785.20

$2,145.00

$513.40

$2,658.40

6

$1,608.00

$534.24

$2,142.24

$2,574.00

$616.08

$3,190.08

7

$1,876.00

$623.28

$2,499.28

$3,003.00

$718.76

$3,721.76

8

$2,144.00

$712.32

$2,856.32

$3,432.00

$821.44

$4,253.44

9

$2,412.00

$801.36

$3,213.36

$3,861.00

$924.12

$4,785.12

10

$2,680.00

$890.40

$3,570.40

$4,290.00

$1,026.80

$5,316.80

11

$2,948.00

$979.44

$3,927.44

$4,719.00

$1,129.48

$5,848.48

12

$3,216.00

$1,067.16

$4,283.16

$5,148.00

$1,226.84

$6,374.84

13

$3,484.00

$1,067.16

$4,551.16

$5,577.00

$1,226.84

$6,803.84

14

$3,752.00

$1,067.16

$4,819.16

$6,006.00

$1,226.84

$7,232.84

15

$4,020.00

$1,067.16

$5,087.16

$6,435.00

$1,226.84

$7,661.84

Graduate Main Campus IN-STATE

OUT-OF-STATE

Credits

Tuition

Fees

Total

Tuition

Fees

Total

1

$429.00

$119.07

$ 548.07

$644.00

$140.32

$784.32

2

$858.00

$238.14

$1,096.14

$1,288.00

$280.64

$1,568.64

3

$1,287.00

$357.21

$1,644.21

$1,932.00

$420.96

$2,352.96

4

$1,716.00

$476.28

$2,192.28

$2,576.00

$561.28

$3,137.28

5

$2,145.00

$595.35

$2,740.35

$3,220.00

$701.60

$3,921.60

6

$2,574.00

$714.42

$3,288.42

$3,864.00

$841.92

$4,705.92

7

$3,003.00

$833.49

$3,836.49

$4,508.00

$982.24

$5,490.24

8

$3,432.00

$952.56

$4,384.56

$5,152.00

$1,122.56

$6,274.56

9

$3,861.00

$1,071.50

$4,932.50

$5,796.00

$1,262.75

$7,058.75

10

$4,290.00

$1,092.50

$5,382.50

$6,440.00

$1,327.50

$7,767.50

11

$4,719.00

$1,113.50

$5,832.50

$7,084.00

$1,392.25

$8,476.25

12

$5,148.00

$1,134.50

$6,282.50

$7,728.00

$1,457.00

$9,185.00

13

$5,577.00

$1,155.50

$6,732.50

$8,372.00

$1,521.75

$9,893.75

14

$6,006.00

$1,176.50

$7,182.50

$9,016.00

$1,586.50

$10,602.50

15

$6,435.00

$1,197.50

$7,632.50

$9,660.00

$1,651.25

$11,311.25

* All tuition is assessed per credit; there is no flat tuition rate during the summer. Fee assessment is based on the total number of credits. All tuition and fees are subject to change without notice to student.

.

SUMMER COLLEGE 51


Tuition & Fee Summary

*

Summer 2013

Undergraduate Off Campus (WEB Courses) IN-STATE

OUT-OF-STATE

Credits

Tuition

Fees

Total

Tuition

Fees

Total

1

$268.00

$24.43

$292.43

$429.00

$38.07

$467.07

2

$536.00

$48.86

$584.86

$858.00

$76.14

$934.14

3

$804.00

$73.29

$877.29

$1,287.00

$114.21

$1,401.21

4

$1,072.00

$97.72

$1,169.72

$1,716.00

$152.28

$1,868.28

5

$1,340.00

$122.15

$1,462.15

$2,145.00

$190.35

$2,335.35

6

$1,608.00

$146.58

$1,754.58

$2,574.00

$228.42

$2,802.42

7

$1,876.00

$171.01

$2,047.01

$3,003.00

$266.49

$3,269.49

8

$2,144.00

$195.44

$2,339.44

$3,432.00

$304.56

$3,736.56

9

$2,412.00

$219.87

$2,631.87

$3,861.00

$342.63

$4,203.63

10

$2,680.00

$244.30

$2,924.30

$4,290.00

$380.70

$4,670.70

11

$2,948.00

$268.73

$3,216.73

$4,719.00

$418.77

$5,137.77

12

$3,216.00

$292.16

$3,508.16

$5,148.00

$451.84

$5,599.84

13

$3,484.00

$292.16

$3,776.16

$5,577.00

$451.84

$6,028.84

14

$3,752.00

$292.16

$4,044.16

$6,006.00

$451.84

$6,457.84

15

$4,020.00

$292.16

$4,312.16

$6,435.00

$451.84

$6,886.84

Graduate Off Campus (WEB Courses) IN-STATE

OUT-OF-STATE

Credits

Tuition

Fees

Total

Tuition

Fees

Total

1

$429.00

$36.00

$465.00

$644.00

$46.00

$690.00

2

$858.00

$72.00

$930.00

$1,288.00

$92.00

$1,380.00

3

$1,287.00

$108.00

$1,395.00

$1,932.00

$138.00

$2,070.00

4

$1,716.00

$144.00

$1,860.00

$2,576.00

$184.00

$2,760.00

5

$2,145.00

$180.00

$2,325.00

$3,220.00

$230.00

$3,450.00

6

$2,574.00

$216.00

$2,790.00

$3,864.00

$276.00

$4,140.00

7

$3,003.00

$252.00

$3,255.00

$4,508.00

$322.00

$4,830.00

8

$3,432.00

$288.00

$3,720.00

$5,152.00

$368.00

$5,520.00

9

$3,861.00

$324.00

$4,185.00

$5,796.00

$414.00

$6,210.00

10

$4,290.00

$360.00

$4,650.00

$6,440.00

$460.00

$6,900.00

11

$4,719.00

$396.00

$5,115.00

$7,084.00

$506.00

$7,590.00

12

$5,148.00

$432.00

$5,580.00

$7,728.00

$552.00

$8,280.00

13

$5,577.00

$468.00

$6,045.00

$8,372.00

$598.00

$8,970.00

14

$6,006.00

$504.00

$6,510.00

$9,016.00

$644.00

$9,660.00

15

$6,435.00

$540.00

$6,975.00

$9,660.00

$690.00

$10,350.00

* All tuition is assessed per credit; there is no flat tuition rate during the summer. Fee assessment is based on the total number of credits. All tuition and fees are subject to change without notice to student.

.

52 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA


Tuition & Fee Summary

*

Summer 2013

Undergraduate Southpointe IN-STATE

OUT-OF-STATE

Credits

Tuition

Fees

Total

Tuition

Fees

Total

1

$268.00

$35.25

$303.25

$429.00

$43.25

$472.25

2

$536.00

$70.50

$606.50

$858.00

$86.50

$944.50

3

$804.00

$105.75

$909.75

$1,287.00

$129.75

$1,416.75

4

$1,072.00

$141.00

$1,213.00

$1,716.00

$173.00

$1,889.00

5

$1,340.00

$176.25

$1,516.25

$2,145.00

$216.25

$2,361.25

6

$1,608.00

$211.50

$1,819.50

$2,574.00

$259.50

$2,833.50

7

$1,876.00

$246.75

$2,122.75

$3,003.00

$302.75

$3,305.75

8

$2,144.00

$282.00

$2,426.00

$3,432.00

$346.00

$3,778.00

9

$2,412.00

$317.25

$2,729.25

$3,861.00

$389.25

$4,250.06

10

$2,680.00

$332.50

$3,012.25

$4,290.00

$412.25

$4,702.25

11

$2,948.00

$347.25

$3,295.25

$4,719.00

$435.25

$5,154.25

12

$3,216.00

$361.25

$3,577.25

$5,148.00

$453.25

$5,601.25

13

$3,484.00

$361.25

$3,845.25

$5,577.00

$453.25

$6,030.25

14

$3,752.00

$361.25

$4,113.25

$6,006.00

$453.25

$6,459.25

15

$4,020.00

$361.25

$4,381.25

$6,435.00

$453.25

$6,888.25

Graduate Southpointe IN-STATE

OUT-OF-STATE

Credits

Tuition

Fees

Total

Tuition

Fees

Total

1

$429.00

$41.25

$470.25

$644.00

$51.25

$695.25

2

$858.00

$82.50

$940.50

$1,288.00

$102.50

$1,390.50

3

$1,287.00

$123.75

$1,410.75

$1,932.00

$153.75

$2,085.75

4

$1,716.00

$165.00

$1,881.00

$2,576.00

$205.00

$2,781.00

5

$2,145.00

$206.25

$2,351.25

$3,220.00

$256.25

$3,476.25

6

$2,574.00

$247.50

$2,821.50

$3,864.00

$307.50

$4,171.50

7

$3,003.00

$288.75

$3,291.75

$4,508.00

$358.75

$4,866.75

8

$3,432.00

$330.00

$3,762.00

$5,152.00

$410.00

$5,562.00

9

$3,861.00

$371.25

$4,232.25

$5,796.00

$461.25

$6,257.25

10

$4,290.00

$392.25

$4,682.25

$6,440.00

$492.25

$6,932.25

11

$4,719.00

$413.25

$5,132.25

$7,084.00

$523.25

$7,607.25

12

$5,148.00

$434.25

$5,582.25

$7,728.00

$554.25

$8,282.25

13

$5,577.00

$455.25

$6,032.25

$8,372.00

$585.25

$8,957.25

14

$6,006.00

$476.25

$6,482.25

$9,016.00

$616.25

$9,632.25

15

$6,435.00

$497.25

$6,932.25

$9,660.00

$647.25

$10,307.25

* All tuition is assessed per credit; there is no flat tuition rate during the summer. Fee assessment is based on the total number of credits. All tuition and fees are subject to change without notice to student.

.

SUMMER COLLEGE 53


Financial Aid Information Application Process In order to apply for federal and/or institutional financial aid for the 2013 Summer semester, a student must complete the 2013-2014 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This form will be used to determine eligibility for all aid processed for the Summer semester. Please note: Any student who completes the FAFSA and who is enrolled at least half time for Summer will be awarded Stafford Loans for the full 2013-2014 academic year. The total loan amount will be divided into 1/3 for the summer, 1/3 for the fall and 1/3 for the spring semester. If you plan to graduate before the spring, you will need to submit a Stafford Loan Adjustment form to the Financial Aid Office in order to reallocate your loans. You can access this form from our office or by downloading it from our website, www.calu.edu/financial-aid.

Loans Federal Direct Stafford Loan

The Federal Direct Stafford Loan is a fixed rate education loan designed for both undergraduate and graduate students. The current fixed interest rate is 6.8% and the current origination fees are 1%. Rates and fees are subject to change each July. This loan is both funded and insured by the federal government. There are two types of Stafford Loans: Subsidized and Unsubsidized. Depending on household income, a student may be eligible for one or both loans. The school will determine the loan type for which the student is qualified. Federal Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan: Awarded on the basis of financial need and available to only undergraduate students. The government pays the interest while the student is in school, in deferment, and during the grace period before repayment begins. Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan: Available to all students regardless of income. Student is responsible for all interest that accrues while they are in school, in deferment, and during their grace period. Listed below are the steps in the Stafford Loan processing cycle: Step 1: File the 2013-2014 FAFSA on the Web. Information contained on the 2013-2014 FAFSA is used to determine the student’s Federal Direct Stafford Loan eligibility for the 2013 Summer Semester. Step 2: The Financial Aid Office will determine your Federal Direct Stafford Loan eligibility. If you have not completed a Federal Direct Stafford Loan Master Promissory Note (MPN) before, you must proceed to Step 3 in order to finalize your Federal Direct Stafford Loan. Step 3: Electronically complete your Federal Direct Stafford Loan MPN by logging on to studentloans.gov. Select “Sign Master Promissory Note,” and complete all steps. You will need your Federal Student Aid PIN number to complete this requirement.

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54 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA

Please Note: The MPN only needs to be completed once every ten years as long as you remain an active student. Step 5: You will also need to complete Federal Direct Stafford Loan Entrance Counseling if you are a first time borrower. Log onto studentloans.gov and select Entrance Counseling and follow the steps listed. Step 6: Your loan proceeds will be sent directly to the school by the U.S. Department of Education and will be credited to your account. Important Reminders: • Stafford Loan monies borrowed during the 2013 Summer Semester will reduce the student’s loan eligibility for the Fall 2013 and/or Spring 2014 semester(s). • Undergraduate students must be enrolled in at least six credits during the summer semester to receive financial aid. • Graduate students must be enrolled for at least five credits. (See Loan Disbursement Chart on the next page for more details). • As specified by federal law, students cannot exceed the aggregate (total loan amounts) loan limits of $31,000 (dependent undergraduate students, $57,500 (independent undergraduate students) or $138,500 (graduate students) for the Federal Stafford Loan Program.

Federal Direct PLUS Loan/ Graduate PLUS Loan

The Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) is a credit-worthy fixed rate loan for the parent or legal guardian of a dependent student or graduate student who needs additional assistance to cover his/her educational costs. The current fixed interest rate is 7.9% and the current origination fees are 4%. Rates and fees are subject to change each July. Graduate PLUS borrowers should consider the Federal Direct Stafford Loan before borrowing funds from the PLUS Program. Parent(s) of a dependent student or a graduate student can request


up to the cost of education less all other financial aid received. Repayment normally begins within 60 days after the second disbursement of this loan. The U.S. Department of Education is the lender for this loan and will determine (based on credit approval) whether or not they will fund this loan. Listed below are the steps in the PLUS Loan processing cycle: Step 1: Complete Federal Direct PLUS Loan/Graduate PLUS Loan Application at studentloans.gov. A credit check will be performed by the Department of Education and we will be notified of the loan’s approval/denial. Step 2: If approved, please complete a PLUS Loan Master Promissory Note also at studentloans.gov. You will need your Federal Student Aid PIN to sign the promissory note. The Financial Aid office will determine the amount of your eligibility for those who qualify and transmit the information to the Direct Loan processor. If your PLUS loan application is DENIED, the undergraduate student may be eligible to borrow additional loan funds through the Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan program. Annual loan eligibility is determined by the student’s academic grade level and remaining Stafford Loan eligibility. During the freshman and sophomore year a student can receive up to $4,000 a year while a junior or senior student can receive up to $5000 a year. This additional money will automatically be added to the student’s Unsubsidized loan. Important information about Federal Direct PLUS Loan Endorser A PLUS Loan borrower may obtain an “Endorser” for the loan if they are ineligible because of an adverse credit history. However, the Endorser must be a creditworthy U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen. Basically, the Endorser on a Federal Direct PLUS Loan will be acting as a coapplicant for the parent or graduate student on the loan. Therefore, the Endorser must meet the same credit criteria as the parent or graduate student borrower. In most cases, the ability to pass these credit criteria is less stringent than qualifying for a private loan. Step 3: The U.S. Department of Education will electronically transmit the Federal PLUS Loan funds to California University of Pennsylvania.

Alternative Loans In addition to the Federal loan programs, there are also private sources of educational loans. These loans are sponsored by banks, state agencies or private guarantors and are available to credit-worthy students. Since these loans are not subsidized by the federal government, they are usually higher-cost loans (higher interest rate) to the borrower and should only be considered as a last resort after all other financial aid options have been explored. Most alternative loans require a co-signer. Repayment of principal and interest may be deferred in most cases.

Because there are numerous private loans available to students today, finding the right loan that best meets your financing goals can be challenging. To assist you in this process, Cal U has partnered with Simple Tuition. Simple Tuition provides an interactive loan comparison tool to assist students and families in evaluating and selecting the best private loan options for their specific circumstances. Please view our website for an alphabetically arranged, comprehensive list of Alternative loan products that California University of PA students have utilized within the past three years. If you plan to apply for any alternative loan, please be sure to contact the lender directly. California University of PA and the Financial Aid Office do not endorse, promote, or recommend any of the loan products listed and their inclusion on this page is strictly informational. We process our alternative loans through ELM, a third party organization. In order to expedite the process, please send an e-mail to finaid@ calu.edu with notification of your approval. Borrowers are encouraged to review the terms and conditions of each program prior to selecting a lender. You are not required to borrow from one of the loan programs listed on our website. Your choice of a lender other than those listed will not result in the denial or a delay of processing. Upon application, the lender of your choice will forward a certification request to the Financial Aid Office.

Stafford Loan Disbursement If you are enrolled at least half time for the first five week session (Summer I) or full ten week session, your financial aid will disburse on 07/01/2013. If you are enrolled at least half time for the second five week session (Summer II), your financial aid will disburse on 7/19/2013. *Please note: If you are enrolled in the first five or ten week session (Summer I), but do not reach half-time status until the beginning of the second five week session (Summer II), your financial aid will disburse on 7/19/2013. This means that the loan funds will not be available during Summer I for your use, and you will have to pay your bill with your own funds. THESE DATES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. Students enrolled in any of the “special sessions”, e.g., one-week, Saturdays, weekends, etc., will be eligible to receive Stafford Loan and/or PLUS Loan proceeds once the student is enrolled at least half-time (undergraduate 6 credits – graduate 5 credits). Please Note: Students attending at least half-time during the May Special Session will not receive their Stafford and/or PLUS Loan proceeds until the June disbursement. Therefore, students attending this session must be prepared to cover all non-University charges without the assistance of financial aid funds. You can contact

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SUMMER COLLEGE 55


the Financial Aid Office at 724-938-4415 if you have any questions concerning your financial aid. Summer Financial Aid information and forms can be found at www.calu.edu/financial-aid. The date above is subject to change. *Master Promissory Notes, Entrance Counseling, and any other requirements (i.e.: verification) must be completed before loans are disbursed*

Grants The summer semester is considered the beginning of the financial aid award year; therefore, students must complete the 2013-2014 FAFSA Form for the 2013 Summer Semester in order to be eligible for PHEAA and Pell Grants. Only undergraduate students are eligible to receive grants. PHEAA Grant A PHEAA Summer State Grant Application is required. This application can be completed on-line at the following PHEAA website: www.pheaa.org. The deadline for submission is August 13, 2013. Students must register for at least 12 credits in order to be eligible for the maximum PHEAA Grant. Some students may be eligible for a reduced PHEAA Grant award if they are enrolled for at least 6 credits and meet certain income restrictions determined by AES/PHEAA. Students must also meet AES/PHEAA academic progress requirements. PHEAA State Grant is a reimbursement program. Refunds are usually available in early-August.

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56 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA

Federal Pell Grant The Federal Pell Grant is an entitlement program that students may qualify for if they meet the grant’s eligibility guidelines. If a student does meet the eligibility requirements the Financial Aid Office will automatically award the student a Federal Pell Grant based on their enrolled credit hours for summer. In order for a student’s Federal Pell Grant to disburse for summer students must have all of their financial aid requirements completed. We advise students to check their VIP to verify they do not have any outstanding requirements. The summer Federal Pell Grant will begin to credit to students accounts July 1. Students cannot receive a Federal Pell Grant award until classes have officially begun, for this reason students may have more than one disbursement during the summer semester. If a student is eligible for a Federal Pell Grant during the summer semester their award will be based on credit hours enrolled and those funds will reduce their grant eligibility for Spring 2014. To review the Federal Pell Grant eligibility requirements please refer to the Financial Aid Office’s webpage at www.calu.edu/financial-aid.

Student Employment

A student seeking summer work-study employment must formally apply to the Financial Aid Office by completing the Summer 2013 Work-Study Application and complete the 2013-2014 FAFSA. In addition, students must meet all federal Title IV eligibility requirements. For detailed information regarding summer employment procedures or to download the Summer 2013 WorkStudy Application, please go to the Financial Aid Office homepage at www.calu.edu/financial-aid.


Satisfactory Academic Progress Students are reviewed for Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress at the end of each semester of enrollment (including Summer). Overview Federal regulations require California University of Pennsylvania to establish Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) standards for students applying for or receiving financial aid assistance. The school’s policies for SAP are designed to review a student’s academic performance in terms of quantitative and qualitative measures to ensure the student is making progress towards the completion of the academic program. The SAP policies apply to all Title IV financial assistance programs including Federal Work-Study, SEOG, Federal Perkins Loans, Federal Stafford Loans, and Federal Direct PLUS loans. Students at California University of Pennsylvania must meet all of the requirements stated in the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy regardless of whether or not they previously received financial aid. Cal U is responsible for ensuring that all students who receive Title IV assistance are meeting these standards. Policies The SAP policy for CAL U for Title IV students is the same as or stricter than the university’s standards for students enrolled in the same educational program who are not receiving Title IV aid. Satisfactory Academic Progress standards include: 1. Qualitative (GPA) 2. Quantitative (credit hours earned) 3. Maximum Time Frame For all degree-seeking students, SAP will be calculated at the end of each semester of enrollment, typically in January, June, and August. Qualitative Undergraduate students must maintain at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average to remain in good academic standing. Graduate students must maintain at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average to remain in good academic standing.

Quantitative Students must earn 67% of credits attempted to maintain good standing and be considered making Satisfactory Academic Progress. The completed percentage is determined by dividing credits earned by the number of credits attempted. • Withdrawals, incompletes, and failures are considered attempted but not earned. • Repeated courses are included in the calculation of both attempted and earned units. • Audited courses are not considered units attempted or earned. Maximum Time Frame Maximum Time Frame is defined as the required length of time it will take a student to complete his/her degree. A student will remain eligible for Federal Aid for up to 150% total attempted credits. For example, if you are pursuing a degree which requires 120 semester hours, you may not receive financial aid after you have attempted 180 hours. This includes transfer credits. Most majors require 120 credits for graduation. Some exceptions: B.S. in Education (certificate in Biology) requires 124 credits (193 credits max). A dual Major in Education is 144 credits (216 credits max). A Bachelor of Science in computer engineering technology, a B.S. in electrical engineering, and a B.S. in computer science require 124 credits (186 credits max). Most graduate degrees require 45 credits (68 credits max). Please contact your Academic Advisor to see how many credits are required to complete your degree. Then you will be able to determine your Maximum Time Frame.

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SUMMER COLLEGE 57


Last Day to Withdraw Students may not withdraw from a class after 67% of the class has elapsed. Last day to withdraw from a First Five-Week course: . . . . . . . . . . . . July 2, 2013 4 p.m. Last day to withdraw from a Ten-Week course: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 25, 2013 4 p.m. Last day to withdraw from a Second Five-Week course: . . . . . . . . August 6, 2013 4 p.m. Special Session classes are calculated separately. Contact the Office of Academic Affairs at 724-938-4407 for more information.

Important Telephone Numbers Academic Affairs.........................................................724-938-4407 Academic Records......................................................724-938-4434 Admissions..................................................................724-938-4404 Bookstore....................................................................724-938-4324 Bursar’s Office............................................................724-938-4431 College of Education & Human Services...................724-938-4125 College of Liberal Arts................................................724-938-4240 Counseling Center......................................................724-938-4056 Day Care......................................................................724-938-7349 Eberly College of Science and Technology................724-938-4169 Financial Aid...............................................................724-938-4415 Graduate School.........................................................724-938-4187 Housing Office.............................................................724-938-4444 Internship Office.........................................................724-938-1578 Library Services..........................................................724-938-4091 Public Safety...............................................................724-938-4299 Southpointe Center.....................................................724-873-2760 Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD).................724-938-5781 Office of Web-Based Programs..................................724-938-5958

Summer College……………...........................................724-938-4407

Did you change your mind about taking classes? Failure to submit written notice of withdrawal will result in a failing grade and a financial liability. Although you should check with your instructor, academic adviser, or academic department before you withdraw from a course, a discussion with them will not get your course dropped. If you register for class(es) and then decide not to attend California University of PA, it is your responsibility to initiate the proper paperwork. Do not assume that you will be dropped from the class(es) because you have not made payment or because your financial aid was not approved. Please come to the Office of Academic Records in 122 Dixon Hall to complete the appropriate paperwork. The sooner you do, the more money you may save (refer to the refund policy on page 50). If the course has not started you my drop it online through the VIP Portal. You may also fax your signed request to drop a course to 724-938-5832 or email summer@calu.edu.

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58 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA


Undergraduate

Admission Procedure

Visiting Student Applicants Visiting students (those students enrolled at another college or university) may enroll for credit classes at California University of PA for one semester only. Complete the application form in this brochure, attach a completed Registration Form from this brochure, and mail both of these, with a $25 non-refundable application fee,* to the Office of Academic Affairs, California University of PA, 250 University Avenue Box 4, California, PA 15419. Transcripts are not required for visiting students in the summer. Once your application has been processed and accepted you will be registered for courses and a billing statement with your schedule will be sent to you. If you have any questions contact the Office of Academic Affairs at 724-938-4407. Visiting students may also apply and register online at www.calu.edu. May I attend Summer College if I am a high school student? If you have completed the sophomore year of high school and are enrolled in a college preparatory curriculum you may be eligible for admission to Cal U through our High School Early Admit Program. You must have a cumulative grade point average of 3.00 for the past two years and have taken one of three standardized tests; PSAT, SAT or ACT. Contact the Office of Continuing Education for current test score requirements. If you meet the qualifications listed, you need to complete the admission application form, pay the $25 nonrefundable fee, submit your official high school transcript and the completed Authorization for High School Students form. Visit us at www.calu. edu for more details. Look under Information for Prospective Students and you will see the Office of Continuing Education link on the left side.

2012 classes through the Office of Academic Affairs or VIP Portal at www.calu.edu. See pages 60-63 in this brochure for a registration form and information on how to register for classes. If you have any questions on becoming a new degree-seeking student at California University of Pennsylvania, please contact the Office of Admissions at 724-938-4404. Non-degree Seeking Students If you are interested in taking undergraduate credit courses for personal enrichment you may apply to become a nondegree seeking student through the Office of Admissions. Complete the application form in this brochure and mail it with a $25 non-refundable application fee* to the Office of Admissions, California University of PA, 250 University Avenue Box 94, California, PA 15419. Please note the requirement on the application form for transcripts. Nondegree students may apply and register online at www.calu.edu. Readmission/Reinstatement Students If you previously attended California University of PA and would like to be readmitted, you need to contact the deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office for the college into which you would like to be readmitted. If you were academically dismissed, or left the university in poor academic standing, you need to contact the Office of Student Retention and Success at 724-938-1523. *No application fee is due if you have paid this fee and taken classes at California University of PA within the past three years.

New Degree Students If you are interested in applying for undergraduate admission to California University of PA, you need to complete the application form in this brochure and mail it with a $25 nonrefundable application fee* to the Office of Admissions, California University of PA, 250 University Avenue, California, PA 15419. Degree students may apply and register online at www.calu.edu. Please note the requirement on this form for transcripts. Once you have received a letter of acceptance you may register for Summer

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SUMMER COLLEGE 59


4 Ways to

Register

Beginning January 21, 2013 1. In Person: Bring your completed registration card to the Office of Academic Records, 122 Dixon Hall, on the California University of PA campus from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday (except when the University is closed for holidays).

Note: If you have a registration hold, you will need to contact the office that placed the hold on your registration to make arrangements to clear it. You may obtain more information regarding your hold by clicking on the Student Services link at the bottom of the Registration Status screen and then clicking on HOLDS.

2. By Mail: Mail your completed and signed Registration Card to the Office of Academic Affairs, California University of PA, Box 4, California, PA 15419-1394. Registration Cards need to be mailed in sufficient time to arrive prior to the start of the scheduled class(es).

If you have any problems logging into the system, please contact the Computing Services Help Desk at 724-938-5911, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. If you wish to register for a closed section class, please contact the Office of Academic Affairs at 724-938-4407 for more information.

3. By E-mail: Email courses you wish to register through your calu email account to summer@calu.edu at any time prior to the start of the scheduled class(es). 4. Online: If you are a current student at California University of PA, you may register online at www.calu.edu through the VIP Portal from 7 a.m. – 11:30 p.m. daily (times may vary due to occasional system upgrades) until midnight the day before a class begins. Follow the steps listed below to register: • Go to www.calu.edu • Click “VIP Portal” • Enter your Cal U Student ID and password • Click Academic Info Tab • Click Add/Drop Classes • Select term • Add CRN for courses • Submit to enter your selections If there are any closed classes, time conflicts, missing prerequisites or other problems with your registration, you will be given a message showing the problem. If you have any questions, please contact the Office of Academic Affairs at 724-938-5840 for more information. Once you have registered, you may view or print a copy of your schedule by clicking on “Student Schedule” or “Detailed Schedule” at the bottom of the screen.

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60 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA

You may register up to the first day of classes in each of the sessions for those classes that have not been cancelled, however early registration is highly recommended since classes fill quickly. Courses that do not meet the minimum enrollment, prior to the first class session, will be cancelled and students will be notified by phone (see the cancellation schedule on page 6). Undergraduate students are strongly advised to meet with their advisor prior to registering for Summer 2013 classes. Visiting students should get approval from their home institution prior to registering for classes at California University of PA. Graduate students must contact their advisor or department chair, prior to registration, to discuss their summer session schedule. Undergraduate students registering for more than 18 credits for the entire summer, or more than 9 credits at any one time, must complete an Overload Form and it must be signed by their College Dean. This form must be submitted with your registration to the Office of Academic Records. Overload Forms may be obtained from the undergraduate dean’s offices or the Office of Academic Affairs. Payment must accompany all registrations received after the listed billing dates on page 50. If you have any questions or need additional information on Summer 2013 registration procedures, please contact the Office of Academic Affairs at 724-938-4407.


CAL U

UNDERGRADUATE APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA BUILDING  CHARACTER. BUILDING CAREERS. A proud member of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education.

Return to:

California University of Pennsylvania Office of Admissions 250 University Avenue California, PA 15419

Phone: 724-938-4404 Toll free: 1-888-412-0479 Fax: 724-938-4564 Web: www.calu.edu

Instructions to applicants: n Complete the application form. n Submit a non-refundable $25 application fee. n Submit an official high school transcript (if applicable, GED certificate and scores).

This requirement is waived for students who hold associates or higher degrees.

n Submit official SAT or ACT scores. This requirement may be waived for those two years out of high school. n Submit an official college transcript from each college/university attended. n International students should not complete this form. Please contact Admissions for an

International Student Application or visit the website for a printable version at www.calu.edu.

PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY

Term:

-

Social Security Number:

Fall

Spring

-

Year: 20

Summer Date of birth:

-

-

MONTH DAY YEAR

Name:________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

LAST

FIRST

MIDDLE

Address:______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ NUMBER

STREET

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

CITY

Gender:

Male

What is your ethnicity?

STATE

ZIP

Religion: (optional)___________________________________________________________

Female Hispanic or Latino

Not Hispanic or Latino

What is your race? Mark one or more races to indicate what you consider yourself to be. White

Black or African American

Asian

American Indian or Alaska Native

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander

If applicable, previous last name(s):________________________________________________________________________________________ Home phone:__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

(AREA CODE)

NUMBER

Cell phone:____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

(AREA CODE)

NUMBER

E-mail address:_______________________________________________________ Facebook contact:_________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ County of residence: ______________________________________ Years of residency: __________ Are you a U.S. citizen?

Yes

No

Program of study and program code:_______________________________________________________________________________________ Entering Cal U status:

Freshman Full-time

Will you require on-campus housing: Which location will you attend?

Transfer

Certification

Visiting Student

Re-admit

Part-time Yes California

Are you seeking a degree at Cal U?

No Southpointe

Yes

No

Other

Activity/Athletic Interests:________________________________________________________________________________________________


CAL U

UNDERGRADUATE APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

EDUC A TI ONA L B A C K GRO U N D High school name: ___________________________________________________________________________ Graduation date:________________________ High school address: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________

CITY

STATE

ZIP

NOTE: Students must request that official transcripts be submitted from all high schools and post secondary institutions attended. Official high school transcript is required at the time of application for all applicants unless student is transferring with an earned degree or higher. The SAT or ACT is required for incoming freshmen. If you have earned a GED, you must provide GED scores and GED certificate in addition to your official high school transcripts. COLLEGE HISTORY Have you attended any post secondary institutions? NAME OF INSTITUTION OR UNIVERSITY:

Yes

No

DATES ATTENDED

DEGREE EARNED

CITY /STATE

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NOTE: Official college transcripts are required from each college attended at the time of application. If transferring: Are you presently in good standing at the institution last attended? Are you a veteran?

Yes

Yes

No (If no, please explain on separate sheet of paper.)

No

EMERGENCY INFORMATION: Emergency contact : _______________________________________________________________________ NAME

____________________________________ RELATIONSHIP TO STUDENT

______________________________________________________________________________________________________ ADDRESS

STREET

CITY

STATE

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________ PHONE

(AREA CODE)

NUMBER

Is your parent/guardian or family member a Cal U graduate?

Yes

No

_____________________________________________________________________

Living

Deceased

_____________________________________________________________________

Living

Deceased

NAME

NAME

ZIP

RELATIONSHIP

RELATIONSHIP

Office for Students with Disabilities California University of PA welcomes otherwise qualified students with disabilities. The University recognizes its responsibility to these students and is committed to providing reasonable accommodations to insure equal access and full participation assigned by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Requests for accommodation should be submitted directly to the Office for Students with Disabilities. Students requesting accommodations must provide the University with documentation to substantiate the request. Students with disabilities follow the same admission procedures and standards as required by California University of PA’s Admissions Office for all students. Questions regarding admission procedures and acceptance status should be directed to the Admissions Office, 724-938-4404. Questions regarding reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities and required documentation should be directed to the Office for Students with Disabilities, 724-938-5781.

I understand that the above statements are true to the best of my knowledge. Any false information may be used as grounds for denial or dismissal. Signature: _______________________________________________________________________

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62 CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PA

___________________________________

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA BUILDING  CHARACTER. BUILDING CAREERS.

DATE


# Summer Course Registration Card Grad

Undergrad

Campus-wide ID Number

Student’s Last Name

First Name

M.I.

Home Phone Number

Alternate Phone Number

Year

E-mail Address

Course Title

Dept Code

Course No

Cr Hrs

Sec No

Days and Times Sun M T W H F Sat

Building Code

Room No

Instructor

Key No

Location

Total Credits Scheduled

Advisor’s Signature

Date

Students who register will be mailed a billing statement that includes their schedule. If you register after the billing dates (indicated on page 47) you will need to be prepared to make payment at the time of registration. Telephone registrations, cancellations, or withdrawals are not accepted. By signing the line below, you acknowledge that changes may occur in the printed schedule due to circumstances beyond the control of the University. You also acknowledge that neither non-attendance nor failure to make payment for a class constitute official withdrawal. Your registration will not be processed without your signature.

STUDENT’S SIGNATURE DATE WILL THIS COURSE BE USED FOR ACT 48 CREDITS ______ YES _______ NO

SCHOOL DISTRICT_____________________________________________


CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

NONPROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE

250 University Avenue California, PA 15419

F O R M ORE   IN F ORMAT ION Office of Academic Affairs Dixon Hall California, PA 15419 Phone: 724-938-4407 Fax: 724-938-5832 E-mail: summer@calu.edu Website: www.calu.edu Student services/schedule information: VIP Portal A proud member of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education.

I N T EGRITY, CIVILITY, RES P ONS IBILIT Y

California University of Pennsylvania is an academic community dedicated to the ideals of justice, fairness and equal opportunity for all. In compliance with federal and state laws, the University is committed to providing equal educational and employment opportunities for all persons without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, disability, ancestry, sexual orientation or status as a disabled or Vietnam-era veteran. The University will not tolerate racial, ethnic or sexual discrimination. Sexual harassment is considered by law to be a form of sexual discrimination and is, therefore, unacceptable. Direct equal opportunity and affirmative action inquiries or complaints to the Special Assistant to the President for EEEO/University Ombudsperson, Office of Social Equity, South Hall 112, 724-938-4014. Direct inquiries regarding services or facilities accessibility to the ADA/504 Compliance Officer, Office of Student Development and Services, Johnson Hall 012, 724-938-4076. Direct Title IX inquiries to the Senior Women’s Administrator/Title IX Coordinator, Department of Athletics, Hamer Hall 248, 724-938-4351.

SUM 600 1.13

PAID CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

CLASSES OFFERED AT: •

California Campus

Southpointe Center

World Wide Web

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA BUILDING CHARACTER. BUILDING CAREERS.


2013 Summer College