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sa t Ea The st

TABLE OF CONTENTS COVER

Illustrating the Arts at East

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OPINION STUDENTS & LIFESTYLE

SPORTS FEATURE

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Changing Media | 4 Phone Usage | 5 Toodles 2018! | 6

Onions and Orchids Second Generation Olympians Work Before Homework Don’t Miss Your Deadlines

|8 |9 | 10 | 11

Shredding Ice | 18 Behind the Scenes | 19

The Marvelous Maurice | 20 Up In the Air | 21

Winter Snowflakes with a Twist! | 22 New Year, New Movies | 23

page design by Hailee Bott


STAFF

Editors-in-Chief | Luke Harpring & Elaina Sims

Managing Editors | Chesney Loehr & Jake Schoenegge

Content Editors | Ethan Glaid, Hannah Harris & Riley Repp Contributing Writers | D Alexander, Dalton Anderson, Alli Barnette, Kylie Brooks, Monica Burton, Anna Combs, Brody Copas, Caroline Emerick, Kaelin Hanrattie, Gaby Heredia, Jackie Fry, Elise LaSell, Erin McIntyre, Shelby Morrow, Jorge Nieto, Cayden Rooks, Emily Seifert, Caroline Stott, Nick VanAartsen & Anaya Warren

Design Editors| Annie Bastian & Hailee Bott Contributing Designers | Margo Brunner, Logan Foote, Robert Kanehl & Leo Shelp Photography Editor | Liz Hagan Contributing Photographers | Lindsay Akers, Anna Combs, Kaelin Hanrattie, Elise LaSell, Shelby Morrow, Haili Smith, Caroline Stott & Anaya Warren Social Media Editors | Jake Schoenegge & Nick VanAartsen Contributing Social Media Staff | Dalton Anderson & Cayden Rooks Web Editor | Breiana Burton Contributing Web Staff | Erik Cardoso Adviser | Jordan Callison

page design by Hailee Bott

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OPINION

The East Oracle

Febuary 8, 2019

CEHSNews.com

Columbus East

CHANGING MEDIA The Decline of Quality Journalism

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By Luke Harpring

ver the last 15 years, the print media industry has lost two thirds of its revenue as the landscape of print media consumption has gradually, and more recently, chaotically eroded to make room for the rise of digital media. To many, this occurrence is nothing more than an inevitable economic truth; there are simply easier media options that are cheaper, and often, free. Online media, which is free to read, may initially seem like an improvement for readers over a paid newspaper subscription, but the drawbacks of this phenomenon are dangerous to the entire media industry. As online articles have gradually become one of the most common news formats, the ethics of reporting have undoubtedly been put into question. Rarely can a reader find an online news article which does not have a slew of pop-up ads, sidebar clickbait, and even malicious software attempting to get onto their system. This is before the content of the article is even brought into consideration. Because the demand for subscription-free media is so great, most online media sites depend on ad revenue in order to remain a viable business model. This

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means that a media site’s success is dependent not on creating content that people are willing to commit to reading, but simply attracting the greatest amount of site traffic possible. To accomplish this, exaggerated headlines, rushing to publish breaking news before competitors and blatant false reporting have become prevalent. While a handful of standout national newspapers have managed to maintain integrity after the digital transformation of media, most of the quality media online lies behind a paywall. Sites such as the New York Times and Wall Street Journal typically stand a step above their peers in terms of digital content, but require a subscription to view full articles consistently. One would think that since print newspaper membership has historically been very high, that a willingness to pay may translate to digital media, but large and wide, this is

simply not the case. Although there are promising upward trends, subscriptions for paid online media are not even comparable to the state of print newspapers in their most successful past. Although typical pricing for online subscriptions is either comparable or cheaper than their print counterparts, few seem to consider the online paywall worth crossing. Paying for online media not only delivers better content, but also supports quality journalism. Rather than consuming hysterical, often questionable news, the move to paid, quality media needs to be made for the betterment of journalists as well as consumers. Online writers would no longer need to push ethical boundaries to make a living, and consumers could at least have a sliver of faith that the content they read was pieced together to accurately convey the truth.

design by Margo Brunner


OPINION

PHONE USAGE

Do Students Need Their Phones in Class?

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s a freshman, one of the major differences I have seen this year is the increase in usage of cell phones during class time. Sometimes, I will be in a class where the teacher wants students to get off their phones and they never do. It seems like they just do not care about learning or the class. One time I was in a class and the teacher had to wait five minutes for everyone to put their phones away. Some students do not seem to have any self-control with putting their phone away and keeping it away. If students check it for five minutes and then put it away for awhile, then get it back out that doesn’t annoy me. What irritates me is when I am supposed to be doing a project or a worksheet with them and their phone is out all the time and they continuously check it. Students get mad or act like they did not do anything when they get called out for having it. I feel like they want attention and I think the teacher knows they want attention so she ignores it. When they ignore it the person with their phone out makes it known that they are on their phone then they will get called out. Other times students will have an assignment where they can use their phones and they will be on social media. I am on my phone a lot too but I don’t get in trouble for it constantly or I will be on social media for five minutes then do my work. This happens in most of my classes with the same people over and over. It needs to change for productive learning to happen.

design by Logan Foote

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Emily Siefert

CON

? 7:45 AM

Phone

TV

iBooks

100%

Messages

Weather

Camera

Home

iTunes Store

iCow

PRO Alli Barnette

feel like any student at East has used their phone during class for a valuable reason. I mean sure, we would all rather look through Instagram than learn about Shakespeare, but that is not a use for a phone. If you’re like me, you either have a busy family group chat, you need lunch money, you forgot your weight clothes, or you are trying to help a friend through a mental break down. At times, you need to have your phone. I have to say that yes, you shouldn’t use your phone during an important lecture of some sort. But I think that it is okay to text your friends and family when it is work time. Really it’s your choice to take time out of your work for you phone, and it’s nobody else’s choice. As long as your phone is on silent and you are not taking time out of anyone else’s work, you should be more than welcomed to use your phone. It is so much easier to just grab your phone and look something up for class. Or maybe you need to finish a quick math problem and your phone is just right on your desk. Your phone can be used as a tool and even help you with your school. In conclusion, as long as your actions are not affecting someone or your grades, you should be able to use your phone in class. It really just depends if you are responsible with it, like if you put it on silent. But even then, it is your personal choice to pay attention to your phone and not your teacher. I have never been distracted by someone’s phone in class, and nor have I really cared if someone was using it. Therefore, using phones in the class is fine.

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OPINION

TOODLES 2018!

Things We Should Leave in the Past

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Alli Barnette

e are officially a month into the new year of 2019, leaving all of our old memories into last year. 2018 was the year of the good, the bad, and the ugly. Even though I personally feel like 2018 was an okay year, there were many terrible habits that the world possessed. In celebration of the new year, here are just a few things that we should leave in 2018.

1. Plastic Straws

Throughout the year of 2018, 8.3 billion straws polluted our beloved beaches and oceans. This became such an issue that popular food chains like Red Lobster and Starbucks actually started to ban plastic straws. In 2019, we should make it a point to start recycling more and just drink our beverages from the cup. Nothing is worth a sea turtle’s life.

3. Logan Paul

2. Tide Pods

Sadly, this was an actual Internet phenomenon that happened in January 2018. The Tide Pod Challenge is when you try to eat a small pod full of laundry detergent. Considering there are actually warnings and child locks on Tide Pod containers, you’d think people wouldn’t eat them. Not our proudest moment, Millennials.

This 23-year-old problematic Youtuber started by making vines with his brother in Ohio. His billions of views on his channel and net worth of 19 million would never be able to save him from the horrible acts he has committed. After the inconsiderate statements around the LGBT community on his podcast and video taping a dead man for his channel, Paul’s career continues to go downhill. Let’s all agree to leave him in 2018.

5. Flossing

After the sales of cigarettes went down in 2017, the sales for JUULs went up. In 2018, JUUL sales increased by 600%. We had a chance to leave the nicotine addictions to older generations, but alas, we had to fall into the inevitable hole of vaping. Most would agree that breathing in addicting chemicals is not part of the “self-love” we all want to happen in 2019. It’s all fun and games when something tastes like Mangos, even if it hurts your lungs.

Flossing is something that we need to desperately leave in 2018. When I say flossing, I don’t mean the thing you lie to your dentist about; I mean the infamous dance move. Flossing became popular in 2016 by a dancing Instagrammer named Russell Horning. Russell Horning, also known as The Backpack Kid, has been living it up ever since his fame increased from the dance move. Horning even made his own merch and song about the insane dance move. 2019 deserves better than that, and we all need to let go of Flossing.

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4. Nicotine

Welcome, 2019! design by Logan Foote


STUDENTS & LIFESTYLE

ONIONS & ORCHIDS The students and staff sent in anonymous compliments and complaints called Onions and Orchids. The Onions could regard any annoyances or aggravations, while the Orchids could be kudos or anything nice to say. These are some of the best and funniest Onions and Orchids received. The freshmen that don’t know what side of the stairwell to walk on.

People that don’t come to school and don’t help their friends with important interviews but are able to go sledding. The groups who stand in the middle of the hallways. My math teacher telling us not to fail the homework quizzes, but never teaches us the homework.

Disney, for ruining Kim Possible with a crappy movie. People that don’t go to school for stupid reasons.

My teacher because she needs to learn how to fix her attitude. English teachers who decide to give Word Within a Word tests.

The people who won’t keep their drama to themselves. The people who don’t pick up after themselves.

The upperclassmen who are family but won’t take you off for lunch.

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Brody Copas, for being good looking. Mrs. Callison, for being the best supportive role model in my life. Having airpods to flex.

Friends that make school bearable.

Mr. Schmidt, because even though his class is really hard; he is a really good teacher and wants you to succeed. Birds, for just being awesome.

Mr. Brockamp, for all he does for us. Having an open campus for lunch.

Ms. Heath, for always being a ray of sunshine in my day.

The custodians who help take care of the school! Mrs. Sullivan because she’s pretty.

Mrs. Wilder-Newland, for inspiring me to become a better writer. My soccer coach, for helping me to reach my full potential.

design/story by Monica Burton


STUDENTS & LIFESTYLE

SECOND GENERATION OLYMPIANS Parents Passing the Torch To Their Children Carey Coers

Elise LaSell

THE COERS’ “I remember coming to all of the football games all throughout my childhood.” -Riley Coers

“I love being on the East cheer team and I get to spend more time with my sister Riley.” -Macy Coers

“My favorite memory was probably senior year powder puff.” -Carey Coers

Freshman Macy Coers and Senior Riley Coers

THE BERGMAN’S

“I have never missed a game of East Football of all my four years, and going to State was an amazing experience to be apart of,” -Ashlyn Bergman

“My favorite memory from East so far is winning State in football my freshman year.” -Crase Bergman

Brad Coers

“Obviously, East is the better school, and I was proud to be an Olympian.” -Brad Coers “There were no cell-phones in school and the lockers were used by everyone in between classes.” -Kris Bergman

Senior Ashlyn and Sophomore Crase Bergman

Kris Bergman

THE JOHNSON’S

“I was one of the first classes to complete a senior project.” -Melissa Johnson

“Knowing that someone I am close with went here helped some with what to expect.” -Haley Johnson design by Monica Burton

Senior Haley Johnson

Melissa Johnson

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STUDENTS & LIFESTYLE

WORK BEFORE HOMEWORK Balancing Life as a Student

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an students juggle a job, school, and homework? Coming into school at 7:45 am five out of seven days a week and then going to work a shift ranging from two to five hours for multiple nights, is a situation that many teens are able to relate to. Do not forget doing at least a couple hours of homework per night to uphold your straight As. Having expectations from every angle in your life can really stress out a teen, creating a negative impact on their day to day life. Receiving a biweekly paycheck to pay for your own things is nice, but is it okay to add extra hours of stress onto your everyday life? Almost 21 percent of high school students work at least part-time while being a full time student. That number may not seem huge, but it is a challenging scenario that is very real for many students, just like Sophomore Chase Jones. Jones works at Papa Murphy’s several nights a week while balancing a couple hours of homework each night. “On nights I have school activities, work, and hours of homework, I get really stressed and it makes it hard to stay focused,” Jones said. There are definitely some pros for getting a part-time job while in school, but there are

multiple factors to consider. The extra stress can play a toll on how a teen is doing in school as well as their own mental health. Having their mind on a number of things at one time can affect how they react to everyday things. “Family and friends are really important to me, so making an effort to see them everyday is something I

Gaby Heredia

don’t want to worry about. When I have everything else going on, it makes it difficult to spend time with them,” Jones said. Once you are done thinking about all the homework and tests that are coming up, you cannot forget to text your friends back at the end of the day, it is routine for teens everywhere. Keeping friendships while balancing the rest of your workload, makes it even more difficult. Planning times to hang out without it interfering with your work schedule, family plans, or the day your group was going to meet up to finish that project adds additional, unneeded stress. “I think getting a job isn’t the worst choice, just consider all your conflicts that would happen,” Jones said. Considering all the factors, getting a job can affect the day-today-life of a teen, leading to more stress and health problems. design by Hailee Bott


STUDENTS & LIFESTYLE

DON’T MISS YOUR BIG DEADLINE! When to start preping for college C

ollege seems so far away when you are just a freshman, but in reality, you really need to start preparing your freshman year. Here is what Kristin Schuetz, Counseling Department Director, has to say about college prep. “There is a PCC class that is offered here at East for freshmen. It is a big part of what’s offered to get students to start thinking about college,” Schuetz said. “In addition, Mr. Taube, the freshman counselor, always goes to the PCC classes and works with students on creating a four year plan.” In addition to the PCC class, there are many other resources at East that are available to students if they are willing to use them. “In the Naviance program that is used during that PCC class, there is a college supermatch and it’s a program that allows students to view the admission criteria for various colleges. Students can also set filters and criteria that they are interested in, ” said Schuetz. Every year, East hosts the college fair in the fall. It is really meant for juniors and seniors, but luckily it’s held at East, making it available for underclassmen to walk around and review their options for college. “Students can meet face to face and ask questions about each college and university, and even gather information about colleges and universities they don’t know a lot about,” Allison Clark, Scholarship Coordinator, said. “There are schools from all over that are at the college fair; a lot of them are from Indiana but the vast majority are from the midwest.” East allows three excused college visit days where you are able to go visit colleges and universities. Each student is allowed three days for their junior year and their senior year. Those forms are available in the

PREPARING FOR COLLEGE:

Freshman Year

Create Four Year Plan Take PCC Class Join Clubs

Sophomore Year

Begin SAT/ACT Prep Take PSAT Work on GPA design by Ethan Glaid

Anaya Warren

dean’s attendance office for students to get and use whenever it works best into their schedule or their families schedule. “We really encourage students, if they are able, to try to make a personal visit to campuses in which they’re interested because that gives them a really good feel for whether or not that does seem like a good school for them,” Schuetz said. Seniors have many deadlines, but most are not as important as the due date to apply to college. “We encourage seniors who are applying to college to apply by November first of their senior year. Usually, college applications open August 1st of senior year,” Schuetz said. “We say November 1st for a couple reasons. Usually, that is the Early Action Deadline that is considered for any kind of Merit scholarship money.” Many students wonder about the importance of ACTs and SATs. What are they and do they matter? “All juniors in BCSC will take the ACT for free in April of their junior year. We would also encourage all juniors to take the SAT or second ACT to try and get the highest score possible,” Schuetz said. Having a letter of recommendation will also help with applying to a college. This along with having good connections within the school is a great way to show initiative. “Start your freshman year by building a relationship with a teacher, maybe or another adult within the building, that you will touch base with throughout your four years here,” Clark said. Both Sheutz and Clark said that being aware of dates and deadlines is one of the most important aspects of college hunting. Both are available to talk to anyone in the Counseling Center by appointment.

A YEAR-BY-YEAR BREAKDOWN

Junior Year

Visit/Apply to Colleges Apply for scholarships Take SAT/ACT

Senior Year

Finish Senior Project Choose a College Relax and enjoy!

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AL ook Art Int s a o Th t Ea e st By Shelby Morrow and Caroline Stott


photography Classes Offered Photo 1 Photo 2 Photo 3 Photo 4 One semester each Credits Available One Credit Each Teachers Mr. Barber (Photo 1,2,4) Mrs. Kocur (Photo 3)

COVER

“The reason I like photography is because it allows you to look at things differently.It also allows you to explore new places maybe you’ve never been before in Columbus. It’s a wonderful class and I would recommend anyone to take this class in a heartbeat.” - Senior Chelsey Gray

special opportunities

Students can showcase their photos through Instagram. There are weekly Instagram votes and the top three get a shoutout and their photo displayed on the Photography class Instagram. The Scholastic Art Competition allows students to submit photos from all over Indiana. The winner will get a prize and their work will be shown in Clowes Memorial Hall at Butler University and be posted on their website.

design by Hailee Bott

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COVER

2-D ART Classes Offered Advanced 2-Dimensional Art 1 Advanced 2-Dimensional Art 2 Advanced 2-Dimensional Art 3 Advanced 2-Dimensional Art 4 Advanced 2-Dimensional Art 5 Advanced 2-Dimensional Art 6 Advanced 2-Dimensional Art 7 One Semester Each Credits Available One Credit Each Teacher Mrs. Kocur

“I enjoy 3D Art as a stress reliever. I think others should try 3D art because it allows you to be creative and discover new skills you never knew you had. Everyone is able to express themselves through different ways.” - Sophomore Mackenzie Streevel

Special Opportunities

Over both courses, students get the chance to build a portfolio and have scholarship opportunities. There is an Art National Honors Society and a Scholastic Contest that students may enter.

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“The group of people that cultivate here are all focused on the same thing and with that likewise passions. It’s just so easy to have a good time no matter how you’re feeling outside of class. It’s good to explore your talents and maybe find a passion that you didn’t know you had.” - Senior Samuel Crawford

3-D ART

Classes Offered Advanced 3-Dimensional Art 1 Advanced 3-Dimensional Art 2 Advanced 3-Dimensional Art 3 Advanced 3-Dimensional Art 4 Advanced 3-Dimensional Art 5 Advanced 3-Dimensional Art 6 Advanced 3-Dimensional Art 7 One Semester Each Credits Available One Credit Each Teacher Mrs. Antcliff

design by Hailee Bott


COVER

JAZZ BAND “ Jazz band is a great class for anyone interested in music. You can express yourself through the music. Mr. Rodgers is the most relaxed teacher ever and I would suggest for people to give it a try.” - Freshman Derek Heideman

Classes Offered Jazz Band Year-long class Credits Available One credit per semester taken Teacher Mr. Rodgers

Special Opportunities

Students get to participate in live concerts outside of school hours and play for elementary schools. Students are able to sign up for Solo and Ensemble and have the chance to play in front of judges.

BAnd Classes Offered Concert and Symphonic band Year-long class Credits Available One credit per semester taken Teachers Mr. Rodgers Mr.Brookshire

“I really like band because it forces me out of my comfort zone and it’s helped me make some of my best friends. It’s taught me a lot about leadership. I think others should join band because it’s really a family and you make amazing memories.” - Senior Maia Campbell

Special Opportunities

Students will participate in marching band from June-October. Students also get the chance to play pep band during home games for East. Students may only get out of these if they play a sport at the same time as these activities go on. They get to experience different types of band throughout the school year. design by Hailee Bott

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COVER

SHOW CHOIR Classes Offered Intermediate Chorus- Centerstage/Show Choir Year-long class Credits Available One credit per semester taken Teacher Mr. Brockamp

Special Opportunities

Students get to sing in live concerts and become part of the choir. Students get the chance to compete in competitions and showcase their talent. Students may also have the chance to join “Funk City”, Center Stage’s band.

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“[Show Choir] is one of those activities that just grows on you. Once you hear all those people cheering for you, you know that you’re in the right place. If anyone joins they will be accepted immediately and feel like they are a part of something. Being in show choir is like being on a team. Everyone is needed to make the performance work.” - Sophomore Taylor Hollen design by Hailee Bott


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It’s a way of expression, a way to truly be yourself. It is so important that these ways to connect with who you are stay in school, because without them, the world is colorless, bland, and deprived of creativity and personality. While lots of teachers will argue that the academic departments already do not get a lot of money, the arts department gets absolutely none. Considering the arts are just as important as academics, arts do not nearly get as much support as they should. There have been times where even staff members in the art department have paid money out of their own pocket to aid in buying supplies. This is to help cover overall expenses for the students and equipment for their classes. This is not a new concept to teachers and staff members at East. “The band staff has fees that they have to pay,” Jones said. “There have been plenty of times where band directors had to pay [for supplies] out of pocket.” 1 other classes such as phoFor tography and 2-D art, while they 1 participate in fundraisers, they also receive donations from non-school related companies. These donations are then used to help pay for art supplies. The important question to ask is, the arts are important to society and the community, so why do our schools not take them seriously? 1

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design by Annie Bastian

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schools. Since schools focus their 1 budget on academics, art classes are deprived of their spotlight and 1 students fail to find their passion. Across the United States, school 1 districts everywhere are diminishing the amount of money that they 1 grant to their art departments and the following branches. Since 2008, over 80% of the U.S.A.’s school districts have reduced the funding to these departments. However, BCSC schools hardly have any art budgets to cut from in the first place. All of the money put into the art department is out of pocket, donations, or the profit from fundraisers. “It costs $500 to $600 to be in marching band, that’s what I’m in,” Sophomore Amelia Jones said. “It costs so much because we don’t get any money from the school, and our budget is also shared with the guard department.” BCSC has never used corporate money for the arts departments in all of its years. All of the money that the school receives from taxes are forwarded directly to departments for academic and educational purposes, such as English. “I’ve been here [at East] 26 1 years, and it never has been [corporate funded],” Mrs. Penning- 1 ton, overseer of East funds and fundraisers, said. “That’s how it’s always been, how it was set up.” To many types of people, art means so many different things.

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A Look Into How Art Puts the “Fun” In Fundless Caroline Stott cross the board, the arts have been extremely influential to human nature. Variations of art have been around since as long as we have been able to keep record of it. The arts are different interpretations of emotions, characteristics and a way to express who you really are. Art is everything that the world has come to know, love and embrace. Art is in everything. From the cute design on a shirt that you saw someone wearing in the hallway, to the beautiful pictures hanging in the walls of the school and even that catchy tune you just can’t seem to get out of your head. But the arts are not only important to personality and expression, they are also important to functionality and development of the brain in children. The introduction of the arts at a young age will help push along development of fine motor skills, visual learning, decision making, and creativity/ inventiveness. An Early Childhood Longitudinal Study from 1999 to 2007 studied students from when they were in kindergarten to their eighth grade year. From the various groups of students studied, those with high levels of art involvement were more likely to succeed than those with low art involvement. But slowly, these things are beginning to lose their place in

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AN ARTLESS WORLD


SPORTS

SHREDDING ICE Mark Mayhew Senior Mark Mayhew plays for the Columbus Icemen.

Bre Burton

In 30 games, Mayhew has had 31 goals and 23 assists. How has hockey impacted your life?

“Ho s. ckey way y n h a . a I’ve trave s impacted my life in so mplaying l y I’ve b ed all around the countr ures lt een int u c w e roduced to n and me.” i friends t e f that will last a li

What about hockey do you enjoy most ? “I lo ss ve th ene v i t i e fast p t ace and compe abo to have ns.” wat ut the gam s y a e.You will alw io ch o ecis ut for hits and make quick d

How long have you been playing hockey ?

“I st a

r te d p l ay i n g h o c k e y when ” I w a s 4 ye a r s o l d

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design by Bre Burton


SPORTS

BEHIND THE SCENES Going Behind the Concession Stand

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ho does not love a delicious hot dog during a basketball game or a refreshing soda to quench somebody’s thirst throughout a long soccer match? Everybody appreciates it, but how does the food and drinks always seem to satisfy the customers? Jeff Romig, father of students Ben and Matt Romig, and Anthony Pottorff, a teacher here at East, have been leading the concession stands for multiple sports, for many years. “Making people happy and serving a good product keeps me going. Everything we earn goes back to the programs,” Romig said. Much of their motivations thrive from the satisfaction of their customers. Additionally, giving back to the program helps benefit the future of East athletics. These both make Romig and Pottorff feel worthwhile and beneficial. However, doing concessions every game for a whole season can bring a wall of challenges they have to climb over. “One of the big things is trying to find groups to work, and if the inventory is managed properly,” Pottorff said. Not knowing how many people will attend can be vital because they never know how much supplies to get before the games. This could lead to having too much food, or even not enough food. Not having enough workers in the concessions can lead to slower service and more work for the workers there. Even though the challenges seem hard to get by, Romig and Pottorff still seem to satisfy their customers. This brings a big ques-

design by Leo Shelp

tion to the surface: what makes them the best choice for the job? “As a member of the United States Air Force and the Kentucky Air National Guard, you learn to be a structured person,” Romig said. Romig has experience with having a tight schedule. This obviously helps out with getting things done on time. Structure can also progress the line, and sell more product. Pottorff however, has different reasonings for why he’s the best choice. “I had background in retail before I started teaching. I was used to stocking things, and I was used

Tony Pottorff

Brody Copas

to dealing with money,” Pottorff said. This is an instant benefit because, similar to Romig, knowing what to do can make the line go faster and product sell quicker. When seeing concessions from the front, they do not seem to be much. However, knowing what happens behind the scenes, can make you appreciate the hard work and dedication that goes into it. The next time you get your food from Mr. Pottorff or Jeff Romig, make sure to thank them for everything they’ve done for you and for all of East.

Jeff Romig

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FEATURE

THE MARVELOUS MAURICE

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rom day to day, the fear settles in among the custodians as they begin to clean. Will the boys bathroom be flooded today? Am I going to get stabbed in the hand? Will I be respected? For Columbus East’s custodians, these are all questions that they face daily. Custodian Maurice Clifton has been a member of the Olympian family for nearly three years. Within those three years, he has faced numerous accounts of disrespect directed at the custodial staff. “Teachers and students are thinking ‘Oh, I’m going to throw this on the ground because we have custodians, it’s their job’.” Clifton said, “[They] have no manners, we aren’t maids, we are custodians.” Any student of East can verify the havoc that takes place around the school. The school has had several accounts of trashed stairways, cafeterias and bathrooms. Clifton carries a vibe of respect and “chillness”, but when asked about the boys bathroom scandal, you could see his look harden and an energy change in the room. He quickly disregarded the words “messed up” when used to describe the bathroom. “They don’t mess it up, they utterly destroy it. They will fill the toilets with paper towels and there will be pee and poop in it and they will flush it until it overflows,” Clifton said. Clifton even addressed items that have been dismembered from the bathroom, such as the mirrors

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Chesney Loehr

and toilet paper holders. He even talked about how someone misused a urinal, yet with all of this misuse and destruction, no actions have been taken towards the students. “We’re the jerks if we don’t clean, to show a lesson, but these kids ain’t getting in trouble. They say these cameras work, so why aren’t we using them? If I was the principal, they would be expelled for destroying private property., Clifton said. Clifton and his co-workers have endured acts of rudeness from the staff too. He has witnessed teachers throwing down trash and ignoring the trash can “that’s, like, two feet away”. Clifton always respectfully asks them to pick it up, but still finds it amazing that people will throw trash down in front of him, as if they expect him to be their maid. “This one teacher threw a receipt from his pocket onto the ground right in front of me,

odian Cust

and I was like ‘Really, you’re gonna do that right here in front of me?’” Clifton said. While Clifton does enjoy working here at East and is thankful for the letters he gets from the students to show their appreciation, he continues to wonder why so many people can show such disrespect to others. “Why is it so hard for you to be nice to us? We may not be on a higher caliber like the teachers, but without us, you wouldn’t have things set up or cleaned up. Without us, everything would be gross and unsanitized,” Clifton said. Messes will be made, it’s human and Clifton understands that. He understands that kids will have fun. He even threw in a good laugh when he brought up class parties and their messes. “I don’t even get how y’all get turnt on cupcakes and juice boxes, like, are y’all okay?” Clifton said. Clifton’s voice rings out for the entire custodial staff. Respect is something that they want and deserve. “All we ask is for a little respect. You cannot disrespect us and expect us to clean up. If you see trash, pick it up and throw it away. It takes like five seconds out of your day.” Clifton said. With a jovial smile, Clifton said thank you for telling his story, and went off to continue to clean our messes, bopping to the music coming from his headphones.

Maurice Clifton

design by Margo Brunner


FEATURE

UP IN THE AIR

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veryone has dreams of what they want to be when they are older. Some dream of becoming a doctor while others dream of being a star athlete. However, sometimes dreams change as people go through life. Chris Cooper, a calculus teacher at East, was set on becoming a pilot when he graduated from high school. As a senior, he began taking private pilot’s lessons and earned his private pilot’s license in August 1997. After high school, Cooper was accepted into the aviation program at Purdue University. At the time, Purdue was only accepting around 100 pilots a year. With the numbers being so low, he was happy to be accepted. “The program they have is fantastic,” Cooper said. “You go through all of this training and you get your instrument rating first and then your commercial license and all of that, but your last couple of years, you fly.” Cooper said everyone has hobbies that they like for a reason, such as running or watching sports. For him, flying was something fun that he had the opportunity to do. “Flying was just, it was just really cool,” Cooper said. “I mean, you’re doing something that most people don’t have the opportunity to do or can’t do.” In May 2001, Cooper graduated from Purdue with a degree in Flight Technology and was put in a hiring pool at Chautauqua Airlines, a

design by Margo Brunner

regional carrier for U.S. Airways. He said the airline held a round of interviews and began hiring 25 people at a time. Each month, Chautauqua Airlines would pull 25 people out of their hiring pool and put them through ground school during the following month. Cooper had his interview in May and did not receive a call back until the end of the summer. “By the time I started in that hiring pool, I was one of the last ones,” Cooper said. “They had 150 pilots at the time and my seniority number was like 150 out of 150.” Then, on September 11, 2001, Cooper’s career began to change course. The terrorist attacks that morning created, “almost a fear of flying for a brief period of time,” Cooper said. The volume of air traffic was cut by around

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Liz Hagan

70 percent and pilots were laid off by their airlines. Cooper said the pilots who were laid off had around 20,000 hours of flight time, whereas he only had 450 hours. He knew that flying would not just go away, but it would take some time before it picked back up. “So I got another job. I ended up moving back here and got involved coaching wrestling actually and was just kind of waiting it out,” Cooper said. “At some point in time, I just decided, you know, maybe that’s not what I want to do.” After leaving Chautauqua Airlines, Cooper began coaching wrestling at East. He coached for several years before deciding that he would go back to school to earn a math degree. “I went back and I didn’t get a teaching degree, I actually got a math degree,” Cooper said. “I took the teaching test, the Praxis test and everything, and got my teaching license.” Cooper is now a calculus teacher at East and he still coaches wrestling. He has a lifetime commercial pilot’s license with multi-engine and instrument ratings, which he would need to make current if he wanted to fly again. Cooper has not flown a plane in years, but he said he wants to become current again so that he can take his kids on a ride through the skies. “I’ve always said, when my kids get older, old enough to enjoy it, I’m gonna do it just to take them up,” Cooper said.

Chris Cooper

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ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

WINTER SNOWFLAKES WITH A TWIST! How to make a snowflake out of a Doily

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Caroline Emerick

f you’re looking for a cool twist on how to make a paper snowflake, try using doilies! Doilies are small decorative mats, usually placed under fancy pastries or on top of platters, but they actually work great as snowflakes. Add some water colors to make them pop which then creates a wonderful winter snowflake display to hang on windows or walls. For this craft, using coffee filters works just as well if you don’t have any doilies.

Steps

1. Start with using the paint brush to paint the watercolors onto the doilies. If your doilies look a little puffy after the painting, that’s okay, it’s supposed to be like that. 2. Next, fold your doily into a snowflake (instructions below) 3. Cut your snowflake. The more details in your cuts the better! 4. Carefully unfold your snowflake to reveal your final product.

How to Fold a Snowflake 1. 2. 3. 4.

1.

3. 4.

Fold doily in half Fold in half again Fold one side ⅓ of the way in Fold the other side ⅓ of the way in so that it overlaps with the other side

Materials

Paper doilies or Coffee filtersvarious sizes, found at local craft stores Paint brushes Watercolor paints Scissors Newspaper (to protect your work space from getting stained)

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2.

1.

3. 4.

design by Robert Kanehl


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

NEW YEAR, NEW MOVIES Films to Watch in 2019 Isn’t It Romantic February 2019

If romantic comedies are your thing, this movie hits home. Isn’t It Romantic, starring Rebel Wilson and Liam Hemsworth, is a rom-com about a rom-com.

Shazam! - April 2019

Through the power of one word, Billy Batson can transform from a normal teenage boy to a superhero adult version of himself in a split second. Though the road to understanding these newly gained powers may be difficult, Batson must learn them quickly to fight the evil Dr. Thaddeus Sivana in this lighthearted DC film.

Hannah Harris

Avengers: Endgame April 2019

11 years and 22 movies later, Endgame is the last Avengers movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s collection. It will be a bitter and not so sweet time for fans as they say goodbye to their favorite characters. Endgame will introduce new characters into the Avengers and leave the audience awestruck with the twists in the film.

Aladdin - May 2019

A whole new world is revealed in this live-action version of Aladdin. Though the story is intensified through real-life acting, it is still the same classic tale of Princess Jasmine (Naomi Scott), Aladdin (Mena Massoud) and the Genie (Will Smith).

Pet Sematary - April 2019

Based off of the novel written by Stephen King, Pet Sematary follows a young family who moves to Maine only to find an unexplainable burial ground in the woods where they live. It is a retelling of the original movie released in 1989. The Lion King - May 2019

This classic tale is a realistic retelling of the original cartoon released in 1994. 25 years later, advanced animation is used to transform these beloved cartoon characters to lifelike versions of themselves.

Like Games? Want Candy?

Find the other hidden cow in this issue. Come show Mrs. Callison in room C257 for a candy prize! design by Robert Kanehl

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The Oracle: Issue 4  

The Oracle: Issue 4  

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