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19A

Quick Read

CCPD KEEPS AN EYE ON GANGS The gang team was formed 20 years ago, but today’s specialty force relies on education and enforcement to keep down the number of gang members. LOCAL, 1B

AIRFARES GET MORE EXPENSIVE

SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 ■ CITY EDITION

Suspended judge earns $49K ■ Adams paid by county, state

Adams is being investigated following a viral video of the judge striking his daughter.

pending investigation, as required By Mark Collette collettem@caller.com 361-886-3678

Aransas County family law Judge William Adams received nearly $49,000 in pay in almost four months since he stopped hearing cases. Adams was suspend-

ed after the release of a 2004 video showing him striking his then-teenage daughter with a belt. His duties in the County Court-at-Law included determining whether parents were fit to raise their children. The county must continue to pay Adams while

awaiting the results of the State Commission on Judicial Conduct’s investigation. “I’m not going to comment on it,” said County

BY THE NUMBERS 103

Judge Burt Mills, who, as the county’s chief executive, oversees the budget. “It’s something that’s mandated by the Supreme Court. We have no say so.” Adams, in a text message, said he would be working right now if it were up to him. “This suspension was not my idea, but was probably a good one,” he said.

Days since suspension

$23,258

In county pay

$183

Cellphone allowance

$25,427 In state pay

$48,868

Gross pay since November Source: Aransas County treasurer

See JUDGE, 11A

BIG-TIME BUCS MILLER EARNS FIRST STATE BERTH IN 62 YEARS

Fuel costs are to blame for increases in airfare rates, which are expected to spike again during summer travel months. BUSINESS, 16A

$8B BP PAYOUT TO PLAINTIFFS BP is expected to pay almost $8 billion to settle claims with plaintiffs in the Deepwater Horizon spill, not including environmental costs. NATION, 3A

MORE DEAD AFTER STORMS At least 38 people were killed in storms that spanned five states. Yet among the tragedy there are remarkable stories of survival. NATION, 8A INDEX BUSINESS 16A-17A COMICS 1D-6D CROSSWORD 5G LOTTERY 2C OBITUARIES 5B-7B WEATHER 19A

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Miller’s Marquis Lewis high-fives fans as he carries around the championship trophy Saturday following the team’s 61-59 overtime win against Liberty Hill in the regional championship at American Bank Center.

A

fter 62 long years, it once again will be Miller’s shot at the boys state basketball tournament. The Bucs pulled off their second thrilling win in as many days on Saturday, rallying to beat Liberty Hill 61-59 in overtime in the Region IV-3A final at the American Bank Center. Miller (31-8), in its first state tournament since 1950, will play in a Class 3A state semifinal at 2 or 3:30 p.m. Thursday at the Frank Erwin Center in Austin. “We’ve just got to do what we did today — stick together,” said junior Marquis Lewis, who scored a team-high 18 points. “One team, one dream.” Greg Rajan

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883-3800

scrambling to manage boom By Mike D. Smith smithm@caller.com 361-886-3759

Millions of barrels of oil and billions of cubic feet of gas have been extracted from the Eagle Ford Shale. Companies have invested billions of dollars in land leases, equipment and royalty payouts — and the boom isn’t even at full throttle, industry insiders say. Eagle Ford has proved lucrative so quickly that production can’t afford

INSIDE Miller shows once again that failure is not an option. 1C Matt Young: Billy the Kid strikes again. 1C See more photos. 7C

Struggling with sustainability ■ Counties are

High school playoffs

EAGLE FORD SHALE PLAY Eagle Ford petroleum windows ■ Oil ■ Wet gas/condensate ■ Dry gas Top Eagle Ford subsea depth structure ■ Eagle Ford shale − Austin chalk outcrops

Austin

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NEXT SUNDAY How the state and counties will address an unforeseen impact of the Eagle Ford boom — roads crumbling faster and on a far greater scale than anyone projected.

Helena

Beeville George West

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2A » Sunday, March 4, 2012 »

C A L L E R -T I M E S

PAGE 2 McEntire spoke Sunday night about the 1991 plane crash that killed seven band members.

Reba lets emotions out on OWN By Caitlin R. King Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — More than 20 years after a plane crash killed seven members of her band and her tour manager, Reba McEntire can still clearly see the hotel room she was in when she got the news. The emotion comes flooding back when she revisits that tragic day in 1991 on “Oprah’s Master Class” on the OWN network Sunday night. It’s a rare break in composure from the queen of country music. “I don’t guess it ever quits hurting,” she says on the show, recalling how she tearfully followed husband-manager Narvel Blackstock room to room as he called people to let them know. From that tragedy, she learned to make each day count and not to put anything off until tomorrow. However, McEntire said after the crash, she built up a wall so she would not get close to anybody, and it took time for her to open up to members of her touring family again. She accepted support from industry friends like Dolly Parton, who helped her put a new band together, and she took solace in her strong work ethic. McEntire is now a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame and has sold more than 55 million albums worldwide. She also runs a successful fashion and merchandise line.

MC5 rocker gives jails guitars ■ Kramer says

In Los Angeles, MC5’s Wayne Kramer plays one of the instruments that will be given to jail inmates who are using music as a means of achieving rehabilitation.

music helps 85% of inmates By John Rogers Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — He spent two years in a federal lockup for trying to sell cocaine to undercover agents, and all Wayne Kramer can think about these days is trying to find a way to get back behind bars. This time, though, the guitar god for rock music’s seminal pre-punk band, the MC5, wants to bring his ax with him and a few dozen others for the inmates to play. With a little help from friends like the Foo Fighters’ Chris Shiflett, former Guns N’ Roses guitarist Gilby Clarke and others, Kramer has formed Jail Guitar Doors USA. He runs the nonprofit charitable organization

ASSOCIATED PRESS

with his wife, Margaret, out of the Hollywood studio where he makes a comfortable living these days composing music for movies and television. Over the past two years, Jail Guitar Doors USA has delivered scores of instruments to prisons and jails in Nevada, California and Texas. “He’s a great man. He’s taken his skill, his talent,

and he’s putting it to use, giving back to society,” says Deputy David Bates, who has worked with Kramer in bringing guitars to several jails run by the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. Bates, who calls music “the universal language,” says he’s seen the positive effect it has had on inmates. So, Kramer says, has he. In his case, first hand.

“When I played music in prison, I wasn’t in prison anymore,” he says, as he sits in his studio over a lunch of vegetarian Thai food. “And that’s what we’re trying to accomplish with the instrument donations,” he says. “That this is a way that you can get through this time, that you can go someplace else, you can get involved in your guitar.”

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Man who took JFK Jr. photo dies

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■ Stearns focused on 3-year-old

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By Jessica Gresko Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The photographer who took the iconic picture of John F. Kennedy Jr. saluting his father’s coffin during the slain president’s 1963 funeral has died. Stan Stearns, 76, died Friday at a hospice in Harwood, Md. His son, Jay Stearns, said the cause was cancer. Stearns was assigned to cover John F. Kennedy’s funeral on Nov. 25, 1963, as a photographer for United Press International. He would later describe standing outside the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington and being squeezed into a roped off area with 70 other photographers. Stearns stood by as the president’s flag-draped

casket was loaded on to a horse-drawn caisson after the funeral. Through his Telephoto lens, he watched as Jacqueline Kennedy leaned down to whisper to her son, who turned 3 years old that day. Then the boy stepped forward and saluted. Stearns’ camera clicked. The salute lasted less than five seconds. Stearns later said he learned other photographers had focused on Jacqueline Kennedy or the president’s coffin. Stearns returned early to UPI’s office with his film. His angry boss demanded to know why he’d left the funeral. Stearns explained he had the picture of the day. “I knew I got it,” Stearns later said of the famous shot. “You know when you get it.”

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Allison Pollan • 886-3683 pollana@caller.com CITY EDITOR ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE

In Annapolis, Md., former United Press International photographer Stan Stearns holds his photo of John F. Kennedy Jr. saluting his father’s coffin. Stearns, 76, died Friday of cancer at a hospice in Harwood, Md., said son Jay Stearns.

Bro Krift • 886-3662 kriftb@caller.com EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Tom Whitehurst Jr. • 886-3619 whitehurstt@caller.com INVESTIGATIVE/DATA EDITOR

Denise Malan • 886-4334 maland@caller.com NIGHT BREAKING NEWS EDITOR

Houston’s child to talk to Winfrey

Women’s

By The Associated Press

history month

NEW YORK — Oprah Winfrey has landed an interview with Whitney Houston’s daughter and other family members for a TV special

Susan B.

ANTHONY 1820- 1906 Women’s rights activist, suffragist ■ Susan B. Anthony began her lifelong campaign for women’s suffrage when she met activist Elizabeth Stanton in 1852. ■ They organized the National Woman Suffrage Association in 1869. Anthony edited its newspaper, traveled extensively, organizing and lecturing. ■ When committed people work for justice, she said, “Failure is Impossible.” ■ The Nineteenth Amendment, passed in 1920, has been called the “Anthony Amendment” in tribute to the tireless work of this great crusader. QUOTE: “Join the union, girls, and together say equal pay for equal work.” — The Revolution, March 18, 1869

Late-night laughs “Mitt Romney won in Michigan ... It was certainly a close race — a real nail-biter or, in Romney’s case, a real manicure.” “They went crazy celebrating. A friend of mine who was in campaign headquarters said that after he won and the lights were turned off and people were going home, Romney took off his jacket and chugged a glass of tap water.” “Rick Santorum thinks that global warming, climate change, is a hoax. Let me ask you something, Rick. If you think global warming and climate change is a hoax, how do you explain those sleeveless sweaters?”

— David Letterman

that will air on the Oprah Winfrey Network. “Oprah’s Next Chapter” will feature an interview with 19-year-old Bobbi Kristina, Houston’s only child. It will also include Patricia

Houston, who’s the singer’s sister-in-law and manager, as well as the singer’s brother Gary. It is scheduled to air March 11. Winfrey attended Houston’s funeral in Newark, N.J., last month.

Will Leschper • 886-3785 leschperw@caller.com DAY BREAKING NEWS EDITOR

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NIELSENS RATINGS By The Associated Press

Prime-time viewership numbers compiled by Nielsen for Feb. 20-26. Listings include the week’s ranking and viewership. 1. “Academy Awards,” ABC, 39.34 million. 2. “Oscar’s Red Carpet” (8 p.m. EST), ABC, 24.07 million. 3. “NCIS,” CBS, 19.29 million. 4. “Oscar’s Red Carpet” (7:30 p.m. EST), ABC, 16.63 million.

Day in history Today is Sunday, March 4, the 64th day of 2012. There are 302 days left in the year. ■ In 1681, England’s King

Charles II granted a charter to William Penn for an area of land that later became Pennsylvania. ■ In 1789, the Constitution of the United States went into effect as the first Federal Congress met in New York. ■ In 1791, Vermont became the 14th state. ■ In 1858, Sen. James Henry Hammond of South Carolina declared “Cotton is king” in a speech to the U.S. Senate. ■ In 1861, Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated as the 16th president of the United States. The U.S. Government Printing Office began operation. The Confederate States of America adopted as its flag the original version of the Stars and Bars. ■ In 1917, Republican Jeannette Rankin of Montana took her seat as the first woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives.

5. “The Big Bang Theory,” CBS, 16.20 million. 6. “American Idol” (Feb. 22), Fox, 16.10 million. 7. “The Voice,” NBC, 16.04 million. 8. “American Idol” (Feb. 23), Fox, 15.64 million. 9. “NCIS: Los Angeles,” CBS, 15.47 million. 10. “Person of Interest,” CBS, 14.56 million. 11. “The Mentalist,” CBS, 13.36 million. 12. “Two and a Half Men,” CBS, 13.33 million. 13. “Criminal Minds,” CBS,

Birthdays ■ In 1930, Coolidge Dam in

Arizona was dedicated by its namesake, former President Calvin Coolidge. ■ In 1940, Kings Canyon National Park in California was established. ■ In 1960, an explosivesladen French freighter, La Coubre, exploded in Havana’s harbor, killing at least 75 people. ■ In 1977, some 1,500 people were killed in an earthquake that shook southern and Eastern Europe. ■ In 2002, European Union’s 15 members ratified the Kyoto Protocol on global warming, but failed to set pollutant-emission levels to meet the accord’s targets. ■ In 2007, NAACP President Bruce S. Gordon announced he was quitting the civil rights organization after just 19 months at the helm. ■ In 2011, Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi’s regime struck back at its opponents with a powerful attack on Zawiya, the closest opposition-held city to Tripoli.

12.78 million. 14. “Oscar’s Red Carpet” (7 p.m. EST), ABC, 12.58 million. 15. “CSI,” CBS, 11.91 million. 16. “Modern Family,” ABC, 11.54 million. 17. “2 Broke Girls,” CBS, 11.37 million. 18. “Blue Bloods,” CBS, 11.35 million. 19. “Mike & Molly,” CBS, 11.33 million. 20. “Unforgettable,” CBS, 10.70 million. Associated Press

Today on

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■ Actress Paula Prentiss

is 74. ■ Singer Bobby Womack is 68. ■ Rock musician Chris Squire (Yes) is 64. ■ Singer Shakin’ Stevens is 64. ■ Singer Chris Rea is 61. ■ Actor Ronn Moss is 60. ■ Actress Kay Lenz is 59. ■ Musician Emilio Estefan is 59. ■ Actress Catherine O’Hara is 58. ■ Actor Mykelti Williamson is 55. ■ Actress Patricia Heaton is 54. ■ Actor Steven Weber is 51. ■ Rock musician Jason Newsted is 49. ■ Actress Stacy Edwards is 47. ■ Rapper Grand Puba is 46. ■ Rock musician Patrick Hannan (The Sundays) is 46.

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Gregorio L. Espinoza Josefa Garcia Felipe Hernandez Dee D. Hill Jr. Servando Lichtenberger Reynaldo Munoz Jr. Shari D. Munoz Doris W. Ozio Carlton Payne Jr. Jesus D. Salinas Janie A. Washington Florentino Zamora Jr. Page 5B

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C A L L E R -T I M E S

« Sunday, March 4, 2012 « 3A

NATION

Obama defends energy policy

Questions remain in Gulf spill settlement ■ What about

Fire boat response crews spray water on the blazing remnants of BP’s Deepwater Horizon offshore oil rig in April 2010. BP agreed late Friday to settle lawsuits brought by more than 100,000 fishermen who lost work.

environment? By Michael Kunzelman and Harry R. Weber Associated Press

■ New cars to

get increased gas mileage By Jim Kuhnhenn Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama says higher auto mileage standards set under his administration and better cars built by a resurgent U.S. auto industry will save money at the gas pump over the long term, a counterpoint to Republican criticism of his energy policy. In his weekly radio and online address Saturday, Obama said Detroit automakers are on track to build cars that average nearly 55 miles per gallon by 2025, doubling current mileage standards. “That means folks will be able to fill up every two weeks instead of every week, saving the typical family more than $8,000 at the pump over time,” he said. “That’s a big deal, especially as families are yet again feeling the pinch from rising gas prices.” Obama has been eager to appear aggressive in the face of rising gasoline prices even as he reminds audiences that there is no simple, immediate solution that will reverse the current spike in prices. “What’s happening in Detroit will make a difference. But it won’t solve everything,” Obama said. “There’s no silver bullet for avoiding spikes in gas prices every year.” By drawing attention to the auto industry, Obama looked to highlight both his efforts to improve fuel efficiency as well as his role in helping rescue General Motors and Chrysler. He also reiterated his call to end oil and gas company tax breaks and government subsidies that average about $4 billion a year. Rising oil prices have become a concern at the White House, where Obama aides worry they could hurt the economic recovery. Oil prices typical rise in the spring, but they have spiked to heights unseen at this time of year, hastened by increased tensions over Iran’s nuclear program. Gasoline prices reached $3.74 a gallon on Friday, a record at this point in the calendar but still shy of the high point of $4.11 hit in July 2008. In Saturday’s Republican address, Rep. Doc Hastings of Washington said a meeting this week among Obama and leaders from both parties “provided a glimmer of new hope that the president and the Democratic-controlled Senate may finally act on some bipartisan energy bills” already passed by the Republican-controlled House. Still, Hastings, the chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee, faulted Obama for not doing more to increase domestic oil and gas production, for opposing drilling on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, for blocking a Canada-to-Texas oil pipeline and for imposing regulations on energy producers.

NEW ORLEANS — BP’s settlement with plaintiffs suing the company over the 2010 oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico may address harm to individuals and businesses, but there is nothing in it that compensates the public for damage to its natural resources and environment, the Justice Department said Saturday. That’s a potentially critical issue because a separate victims’ claims fund that was set up months after the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion also was meant to cover environmental damages, but it’s now expected to be used to cover the BP settlement with plaintiffs. BP said it expects to pay out $7.8 billion in the settlement with the plaintiffs that was announced Friday. It’s not clear whether environmental claims will now have to be addressed separately between BP and the U.S. government, or whether it will be rolled up into their ongoing discussions over settling the fines and penalties that the British company faces. Both issues also could be resolved at an eventual civil trial, which

ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE

now has been postponed indefinitely. The Justice Department noted that the settlement doesn’t address “significant damages” to natural resources and the environment. “While we are pleased that BP may be stepping up to address harms to individual plaintiffs, this by no means fully addresses its responsibility for the harms it has caused,” the agency said in a statement to The Associated Press. The spill soiled sensitive tidal estuaries and beaches, killed wildlife and closed vast areas of the Gulf to commercial fishing for months. Dispersants and siphoning equipment and other

methods were successful in getting rid of much of the oil in the ocean, but some environmentalists believe oil beneath the surface could return one day to Gulf shores. David Uhlmann, a University of Michigan Law School professor who previously served as chief of the Justice Department’s environmental crimes section, estimates that a deal between BP, the federal government and the states — one that includes criminal and civil penalties and resolves natural resource damage claims — would be worth between $20 billion to $25 billion. BP still has to resolve claims by the U.S. govern-

ment, Gulf states and its partners on the doomed Deepwater Horizon rig, which exploded and sank 50 miles off Louisiana after a BP oil well a mile below the ocean’s surface blew out. Eleven rig workers were killed and, according to the

government, more than 200 million gallons of oil spewed before the well was capped nearly three months later. Rig owner Transocean and cement contractor Halliburton have rejected recent overtures to settle their claims with BP and pay billions of dollars, according to two people close to the case who spoke on condition of anonymity because the talks are confidential. But legal observers expect that could change now that BP and the Plaintiffs Steering Committee have reached a settlement. BP anticipates that the separate claims fund run by Ken Feinberg will cease at some point. It says it expects money from the fund will be used to pay the settlement. According to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Trust, current total trust assets are approximately $9.5 billion.

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4A » Sunday, March 4, 2012 »

C A L L E R -T I M E S

DID YOU KNOW?

Nation&World

The Joint Committee on the Library is the oldest continuing Joint Committee of the U.S. Congress. It was created on April 24, 1800. Source: loc.gov

Limbaugh apologizes to law student

Across the nation D I S T R I C T O F CO L U M B I A

CIA-led force may speed Afghan exit

■ Popular host

criticized for use of slur By The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Conservative talk show host Rush Limbaugh apologized Saturday to a Georgetown University law student he had branded a “slut” and “prostitute” after fellow Republicans as well as Democrats criticized him and several advertisers left his program. The student, Sandra Fluke, had testified to congressional Democrats that she wanted her college health plan to cover her birth control. “My choice of words was not the best, and in the attempt to be humorous, I created a national stir,” Limbaugh said on his website. “I sincerely apologize to Ms. Fluke for the insulting word choices.” Fluke had been invited to testify to a House committee about her school’s health care plan that does not include contraception. Republican lawmakers barred her from testifying during that hearing, but Democrats invited her back and she spoke at an unofficial session. The issue has been much debated in the presidential race, with Republican candidates particularly criticizing President Barack Obama plan’s requirements on such employers as Catholic hospitals. Democrats have suggested the issue could energize women to vote for Obama.

ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE

President Barack Obama declares the United States could take military action to prevent Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon. He also says he will try to persuade Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in a crucial meeting to avoid a pre-emptive strike against Iran. Meanwhile, Tehran insists its nuclear program is for peaceful purposes.

Iran has become the top U.S.-Israel issue ■ Yet shifting

focus may have its advantages By Bradley Klapper and Matthew Lee Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Peace talks with the Palestinians dominated President Barack Obama’s meeting last year with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu but will barely warrant a mention at their White House session Monday or in speeches to a powerful proIsraeli lobby. Iran is now the issue commanding urgent attention. The Palestinians probably will not get much more than a passing reference by the U.S. and Israeli officials, lawmakers, GOP presidential hopefuls and others at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee’s annual policy conference, where Obama was scheduled to speak today, a day before Netanyahu. Nor is the peace process

at the top of the agenda for Netanyahu’s meeting with Obama at the Oval Office on Monday and his talks with congressional leaders on Tuesday. Shifting focus from the seemingly intractable Mideast conflict has political advantages for both Obama and Netanyahu, even if they also don’t see eye to eye on the preferred tactics to prevent Iran from being a nuclear-armed state. For one, no politician in an election year has ever suffered from being tough on Iran. Pressing Israel on the need to make concessions to the Palestinians can be a political minefield. That is what happened last year when Obama declared that the need for a two-state solution was “more urgent than ever.” He challenged Israel to make concessions on borders and security that have hindered an agreement for six decades. The immediate result was public confrontation with Netanyahu, and fodder for a Republican Party

eager to cast Obama as a weak partner to Israel. Israel is an ally whose wishes are key to the Democratic-leaning Jewish vote and to the evangelical Christians who make up a large chunk of the Republican base. A year of balky peace negotiations, an acrimonious Palestinian campaign to win U.N. recognition and continued Israeli settlement construction in disputed territories have hardly validated Obama’s public call for a speedy resolution. But as America’s proIsrael advocates gather again, the call for peace with the Palestinians has succumbed to fever-pitched talk of military action against Iran. Israel believes the time to strike is before Iran has a nuclear weapon. The U.S. position is to wait until it is certain Iran has one, and allow more time for sanctions to succeed in pressuring Iran back into negotiations. Tehran insists its nuclear program is for peaceful purposes.

WASHINGTON — Top Pentagon officials are considering putting elite special operations troops under CIA control in Afghanistan after 2014, just as they were during last year’s raid on Osama bin Laden’s compound in Pakistan, sources told The Associated Press. The plan is one of several possible scenarios being debated by Pentagon staffers. It has not yet been presented to Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, the White House or Congress, the sources said. If the plan were adopted, the U.S. and Afghanistan could say there are no more U.S. troops on the ground in the war-torn country because once the SEALs, Rangers and other elite units are assigned to CIA control, even temporarily, they become spies. Pentagon spokesman George Little denied the idea is being discussed. OHIO

House fire kills four; no survivors inside WARREN — A man, woman and two girls died Saturday in a house fi re in northeast Ohio, fi re officials said. Warren Fire Chief Ken Nussle tells the Tribune Chronicle that one of the first 911 calls came from a woman inside the house. Flames had engulfed the two-story house by the time fi refighters arrived around 3:30 a.m. No one was able to escape the wood-framed home, Assistant Fire Chief Dan Suttles said. He said the man was identified as 32-year-old Edtwan Kimble but that the coroner had not posi-

Official: U.S. must halt military drills PYONGYANG — A spokesman for North Korea’s powerful National Defense Commission said Saturday that the United States must halt joint military drills under way in South Korea if it is serious about peace on the Korean peninsula. Military officials convened a rare news conference at the People’s Palace of Culture in Pyongyang to denounce the joint U.S.-South Korean war games as a threat to peace at a time when U.S. and North Korean officials are holding talks aimed at improving relations. JA PA N

Premier cites faults on tsunami reaction TOKYO — Japan’s Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda acknowledged Saturday the government failed in its response to last year’s earthquake and tsunami, being too slow in relaying key information and believing too much in “a myth of safety” about nuclear power. Noda was speaking to reporters at his official residence ahead of the anniversary of the March 11 disaster that killed nearly 20,000 people in northeastern Japan and set off the worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl. Japan has learned important lessons to be better prepared for tsunami, he said. IRAN

Ahmadinejad rivals appear to gain clout

TEHRAN — Conservative rivals of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad appeared on course Satur-

day to gain firm control of parliament after elections that could embolden Iran’s nuclear defiance and give the ruling clerics a clear path to ensure a loyalist succeeds Ahmadinejad next year. Although Iran’s parliament has limited sway over key affairs, the elections highlight the political narratives inside the country since Ahmadinejad’s disputed re-election in 2009 and sets the possible tone for his fi nal 18 months in office.

MOGADISHU — Police say a man driving a car laden with explosives blew himself up in Somalia’s capital. Policeman Nur Hassan at the scene said Saturday it appeared the man detonated his explosives prematurely. He died on the scene. No one else was wounded or killed. I TA LY

Hearing gets heated in cruise ship wreck GROSSETO — The first hearing of the criminal investigation into the Costa Concordia’s shipwreck was held in a theater Saturday instead of a courthouse because of high demand, with angry survivors seeking compensation, justice and the truth. The judge at the hearing assigned four experts to analyze the cruise ship’s data recorder and ordered them to report their findings in July. Prosecutors must decide whether to seek a trial against the captain, other top officers and officials of Italian cruise company Costa Crociere SpA . Wire services

14 hurt in shooting outside nightclub

TEMPE — Police in the Phoenix suburb of Tempe say they’ve made one arrest and are looking for two other suspects after a shooting outside a nightclub left more than a dozen people wounded. Lt. Mike Horn says the number of people confirmed to have been wounded in the shooting rose to 14 after a person went to a hospital with a gunshot wound to the foot Saturday. He says the man in custody is one of three who opened fire at each other after they began arguing as a crowd of at least 250 people lined up for a hip-hop show late Friday. NEW JERSEY

Expert: Pill mix-up unlikely to hurt kids

TRENTON — Children who may have taken breast cancer treatment medication mistakenly distributed by a New Jersey pharmacy instead of prescribed fluoride pills likely won’t suffer any health problems, a pharmaceutical expert said Saturday. CVS Caremark officials say only a few children ingested pills for breast cancer treatment that they mistakenly received, and company investigators are still working to determine how and why the errors occurred at the pharmacy in Chatham. The pharmacy has acknowledged improperly dispensing Tamoxifen instead of chewable fluoride tablets to children in as many as 50 families between Dec. 1 and Feb. 20. Wire services

By Patrick Quinn Associated Press

SOMALIA

Man blows self up while driving car

ARIZONA

Accounts differ in burning of holy books

Across the world N O R T H KO R E A

tively identified the other victims by Saturday afternoon. He said Kimble had been staying at the house.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Men bury three Free Syrian Army fighters allegedly killed by the Syrian Army during their funeral Saturday in Idlib.

Syrian forces shell Homs; Red Cross shipment blocked By Zeina Karam Associated Press

BEIRUT — Syrian forces launched a fresh assault on Homs on Saturday as the Red Cross pressed forward with efforts to deliver badly needed aid to thousands of people stranded in a besieged neighborhood despite warnings from regime troops of land mines and booby traps. Two days after they fought their way into the rebel stronghold of Baba Amr, government forces shelled several other neighborhoods of the city, the country’s third largest with about 1 million people. They included districts where many of Baba Amr’s residents had fled, activists said. The Syrian regime has said it was fighting “armed gangs” in Baba Amr, which has become a symbol of the nearly year-old uprising against President Bashar Assad’s authoritarian rule. The revolt has killed more than 7,500 people, according

to the U.N. The Local Coordination Committees activist network said mortars slammed into the districts of Khaldiyeh, Bab Sbaa and Khader. Abu Hassan al-Homsi, a doctor at a makeshift clinic in Khaldiyeh, said he treated a dozen people who were wounded, most lightly. “This has become routine, the mortars start falling early in the morning,” he said. Several homes were damaged from the morning shelling. Another Khaldiyeh resident who spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals said the district has been without water and heating fuel for a week amid freezing temperatures and snow. “We are collecting rain and snow water, and cutting trees to burn to warm ourselves,” he said. Conditions in Baba Amr are believed to be dire, with extended power outages, shortages of food and water, and lack of medical care.

Syrian government forces took control of the neighborhood Thursday after rebels fled the district under constant bombardment that activists said killed hundreds of people since early February. The Red Cross said the regime blocked its entry to Baba Amr on Friday, one day after the group received government permission to enter with a convoy of seven trucks carrying 15 tons of humanitarian aid including food, medical supplies and blankets. “We are still in negotiations to enter Baba Amr,” ICRC spokesman Hicham Hassan said Saturday in Geneva. The Syrians said they were not letting the Red Cross into Baba Amr because of safety concerns, including land mines, Hassan said, adding the organization had not been able to verify the danger. The government has not offered an official explanation.

KABUL, Afghanistan — An investigation into the burning of Muslim holy books at a U.S. military base has found it was a mistake involving at least five Americans who may face a disciplinary review, a Western official said Saturday, but Afghan investigators claimed it was an intentional desecration. The Western official told The Associated Press that preliminary findings from a joint investigation by senior Afghan and U.S. military officials that was ordered by Marine Gen. John Allen has convinced them that although mistakes were made, there was no intent to desecrate the Qurans or other material. Maulvi Khaliq Dad, a top Afghan religious leader who was on a panel appointed by President Hamid Karzai to investigate the incident, claimed the burning was intentional. Full details of the incident are expected to be included in the joint Afghan-U.S. probe that is being reviewed by a coalition legal expert. A date for its release has not been set. A more formal U.S. military investigation is still weeks away from completion. “We are waiting for the result of the investigation by NATO, which will probably show who is involved in this and how many people are involved. After studying it we will announce our stance,” said presidential spokesman Aimal Faizi. “What the Afghan president has requested from U.S. officials and the U.S. military is a trial and punishment.”


★

ÂŤ Sunday, March 4, 2012 ÂŤ 5A

C A L L E R -T I M E S

NATION

Gingrich, Santorum battle for Bible Belt By Russ Bynum Associated Press

SAVANNAH, Ga. — The GOP presidential candidates are ďŹ ghting to win over conservative voters in the Bible Belt as the race takes on a more prominent Southern focus. After bowing out of recent contests north of the MasonDixon line, Newt Gingrich is staking his entire campaign on a big victory Tuesday in Georgia, where the onetime House speaker represented a suburban Atlanta district for 20 years. Rick Santorum is making inroads in Tennessee with a message that the state’s evangelical voters

should feel right at home with the former Pennsylvania senator’s socially conservative views. Both candidates hope to capitalize on Super Tuesday victories to propel their campaigns forward to Alabama and Mississippi on March 13 and to Louisiana on March 24. None of those Southern states was very hospitable to Mitt Romney during the former Massachusetts governor’s White House bid in 2008, so there’s prime recruiting ground to entice conservative voters who want an alternative to Romney. “I fully believe that the South will be a key player,� said Joe Dendy, Republican chairman for

AP FACT CHECK

Statements from candidates don’t always check out Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Is there any impulse greater in politics than to promise people the sun and the moon? Each in their own way, the Republican candidates heading into Super Tuesday primaries are telling Americans they can have “it all� — plentiful energy without pain at the pump, jobs without deeper debt, thriving factories like the days of yore, a renaissance at every dusty turn. Call it the can-do spirit or, as Barack Obama liked to put it, “Yes we can.� But, seriously. No independent economist believes manufacturing will come rushing back against the global economic tide if the government merely backs off on taxes and regulations. The vastly complex energy market is not a Norman Rockwell painting that a president can create with brush strokes. Taps on a cold calculator tell a different story than the rosy accounts of balanced budgets just ahead. In promising to unleash an energy production boom leading America to the promised land of cheap fuel, Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum and Newt Gingrich (who promises a moon colony) routinely ignore that the nation is already experiencing such a boom — apparently without making a dime’s worth of difference at the gas station. Here’s a look at some of those promises and how they stack up against the facts: DEBT

ROMNEY: “I’m going to deliver on more jobs, less debt and smaller government. ... He (Obama) raised the national debt. I will cut, cap and balance the budget. He passed Obamacare. I’ll repeal it. He lost our AAA credit rating; I’ll restore it.â€? THE FACTS: Romney’s taxcut and spending plans fall far short of balancing the budget or making much of a dent, if any, in the national debt, now more than $15 trillion, according to independent analyses of the plan. He can cut taxes. He can cut debt. It’s unlikely he can do both. An analysis by the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget ďŹ nds that his plans probably would add signiďŹ cantly to deďŹ cits for the coming decade, deepening the debt by some $250 billion under a middle-of-the-road scenario or by as much as $2.15 trillion in the worst case. The group found a best-case scenario that could see the debt decline by as much as $2.25 trillion but considered that improbable.

MANUFACTURING: SANTORUM: On the decline of the manufacturing workforce: “That’s just inexcusable — all of it because government regulation and government taxation ... The average manufacturing job in America pays $20,000 more a year than the average job in America. We can get those jobs back.� THE FACTS: Santorum’s assertion that rules and

taxes are solely to blame for closed factories ies in the face of America’s decadeslong transformation to a new economy and global forces anchoring the production of consumer goods in lowwage economies. Remaining manufacturing jobs pay better than usual because low-wage manufacturing jobs have largely ed and are out of the equation. Building airplanes for Boeing, tractors for Caterpillar and big machinery and equipment for overseas customers is a higher-value enterprise than turning out the toys and consumer electronics now made in Asia.

ry Barbour, a Republican National Committee member and Romney supporter from Mississippi. Dot Ward, a 73-year-old homemaker from Madison, Miss., said she is leaning toward Gingrich. “I think Newt stands the greatest possibility of being able to debate with him intelligently and present a good case,� Ward said. “But then I’m not sure about Newt and his ability to be president. See, that’s what worries me the most. I’m unhappy about all of the candidates. And Rick Santorum, I do like very much. I like what he stands for. But I don’t think he’s got what seems to me the maturity.�

conceded the South. He planned a rally today in Knoxville, Tenn. In the 2008 race, Romney ďŹ nished third in each of the upcoming Southern primary states except for Mississippi, which voted after Romney quit the race. He still faces trouble connecting with Southern conservatives, who see him as too moderate, and with evangelicals, who might be troubled by Romney’s Mormon faith. After Super Tuesday, the Southern campaign moves to Alabama and Mississippi, which hold primaries a week later. “Super Tuesday, I’m sure, will set the tone for Mississippi and Alabama particularly,â€? said Hen-

Romney nets solid win in Washington â– 40 delegates

at stake in state caucus By David Espo Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Mitt Romney rolled to a double-digit victory in Republican presidential caucuses in Washington state Saturday night, his fourth campaign triumph in a row and a fresh show of strength in the run-up to 10 Super Tuesday contests in all regions of the country. Rick Santorum and Ron Paul battled for second place, while Newt Gingrich trailed. Claiming his victory, Romney said in a statement that the win meant Washington state’s voters “do not want a Washington insider in the White House. They want a conservative busi-

Gingrich

Paul

Romney

Santorum

nessman who understands Saturday night, Romney the private sector and knows had nearly 37 percent of the vote, followed by how to get the federal Ron Paul with 25 government out of the ELECTION percent. Rick Sanway so that the econtorum was close omy can once again behind with 24.4 grow vigorously. percent and Newt Romney’s West Coast victory came on Gingrich had nearly 11 perthe heels of twin primary cent of the vote. Romney’s win was worth triumphs over Santorum earlier in the week in hard- at least 12 of the 40 delegates fought Michigan and lightly at stake. Paul and Santorum contested Arizona, as well as each won at least three. The a narrow win over Paul in rest remained unallocated, Maine caucuses earlier in pending ďŹ nal returns. That brought Romney’s February. With about 92 percent of overall total to 185 delegates, the precinct votes counted according to an Associated

2012

Press count that includes party officials who will vote on the selection of a nominee but are not selected at primaries or caucuses. Santorum had 90, Gingrich 33 and Paul 23. It takes 1,144 delegates to win the nomination at the Republican National Convention this summer in Tampa and challenge President Barack Obama in the fall. Romney criticized Obama after a woman attending a campaign rally in Beavercreek said she had a daughter stationed in Afghanistan who believes the U.S. mission there is unclear. “If your daughter is not familiar with the mission that she’s on, how in the world can the commander in chief sleep at night, knowing that we have soldiers in harm’s way that don’t know exactly, precisely, what it is that they’re doing there,� he said.

ENTITLEMENTS: GINGRICH: “The duty of the president is to ďŹ nd a way to manage the federal government so the primary pain is on changing the bureaucracy. On theft alone, we could save $100 billion a year in Medicaid and Medicare if the federal government were competent. That’s a trillion dollars over 10 years. And the only people in pain would be crooks.â€? THE FACTS: A sober look at the books shows leaders from both parties that painful choices must be made in entitlements. Medicare and Medicaid are running into trouble mainly because of an aging population, the cost of high-tech medicine and budget woes. The number-crunchers say solving health care fraud alone is not enough. Health care fraud investigations are already a big source of recovered money, surpassing ďŹ nes and penalties collected for defense contracting fraud. ENERGY:

OBAMA: “After three decades of inaction, we’re gradually putting in place the toughest fuel economy standards in history for our cars and pickups. That means the cars you build will average nearly 55 miles per gallon by the middle of the next decade — almost double what they get today. That means folks, every time they ďŹ ll up, they’re going to be saving money. They’ll have to ďŹ ll up every two weeks instead of every week. That saves the typical family more than $8,000 at the pump over time. That means we’ll cut our oil consumption by more than 2 million barrels a day.â€? THE FACTS: Raising mileage standards is not painfree, and Obama spoke about the beneďŹ ts while excluding the costs. Compliance will add thousands of dollars to the cost of a car. The standards are going up in two stages. The second and most ambitious stage is expected to cost the auto industry more than $150 billion, raise the cost of the average new vehicle by $2,000, then save drivers up to $4,400 in gas over the life of the vehicle. Obama’s estimate of $8,000 in savings refers to the substantial break in fuel purchases from both increases in mileage standards, but excludes the higher costs of buying the vehicle in the ďŹ rst place.



       



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Cobb County in metro Atlanta. “I think we’re going to see a clearer picture between Newt and Rick as to which one the South has seen as more conservative. And that’s going to play a big role in the rest of the campaign.� With 76 delegates up for grabs, Georgia holds the biggest prize on Super Tuesday, and Gingrich spent most of the past week touring the state by bus. Still, a victory largely would be seen as meeting expectations and might not generate much momentum. For Santorum, any victory in the South would come off as a sign of strength. Romney hasn’t completely




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8A Âť Sunday, March 4, 2012 Âť

C A L L E R -T I M E S

NATION

Crews assist storm victims

â– String of

tornadoes kills 38 people By Roger Alford and Jim Suhr Associated Press

Robert Elliott sits in his damaged kitchen after a tornado struck his home in Harrison, Tenn., on Saturday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Jackson Hambree cleans up debris after a tornado struck in Marysville, Ind., on Saturday. Powerful tornadoes raked across a wide swath of the Midwest and South on Friday, killing at least 38 people in ďŹ ve states and bringing the death toll to at least 51 from a week of deadly late-winter storms.

few structures were recognizable. The Rev. Kenneth Jett of the West Liberty United Methodist Church recalled huddling with four others in a little cubby hole in the basement as the church collapsed in the storm. The pastor and his wife had just returned to the parsonage when he turned on the TV and saw that the storm was coming. Jett yelled to his wife to take shelter in the basement of the church next door, where they were joined by two congregants who were cleaning the church and a neighbor. As they ran for the basement stairs, they could see the funnel cloud approaching. The last one down was Jett’s wife, Jeanene. “I just heard this terriďŹ c noise,â€? she said. “The windows were blowing out as I came down the stairs.â€? The building collapsed, but they were able to get out through a basement door. They escaped with only bumps and bruises. “We’re thankful to God,â€?

Jett said. “It was a miracle that the ďŹ ve of us survived.â€? In Indiana, a baby was found alone in a ďŹ eld near her family’s home in New Pekin, said Melissa Richardson, spokeswoman at St. Vincent Salem Hospital, where the little girl was initially taken. The child was in critical condition Saturday at a hospital in Louisville, Ky., and authorities were still trying to ďŹ gure out how she ended up in the ďŹ eld, Richardson said. A tornado hit the New Pekin area Friday, but it wasn’t clear whether it had picked up the child. Authorities have not identiďŹ ed the baby or her parents. About 20 miles east, a twister demolished Henryville, Ind., the birthplace of Kentucky Fried Chicken founder Colonel Harland Sanders. The second story of the elementary school was torn off, and wind blew out the windows and gutted the Henryville Community Presbyterian Church. Few recognizable buildings remained. A secretary at the school said a bus left Friday after-

noon with 11 children, but the driver turned back after realizing they were driving straight into the storm. The children were ushered into the nurse’s station and were hiding under tables and desks when the tornado struck. None were hurt. The school bus, which was parked in front of the school, was tossed several hundred yards into the side of a nearby restaurant. Todd and Julie Money were hiding there, having ed their Scottsburg home, which has no basement. They were in the basement of their friend’s restaurant when the tornado struck. “Unreal. The pressure on your body, your ears pop, trees snap,â€? Todd Money said. “When that bus hit the building, we thought it exploded.â€? “It was petrifying,â€? Julie Money added. “God put us here for a reason.â€?

Mike Hatheway sits on a tree uprooted by a deadly tornado as he talks on the phone at the remains of his grandparent’s home in the Rinnie Community near Crossville, Tenn.

Friday’s tornado outbreak came two days after an earlier round of storms killed 13 people in the Midwest and South, and forecasters at the National Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center had said the day would be one of a handful this year that warranted its highest risk level. The weather service issued 297 tornado warnings and 388 severe thunderstorm warnings from Friday through early Saturday. In April, when tornadoes killed more than 240 people in Alabama, it issued 688 tornado warnings and 757 severe thunderstorm warnings from Texas to New York, said Greg Carbin, warning coordination meteorologist at the storm

prediction center. The storms have been carrying strong winds that change direction and increase in speed as they rise in the atmosphere, creating a spin, said Corey Mead, a storm prediction center meteorologist. The tornadoes develop when cold air in the storm system moving east from the Mississippi River Valley hits warm air coming north from the Gulf of Mexico, he said. More severe storms were expected Saturday across parts of southern Georgia and northern Florida. Friday’s killed 19 people in Kentucky, 14 in Indiana, three in Ohio, and one each in Alabama and Georgia.

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WEST LIBERTY, Ky. — Rescue workers with search dogs trudged through the hills of Kentucky, and emergency crews in several states combed through wrecked homes in a desperate search Saturday for survivors of tornadoes that killed dozens of people. But amid the attened homes, gutted churches and crunched up cars, startling stories of survival emerged, including that of a baby found alone but alive in a ďŹ eld near her Indiana home, a couple who were hiding in a restaurant basement when a school bus crashed through the wall, and a pastor nearly buried in his church’s basement. The storms, predicted by forecasters for days, killed at least 38 people in ďŹ ve states — Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio, where Gov. John Kasich proclaimed an emergency. P resident Ba rack Obama offered Federal Emergency Management Agency assistance as state troopers, the National Guard and rescue teams made their way through counties cut off by debrislittered roads and knocked down cellphone towers. The landscape was littered with everything from sheet metal and insulation to crushed cars and, in one place, a ďŹ re hydrant, making travel difficult. No building was left untouched in West Liberty, a small eastern Kentucky farming town in the foothills of the Appalachians. Two white police cruisers had been picked up and tossed into city hall, and

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C A L L E R -T I M E S

ÂŤ Sunday, March 4, 2012 ÂŤ 9A

NATION

Girls: Am I pretty or ugly? â– YouTube

videos boost cyberbullying By Leanne Italie Associated Press

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WASHINGTON — Two years after Congress passed a high-proďŹ le law to improve health care for military veterans, lawmakers and advocates are again raising alarms that the sprawling Department of Veterans Affairs is not expanding help for the nation’s former ďŹ ghters and their families as quickly or widely as intended. This time the dispute is over two mental health measures: one to establish a network of peer counselors so that Iraq and Afghanistan veterans have someone to consult with who shares their war experience, the other to give the families of National Guard and reserve members temporary access to mental health services at VA facilities. Veterans Affairs, the second largest federal agency after the Defense Department, says it was already providing the help that Congress wrote into law in May 2010. Advocates for veterans, though, say the VA is effectively ignoring the law’s demand for those two steps. “The VA does some wonderful stuff, don’t get me wrong, but they seem to be ignoring their obligations under this law, almost to the point of being a scofflaw,â€? said Peter Duffy, deputy director for

 

Associated Press

 

By Kevin Freking

sion of law and say it has no meaning, which is essentially what the VA is doing,â€? said Ralph Ibson, national policy director for the Wounded Warrior Project, a nonproďŹ t group that assists injured service members and veterans. Ibson said the conict reminds him of an earlier disagreement over the bill’s provision of ďŹ nancial aid to caregivers of wounded vets. When the department announced in early 2011 how the program would work, lawmakers and advocacy groups complained that it would help fewer families than expected. The department subsequently expanded the program’s reach to about 3,500 families. Proponents of the legislation said that establishing a strong peer network throughout the VA system would supplement the care veterans get from doctors. Many veterans report feeling more comfortable talking with somebody who has shared similar experiences. The rapport that a veteran counselor develops with clients could encourage more vets to access and stick with their care. A Rand Corp. study has indicated that accessing care is a signiďŹ cant problem. Researchers found in a 2008 study that barely more than half of those veterans exhibiting symptoms of major depression or PTSD had sought help from a physician or mental health provider in the previous year.

 

focus on two key measures

legislative programs at the National Guard Association of the United States. The VA says it already offers peer support and family counseling at about 300 vet centers around the country. The vet centers are located in strip malls, downtown stores and in office buildings around the country. About twothirds of the workers are veterans. So, rather than create an entirely new program, the department has told lawmakers that it’s meeting the bill’s requirements through existing services. “I think we need to use the legislation in a positive sense to reinforce what we’re already doing,� said Dr. Jan Kemp, director of the VA’s suicide prevention program. “As the need increases, which it inevitably will, we’ve got the legislation now to help us move resources in that direction. It’s an evolving sort of process.� The VA’s response has upset those who fought to get the legislation passed. They expected the VA to establish a peer support network consisting of Iraq and Afghanistan vets at each of its 152 hospitals. They also expected family members of guardsmen and reservists to temporarily have access to the full range of mental health services available at the VA’s hospitals and its nearly 800 outpatient clinics. “The language in the bill was not written with the precision that you would like to see, but you can’t read a provi-

“Negative feedback that is personal is rarely easy to hear at any age, but to tweens and teens who value, as well as incorporate, feedback into their own sense of worth, it can be devastating,� said Elizabeth Dowdell, a nursing professor at Villanova University in suburban Philadelphia. She has researched child Internet safety and risk behavior in adolescents in partnership with the Justice Department. Emilie Zaslow, a media studies professor at Pace University in New York, said today’s online world for young people is only just beginning to be understood by researchers. When the Internet is your diary and your audience is global, she said, “The public posting of questions such as “Am I ugly?� which might previously have been personal makes sense within this shift in culture.�



â– Advocates

and call them “fuglyâ€? and worse. “Y do you live, and kids in africa die?â€? one responder tells the girl in the koala hat who uses the name Kendal and lists her age as 15 in her YouTube proďŹ le, though her demeanor suggests she was far younger at the time. Some offer support and beg Kendal and the other young faces to take down their “Am I Pretty?â€? and “Am I Ugly?â€? videos and feel good about themselves instead. Much has been made of cyberbullying and pedophiles who cruise the Internet, and of low self-esteem among pre-adolescents and adolescents, especially girls, as their brains continue to develop. There have been similar “hot or notâ€? memes in the past, but as more young people live their lives online, they’re clearly more aware of the potential for negative consequences.

 

Vet groups, VA split over mental health

ASSOCIATED PRESS

This video posted on the YouTube website on Dec. 17, 2010 shows a girl with a koala hat asking “Am I pretty or ugly?� The video has more than 4 million views and more than 107,000 anonymous, often hateful responses.

 

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Veteran Ryan Alaniz, 32, poses for a photo at a Wounded Warrior Project facility in San Antonio. Alaniz, who suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder after serving in Iraq, is part of a peer-mentoring program in San Antonio.

NEW YORK — The young girl shows off her big, comfy koala hat and forms playful hearts with her ďŹ ngers as she drops the question on YouTube: “Am I pretty or ugly?â€? “A lot of people call me ugly, and I think I am ugly. I think I’m ugly, and fat,â€? she confesses in a tiny voice as she invites the world to decide. And the world did. The video, posted Dec. 17, 2010, has more than 4 million views and more than 107,000 anonymous, often hateful responses in a troubling phenomenon that has girls as young as 10 — and some boys — asking the same question on YouTube with similar results. Some experts in child psychology and online safety wonder whether the videos, with anywhere from 300 to 1,000 posted, represent a new wave of distress rather than simple self-questioning or pleas for affirmation or attention. How could the creators not anticipate the nasty responses, even the tender tweens uploading videos in violation of YouTube’s 13-and-over age policy? Their directness, playful but steadfast, grips even those accustomed to life’s open Internet channel, where revolutions and executions play out alongside the ramblings of anybody with digital access. Commenters on YouTube ask for sex and to see them naked. They wonder where their parents are

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Fighters loyal to the former Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi pray in a prison Feb. 24 in Gherian, Libya. Six months after Gadhafi’s ouster, the nominal central government stands largely helpless and unable to impose its authority.

Freed of Gadhafi, Libya’s instability still growing ■ Government

proves itself incapable By Maggie Michael Associated Press

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sentment and bitterness he incubated is now bursting forth in general lawlessness. “What Gadhafi left in Libya for 40 years is a very, very heavy heritage,” said Mustafa Abdul-Jalil, head of the National Transitional Council, which in theory rules Libya but doesn’t even hold sway in the capital Tripoli. “It’s ... hard to get over it in one or two years or even five years.” Signs of the government’s weakness are everywhere. Tripoli remains under the control of various revolutionaries-turned-militiamen, who have resisted calls to integrate into a national army. Kufra, deep in the southern desert, is a battleground for two rival tribes, one Arab and one African, with dozens killed in two weeks of fighting last month. And Misrata, the country’s third-largest city and just two hours’ drive east of the capital, effectively rules itself, with its militias ignoring government pleas and exacting brutal revenge on anyone they believe to have supported Gadhafi. The violence highlights the weakness of the National Transitional Council, made up of representatives from around the country.

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MOSCOW — Vladimir Putin appears all but certain to return to the Kremlin in today’s Russian presidential election, but he’ll find himself in charge of a country far more willing to challenge him. An unprecedented wave of massive protests showed a substantial portion of the population was fed up with the political entrenchment engineered by Putin since he first became president in 2000, and police already are preparing for the possibility of postelection unrest in Moscow. The Putin system of socalled “managed democracy” put liberal opposition forces under consistent pressure, allowing them only rare permission to hold small rallies and bringing squads of police to harshly break up any

unauthorized gathering. The Kremlin gained control of all major television channels and their news reports turned into uncritical recitations of Putin’s programs, often augmented with admiring footage of him riding horseback, scuba-diving or petting wild animals. But the protests, sparked by allegations of widespread fraud in December’s parliamentary elections, forced notable changes. Authorities gave permission, however grudgingly, for opposition rallies that attracted vast crowds, upward of 50,000 in Moscow. State television gave them substantial and mostly neutral coverage. Whether that tolerance will last after the election is unclear. According to the most recent survey by the independent Levada Center polling agency, Putin is on track to win the election with around two-thirds of the vote against four challengers — enough to bolster his

irritable denunciations of the protesters as a small, coddled minority. Putin repeatedly has alleged that the protesters are stooges of the United States and Western European countries that want to undermine Russia and he has insulted them. Whether today’s vote is seen as honest is likely to be key; a count without reports of wide violations could deprive protesters of a galvanizing issue. In his past four years as prime minister — a sojourn he took because of a constitutional limit of two consecutive presidential terms — the steely Putin remained Russia’s dominant political figure, overshadowing mild-mannered successor Dmitry Medvedev, who spoke often of reforms but accomplished little. Putin has promised to appoint Medvedev prime minister if he wins the presidency to pursue his reform ideas, but many regard Medvedev as lacking the hard-edge political skills to be an effective reformer.

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BENGHAZI, Libya — A large map of Libya hangs on the wall in the home of Idris alRahel, with a line down the middle dividing the country in half. Al-Rahel, a former army officer, leads a movement to declare semiautonomy in eastern Libya, where most of the country’s oil fields are located. The region’s top tribal leaders meet Tuesday in the east’s main city Benghazi to consider unilaterally announcing an eastern state, linked to the west only by a tenuous “federal union.” Opponents fear such a declaration could be the first step toward outright dividing the country. But some easterners say they are determined to end the domination and discrimination by the west that prevailed under dictator Moammar Gadhafi. Al-Rahel points to the capital Tripoli on the map, in the west. “All troubles came from here,” he said, “but we will not permit this to hap-

pen again.” The move shows how six months after Gadhafi’s fall, the central government in Libya has proved incapable of governing at all. Other countries that shed their leaders in the Arab Spring revolts — Egypt, Tunisia and Yemen — are going through rocky transitions, but none has seen a collapse of central authority like Libya. The collapse has only worsened as cities, towns, regions, militias and tribes all act on their own, setting up their independent power centers. After liberation from the rule of Gadhafi, Libyans dreamed their country of 6 million could become another Dubai, a state with a small population, flush with petrodollars, that is a magnet for investment. Now they worry that it is turning more into another Somalia, a nation that has had no effective government for more than 20 years. Libya may not face literal fragmentation, but it could be doomed to years of instability as it recovers from four decades of rule under Gadhafi, who pitted neighbor against neighbor, town against town and tribe against tribe. The re-

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« Sunday, March 4, 2012 « 11A

FROM THE COVER

Navy ‘Sinkex’ raises pollution fear By Jason Dearen Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — In 2005, the USS America aircraft carrier was towed out to sea on her final voyage. Hundreds of miles off the Atlantic coast, Navy personnel then blasted the 40-year-old warship with missiles and bombs until it sank. The massive KittyHawk class carrier — more than three football fields long — came to rest in the briny depths about 300 nautical miles southeast of Norfolk, Va. Target practice is now how the Navy gets rid of most of its old ships, an Associated Press review of Navy records for the past dozen years has found. And they wind up at the bottom of the ocean, bringing with them amounts of toxic waste that are only estimated. Navy documents state that among the toxic substances left onboard the America were more than 500 pounds of PCBs or polychlorinated biphenyls, a chemical banned by the U.S. in 1979, in part be-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A worker uses a cutting torch to cut through the metal of a ship at Esco Marine at the Port of Brownsville.

cause it is long-lasting and accumulates throughout the food chain. Disposing of the carrier that served in the Vietnam War, Desert Storm and Desert Shield cost more than $22 million. In the past 12 years, records show the Navy has used missiles, torpedoes and large guns to sink 109 old, peeling and rusty U.S. warships off the coasts of California, Hawaii, Florida and other states. During the same period, 64 ships were recycled at one of six approved domestic shipbreaking facilities.

The Navy says target practice on actual military ships serves an important national security function, allowing for live-fire exercises and study of “weapons lethality.” But since the program’s inception, the AP found that the Navy has struggled to balance its military training needs with an environmentally sound way to send ships to the grave. The program — called “Sinkex” for sinking exercise — has come under fire from environmentalists for the pollutants it introduces to the sea. The

ship recycling industry complains about the jobs and revenues it takes away. The Navy has performed these operations for decades, disposing of decommissioned ships with little public record of the toxins left onboard. Then in 1999, the Environmental Protection Agency ordered the Navy to better document toxic waste on the doomed ships, and in return the EPA exempted the military from federal pollution laws that prohibited such dumping in the ocean. Now, new evidence from a Florida ship sinking site suggests these old warships can cause spikes in PCB levels in nearby fish. It spurred Florida officials to bar further dumping along their coast. And it has evoked a federal lawsuit alleging the EPA has failed to properly safeguard federal waters. Along with the memories of sailors who once lived on these ghost ships, the massive boats each can contain thousands of pounds of PCBs, asbestos, lead, mercury and other harmful substances in keels, insulation materi-

JUDGE from 1A

“Due to all of the mediagenerated commotion at the courthouse, it would have been hard to get much done for a few days.” He noted the state pays the visiting judges who have heard cases in his absence. “It won’t cost the taxpayers near as much as all the consultants the government has hired around here, nor as much as the street neglect/repair problems, or many other things our money has been wasted on,” Adams wrote. In November the Texas Supreme Court approved a motion, agreed upon by Adams and the commission, to suspend him with pay during the investigation, which could last months. The commission doesn’t comment publicly on the status of pending investigations. Although Adams is the only Texas judge on suspension with pay, it’s rare for the commission to ask the Supreme Court to suspend a judge without pay during

SHALE from 1A

workers to house, and traffic jams to manage. There is skilled labor to provide for drilling. And there are constant vacancies in lower paying jobs to staff the restaurants, gas stations and other services that can’t nearly compete with oil field paychecks. Tackling those issues has been a 15-month effort for the Eagle Ford Consortium, a group of industry, city, county, housing staffs, business owners and other stakeholders who meet monthly. “We’re no longer divided by county boundaries,” said Consortium Chairman Leodoro Martinez. “This shale is one big region now.” The group gathered in San Antonio for its first conference last week to network, brainstorm and hear examples from parts of the country that were in their predicament a few years ago. The consensus was that sustaining the boom will take partnership and innovation decades ahead about their communities’ futures.

CATCHING UP Eagle Ford is enhancing the quality of life in many South Texas towns. Some are getting business they’ve never had, and people are getting royalty checks for amounts they’ve never seen. But there are trade-offs with rapid growth. No one is complaining about the windfall in tax revenue. Sales taxes have

MICHAEL ZAMORA/CALLER-TIMES FILE

Aransas County and the state have paid family law Judge William Adams nearly $49,000 since November, when he agreed to a suspension by the Texas Supreme Court.

an investigation, Commission Director Seana Willing said. Unlike other state employees, judges are elected. “It’s not a simple matter of saying you can’t get paid and you can’t serve for this

EAGLE FORD NUMBERS

Population: Latest figures show about 900,000 people live in the 24-county drilling area atop the Eagle Ford Shale formation. Jobs: Production is predicted to support 68,000 jobs by 2020. Money: Bank deposits across the region increased from about $14 billion in 2008 to $16 billion in 2011. Source: Center for Community and Business Research, University of Texas at San Antonio

helped turn things around in Cotulla, a city of 3,500 and the La Salle County seat, interim City Manager Larry Dovalina said. Property tax collections are a city’s more stable money source, but it can take up to a year from development to see an increase, Dovalina said. Sales tax is just a bonus. “You can’t plan for your financial future based on a bonus,” Dovalina said. Ballooning property values are a good short-term sign for tax revenue, but it could spell trouble for future city and county budgets because of effective tax rates. In setting budgets, the effective tax rate is the rate that brings in the same amount of revenue as the previous year. As values increase, the effective rate drops. The extra $281 million in value added in DeWitt County lowered the effective rate by 15 cents to 50 cents per $100 valuation, County Judge Daryl Fowler said. In Dimmit County —

period of time,” Willing said. “There are rights that judges have, and there has got to be due process for undoing what the voters did.” Exceptions include cases of a judge under indictment, especially if the charge in-

volves misappropriation of public funds or exchanging rulings for money or sex, Willing said. In those cases, the general policy of the commission has been to recommend suspension without pay. Ultimately,

one of the state’s poorest with one of the highest county tax rates before Eagle Ford — the rate plunged from 68 cents to 41 cents, County Judge Francisco Ponce said. If production activity leaves, raising those rates to keep up with expenses puts them in jeopardy of passing the state’s 8 percent ceiling on tax hikes before residents can petition to vote down the increase, the judges said. There is the housing crunch, with some local governments having to dust off subdivision ordinances for the first time in a while as builders descend on the region. To Sandy Hurwitz, a Uvalde landowner, urban renewal seems to be absent from the discussion. Hurwitz pointed to many small South and Southwest Texas communities where existing properties have fallen in disrepair and either could be upgraded or cleared for space instead of building apartments and hotels that will go vacant once workers leave. “There’s capacity there,” Hurwitz said. “No one’s connecting the dots here.”

communities had been there before, they really weren’t ready to deal with this,” Anderson said, adding there was uncertainty how long the boom would last. In 2010, state agencies visited oil areas to tally up needs and timetables for population growth. An estimate was an extra 36,000 people and 18,000 extra households. The answer for housing was the North Dakota Housing Incentive Fund, which Anderson called an unconventional solution to what were going to be unconventional times. Created in 2011, the program is funded by taxpayers to build affordable multifamily housing. Taxpayers choose to contribute money and get a dollar-fordollar credit against what they owe for state income or financial institution taxes. The fund can issue up to $15 million in tax credits. To date, the young account has more than $6.3 million, according to the housing agency’s website. Contributors can request their money go to certain projects or communities. Taxpayers know exactly where their money is going, Anderson said. There was a change in how Gillette, Wyo., developed itself, consultant and former city engineer Mike Coleman said. When a second coal bed methane gas boom took off there in the late 1990s, the city’s stagnant population growth began to pick up the pace, gaining 11,000 people between 2000 and 2009, city development records show.

SOLUTIONS Other oil and gas boom regions in the United States that developed years ahead of Eagle Ford faced the same dilemmas. Small towns in western North Dakota had been through 60 years of booms and busts when the Bakken Shale discovery struck last decade, said Michael Anderson, executive director of the North Dakota Housing Finance Agency. “Even though a lot of

als, wiring and felt gaskets. The EPA and federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say PCBs endure for years. In humans, high levels are believed to increase the risk of certain cancers and, in pregnant or breastfeeding women, harm the developing brains of fetuses and infants. PCBs once were widely used in transformers and electrical equipment and they’ve turned up in fresh water fish and other foods as well. Under its agreement with the EPA, the Navy must document how much toxic material is removed and how much is sent into the sea. But the AP review of the Navy’s year-end reports since 2000 found incomplete and inconsistent estimates of PCBs and other toxics. The Navy says it costs $500,000 to $600,000 to remove toxics from ships before the target practice, although the total cost of the disposal exercises is much higher. Ship breaking companies say their price for recycling a large Navy vessel is typically tens of millions of dollars.

The Navy defended its cleaning and inventory process, saying it removes all liquid PCBs, thousands of gallons of fuel, mercury from instruments and other pollutants. “The Sinkex program provides numerous benefits to the Navy by making target vessels available for at-sea live-fire exercises,” Navy spokesman Christopher Johnson said in an email. Meantime, the nation’s ship breaking concerns have spoken out against Sinkex, saying it is costing the industry many millions of dollars and badly needed jobs. Richard Jaross, co-owner of Esco Marine, Inc. in Brownsville, Tex., said his business would add jobs and revenue to the local economy if more Sinkex vessels were sent for recycling. He also believes the program is bad for the environment. “The waters of the world aren’t dumping grounds for getting rid of old things. It’s totally irresponsible of our government to use them for target practice,” Jaross said.

terms of judicial suspensions are up to the Supreme Court. State law mandates suspension without pay in cases where a judge is convicted and awaiting appeals. Although police and prosecutors reviewed the Adams video, they did not pursue criminal charges, citing statutes of limitation. Adams, with 13 years of experience, has the fifth highest base salary of any county employee, at about $61,000. He also receives supplemental pay from the state. Since early November, when he stopped hearing cases, Adams received about $23,400 in county pay, including a cellphone allowance, and $25,400 in state pay. The county also has spent about $2,600 on travel expenses for visiting judges hearing cases in Adams’ absence. In October, Hillary Adams posted a video on YouTube of her father and mother striking her with a belt when she was 16. Overnight, a surge of calls for his

removal flooded the Aransas County Courthouse and the commission. While his daughter took to national TV, Judge Adams maintained a lower profile, releasing a threepage statement through his attorney in which he said he was disciplining his daughter for theft of music and video games. He questioned his daughter’s motives for releasing the video. He said he regretted the interruption the matter caused people in Aransas County. “It’s amazing to me we’re still getting emails from people who are just now seeing that video,” said Linda Garcia, an administrative assistant in County Judge Mills’ office. Based on the official complaint against Adams, the commission is likely to consider a variety of factors in deciding whether to sanction him and in considering the severity of any sanction. The factors include whether Adams broke any laws and whether his conduct casts doubt on his ability to remain impartial and effective as a judge.

A big lesson from the 1980s boom was traffic. At that time, additional roads were built to handle extra vehicles, which left the city with extra upkeep as the city sprawled, Coleman said. The city focused its growth on f illing in the areas that had been skipped once highway corridors spread homes and businesses away from the city, he said.

Handling the side effects of the boom should include long-term plans for municipal projects or other opportunities such as rediscovering historical or architectural gems that could become tools for economic development, said Thomas Tunstall, director of the Center for Community and Business Research at the University of Texas at San Antonio. Fiscal discipline with the revenue windfalls they find themselves taking in is a must, Tunstall said. The Internet has made it possible for colleges and universities to be present in any community with online access. Extending a school’s reach is an example of the type of collective effort to invest in the region’s future, Cifuentes said. A sustainable future needs local governments, economic groups, legislative support and academic study. Eagle Ford oil won’t just be used in Three Rivers and Cuero but nationwide, Cifuentes said. “I would hate for these folks to feel like because they’re getting jobs and they’re improving their economic situation that they’re the ones responsible for the sustainability effort,” Cifuentes said. Eagle Ford could hold a future promise of curing the decline of small communities. “Now if there is a promise of really good jobs all over South Texas for the next 20 years, if you send your kids to College Station or Corpus Christi to get an education, they can come back and get a good job,” Cifuentes said.

PATHWAYS Industry projections suggest an end to the Eagle Ford boom is a long way off. Tax revenue, royalties and other benefits are gushing out with the oil and gas, but now is the time to think about what comes next for those communities, said Luis Cifuentes, associate vice president for research and scholarly activity for Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. “Sustainability is using those resources in such a way that you hand to your children and your grandchildren the opportunity to also be economically successful down the road,” said Cifuentes, who leads a National Science Foundation research network of eight schools and a research institute studying the topic. Examples could be looking at ways to take advantage of other energy resources — including wind in South Texas — or other industries that can pick up when the boom ends in an area. Oil booms are nothing new to the region, but a constant theme Cifuentes said he heard at last week’s conference was “Let’s do it right this time.”


12A » Sunday, March 4, 2012 »

C A L L E R -T I M E S

DIRECTED BY GUY CARON

MARCH 9 – 11

AMERICAN BANK CENTER OPENS FRIDAY

Tickets starting at $40 • cirquedusoleil.com Tickets on sale at the box office, all Ticketmaster outlets, ticketmaster.com or charge by phone 1-800-745-3000. OFFICIAL SPONSORS

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Thank You

The American Heart Association would like to thank the generous sponsors who made this year’s Heart Ball such a tremendous success. This year’s heart heroes are: Title Sponsor

President’s Heart Sponsors • Peggy & Avinash Ahuja • Earl C. Sams Foundation Champions Heart Sponsors

Benefactor’s Heart Sponsors • AEP Texas • AG/CM• American Bank • Atlas Tubular, LP • BAY, Ltd. • Julie Buckley • CA Cintron & Todd M. Walter • CHRISTUS Spohn Health System • Coastal Cardiology Association • Marie Colson • Corpus Christi Medical Center • Driscoll Children’s Hospital • Flint Hills Resources • Kindred Hospital • Carol & Sammy Kins • L&F Distributors • Pam & Richard Leshin

• Linebarger, Goggan, Blair & Sampson, LLP • Laurie & Philip Plant • Radiology & Imaging of South Texas • Toby Shor • Karen & Larry Urban Pacemaker Sponsors • Chris and Robert Adler • Bank of America- Merill Lynch • Driscoll Physicians Group- Heart Center • Dugan Eye Institute • Frost Bank • Fulton Construction/ Coastcon General Contractors • Dr. & Mrs. Ray Graf • Gulf Shore Anesthesia Associates • Mary F. Haas • Willard Hammonds • Humpal Physical Therapy • Kiewit Offshore Services • Scott & Thelma Mandel • Dr. Isabel C. Menendez & Dr. Carlos E. Martinez-Quinones • NuStar Energy • Repcon, Inc. • South Texas Brain & Spine Center • Pat & Sam J. Susser

• Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi • Valero Bill Greehey Refinery • Wells Fargo Bank • Whataburger • WellMed Lifesaver Sponsors • Dr. Thomas Alexander • Andrews Distributing • D. Scott Eliff • Gignac & Associates • H&S Constructors • The John G. and Marie Stella Kenedy Memorial Foundation • Maureen Miller • Thetis & Judge Loyd Neal • Port Corpus Christi • Prosperity Bank Sweetheart Sponsors • Coldwell Banker Pacesetter Steel • Maxine Flournoy • Highland Property Development LLC • Senior District Judge Jack Hunter • Todd & Alexis Hunter • Dottie Lane • Mary & Michael Sullivan • Linda H. Weil • Janet & Joe Westheimer

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« Sunday, March 4, 2012 « 13A

NATION

Postal closures may hurt elections By Hannah Dreier Associated Press

100 YEARS

GIRL SCOUTS GO FORTH By Russ Bynum Associated Press

SAVANNAH, Ga. — Recruited over tea at the mansion of a Georgia widow, the first Girl Scouts went on to earn proficiency badges for cooking meals and caring for babies. In a nod to their changing times, they also learned to shoot rifles and self-defense tactics such as “how to secure a burglar with eight inches of cord.” Now a century has passed and millions of Americans have taken the Girl

Scout promise, sold Samoas and Thin Mints by the truckload and gone on to careers from CEOs to astronauts. As they celebrate their 100th anniversary this month, the Girl Scouts of the USA boast a record of progressiveness built on combining lessons in domestic know-how with outdoor adventures and technical skills aimed at teaching girls they can do anything. Take 11-year-old Kathryn Hoersting from the Girl Scouts’ birthplace of See SCOUTS, 14A

FROM TOP: The oldest living Girl Scout, Amelia “Milly” Bowden England (top row far right), poses with Boy Scouts and other members of the Girl Scouts Thistle Troop at the Abraham Lincoln Elementary School in New Bedford, Mass., in 1912. England joined the organization in 1914, two years after its inception in 1912, and provided this photo. Eleanor Roosevelt (right) stands with Girl Scout Betty Bredin in 1943, who posed for the Girl Scout War Bond poster (center) in New York.

Santa Clara County Girl Scouts of America members Viris Rios, 10 (left), and Madeline Hurst, 10, recite the Pledge of Allegiance during the 20th Annual Flag Day Ceremony in San Jose, Calif., in 2004. There are now an estimated 2.3 million active Girl Scouts nationwide. ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTOS

Elections officials in several states are concerned that the closing of mail processing centers and post offices could disrupt voteby-mail balloting this year, a potential problem that has led some members of Congress to call for a delay until after the November elections. The U.S. Postal Service recently announced it is moving ahead with plans to close at least 223 processing centers and thousands of post offices, adding to the 153 centers and 965 post offices that have closed since 2008. The moves are part of a wide-ranging cost-cutting strategy for an agency that estimates it will lose up to $18 billion a year by 2015. Voting officials are raising a variety of concerns, depending on the circumstances in their states. Meanwhile, postal customers have security concerns about leaving ballots in their mailboxes to be picked up by postal carriers. In California and Arizona, officials say the closing of processing centers could delay the delivery of mail-in ballots beyond the deadline to have them counted. The state registrar in Ohio wrote the postmaster general with concerns about ensuring the security of ballots sent to processing centers that will be across state lines. And in Oregon, the first state to require vote-bymail, the state registrar says voters in rural areas where post offices are scheduled to be closed may have nowhere nearby to drop off their ballots. That would be See CLOSURES, 15A

‘C ultura y V ida’ A T e ja n o A r t S h o w Artwork “Love” by Christina Kay Garza

Art Walk – March 2 Sponsors and Artists Reception – March 4 Javelina Alumni Mixer – March 9 Closing – March 13

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Featuring 40 of the state’s most prominent Tejano artists

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For more information about the Tejano Art Show, please contact: Corpus Christi Art Center 361-884-6406  Texas A&M-Kingsville 361-593-3401 CAL563429

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14A Âť Sunday, March 4, 2012 Âť

C A L L E R -T I M E S

NATION SCOUTS from 13A

Savannah, who just got her cooking badge by making her family breakfast of hash with eggs. Next up: the “Special Agentâ€? badge, which requires an introduction to forensic science and other crime-solving techniques. “You get to work together on anything,â€? said Kathryn, a third-generation Girl Scout whose Brownie and Scout vests are decorated with dozens of colorful badge awards. “It’s just hanging out with your friends and doing something new and creative, something you love.â€? When Juliette Gordon Low rounded up her ďŹ rst troop on March 12, 1912, few women held jobs and only six states allowed them to vote. Low didn’t set out to cause sweeping social change, to wage a battle of the sexes. Regardless, the Girl Scouts would help set the stage for the modern women’s movement and gradually help bridge the gender gap. Kathryn’s grandmother, Amy Gerber, says being a Girl Scout in the 1950s gave her the courage to open and operate two conference centers in Arizona and become a grief counselor. The girl’s mother, Wendy Hoersting, was a Scout in the 1970s and became a nurse anesthetist. “Girl Scouting from its inception was always forward-looking,â€? said Mary Rothschild, a retired historian from Arizona State University who spent 30 years studying the Girl Scouts. “Although it was always rooted in domesticity, it always opened further paths to women.â€? And not just women of a particular class, race, religion or sexual orientation. The original Girls Scout troops from 1912 mixed girls who were Jewish, Protestant and Catholic. The ďŹ rst troop for black girls was formed a year later, and a year after that, troops were founded for girls attending schools for the blind and deaf. (Low herself suffered from serious hearing loss, and felt no girl should be denied participation because of a disability.) Milly England was one of the earliest Girl Scouts, joining the Thistle Troop in her hometown of New Bedford, Mass., in 1914. Now 111, England still has her Girl Scout ring with its emerald gemstone and recalls sewing her own uniform — a long-sleeved

ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE

Baseball player Babe Ruth holds a Girl Scout cookie in his mouth during a promotion for the group’s Annual Cookie Sale in 1923. Girl Scout cookies transcended their origins as a mere fundraiser and became an iconic American treat.Last year, troops across America sold a whopping 207 million boxes raking in record revenues of $760 million.

blouse with a blue neck scarf — that she wore on camping trips and to troops meetings, dances and suppers at a local church. “I know we started something good. It was good for a lot of girls,â€? England said. “... I wanted to belong to a gang always.â€? That history of hard-nosed inclusiveness has continued into the 21st century as Girl Scout troops have admitted not only members who are gay but, in at least one recent case, a transgender child as well. It’s a trait that’s fueled some of the group’s harshest critics and that’s given it a distinctly different identity from the Boy Scouts, who have waged court battles to be able to exclude those who don’t ďŹ t the group’s Judeo-Christian mores. It was during a trip to England that Low, a wealthy, childless socialite, became friends with Robert Baden-Powell, the former British Army officer who founded the Boy Scouts in 1907

to pass on the rugged frontier skills he had found lacking in young military recruits. Powell’s sister had started an offshoot, the Girl Guides. Low became smitten with the idea and brought it to America with Baden-Powell’s blessing. “She believed it was an organization that was good for girls, but it was not necessarily trying to bring them to parity with boys,â€? said Anastatia Sims, a history professor at Georgia Southern University who has spent years researching and writing about Low’s life. “She is not feminist. She is not affiliated with any feminist movement. She does not talk in terms of any kinds of women’s equality and does not seem to think in those terms.â€? The ďŹ rst Girl Scout handbook, published in 1913, encouraged girls to shoot ries and gave instructions for tying up intruders. The original Scouts took camping trips and played basketball on outdoor courts shrouded from

public view by curtains hung so that men couldn’t glimpse the girls in their bloomers. “She had girls in the outdoors, in the green environment, before it was cool to be green or cool for girls to be out there kicking balls,â€? said Anna Maria Chavez, CEO of the Girl Scouts of the USA, who credits much of the group’s success to Low thinking well ahead of her time. Barely a year after she started the group, Low moved its headquarters to Washington — it later moved to New York — and officially changed the name to Girl Scouts. Troops sprouted nationwide. Her original registration book shows 102 girls enlisted within just a few weeks. By 1914 there were 1,000 Girl Scouts, then 5,000 just a year later. By 1917, enrollment had swelled to 13,000, and today the girls number 2.3 million nationwide. In 1947 the Girl Scouts published a new edition of their handbook with watercolor illustrations that showed white, black and Asian Scouts together. The book caused an outcry, especially in the segregated South. An Ebony magazine story marking the Girl Scouts’ 40th anniversary in 1952 noted there were 1,507 integrated troops mostly in the North and West and 1,634 all-black troops based mainly in the South. “But even in Dixie the Scouts were making slow and steady progress toward surmounting the racial barriers of the region,â€? the Ebony story said, crediting Southern Scouts with holding interracial meetings and quietly urging white newspapers to drop policies that forbade publishing photos of blacks. Decades later, Girl Scouts ofďŹ cials say they’re still pushing boundaries and working to boost girls’ conďŹ dence to be leaders in areas still dominated by men, such as in business and science. Hillary Rodham Clinton was a Girl Scout, as was Laura Bush. Journalist Barbara Walters, Olympic ďŹ gure skater Peggy Fleming, tennis star Venus Williams and singer Mariah Carey all wore Girl Scout uniforms, as did at least seven astronauts, 13 current and former members of Congress and numerous executives and CEOs. In Ames, Iowa, six Girl Scouts have applied for a patent after they designed a prosthetic hand to enable a 4-year-old girl born without ďŹ ngers on her right hand to grip

pencils and crayons. Their device, called the BOB-1, won ďŹ rst place in a contest for young inventors last year and earned them a meeting with President Barack Obama at the White House Science Fair on Feb. 7. As part of their research, the six girls talked to prosthetics manufacturers, physical therapists and people living with hand or arm disabilities. The ďŹ nal product — made from plastic, Velcro and foam at a cost of about $10 — came about through trial, error and do-overs after the ďŹ rst prototypes broke. “We made a bunch of different ideas,â€? said 12-year-old Zoe Groat. “We used rubber gloves and cut them up and used pencil grippers, paper, glue and tons of tape.â€? As their ranks grew, the Girl Scouts had to fall back on their own resourcefulness after they outgrew their initial source of funding — Low’s personal fortune. In 1917, a troop in Muskogee, Okla., came up with its own moneymaker: girls would sell cookies baked at home with their mothers. It didn’t take long for the idea to spread. By 1936, the Girl Scouts were starting to partner with commercial bakers to sell cookies across the nation. In the decades since, Girl Scout cookies transcended their origins as a mere fundraiser and became an iconic American treat. Last year, troops across America sold a whopping 207 million boxes of Thin Mints, Tagalongs, Trefoils and other varieties, raking in record revenues of $760 million. That’s about 90 boxes of cookies sold for every Girl Scout. A booming cookie business is just another example of the difference between Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts. In fact, though the Boy Scouts’ founder gave Low her inspiration, the two groups have never had an official connection. In 2009, the Boy Scouts of America announced its first official partnership with a likeminded organization serving the opposite sex — the American Heritage Girls, a Christianfocused group founded by former Girl Scouts volunteers who broke away in protest over what they saw as Girl Scouting being watered down by secularism. The move highlighted how different the two scouting groups really are. While the

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C A L L E R -T I M E S

« Sunday, March 4, 2012 « 15A

NATION CLOSURES from 13A

especially problematic for those who have become accustomed to mailing them on the final weekend. “We just have to have a moratorium through this presidential year to avoid disastrous consequences,” said California Secretary of State Debra Bowen, who wrote a letter last week to the U.S. postmaster general urging a halt to the closures until after the November election. “I’m asking for a timeout.” The Postal Service has said the next round of facilities won’t close until August, and it would then halt the process temporarily at the end of the month to minimize disruptions ahead of the general election. The agency might begin its closures in states that already have held their primaries, Postal Service spokeswoman Patricia Licata said. She acknowledged that the consolidation will lead to longer delivery times but dismissed concerns that it could disenfranchise voters. “We realize that election mail is vital to the country, and we don’t want to do anything to disrupt that,” she said. Mindful of the concerns back home, some members of Congress say they plan to ask for another delay, after the Postal Service agreed last year to a five-month moratorium on the closures that ends in mid-May. According to the Postal Service, once the moratorium lifts, the earliest a mail processing center could close would be August, partly because the mail agency must work to reassign employees. The first mail processing centers to be affected, which are yet to

SCOUTS from 14A

Boy Scouts have been criticized for excluding gays and atheists, the Girl Scouts have taken flak for pushing inclusion beyond the comfort zones of more conservative Americans. Rothschild, the retired historian, notes that in the 1970s the Catholic church pulled support from Girl Scouts in Philadelphia after local troops established a proficiency badge course dealing with womanhood that included information on sexuality and birth control. In 1993, Christian conservatives were outraged when the Girl Scouts agreed at their national convention to allow girls substitute another word for “God” — such as Allah or Buddha — in the Girl Scout promise that reads: “On my honor, I will try to serve God and my country.” That change appalled Patti Garibay, a Girl Scout troop leader for 13 years in Cincin-

~~s~Á

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mail is deposited into an outdoor postal box at the Sacramento Processing Center in West Sacramento, Calif. The U.S. Postal Service announced it plans to close at least 223 processing centers.

be determined, would be a handful of places involving the least difficulty in transferring employees. Montana Sen. Jon Tester, a Democrat who sits on the committee that oversees the agency, is working to minimize the effects of the cuts. Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden said he plans to file an amendment seeking to delay the closures until after the presidential election. He said they would disproportionately affect rural voters. “Closing these facilities carries many unintended consequences,” Wyden, a Democrat, said in a statement last week. “It is not a risk worth taking.” Congress is expected to take up the overhaul of the Postal Service in the coming weeks. Postal closures are unpopular with constituents,

but spokeswoman Shannan Velayas said California’s secretary of state Bowen is concerned only with the integrity of elections and that her letter to the postmaster general was not politically motivated. While voting by mail has been mandatory in Oregon since 2000, it is growing nationwide. One in five voters cast ballots by mail in 2010, according to the U.S. Election Assistance Commission, up from one in eight in 2004. In some states, such as Washington, ballots must be merely postmarked by Election Day to count. In others, they must be received by the time polls close. The Postal Service changes worry some voters, who wonder if their

nati who had raised all three of her daughters as Scouts. “I was quite the student of Juliette Low and knew she was a woman of faith,” said Garibay, who in 1995 founded the American Heritage Girls, which calls itself a “Judeo-Christian focused” alternative and has grown to 18,000 members in 45 states. She noted that the Boy Scouts’ founder, Baydon-Powell, had once said: “Scouting is nothing less than applied Christianity.” Unlike the Boy Scouts, who took their battle to exclude gays to the U.S. Supreme Court, the Girl Scouts have a policy forbidding such discrimination that states: “We believe that sexual orientation is a private matter for girls and their families to address.” That policy was recently put to the test in Colorado when a woman sought to enroll her 7-yearold transgender child, who was born a boy but was being raised as a girl. The local Girl Scout troop at first refused to allow the child to enroll, but relented on

orders from its governing council at the state level. Some conservative groups were outraged and called for a boycott of Girl Scout cookies this year. National Girl Scout officials say the organization has no policy on transgender children and left the decision up to its council in Colorado. “Most of the criticism about us stems from our history of openness and inclusivity, and we are very proud of that,” said Michelle Tompkins, spokeswoman for Girl Scouts of the USA. Girl Scouts leaders say that history began with Juliette Low, who was largely deaf and in the 1920s made sure Scouts with disabilities would be able to earn the Golden Eaglet — at the time the name of the Girl Scouts’ highest honor — even if they were unable to perform all of the physical requirements. Low died of cancer in Savannah in 1927. She had left explicit instructions that she be buried in her Girl Scouts uniform.

ballots will be delivered in time or whether they will have a convenient way to mail them. Charles Henze, who has voted by mail in California since he first registered, said the cutbacks have him considering whether to get off the permanent absentee voter rolls this year. Henze, 46, likes to wait until the last minute to cast his vote. Now that he may have to mail his ballot sooner, he is leaning toward voting in person at his polling place in the eastern San Francisco Bay area city of Pleasanton. “With primaries in particular, by the time you get to voting, the situation can have changed,” he said. It’s a somewhat different concern for Nancy Bowers, who lives on a farm outside Fort Rock, Ore., where the post office is un-

der review for closure. She is worried there will not be a drop-box close enough to make voting convenient. “If they make us go somewhere else, some people may have to drive 50 miles,” said Bowers, 65. “They’ll consider not voting. A lot of people will.” Fort Rock, about 60 miles south of Bend in central Oregon, is nine miles from Bowers’ farm. She said if the post office closes, she would have to drive at least 20 miles to drop off a ballot. For the November general election, that could mean driving in snow. Oregon Secretary of State Kate Brown is considering asking county registrars to establish more ballot drop-boxes at libraries and other public buildings, including shuttered post offices.

In Arizona, where more than 1 million residents voted absentee last year, election officials are advising residents to get their ballots in the mail by the Wednesday before an election. Pima County Recorder F. Ann Rodriguez said the change could have the biggest effect on residents of Indian reservation and others in rural areas who only make weekly trips to town to pick up mail. “We’re going to have to go back and educate voters,” she said. Delays are among the concerns of Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted, who sent a letter about the processing center closures last week to the U.S. postmaster general. He expressed concern that Ohio ballots could pass through out-of-state processing centers on the way to and from voters. “A ballot leaving the state by its very nature is a problem ...” Husted said in a follow-up telephone interview. His spokesman, Matt McClellan, said the longer trip increases the risk of ballots being damaged, lost or delayed. McClellan said those concerns would be magnified in a presidential election year, when the number of voters and mailin ballots is highest. California poses a special problem because of its sheer size. About 40 percent of California voters are registered for permanent absentee ballots, compared with 5 percent in 2000. Nearly 6 million residents voted by mail in 2008, the last presidential election. The Postal Service has closed four processing centers in the state since 2008 and plans to close 14 more. Some county registrars said the closures already have had an effect.

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16A » Sunday, March 4, 2012 »

C A L L E R -T I M E S

Business SCOTT BURNS COLUMNIST

Variable annuities: Savings are costly

Airlines push fares

HIGHER AND HIGHER

■ Rising fuel prices

combine with usual seasonal ticket bump By David Koenig Associated Press

DALLAS — Airfares are up and headed higher this summer. Airlines blame soaring fuel prices that could cost them billions more than last year. That means fares, which normally rise as the summer travel season nears, could increase faster than usual. Airlines already have pushed through two price increases this year, and it’s only February, when leisure travel is slow. It’s a sign of things to come. “You’ll see gradual increases and then a much bigger jump in April and May when people start shopping for the summer travel season,” says Rick Seaney, CEO of travel website FareCompare.com. The latest data on average fares show that Southwest charged $140 each way during the fourth quarter, JetBlue charged $156 and United Continental charged $270. Length of flight accounted for most of the difference — on a permile basis, prices were similar. The average fare rose 9 percent between January 2011 and January 2012, according to Airlines for America, a trade group of the biggest carriers. Fuel is driving the increases. The spot price of jet fuel rose 18 percent during the same period, according to government figures. Airlines burn 48 million gallons per day, making fuel their biggest expense. There’s little that airlines can do about fuel prices. They hedge, which is like buying insurance against big price spikes, and they’ve been adding more-efficient planes, but it takes years to replace a whole fleet. The simplest response is to raise fares — that’s what they did nearly a dozen times last year. Airlines will respond to higher fuel prices this year by boosting fares, running fewer sales, and cutting some flights, predicts Deutsche Bank analyst Michael Linenberg. He noted that despite a weak economy last year, the seven carriers in Airlines for America used the same moves to boost revenue by $14.1 billion, more than offsetting a $12.2 billion increase in fuel spending. If they aren’t careful, airlines could price more passengers out of the market. That’s what’s happening to Jessica Streeter, a 27-year-old teacher and doctoral candidate in Philadelphia who took four plane trips last year. She and a companion planned to fly to Florida See FARES, 17A

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Airfares are up and headed higher this summer. Airlines blame soaring fuel prices that could cost them billions more than last year.

Leader in Business

PEGGY MUDD CO-OWNER/PAMPERED PETS GROOMING & MORE

Address: 4541 Everhart Road, Suite 200 Phone: 992-8141 Company description: Pampered Pets Grooming & More provides bathing and grooming for cats and dogs up to 90 pounds. We can do any special style and use shampoo with natural ingredients. We also provide free dipping for fleas and ticks with the purchase of a bath. Hometown: I was born in Liberal, Kan., but my family moved me to Corpus Christi when I was 6 months old. Years in business: 30 Tenure in position: Three years this July Education: King High School, Class of ’78. First job: When I was 16, I went to work at the original Pampered Pet Center, a full-line pet store with a grooming service. I learned how to groom small animals, cats and dogs. I also learned customer service. Biggest career break: Except for about five years in the 1980s that I took off to get married and raise my son, I have always worked at Pampered Pets. In 2009, the previous owner decided she was going to close

able to tell our clients where we would be operating. We chose this location because it’s convenient for our customers and has good visibility. Because we did all of the prep work, it was a smooth transition. Business philosophy: We always do the best job we possibly can with every pet we groom. It’s rare that there’s a pet that we can’t handle. We’ve had owners come in and stay with their pet so they can relax and we can take care of them. We both have been scratched and bitten, but we always put the pet first.

How would you improve the Coastal Bend’s business climate? Many of the streets

JANET HERLIHY/SPECIAL TO THE CALLER-TIMES

Rosalinda Fitzgerald (left) and Peggy Mudd are partners in Pampered Pets Grooming & More and are building their business on a combined 60 years’ experience in grooming dogs and cats. the business. Rosalinda Fitzgerald had worked there as long as I had. Rosalinda took a grooming class at Del Mar College, and we both learned a lot from Rose Koehl, who owned London Kennels. Rosalinda and I are good friends and decided we would start our own grooming business. We were able to acquire the name and phone

number of the original Pampered Pets. We divided up the administrative part of the business and split the grooming. We work very well together and are equal partners in the business. Business turning point: Because we knew we were going to open our business about a month before the original business closed, we were

here in town are in very bad shape. The construction here (near the intersection of Staples Street and Everhart Road) has been going on for so long that some clients don’t come to us anymore. As some of it is completed, it’s getting a little better, but we really need to find a way to solve the street problem.

How has your business changed with today’s economic climate? People who used to bring their pets in once a month now are waiting longer between visits — maybe two or three months. In the past few weeks, things have started to pick up. We are seeing more new clients and others are returning. Janet Herlihy

Variable annuities are a triumph of marketing over arithmetic. Yes, it’s time for my annual Variable Annuity Watch column and, as in every other year of testing, being simple and cheap has, yet again, been more rewarding for the majority of investors than being complex and tax-deferred. In the unlikely event your life has been so incredibly blessed that no one has tried to sell you one of these products, a variable annuity is basically a mutual fund wrapped in an insurance contract. The insurance contract provides tax-deferral. As a consequence, your investment can grow without the impediment of annual tax payments on the return. The basic contract has other goodies, such as a death benefit, as well. It guarantees that your designated beneficiaries will get your original investment, even if the value of the investment has declined. Except for the considerable inconvenience of being dead, most agree this is a nice benefit. But rather than jump at the opportunity for tax deferral, let’s go through the arithmetic. The problem with variable annuities is that their most important benefit, tax deferral, costs more than any taxes deferred. A typical variable annuity contract, according to Morningstar data, now has an average annual insurance cost of about 1 percent. It costs another 0.75 percent to manage the basic domestic equity mutual fund it may contain. As a consequence, the insurance company skims 1.75 percent, or more, off the top of your gross return. It does this year in, year out. The 1.75 percent is a significant part of your return in a good year. It can be an annoying portion of your principal in a bad year. So let’s ask a rude question. How does the insurance company do as a stand-in for the Internal Revenue Service? Answer: It’s a shoo-in. Over the long term, common stocks provide a compound return of about 10 percent a year, or so legend has it. During the last 10 years, the Vanguard 500 Index Fund, which has current costs of only 0.17 percent a year, has provided an annualized return of 2.82 percent a year. This is better than 61 percent of its higher-cost competitors. If you had wrapped it in a variable annuity with an additional cost of 1 percent, your annualized return would be about 1 percentage point lower. That is the equivalent of a 35 percent tax rate on the return as you earn it (1 divided by 2.82). In addition, you still would be liable for deferred taxes, at ordinary income tax rates, when you took your remaining return from the account. Of course, this was a dismal period for the domestic stock market. So let’s go back 15 years and capture some of those bubbly Internet days. Over that period the annualized return of the Vanguard 500 Index Fund was 5.37 percent, implying a substitute tax rate of 18.6 percent (1 divided by 5.37). Again, that’s only See BURNS, 17A


C A L L E R -T I M E S

« Sunday, March 4, 2012 « 17A

BUSINESS Business journal

Local agent offers Hartford program

The Hartford announced its award-winning A AR P-branded auto insurance program is now available through Crawford Insu ra nce Services. T h e company met t he Hartford’s training requirements Crawford for serving customers aged 50 years and older and demonstrated both a commitment to the community and the highest ethical standards. Tandy Crawford is owner/agent and the office is located at 5262 S. Staples St., Suite 300.

Knox becomes new chamber intern Stephanie Knox has joined the communications team as an intern at Corpus Christi Chamber of Commerce where she will assist with communications, government affairs and administration. Knox is a senior political science/communications major at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. She graduated from King High School in 2008.

Kroeger completes associate program Radiology Associates announced that Michael Kroeger

has earned his Masters of Imaging Sciencefrom the University of Arkansas for Medical Kroeger Sciences. He was one of four in the inaugural class to pass the program.

Committees select new members Three local health care professionals have been selected by the Texas

FARES from 16A

next month, but when fares shot above $300, they decided that they’ll visit friends in Pittsburgh instead. A planned summer trip to Belgium with an aunt is looking doubtful unless they can find a lastminute deal. “With the economy down, these fares are hard on people,” she says. “It’s hard to get away when you’re on a budget.” Vacationers are usually the first to cut back on travel if it becomes too expensive. Americans already are paying an average of $3.72 a gallon for gasoline, up 30 cents in just the last month. “About 75 percent of leisure travel is not essential,” says George Hobica of the travel website airfarewatchdog.com. “Fares have reached a ceiling. I think you’ll see more people stay home, or they’ll drive or take the bus or the train.” Even business travel, which accounts for an outsized share of airline revenue, could be affected. Corporate profits rose strongly in 2011, which helped prop up business travel. But research firm FactSet, which surveys analysts, estimates that first-quarter earnings will barely rise. Kevin Mitchell of the Business Travel Coalition, which represents corporate travel managers, says big corporations have set their travel budgets for the year. But at smaller firms, he says, “if it feels like it’s getting more expensive, they’ll cut back or look for cheaper ways to do things.” The big airlines have tried to raise prices four times this year and succeeded twice. When they failed, it was because discount airlines such as Southwest and JetBlue declined to go along. Consumers will change airlines just to save a few dollars, and the Internet

Biz Buzz Health and Human Services Commission to serve on three new Medicaid advisory committees created by the 2011 Texas Legislature. Steven F. Woerner, president and chief executive officer of Driscoll Children’s Hospital, was selected to serve on the Neonatal I nten sive Care Unit Council, which will Woerner advise the commission on standards for neonatal intensive care units and on the development of an accreditation process for a neonatal intensive care unit to receive Medicaid payments. Dr. Mary Dale Peterson, chief executive officer of Driscoll Children’s Health Plan, was c ho s en as chairwoman of the Quali t y- B a s e d Payment Advisory Committee. Peterson The committee will advise on performance, standards and outcomes measures for Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program. Dr. Isabel Menendez , of Portland, was selected to serve on the Physician Payment Quality Committee. The committee will identify the 10 most-overused or unnecessa r y services in Texas MedMenendez icaid and decrease payments for those services. Menendez is a board-certified diagnostic radiologist who has practiced in San Patricio County since 1985 and in medical facilities throughout the Coastal Bend and Laredo. Compiled by Tina Vasquez

has made comparisonshopping much easier. Still, when it comes to setting prices, the airlines are dealing from a position of strength. Since 2008, mergers have eliminated three major U.S. airline companies and reduced competition. That’s made it easier for airlines to limit flights, charge higher prices, and return to profitability after losing money for most of the 2000 decade. At higher fuel costs, more routes become unprofitable and targets for the chopping block. That will make it harder for passengers to get where they want to go. Delta Air Lines will end flights between Miami and London in April. Demand was inconsistent, but “fuel is by far the biggest culprit there,” says spokesman Trebor Banstetter. In announcing that AirTran Airways would stop flying to several cities later this year, Bob Jordan, the executive who runs Southwest Airlines’ AirTran unit, says, “there are some markets that we simply cannot make work” at current fuel prices. The airlines say that over the long term, airfares have increased far less than other consumer goods and services. And although most U.S. airlines made money the past two years, there have been many years since 2001 in which they lost money. Net profit margins at U.S. airlines fell to 0.3 percent last year from 1.6 percent in 2010, according to Airlines for America. The group’s chief economist, John Heimlich, says that in the past decade airlines increased revenue by packing more people on the plane, but there just aren’t many empty seats left anymore. Airlines need to raise more money to cover fuel, labor costs, and other expenses — and that means higher fares.

New area dealer for New Holland brand Equipment Depot has been appointed to be a New Holland Construction equipment dealer. “We are thrilled to add New Holland Construction Equipment’s premium brand to our line offering,” says Kevin Corley, New Holland district sales manager for Equipment Depot. “We’re confident that the addition of New Holland Construction Equipment will allow us to offer customers the most dependable and complete line of construction equipment in the industry.”

Equipment Depot will represent New Holland for an eight-county area of South Texas from its location at Port Avenue and Interstate 37. Based in Houston, Equipment Depot sells, rents and services industrial and construction products including forklifts and boom lifts. Equipment Depot is part of the Dutch company Pon Material Handling.

Hispanic Chamber welcomes new biz A new business targeting the Coastal Bend’s youngest customers opened in February.

Boing Boing Bounce, 3403 S. Padre Island Drive, Suite 103, offers an indoor setting filled with inflatable bouncy houses and slides. The Corpus Christi Hispanic Chamber of Commerce had a ribbon cutting for the business Friday. More information is available at www.boingboingbounce.com.

Perry extends Texas drought declaration Gov. Rick Perry recently renewed a proclamation extending the state’s drought emergency. Citing how the ongoing historic drought poses

threats to public health, property and the economy, Perry renewed the declaration on Feb. 24, according to the governor’s office. The declaration suspends all rules and regulations that prevent or slow response to the drought. The renewed declaration is in effect for 245 of Texas’ 254 counties. Perry first issued a proclamation on July 5, stating that record high temperatures and significantly low rainfall caused declining reservoir and aquifer levels, threatening the state’s water supplies and methods of delivering water.

Business datebook TUESDAY

Del Mar offers Kingsville economic bookkeeping tips Del Mar College Small forum planned Business Development The College of Business Administration at Texas A&M University-Kingsville, the city of Kingsville and the Kingsville Economic Development Council will host an economic forum and luncheon from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in room 219 ABC of the Memorial Student Union Building. Speakers include Keith Phillips, senior economic and policy adviser at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas-San Antonio Branch and Thomas Krueger, professor and director of faculty research for the college. Cost: $12/includes lunch. Advanced registration required. Call 361-5934856 or visit www.tamuk. edu/cba/economic_forum.

Seminar gives tips for new businesses Del Mar College Small Business Development Center, 3209 S. Staples St., will present “Starting Your Business, Step by Step” from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in Room 167. This seminar is designed for entrepreneurs and individuals who have never owned a business and are interested in learning how to start their own business. Cost: $30. To register, go to www. delmar.edu/sbdc and click on the on-site workshops tab. For additional assistance, call Lisa Farr at 698-2422.

City manager Olson to talk leadership American Society of Training and Development lunch and networking will begin at 11:30 a.m. at Del Mar Center for Economic Development, 3209 S. Staples St., Room 119. A presentation, “Leadership Development — Training Leadership and Ethics,” will begin at noon. City manager Ron Olson will be the guest speaker. Cost: $15; $10/members. Register online at www. astd-cc.org or call Linda Houts at 949-4714. Information: Michelle Hinojosa at 698-2411. WEDNESDAY

Seminar has tips on video conferencing High Touch Technologies will host a free lunch seminar on video conferencing from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at 711 N. Carancahua St., Suite 1500. Seating is limited. For reservations, call 361-737-0646 or visit tinyurl.com/74zryyz.

BURNS from 16A

the cost of deferring taxes: When you actually want some spending money, you still will be liable for the deferred income taxes on your net return. None of this considers the additional cost of a managed domestic fund — that 0.75 percent — over the lower-cost index fund. If you figure that difference, a total of about 1.58 percent, the insurance product cost is the equivalent of an immediate “tax”

Center, 3209 S. Staples St., will have “Basics of Business Bookkeeping” from 2 to 5 p.m. in Room 140. This seminar is designed to teach small business owners about record-keeping basics and is highlighted with straightforward advice from experienced small business consultants. Cost: $30. To register, go to www. delmar.edu/sbdc and click on the on-site workshops tab. For additional assistance, call Lisa Farr at 698-2422.

Del Mar offers tips on foreign trade Del Mar College Small Business Development Center, 3209 S. Staples St., will present “International Trade for Corpus Christi: Know Your Incoterms” from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Room 140. Free/lunch included. To register, go to www. delmar.edu/sbdc and click on the on-site workshops tab. For additional assistance, call Lisa Farr at 698-2422.

delmar.edu/sbdc and click on the on-site workshops tab. For additional assistance, call Lisa Farr at 698-2422.

Primerica will offer business advice Primerica will host “The Business of the 21st Century” presentation at 7 p.m. at the ValueBank Tower, 3649 Leopard St., Suite 512. Free. Information: Mark Oser at 883-7217 or 883-9365. FRIDAY

SBA explains business loans The U.S. Small Business Administration will conduct a free seminar for startup or existing small businesses to explain the SBA loan programs, counseling and training services and federal contracting assistance for small businesses. The seminar is from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at the agency office, 3649 Leopard St., Suite 411. Registration begins at 8:45 a.m. Seating is limited/ seminar subject to change. For reservations, call 879-0017, ext. 300. LATER

sented during a webinar from 2 to 3 p.m. March 13. The event is hosted by Agility Recovery Solutions and the U.S. Small Business Administration. Experts Jim Garrow with the Philadelphia Department of Public Health, and Patrice Cloutier from the Ontario (Canada) Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services will address the practical use of social media during emergency situations. Case studies, including the Joplin recovery efforts, also will be discussed. Space is limited. Register at www.gotomeeting. com/register/620323496

Del Mar offers Facebook advice

Del Mar College Small Business Development Center, 3209 S. Staples St., will offer “Creating and Promoting a Facebook Page for Your Business” from noon to 2 p.m. March 21 in Room 124. Free; seating is limited. To register, go to www. delmar.edu/sbdc and click on the on-site workshops Tab. For additional assistance, call Lisa Farr at 698-2422.

SBA gives seminar World Affairs Transportation Council meets for businesswomen contracts explained World Affairs Council The U.S. Small Business Administration will conduct a free seminar to explain the new Woman Owned Small Business Contracting Program to help women in targeted industries compete in government contracting. The SBA loan program also will be discussed to assist small businesses with access to capital. The seminar is from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at the agency office, 3649 Leopard St., Suite 411. Registration begins at 8:45 a.m. Seating is limited/ seminar subject to change. For reservations, contact Elizabeth Soliz at 8790017, ext. 301. THURSDAY

Forum focuses on Eagle Ford Shale Del Mar College Small Business Development Center, 3209 S. Staples St., will offer “Eagle Ford Shale: Turning Prospects into Business” from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Room 106. Presenters from Chesapeake Energy, NuStar Energy, Kinley Construction, Alice Economic Development Corp. and Chamber of Commerce, and SCORE Corpus Christi will cover what member companies provide in the Eagle Ford Shale and any problems/ solutions they encounter. Free/lunch included. To register, go to www. of 15 percent on an annualized return of 10.5 percent; a 25 percent “tax” on an annualized return of 6.3 percent; and a 28 percent “tax” on an annualized return of 5.6 percent. Because 5.6 percent is greater than the 5.37 percent return index investors enjoyed over the past 15 years, the majority of variable annuity investors have paid more for the privilege of tax deferral than they would have paid in taxes — and they lost the preferred 15 percent tax rate on dividends and capital gains to get the

of South Texas meets at 11:30 a.m. March 12 at Congressman Solomon P. Ortiz International Center. Economist Gernot Wagner will be guest speaker. Wagner teaches energy economics as adjunct faculty at Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs. Cost: $32.50; $25/members and active duty military in uniform; $18/students. Registration after Thursday is $5 more. All reservations must be prepaid. For reservations and/ or membership information, call 241-2018.

Land conservation sign-up available The U.S. Department of Agriculture will conduct a four-week Conservation Reserve Program general sign-up from March 12 to April 6. The Conservation Reserve Program is a voluntary program available to agricultural producers to help them use environmentally sensitive land for conservation benefits. Information: www.fsa. usda.gov

Using social media for disaster recovery Tips on best practices for creating a crisis communications plan using social media will be preprivilege. Here are the pre-tax return figures for different time periods: Vanguard 500 Index Fund returned an annualized 1.97 percent during the past year, 14.01 percent during three years, a loss of 0.33 percent during five years and a return of 2.82 percent during 10 years. The average returns of 2,664 large-blend domestic variable annuity subaccounts was minus 1.75 percent during the past year, 12.84 percent over three years, a loss of 1.61 percent over five years and

Del Mar College Small Business Development Center, 3209 S. Staples St., will offer “Doing Business with TxDOT” from 9 to 11 a.m. March 21 in Room 140. The purpose of this seminar is to learn how to become a contractor for the Texas Department of Transportation. Free. To register, go to www. delmar.edu/sbdc and click on the on-site workshops tab. For additional assistance, call Lisa Farr at 698-2422.

Workshop gives profitable advice

Del Mar College Small Business Development Center will offer “Running Your Business Profitably Using Your Financial Statements” from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. March 21 at City Hall Annex, 2665 San Angelo, Ingleside. This seminar will be presented by Eric Bolusky, a rural business consultant with the Small Business Development Center at Del Mar College who has more than 25 years of experience as the owner of his own businesses. Free. To register, go to www. delmar.edu/sbdc and click on the on-site workshops tab. For additional assistance, call Lisa Farr at 698-2422. Compiled by Tina Vasquez

2.09 percent over 10 years. As you can see, a lowcost index fund beat highcost tax-deferral from the get-go. Scott Burns is a principal of the Plano-based investment firm AssetBuilder Inc., a registered investment adviser. The opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect the views of AssetBuilder Inc. This information is distributed for education purposes, and it is not to be construed as an offer, solicitation, recommendation or endorsement of any particular security, product or service.


18A » Sunday, March 4, 2012 »

C A L L E R -T I M E S

Visit:

Opinion

/opinion

Editorial

Ask RTA to share street burden, not be beast of burden

As the city grapples with how to reverse 30 years of neglected street maintenance, the Corpus Christi Regional Transportation Authority makes a handsome, well-fed target. Any City Council member or resentful taxpayer outraged at the proposal to add a street user fee to utility bills should think so. If an increment of the RTA’s half-cent sales tax were to be dedicated to street maintenance, no right-minded non-RTA insider would see it as a diversion of funding from the transportation authority’s central mission. Neither do we. The council should pursue it, along with a strictly dedicated gasoline tax and vehicle registration fee. Of the three, perhaps the council should pursue RTA funding fi rst if not foremost. That said, RTA funding wouldn’t be more than a partial solution. Nor should the RTA be a scapegoat for the understandable anger of taxpayers who resent the user fee proposal and feel that their taxes and fees already are too high. The gasoline tax, which would require approval from the Legislature, and the vehicle registration fee, which would require approval from the Nueces County Commissioners Court, also are only partial potential sources of the estimated $55 million a year needed for 22 years to return the streets to an acceptable condition. The council can ask the Legislature, the Commissioners Court and the RTA for help — the RTA in a much more demanding tone (the council appoints four of its 11 board members). All three will have a harder time saying no if the council fi rst enacts the street user fee, which it has the power to do. If the council pursues these other sources without first approving the street fee, then it will suffer both the appearance and reality of asking others to solve a Corpus Christi problem that Corpus Christi isn’t willing to solve. Why take responsibility for Corpus Christi if Corpus Christi won’t take responsibility for itself? The Legislature would be on firm ground to ask. The Commissioners Court would be on slightly less-fi rm ground because Corpus Christi is its overwhelming majority constituency, though it could argue that it has its own roads outside the city to maintain. The RTA can argue that its buses run outside Corpus Christi. But most of them run inside the city, putting a huge stress on the roads. Not only are RTA buses contributors to the maintenance burden but Corpus Christi street maintenance is of direct benefit to the RTA. Our recommendation that the city pursue these other funding sources in no way contradicts our challenge to the council to enact the user fee rather than put it to a referendum. The user fee is an amendable decision that can be scaled back accordingly if other funding sources come through. Our call for action has been strident and has been portrayed as a call for a rush to judgment. The council has scheduled public hearings for late March and April. Enacting the fee a few weeks from now will allow time for suitable evidence-gathering and refi nement of the fee plan to balance the burden equitably among residential, commercial and industrial customers. A rush to judgment would be rash — not as rash as putting off the problem for the next council to solve after the November election. We will expect the council to gather evidence with the intention of acting upon it. None of the suggested funding sources is a magic bullet and no amount of evidence-gathering will yield one.

EDITORIAL BOARD DARRELL COLEMAN PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER

SHANE FITZGERALD VICE PRESIDENT/EDITOR

TOM WHITEHURST JR. VIEWPOINTS/OPINION PAGE EDITOR

ADRIANA GARZA COMMUNITY BOARD MEMBER

NICK JIMENEZ EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR EMERITUS

CONTRIBUTIONS Letters should be 200 words or fewer. They must be signed and include name, address and phone numbers for day and evening. Letters will be edited. Inquiries about individual letters cannot be answered. By mail: Letters to the Editor P.O. Box 9136 Corpus Christi, TX 78469

By email: ctletters@ caller.com By fax: 361-886-3732

LETTERS Jack and Kay Miller

A missed friend We lost a great neighbor. Frank Horner was our neighbor for 14 years. He was one of the most compassionate, caring individuals we have ever met. A World War II veteran, Frank had strong spiritual, family and national values. He was a valued husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather. He was a true friend to many. We will miss his wry sense of humor and his direct communication style. He was not afraid to stand up for his beliefs. Thanks, Frank!

Mary Yrlas

Exposure of county’s plan Ms. Lisa Hernandez should be commended for exposing the Nueces County commissioners’ plans to continue spending taxpayer dollars in defense of their failed redistricting plans (“Toss out illegal redistricting plan,” Feb. 29). This young lady’s serious involvement in the political arena is a welcoming step of young people concerned about their future in politicos’ control. Unknown to much of the public are the ways counties and cities handle their daily business. Most of the time we are kept in the dark about risky or political schemes. Ms. Hernandez states in her letter how persistent the Nueces County judge is in asking for more public money to continue defending the

Nueces County redistricting plan which the U.S. Justice Department objected to. Other Texas counties with rejected redistricting plans did not pursue redress, but rather submitted new redistricting plans. The Nueces County judge is being persistent and wants to continue the issue. Sure, it is not his money!

Carolyn Moon

Locked gates in council chambers When Joe Adame became mayor, he made it clear that he did not want to hear the thoughts of the people. So last year when I saw there were gates placed in every access point in council chambers, I thought he had simply spent a lot of money making that clear. Last week when I went up to make comments, I found that these gates were locked. I had to climb over the seats, which does not look good. Many people crowded the center aisle, so I tried to leave by the side aisle. Again, I found this gate was locked. I checked with the fire marshal, and these gates comply with fi re codes for exiting, but he told me they were put there for the safety of the council members after a shooting somewhere else. This added an additional insult. It insults the many police officers in the chambers. It insults the ability of Texans to shoot from the back of the room. It insults the people of Corpus Christi who have to crowd through the center aisle to make their thoughts heard, especially as Dr. Gloria Scott pointed out, the sign-in sheet is ignored.

If the city council members are afraid of the public, it is time to do us all a favor and quit.

John Manuel Gonsalves

Get rid of trashers, not plastic bags

I could have been a puppet sitting on the lap of Mr. Nick Jimenez, on his column “All that litters isn’t singleuse plastic” on Feb. 26. It was an outstanding column, and I have written and uttered the same thoughts and ideas. When plastic bags are produced in factories, it’s not the bag that blows in the wind, but the wind itself or trashers for allowing it to happen. In part, the city also is to blame. Last Friday when the garbage truck emptied my garbage can, the wind blew a bag out of the can when it was returning to the curb. Since we can no longer recycle plastic bags they end up in garbage cans, we hope. The majority use the word “mindset” to describe the trashers of the city. I prefer the word “cultural” lifestyle. People in South Texas grow up in a certain environment and are taught a certain way to live. That’s why bottles, soda drink cups, etc., are thrown out of car windows onto the streets. That’s why baby diapers often end up in parking lots. It’s the cultural lifestyle of the city to behave that way. Finally, Corpus Christi was incorporated on Sept. 9, 1852. In all that time, why haven’t we found a way to recycle glass? The city has a population of approximately 305,215 people. That figure produces a lot of glass containers for our city dump!

We need the facts on streets before we act The Corpus Christi Caller-Times recently published an editorial urging the City Council to enact a plan to fi x city streets that would place a user fee on every utility customer in the city. It is one of several ideas being considered by the City Council as we all look for ways to pay a potential $2 billion bill to fi x city streets and infrastructure that have suffered from decades of too little maintenance and care. The editorial, and some members of the community, expressed the view that the council should make the decision without giving citizens a chance to vote for or against what will affect each of their pocketbooks for years to come. While City Council members are elected to make tough decisions, they are also elected to listen to the will of the people and we should not make any decision until we have all the facts and information to make an intelligent choice that will work best for Corpus Christi. I don’t think that city voters should run to the ballot box before every City Council session on Tuesdays and tell us how to vote. We’ve made tough decisions before but I do believe that we should do everything possible to make sure that taxpayers and citizens have a strong voice in these kinds of decisions, and the decision

CHRIS ADLER FORUM

made is fair to all of our community. The city will hold a series of five public workshops, beginning on March 20 and continuing until mid April. I would ask all interested citizens to show up at these workshops to express their solutions to the issues we face with funding street repairs and infrastructure. The report recommending the user fee was presented by a citizen committee that researched and presented facts concerning solutions to the street maintenance problem. They spent a year looking at the problem and chose the street user fee because it would provide a dedicated funding source to help generate the $55 million suggested that we will need each year to fi x the problem in 22 years. But there are also other options being considered which will be discussed in the workshops along with ideas from citizens to help determine what the best solution will be to the problem. We still don’t have all the facts and to make a

I don’t think that city voters should run to the ballot box before every City Council session on Tuesdays and tell us how to vote. We’ve made tough decisions before but I do believe that we should do everything possible to make sure that taxpayers and citizens have a strong voice in these kinds of decisions, and the decision made is fair to all of our community.” decision without all the facts is irresponsible. We all agree that something has to be done. Our city manager and his staff are reviewing the report, assessing needs and solutions, and will present them to the council in the next few weeks. Ideas continue to come in from citizens and business groups. And we continue to work to fi nd the best answer to a difficult situation. Over the past three weeks I have spent more than 12 hours with a local engineer to understand the city streets and how we got where we are today — and, more important, to get more ideas on what kind of a solution we can fi nd for our problem. I’ve met with the Corpus Christi Regional Transportation Authority representatives, city

business owners, homeowners, legislators, and anyone who wants to offer solutions or suggestions. I hope to ask all these stakeholders to come together to help fi nd a solution because it is a problem that all of us have to face together. I can make tough decisions and while I am not opposed to a vote of the people, I’m not hiding behind a referendum. I’m looking for a fair solution, and it may be a combination of ideas. As the Caller-Times states, 30 years of street maintenance neglect, is not something to be taken lightly, but is something we need to correctly address NOW. But before we act, let’s get the facts and do it right the fi rst time. Chris Adler represents District 4 on the City Council.


C A L L E R -T I M E S

Viewpoints The best ethics code exists in conscience

Weather

Visit: /opinion

Save Women’s Health Program

tion of “confl ict of interest,” which the existing policy does not have. That defi nition, and in particular the phrase “any interest … in a matter or transaction involving the city,” became a hangup. Some, like Councilman Mark Scott, believe the written notification, which would be triggered by the “any interest” phrase, would become burdensome to council members in their ordinary course of business. Suppose a council member, he asked, needs ordinary services, like having a plugged sewer line fi xed at his residence or business. Would he fi rst need to fi ll out a disclosure form before calling the wastewater department? Well, as it turns out, Councilman David Loeb did have a city sewer line serving his residence plug up recently. After fi nding a bathroom floor at his house covered with water, he called the wastewater department to tend to the emergency situation. But then he notified the city manager in an email disclosing his contact with city employees and his reason for doing so, dismissing any suspicion that he was getting preferential treatment. Given the circumstances, Loeb’s action was in the spirit of the policy. But still, Scott said, this kind of bureaucratic form-fi lling could be an obstacle. “There are a lot of people who would want to run for office who will not have the tolerance … nor believe it is appropriate to fi ll out a form in the normal course of business.” Perhaps disclosure to the point of nuisance might be a turnoff

There was a short but illuminating bit of business at last week’s City Council meeting. The item was straightforward and routine — amending the city’s ethics code — but the discussion was telling about how such rules of conduct are viewed. The aim of amending the policy, which governs both the City Council and every city employee, Chairwoman Jennifer Dragoo told the council, is to simplify the language and cut down on the verbiage. The policy, as City Manager Ron Olson said later, is some 20 pages, too long and too detailed for the average employee to imprint it into their normal course of work. Someone once said that ethics is what you do when no one is looking. That, however, assumes that the little voice that tells us “don’t do that” is loud and clear in all of us. We have ethics policies because that voice is silent in some. Yet an ethics policy is no guarantee that anyone will be ethical. You simply can’t write the ethics policy that will be extensive and airtight enough as to stop the person determined to fi nd a loophole. That’s why ethics policies grow in length. For City Council members, the emphasis of the policy is to avoid conflicts of interest and to prevent office holders from taking advantage of their position. Where there are conflicts or where there is the possibility of undue influence, the person should disclose the confl ict in writing. The rewrite includes a defi ni-

The League of Women Voters of Texas deplores the ongoing “war against women” and is outraged that the Texas Women’s Health Program has apparently become its latest victim. Initially authorized by the Texas Legislature in 2005 with strong bipartisan support, WHP has provided preventive family planning and other health care services to women living at or below 185 percent of the federal poverty level and who are U.S. citizens. The state has paid only 10 percent of the costs of these services, with the federal government paying 90 percent. WHP has served women who do not qualify for other government-funded family planning programs but who would qualify for Medicaid prenatal and delivery care if they were to become pregnant. According to the Texas Health and Human Services Commission, WHP helped an unduplicated 217,377 women receive such services as well-woman exams, contraception, diabetes and cancer screening and treatment of gynecological infections in its fi rst two years. Despite the proven need and cost-effectiveness of WHP, recent actions by our state government mean that access to its services will be cut off unless we the people demand a reversal of these actions. Although renewal of the WHP was authorized by the 2011 Legislature, a 2011 advisory opinion by the Texas Attorney General interpreted state law as prohibiting the Health and Human Services Commission from contracting with agencies affiliated with organizations that provide abortions and said that the HHSC has authority to define “affili-

NICK JIMENEZ COLUMNIST

for talented individuals, but there’s a reason they call elected office public service. I’ll concede that Scott has a valid point, barely. Elected members need city services just like anyone else and having every contact with the city recorded doesn’t necessarily ensure ethical conduct. Still, I’d rather council members err on the side of disclosure, rather than parse ethics policy language. They should be vigilant about possible confl icts of interest, and even the appearance of confl ict. It shouldn’t take a legalistic policy defi nition of “substantial interest,” defi ned by voting stock or dollar limit, to sound the ethical alarm bells. You know when you have something at stake. If you have to ask whether an issue is a conflict of interest, it probably is. The council asked for more study by the ethics commission on the language. But more language won’t plug any holes if you are not squeamish about ethics. As Olson indicated in conclusion of the discussion, the best ethics policy is often the simplest. Olson said he follows five principals in his own conduct. ‘Be truthful. Be honest Be fair,” he said. “Keep your word and have integrity in applying the fi rst four principals.” Sounds like a clear set of rules that every council member should follow. Nick Jimenez is Editorial Page Editor Emeritus of the CallerTimes.

Austin

Houston

FORUM

ate.” Following this specious line of reasoning, the renewal application that the state submitted to the federal government effectively excluded Planned Parenthood centers from providing WHP services. The federal government countered that the exclusion of qualified providers (i.e., Planned Parenthood) is a violation of the Social Security Act and gave the state an extension — until the end of March — to resubmit an application without the exclusion. Now, however, the Health and Human Services Commission has signed a rule formally banning Planned Parenthood and other “affiliates of abortion providers” from participating in WHP. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has made it clear that no federal money will be sent to the state while the exclusion stands, so it appears that WHP will no longer be an option for Texas women. The loss of this program means that thousands of poor women will lose vital health care. Many of them who would have availed themselves of the contraceptive services offered will become pregnant and bear children at state expense. The Texas Department of State Health Services has estimated that it costs less than $170 per year per woman for family planning services — and more than $8,500 per woman for Medicaid delivery, postnatal and infant care. Other women will develop diseases that could have been prevented or cured through early

74/44/s Galveston

South Texas

68/55/s

Cuero

74/42/s

SUN 4

MON 5

TUE 6

WED 7

THU 8

FRI 9

SAT 10

75° 47°

77° 56°

74° 63°

75° 65°

74° 51°

72° 54°

76° 54°

Mostly sunny and pleasant

Mostly sunny and breezy

Mainly Clouds breaking cloudy and windy and windy

Showers possible

Pleasant with sunshine

Plenty of sunshine

94, 1983 28, 2002

93, 1991 32, 2007

99, 1991 29, 1989

88, 1999 31, 1956

96, 1901 32, 1932

89, 1954 30, 1996

Victoria

RECORD

74/41/s

Choke Canyon Reservoir (220.5 ft. max cap) 208.09 -0.02

Beeville Combined 74/44/s Refugio Capacity 74/52/s George West Lake Corpus Christi 76/43/s (94.0 ft. max cap) 82.06 +0.00 Rockport Sinton 72/52/s 75/48/s Robstown Freer Port Aransas 74/47/s 77/46/s 69/57/s Alice Corpus Christi 78/44/s 75/47/s Laredo Kingsville Hebbronville 78/52/s

51.3%

Billings 56/35

77/45/s

77/45/s

San Francisco 64/45

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather.com ©2012

McAllen

79/53/s

Brownsville

High: 90° at Fort Pierce, FL Low: -18° at Angel Fire, NM

76/52/s

TYPE

Winds:

COUNT

10 miles

Grass 2 Trees 149 Weeds 9 Ragweed Mold 2585

Tides:

Source: Dr. Gary L. Smith, M.D.

South-southeast at 6 to 12 knots.

Visibility: High 2:29 pm, 11:13 pm Low 5:38 am, 6: 06 pm

(Yesterday) RATING

Low High Low Absent Low

Surf:

Bay water:

6 rows at 3 feet

65°

UV Readings

Mar 8

Sunrise Sunset

6:51 a.m. Moonrise 3:03 p.m. 6:32 p.m. Moonset 3:55 a.m.

Almanac

Expected level of ultraviolet light from the sun.

Canada TODAY

TOMORROW

High 74°, Low 61° Peak winds at 29 mph from the North at 9 a.m.

Rain: Yesterday until 3 p.m. Trace Month-to-date Trace Year-to-date 4.54 in. Normal year-to-date 3.77 in. Normal yearly rainfall 32.26 in.

HI/LO W

Amarillo Brownsville Dallas El Paso Fort Worth Lubbock San Angelo Waco Wichita Falls

67/34 76/52 74/46 65/40 74/46 70/33 73/40 74/43 74/39

s s s s s s s s s

HI/LO

72/37 77/60 76/51 74/47 74/51 74/42 77/48 74/50 77/47

W

s s s s s s s s s

Mexico TODAY

Calgary Edmonton Halifax Montreal Ottawa Regina Toronto Vancouver Winnipeg

The World TODAY

HI/LO

W

50/32 40/17 38/26 23/9 20/6 34/15 28/10 47/42 24/6

c pc r sf c sf c c sf

Acapulco Cancun Chihuahua Guadalajara Mazatlan Merida Mexico City Monterrey Progreso

TODAY

HI/LO

W

90/72 83/68 65/41 82/50 86/62 81/63 73/42 73/50 80/65

s sh s pc pc r pc s r

HI/LO

Athens Baghdad Beijing Brussels Buenos Aires Cairo Frankfurt Hong Kong Jerusalem

57/48 63/38 45/30 52/39 82/72 68/54 56/43 75/70 53/42

TODAY W

s pc s pc s s sh c r

Miami 78/56

Guadalajara 82/50 Mexico City 73/42 Chilpancingo 83/56

Mérida 81/63

Villahermosa 75/62

(Yesterday until 3 p.m.)

c: cloudy; pc: partly cloudy; r: rain; s: sunny; sh: showers; sn: snow; sf: snow flurries t: thunderstorms; i: ice

Texas

New Orleans 67/49

Monterrey 73/50

Today’s national weather

First Quarter Mar 30

76/49/s

(For the 48 contiguous states)

Houston 71/45

Chihuahua 65/41

Last Quarter Mar 14

Mar 22

Washington 54/32

Dallas 74/46

El Paso 65/40 Hermosillo 93/57

Mexico New

New York 46/29

Atlanta 58/39

La Paz 82/55

Full

Detroit 32/16

Chicago 37/23

Denver 57/32

Los Angeles 83/55 Phoenix 82/54

Moon and Sun

Harlingen

Minneapolis 32/19

Salt Lake City 51/32

Gulf of Mexico

Sarita

Falfurrias

90, 1961 28, 1989

Seattle 53/42 Portland 54/42

77/44/s

77/48/s

Pollen Count

Karen Nicholson is president of the League of Women Voters of Texas.

71/45/s

San Antonio

Boating

detection and treatment — and will end up seriously ill in public hospitals where taxpayers will pay for their care. In Nueces County, an estimated 30,000 women in need, as determined by Texas Department of State Health Services, will be affected by this latest war against women. Is it too late to revive WHP funding? Maybe not — there is still a window of opportunity before the March 31 deadline: LWVTX calls on all Texans who believe, with us, that Texas women should be eligible for basic health care services, including preventive care, and that access to these services is critically important to the well-being of Texas families. ACT NOW by contacting Governor Perry and Health Commissioner Tom Suehs and asking that they remove the “Planned Parenthood exclusion” from Texas’ application for renewal of the WHP. Don’t stop there: Spread the word and urge your colleagues, friends and relatives — via email, Facebook, Twitter or whatever means is available to you — to make these same contacts and save WFP for Texas women! Governor Rick Perry, Office of the Governor, P.O. Box 12428, Austin, Texas 78711-2428; Opinion Hotline for Texas Callers 800-252-9600; messages can be sent online at http://governor.state. tx.us/contact Thomas Suehs, Executive Commissioner, Texas Health and Human Services Commission, Brown-Heatly Building, 4900 N. Lamar Blvd., Austin, TX 78751-2316; 512424-6502.

KAREN NICHOLSON

Weekly Forecast

72/37/s

/weather

Yesterday’s extremes:

« Sunday, March 4, 2012 « 19A

HI/LO

London Madrid Moscow Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome Seoul Sydney Tokyo

45/36 61/39 28/18 49/37 85/71 62/44 52/37 84/68 46/41

W

r c sn sh pc pc c c pc

The Nation TODAY HI/LO

Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Billings Birmingham Boston Buffalo Charlotte, N.C. Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Denver Des Moines Detroit Fairbanks Fargo Hartford Honolulu Indianapolis Jacksonville Kansas City Las Vegas

59/35 23/6 58/39 52/28 56/35 58/41 44/24 28/11 54/34 37/23 42/25 32/18 57/32 43/23 32/16 5/-24 28/16 45/22 80/69 36/23 63/39 60/31 70/49

TOMORROW

W

s pc s pc pc s c sf c sf sf sf s sn sf c sf pc sh sf pc pc s

HI/LO

65/41 23/16 58/32 43/24 62/35 63/33 35/19 22/14 55/26 37/27 39/23 25/20 64/37 46/36 30/20 5/-7 37/24 37/14 82/69 40/27 72/40 55/43 74/50

TODAY

W

s sn s pc pc s pc c pc pc pc c s s pc pc pc pc c pc s s s

HI/LO

Little Rock Los Angeles Memphis Miami Beach Milwaukee Mpls-St.Paul Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Ore. Raleigh-Durham St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa-St. Ptrsbg Washington, D.C.

68/42 83/55 58/44 78/56 28/20 32/19 54/36 67/49 46/29 72/40 51/25 50/31 82/54 38/20 54/42 53/35 48/30 51/32 78/53 64/45 53/42 68/49 54/32

TOMORROW

W

s s s pc sf c pc s pc s pc pc s sf pc r pc s s s pc pc pc

HI/LO

63/39 77/55 56/39 75/61 36/27 38/31 49/29 72/50 40/23 72/44 53/38 40/31 82/54 33/16 52/36 50/29 47/35 59/38 70/56 60/45 47/32 75/49 43/29

W

s s s pc pc pc s s c s s pc s sf r pc s pc s pc r s c


20A » Sunday, March 4, 2012 »

C A L L E R -T I M E S

NATION/WORLD

Aircraft keeps eye on North Korea

Roll call HOUSE

For-Profit Colleges: Members voted, 303-114, to repeal new federal rules for the for-profit colleges and universities that specialize in online instruction. A yes vote was to repeal one rule to subject them to the accreditation standards of every state in which they conduct “distance” learning and another giving “credit hour” a uniform definition for purposes of allocating federal financial aid. (HR 2117) Ron Paul, R-14, yes Blake Farenthold, R-27, yes Henry Cuellar, D-28, yes Ruben Hinojosa, D-15, no Lloyd Doggett, D-25, no

Student Complaints: Members refused, 170-247, to retain a rule to establish a process by which students could file grievances with state officials against for-profit colleges and universities. A yes vote was to retain the new federal rule over arguments that there already are channels for state accreditation officials to hear such complaints. (HR 2117) Lloyd Doggett, D-25, yes Henry Cuellar, D-28, yes Ron Paul, R-14, no Blake Farenthold, R-27, no Ruben Hinojosa, D-15, did not vote

California Water Dispute: Members passed, 246-175, a bill to override existing California and U.S. compacts and laws for allocating San Joaquin River water in the Central Valley and SacramentoSan Joaquin Delta. A yes vote backed a GOP bill (HR 1837) seen as a boon to agriculture at the expense of environmentalists and salmon fishers. Blake Farenthold, R-27, yes Ruben Hinojosa, D-15, no Lloyd Doggett, D-25, no Henry Cuellar, D-28, no Ron Paul, R-14, did not vote

S E N AT E Contraception, Religion, Health Care: Senators tabled, 51-48, and thus killed a measure enabling employers and insurers to refuse to insure contraception or any other medical care that conflicts with their religion or moral code. Such care would be provided under the “Essential Health Benefits” section of the 2010 health law. A yes vote opposed what is known as “the Blunt amendment” to a pending transportation bill (S 1813). John Cornyn, R, no Kay Bailey Hutchison, R, no Thomas Voting Reports, Inc.

■ Plane allows

U.S. to track nation’s plans By Eric Talmadge Associated Press

OSAN AIR BASE, South Korea — As a sleek black U-2 roared back from a mission, Pontiac muscle cars zoomed along the runway to help it touch down using a lowtech method dating back more than half a century to when this Cold War-era aircraft was cutting-edge. “It’s notorious for being hard to land,” the pilot said after climbing out of the cockpit. But the legendary U-2 “Dragon Lady” remains one of Washington’s most prized possessions on the Cold War’s last hot front. Pumped up by a $1 billion overhaul, a trio of these piloted aircraft are proving they can still compete with the most futuristic drones on a crucial mission: spying on North Korea. For more than 35 years, the U-2 has been one of Washington’s most reliable windows into military movements inside the secretive nation. Unlike satellites, they can be redirected at short notice to loiter over target areas. Last month, the Air Force postponed, at least until 2020, any plans to replace them with costlier, unmanned Global Hawks. As the world watches for signs of instability during North Korea’s transition to a new leadership, the U-2 operations are as important — or more so — than ever. The Korean peninsula’s precarious peace was underscored this month, when North Korea, angry over South Korean artillery drills and joint maneuvers with the U.S., warned it was prepared for “total war” and “merciless retaliatory strikes” if necessary. The rhetoric did not mention the U-2s, but North Korea has frequently slammed their spy missions as belligerent. Other than complain, however, it can do little to stop the flights. Three of the longwinged, glider-like aircraft are deployed to Osan Air Base in South Korea, just 50 miles from the border. The Air Force refuses to comment on where they

go, but, in a rare interview and tour of operations, the squadron commander told that U-2 missions are generally flown out of Osan every day. “We are the tripwire, the eyes and ears of Korea,” he said on condition he be identified for security reasons only by his rank and first name, Lt. Col. Deric. “Our extreme high altitude and intelligence capabilities make us extremely sought after.” Formerly flown by the CIA, the U-2 became a Cold War icon during the international drama following the Soviet Union’s capture of pilot Francis Gary Powers in 1960. The program has since shifted to the Air Force, but it’s still hush-hush. The pilots’ full names are secret. More than half of North Korea’s 1.2 million-man army is believed to be stationed south of Pyongyang, the North Korean capital, and the U-2 flights can provide a detailed picture of troop movements, fortifications and any other signs of potential trouble north of the DMZ. The United States, which signed a truce with North Korea in 1953 to end three years of fighting, keeps more than 28,000 troops in South Korea. North Korea has cited the U.S. military presence on Korean soil as a key reason behind its drive to build nuclear weapons and has said the planes prove the U.S. is plotting another war.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Air Force U-2 spy plane pilot Major Colby wears a spacesuit and an astronaut-style fishbowl helmet for a demonstration at the U.S. air base in Osan, south of Seoul, South Korea.

Amid high tensions two years ago, it said the use of the U-2 showed how “hellbent” the U.S. is on spying on its military facilities. Osan squadron pilots fly once every four days on missions of up to 12 hours. The U-2 flies at altitudes of more than 70,000 feet — double the height of a typical commercial jetliner. That makes it nearly impossible to intercept or track and gives it the ability to peer down on a broader

target area than a lowerflying aircraft. But at that height, the pilots are vulnerable to altitude sickness and must wear spacesuits and astronautstyle fishbowl helmets. An hour before taking off, they are put on a regimen of pure oxygen to reduce the amount of nitrogen in their blood. In a worst-case scenario, a pilot’s blood could actually boil at peak altitude. Puréed, meal-in-a-tube versions of everything

from sloppy Joes to apple pie are supplied to the pilots, but must be sucked out of straws. “Our main concerns are hydration and decompression sickness,” said the pilot who made the landing during the tour and who asked to be identified only as Maj. Carl. “It’s extremely hard to fly.” To make the plane lighter, and thus able to fly higher, two “pogos” — wheel gear fixed to either wing — automatically detach when it roars off the runway, meaning that when it comes back down the pilot must land on only two sets of wheels along the fuselage. At Osan, U-2 pilots in white Pontiac G-8 “chase cars” race down the runway at speeds of more than 120 miles per hour to meet each landing and guide the pilot down. The Air Force has 31 U-2s in active duty. NASA operates two more. Though detachments also are located in Cyprus and southwest Asia, the key role it plays in monitoring North Korea is keeping the legendary plane from the chopping block. The plane, which took crucial photos of the Soviet buildup that touched off the Cuban missile crisis in 1962, has proved to be surprisingly versatile. The Air Force has given it a $1.7 billion makeover since 1994, transforming it into an essentially new aircraft in all but name.

CAL555214

10TH ANNUAL

2012 SPRING CAREER FAIR FILLING YOUR JOBS JUST GOT EASIER!

COMING

Wednesday, March 21, 2012 to the Solomon P. Ortiz Center

Attention Employers and HR Departments! Space is limited! Get your booth today.

Call or email one of our Caller-Times Recruitment Specialists today for booth information and sponsorship opportunities.  Booth packages include your business name in promotional advertising.  Premium booth location.  Lunch for your representatives. Cindy Herrera (361) 886-3707 herrerac@caller.com

Tiffany Rosales (361) 886-3705 rosalest@caller.com

CAL563415


Sunday, March 4, 2012

Section B

Local

■ Austin leaders have

■ Fire officials believe

passed one of the broadest plastic bag bans in the country, but a punishment hasn’t been decided on yet. 2B

a cigarette may be the source of a small fire that damaged an external apartment complex wall. 3B

Area schools pitch in to help Premont ISD

■ District must

build 2 science labs by Aug. 1 By Elaine Marsilio marsilioe@caller.com 361-886-3794

Some Coastal Bend superintendents want to reach out to the troubled Premont ISD by encouraging their students to help the neighboring district. “It’s part of who we are when we say we are going to become a teacher,” said Linda Villarreal, executive director for Education Service Center Region 2, which

serves 42 school districts in 11 counties. Many top administrators from those school districts said Premont Independent School District is working hard to meet 11 demands outlined by the Texas Education Agency through an agreement Premont trustees approved in January to keep the district open for at least another year. In recent years, Premont has struggled with truancy, low academic performance and poor finances. School districts across the region aim to help raise a combined total of $100,000 by May to help Premont open two fully

functional science labs by Aug. 1., one of the demands from the state. The regional fundraising goal has a May deadline that is planned to culminate with a news conference involving all the participating districts’ mascots handing raised funds to Premont’s mascot, Villarreal said. Many Coastal Bend superintendents said they are encouraging their students and campus communities to step in while also sharing a lesson in community involvement. “It signals that all of us have an investment in one another,” said Gregory-Portland ISD Superintendent Paul Clore.

A TOUCH OF SPICE DELIGHTS

HOW TO HELP

For more information about regional efforts to help Premont ISD, call 361-5618404, contact your local school district, or email linda.villarreal@esc2.us.

Some districts already have some organized plans for their individual campaigns. Tuloso-Midway Independent School District is set to kick off a donation drive March 12 during Texas Public Schools Week to encourage every student in the district to give $1 to the cause, Interim Superintendent Sue Nel-

son said. The high school plans on allowing students to donate $1 to wear pajamas or hats to school or contribute a buck to blast music during lunch in the high school cafeteria, Tuloso-Midway senior Janelle Gil said. The Tuloso-Midway Student Leaders, of which Janelle is a member, plan to pass out stickers that read: “TM kids for Premont kids.” Janelle said providing help to Premont can show students there they are supported. Nelson said Tuloso-Midway also is contributing its business

Aditi Subramanya, 10, wears bells around her ankles as she performs a Bharatanatyamstyle dance Saturday during the Festival of India at the Sri Venkateswara Temple of Corpus Christi.

■ Corpus Christi festival

showcases India’s culture

See PREMONT, 2B

Police get tips to stop gangs ■ Agencies aid

Corpus Christi unit’s mission By Steven Alford alfords@caller.com 361-886-3602

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL ZAMORA/CALLER-TIMES

Era Gupta (center) tries to light candles as the wind blows Saturday before going onstage at the Festival of India and Community Health Fair at the Sri Venkateswara Temple of Corpus Christi.

en in his life, who would keep him very busy. “What’s the half part?” Jimmy asked. The palm reader whisA palm reader at Saturday’s pered his answer — one that Festival of India trailed a prompted Saugh to give ballpoint pen along a line him a high-five. in Jimmy Saugh’s open Saugh was among right hand. hundreds of visitors who When the reader told gathered for Hindu enterthe 26-year-old engineertainment, temple tours, See more ing student he was very Indian food and a bounty photos from intelligent, Saugh’s two of health fair booths. the India roommates chuckled Wind gusts puffed the festival. and walked away, teasing roof of a performance their friend about being tent as Anushka Bhowal, lazy and less than brilliant. 15, tinkled a strap of tiny bells Then Saugh got the news that See INDIA, 4B he would have one and half wom-

By Mike Baird bairdm@caller.com 361-886-3774

GALLERY

Raju Bhagat has blood drawn Saturday for a free health screening.

1.25 15-Month CD

Nearly 20 years since its formation, the Corpus Christi Police Department’s gang unit still has a long road ahead. This week, gang unit officers and nearly 50 others from the department met at the Omni Hotel Bayfront to learn more about cracking down on gangs with help from other agencies during the Coastal Bend Regional Gang Investigators conference. Officers learned about border violence, human trafficking, interrogation techniques, linking gangs with local bars, and more. It’s a way for the gang unit to learn how to work with other agencies toward a common goal, said Capt. Donnie Mersing , who oversees the Police Department’s gang unit. “We’re trying to use all the assets that are available to us and we’re always looking for more,” he said. That includes bringing code enforcement or animal control officers to the scene while serving warrants at the homes of suspected gang members, or going to bars that known gang members frequent, and bringing along Texas Alcohol Beverage Commission agents or fire marshals to get a hectic nightclub temporarily closed, Mersing said. “The more efforts we put toward gangs, the more we’ll slow them down,” he said. According to gang unit officers, the threat of gangs in Corpus Christi has been on the decline since their high point in the early 1990s. Back then there were nearly 20 highly active, territorial gangs, fighting for the same pieces of Corpus Christi. Now the number of active gangs has slipped to less than five, Mersing said.

See GANGS, 3B

Give Your Savings a Boost. To open a 15-Month CD or IRA CD: Call 1-800-451-2543 | Go to ssfcu.org/CD Visit a location near you % APY * *APY = Annual percentage yield. APY is effective as of February 17, 2012 and is subject to change without notice. This CD rate is fixed for a 15-month term, assuming a minimum deposit of $100,000. These are Share Certificates, and different rates apply to different deposit levels. CDs may be subject to early withdrawal penalty. Membership eligibility required. Federally insured by the NCUA. Visit ssfcu.org/cd for complete details. IRA funds cannot be co-mingled at any time with regular savings or non-IRA funds. CAL556383


2B Âť Sunday, March 4, 2012 Âť

C A L L E R -T I M E S

LOCAL

Farenthold bashes Obama statement

â&#x20AC;&#x153;This week, the White House announced that TransCanada plans to begin work on portions of the Keystone XL Pipeline that will run from Oklahoma to the Gulf Coast,â&#x20AC;? Farenthold said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unfortunately, Americans wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see the complete beneďŹ t of this because the administrationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s special interest ties continue to hold up the full permitting required for this project.â&#x20AC;? Farenthold said while the president promotes the success of White House domestic energy policies, gas prices have doubled since 2008. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If the president wants to take credit and applaud TransCanadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efforts he should approve the full Keystone XL Pipeline permit,â&#x20AC;? he said. Obama in January blocked the Canadian companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s application to build all 1,700 miles of the pipeline on the recommendation of the U.S. State Department, the agency responsible for determining whether the project is in the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best interest. The departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s concerns center on whether the company and the state of Nebraska can come up with a plan to route the pipeline around, instead of through, the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sand Hills natural area. The company has agreed to give the State Department until early 2013 to make a ďŹ nal decision.

Local architect will run for state rep. Local architect Bill T. Wilson II ďŹ led Friday to run as a Republican for 43rd District state representative seat, according to a news release. The 43rd District, currently served by Rep. J.M. Lozano, a ďŹ rst-term Democrat from Kingsville, underwent drastic changes during the recent redistricting of state House maps. The district, once Democrat-friendly, is now split between two Democratfriendly counties â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kleberg and Jim Wells â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and two Republican-friendly ones â&#x20AC;&#x201D; San Patricio and Bee. Wilson, of Portland, is a founder of WKMC Architects Inc. He is board member and past chairman of the San Patricio Economic Development Corp. He also serves on the boards of the South Texas Council Boy Scouts of America, the Texas Society of Architects and the American Institute of Architects.

Selena book lauds Skurka, Valdez A new book about Selena written by her husband, Chris Perez, acknowledged and thanked Nueces County prosecutors for their dedication to the murder case after she was killed in 1995. The book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;To Selena with Love,â&#x20AC;? which is scheduled to come out on Tuesday, is Perezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memories of their relationship. In the bookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s acknowl-

Valdez received a shout-out in a new Selena book.

edgments, Perez wrote, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Carlos Valdez, Mark Skurka and the prosecutionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s entire legal team â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Thank you all so much for your hard work and dedication in making sure that justice for Selena was served.â&#x20AC;? Valdez now is city attorney for Corpus Christi, and Skurka is the district attorney.

Housing authority CEO gets raise early The new CEO of the Housing Authority of Corpus Christi got a raise Tuesday, three months ahead of schedule because he already has made substantial progress, commissioners said. Gary Allsup, whose contract began Nov. 1, was scheduled to get the $5,000 pay increase after six months if his performance was satisfactory. Commissioners decided he met all requirements for the pay increase three months earlier than planned. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wanted to congratulate Gary for taking the bull by the horns and making us feel that we chose wisely when we brought him in,â&#x20AC;? Chairman Rocco Montesano said. The raise brings Allsupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s salary to $135,000 per year. The former CEO of the Kansas housing corporation has a two-year contract with the Corpus Christi Housing Authority, with the option to extend it an additional year. Allsup replaced Richard Franco, who retired. Torres says rising health care costs put Texans at risk.

Torres honored for work on health care Rep. Raul Torres, RCorpus Christi, has been chosen as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Top Ten Legislatorâ&#x20AC;? by the Texas Association of BeneďŹ t Administrators. The award acknowledges the work of legislators who work on behalf of affordable health care. The association said Torres, a member of the House Insurance Committee , was â&#x20AC;&#x153;relentlessâ&#x20AC;? in his efforts to protect Texasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; workers and employers from rising health care costs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a great honor,â&#x20AC;? Torres said in a statement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe the rising cost of health care poses one of the greatest risks facing Texans today, and I will continue to do all I can to ďŹ x whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s broken in our health care system.â&#x20AC;? The other nine lawmakers to receive the award are: â&#x2013; Rep. Lois Kolkhorst, R-Brenham (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Legislator of the Yearâ&#x20AC;?) â&#x2013;  Rep. Kelly Hancock, R-Fort Worth â&#x2013;  Rep. Barbara Nash, RArlington â&#x2013;  Rep. Larry Taylor, RLeague City

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Hinojosa will study education funding with a legislative committee.

Hinojosa on school ďŹ nance committee State Sen. Juan â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chuyâ&#x20AC;? Hinojosa, D-McAllen, will join several other state senators and representatives on a temporary committee to study changes to public school ďŹ nancing. Hinojosa, who is a member of the Senateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s standing committee on ďŹ nance, is the only lawmaker from the Coastal Bend chosen for the temporary committee whose members are appointed by Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst and Speaker of the House Joe Straus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The future of Texas is being forged in our classrooms every day,â&#x20AC;? Dewhurst said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That is why the Texas Legislature remains dedicated to continuing our investment in public education, directing more resources to the classroom and improving the quality of learning for every student in every school and every district across our state.â&#x20AC;? The committee will make recommendations to the 83rd Legislature in 2013. Puente Bradshaw held a town hall meeting in Kingsville.

Congress hopeful visits Kingsville Jessica Puente Bradshaw, candidate for U.S. Representative District 34, held a town hall meeting Friday at the Kleberg County Republican Headquarters to discuss issues important to the community. Puente Bradshaw also attended the grand opening of the headquarters Feb. 24 and went for a tour of Kingsville and the surrounding communities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The future is certainly bright for conservatives all through out South Texas,â&#x20AC;? she stated after the event. Puente Bradshaw, of Brownsville, has two children and is a business owner and real estate entrepreneur. The headquarters is at 1724 S. Brahma Blvd., Suite 104. For more information on Puente Bradshaw, visit www.texansforjessica.com.

Forum presents ed board candidates Those wanting to hear more about the candidates vying for the State Board of Educationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s District 2 seat can attend a community forum March 28. The forum, hosted by the Corpus Christi American Federation of Teachers and Del Mar Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s social sciences department, is planned from 7-9 p.m. in

Political

PULSE

Check Our Pulse Daily Go to blogs.caller.com to get the latest political news from the Coastal Bend Monday through Friday

The Austin City Council has passed one of the broadest bag bans in the country, but still must determine penalties for refusing to comply with the law. The Austin AmericanStatesman reports that the law, which goes into

Wire services

Calendar Society will host a tour of the Centennial House, aka The Britton/Evans House, 411 N. Upper Broadway from noon to 4 p.m. Cost: $3/adults; $1/ages 12 and younger. Information: 882-8691.

Combination event Room 106 in the collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center for Economic Development, 3209 S. Staples St. Part of the forum will honor longtime board member Mary Helen Berlanga, who announced last year she wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seek reelection to the District 2. She has said it is time for someone new to ďŹ ll the seat. Three Democratic candidates are vying for the District 2 seat, according to the Texas Democratic Party website: Coretta Graham, of Corpus Christi; Ruben Cortez Jr., of Brownsville; and Celeste Zepeda Sanchez, of San Benito. The Texas Republican Party website shows two Republican candidates vying for the seat: Laurie Turner, of Corpus Christi; and Veronica Anzaldua, of McAllen.

M.A.S.S. (Music, Architecture, Sonic, Sculpture), a combination of unique musical sculptures and installations with traditional instrumentation, begins at 5 p.m. in the Performing Arts Center, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Cost: $12-$55. Information: www.corpuschristilive.com, or call 980-1949.

Reception LULAC Council No. 1 will host an artist and sponsorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; reception at 4 p.m. for the Tejano art exhibit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cultura y Vidaâ&#x20AC;? at the Art Center of Corpus Christi, 100 Shoreline Blvd. Information: 425-5661 or drnickadame@gmail.com.

House tour Corpus Christi Area Heritage

City Council bid farewell to Garza last week.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Tuloso-Midway ISD ofďŹ cials have plans to use this design on stickers in support of the school district students helping Premont ISD students.

City Council bids farewell to Garza

PREMONT from 1B

Assistant City Manager Rudy Garza received a standing ovation at his ďŹ nal Corpus Christi City Council meeting for his work at City Hall. He recently resigned after accepting a job offer from CPS Energy, a utility owned by the city of San Antonio. He will be the utilityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vice president of external relations in charge of local, state and federal legislative issues. Tuesday marked Garzaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ nal appearance as a staff member at a council meeting, where he is often seen giving presentations about the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business support services, such as economic development opportunities. Garza thanked the City Council and his boss City Manager Ron Olson for the opportunity to work with top management. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a great experience serving as one of his assistant city managers,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the city is poised for great things. Corpus Christi has a great city staff. They work really hard every day, and they do a good job. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been honored to be a part of that team.â&#x20AC;? Mayor Joe Adame then asked the council to stand in a show of support Garzaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s service. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rudy, you will be missed and we are just so proud of this great opportunity for you and your family,â&#x20AC;? he said. Contributors to Political Pulse this week include Rhiannon Meyers, Rick Spruill, Julia Silva, Michelle Villarreal, Elaine Marsilio and Jessica Savage. Got a tip? Email metrodesk@ caller.com.

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Staff writer Rhiannon Meyers contributed to this report.

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services to Premont to help with a needs assessment as part of the state demands that district must meet. CCISD Superintendent Scott Elliff said his district campuses were contacted by district staff about the regional effort and were encouraged to consider helping out. He said the effort is in line with the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s character and civility initiatives. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just want to reach out and help a neighbor any way we possibly can,â&#x20AC;? he said. Premont ISD Superintendent Ernest Singleton said he was touched by the support from other districts, a move he called unprecedented in his tenure as an educator. With their backing, Premont does not feel so alone in its struggles, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is way more than just monetary support,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This makes us want to work that much harder to succeed.â&#x20AC;? This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the ďŹ rst offer of help Premont has gotten since the state announced it would give the longstruggling district more time to rectify its problems. In recent weeks, the district received $20,000 from Exxon Mobil and $20,000 from a Premont resident who wanted to remain

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anonymous, Singleton said. A group of Premont alumni and residents also have joined forces to raise money. The 30-member group, which is working to obtain nonproďŹ t status, is hosting a raffle in April to raise funds for science labs. Calling itself Premont P.R.I.D.E., or Premont Residents Involved in Dynamic Education, the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is to rally the town to save the district. City Councilman Matthew PĂŠrez, president of the group, said they have sold hundreds of raffle tickets so far to residents, alumni scattered across the state and to nearby townspeople who have heard about Premontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plight. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think everybody is looking at us like the underdog with a steep road to climb, but they want to help us in our efforts,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We could be the little gem that makes the comeback, from as low as we are on the totem pole to getting ourselves up to where we need to be.â&#x20AC;? The efforts various districts are making on behalf of Premont can educate students about values such as compassion and honesty, Villarreal said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are a community of learners, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great opportunity for us to truly be teachers,â&#x20AC;? she said.

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Farenthold: Support the full Keystone XL Pipeline permit, Mr. President.

Bag ban penalties to be determined

â&#x2013; Rep. Kenneth Sheets, R-Dallas â&#x2013;  Rep. Vicky Truitt, RSouthlake â&#x2013;  Sen. Glenn Hegar Jr., R-Katy â&#x2013;  Sen. Jane Nelson, RFlower Mound â&#x2013;  Sen. Dan Patrick, RHouston

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Skurka was part of the legal team heralded by Selenaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s husband.

effect March 2013, will prohibit retailers from offering single-use paper and plastic bags at all retail checkout counters . Penalties will be worked out later. A spokeswoman for the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trash and recycling department said only retailers, not customers, will face penalties .

AU S T I N

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U.S. Rep. Blake Farenthold on Wednesday criticized President Barack Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s statement in support of TransCanadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plans to build the Oklahoma-to-Texas portion of the Keystone XL Pipeline.

Texas brief


C A L L E R -T I M E S

ÂŤ Sunday, March 4, 2012 ÂŤ 3B

LOCAL

Cleaning up at Big Event

City scoop

Small ďŹ re damages apartment complex FireďŹ ghters responded about 3:45 p.m. Saturday to a small ďŹ re on the outside of an apartment complex in the 1500 block of Sam Rankin Street, officials said. Fire was smoldering inside an exterior wall between the second and third ďŹ&#x201A;oors, next to a vacant apartment, said Corpus Christi Fire Depart-

ment Capt. James Brown, an investigator. Traffic to the neighborhood was blocked as ďŹ reďŹ ghters removed a piece of wall board to extinguish the blaze. It took about 20 minutes to control the ďŹ re, Brown said. No one was injured. The ďŹ re is believed to have been started by a cigarette, Brown said. Mike Baird

PHOTOS BY GEORGE GONGORA/SPECIAL TO THE CALLER-TIMES

More than a dozen Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi students clean up a yard Saturday on Palmetto Street as part of the fourth annual Big Event, in which volunteers provide a helping hand to those who are unable to do the work themselves. Students clean the yard of a home on Palmetto Street.

More photos on Caller. com

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Brittany Hinojosa carries a pile of dead tree limbs as students prune shrubs and clean a yard on Palmetto Street.

GANGS from 1B

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Either theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve graduated to prison gangs or moved out of the life,â&#x20AC;? he said. The Police Department created the gang unit in 1992 with just four officers. It has since grown to include 17 officers, three supervisors and six fulltime investigators. Gang unit officials said that increased enforcement means fewer high-profile gangs and fewer drive-by shootings. In 2009, the city saw 50

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drive-by shootings. In 2011, there were 24, police said. Interim Police Chief Richard Badaracco, who worked for years as a Drug Enforcement Administration agent, made it a priority to work closely with the gang unit in his four months here. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gangs are a constant problem and something that will not be tolerated in Corpus Christi,â&#x20AC;? he said at a recent meeting. Two weeks ago, Corpus Christi police released details of a gang warrant roundup, arresting dozens of suspected gang members. One arrest yielded three

semi-automatic weapons, six high-caliber handguns with hundreds of rounds of ammunition, body armor, $7,200 in cash and suspected cocaine. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the ďŹ rst of many to come, said Assistant City Manager Troy Riggs, who left his post as police chief to oversee public safety for the city. Riggs said it has been a long time coming, but the gang unitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coordination with other agencies is the ďŹ rst glimpse of a concerted effort to bring city resources together to ďŹ ght crime and protect public safety. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For the last month weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve asked city depart-

ment heads to study what issues their departments have and bring those to the table,â&#x20AC;? Riggs said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to work together to solve these problems and create efficiency.â&#x20AC;?

             

      

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LOCAL INDIA from 1B

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL ZAMORA/CALLER-TIMES

Dharmi Patel (right) and Jasmin Desai help mix dry ingredients for an India salad Saturday during the Festival of India and Community Health Fair at the Sri Venkateswara Temple of Corpus Christi.

Gargi Bhowal adjusts his Ghandi mustache before going on stage Saturday.

Swarna Katragadda helps serve up plates of Indian food Saturday during the Festival of India.

Her 4-year-old daughter Maribel Lopez was having â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hello Kitty,â&#x20AC;? a simple cartoonlike feline face, drawn on the back of her hand with henna. Mehndi is a Hindu traditional decorative adornment of the skin, usually done on womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s palms and feet, with an

herbal stain. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The sun shined on us today,â&#x20AC;? said Dr. Chadre Kataragadda, president of the sponsoring South Texas Hindu Society. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for the community, to show share our customs, and we are pleased to welcome so many.â&#x20AC;?

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Aloke Bhowal (right) gets draped and repositioned to represent the different cultures and religious views of the people of India on Saturday during a skit.

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to the gentle thumping of her brotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tabla â&#x20AC;&#x201D; small hand-held drums similar to bongo drums. Their rhythms joined the chords of a harmonium â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a keyboard instrument with accordian-like sound produced by air blown through suspended reeds, to which another girl sang Hindustani classical music known as morning music. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love performing,â&#x20AC;? said Anushka, a Carroll High School sophomore, who began the entertainment by singing the national anthem a cappella. Outside, Sai Poluri, 11, found fun kicking a rock through a grassy area, along the Sri Venkateswara Temple sidewalk, and past a tent until greeted by his school friend. They dashed into a sea of women wrapped and draped in glittering jeweled and sequined Sari, which means strip of cloth. They were fuscia, aqua, emerald and plum, among other brightly patterned colors, and are worn on special occasions by women in the roughly 450 Hindu families in the Coastal Bend. Everyone removes shoes to enter the temple, which opened seven years ago, one of about 40 in Texas. One of the founding temple trustees, Dr. Kamakrishna Mulukutla, gave tours Saturday, beginning with the traditional Hindu greeting â&#x20AC;&#x153;namaste.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presented with a slight bow and hands pressed together, palms touching and ďŹ ngers pointed upward, in front of the chest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s better than shaking hands, which passes germs,â&#x20AC;? he joked. Mulukutla wiggled his bare toes as he explained the custom of removing shoes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We usually take off shoes to wash our feet,â&#x20AC;? Mulukutla said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is from the belief that a clean mind lives in a clean body.â&#x20AC;? Mulukutla discussed beliefs common to 650 million Hindus worldwide. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We share a respect for other races ...â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any prayer comes with peace. We believe and Hindu says â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;be the best you can be within your religion.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Charlene Chesshir took off her shoes for another reason: to stand ďŹ&#x201A;at in the grass beneath a tent while being measured for a body mass index assessment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It says Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very healthy,â&#x20AC;? said the 5-foot 6-inch tall senior citizen, as her husband handed back her purse. Sally Gonzalez learned how to give CPR, she said.

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C A L L E R -T I M E S

ÂŤ Sunday, March 4, 2012 ÂŤ 5B

OBITUARIES/TEXAS 









The news department publishes obituaries free of charge on a spaceavailable basis as a service to Caller-Times readers. The Caller-Times accepts obituaries only from funeral homes.





 

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FREER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gregorio L. Espinoza died March 2, 2012. He was 63. No services are planned. Mauro P. Garcia Funeral Home, San Diego. Josefa Garcia

Josefa â&#x20AC;&#x153;Josieâ&#x20AC;? Garcia died Feb. 26, 2012. She was 85. Services were private. Guardian Funeral Home Felipe Hernandez

PETTUS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Felipe â&#x20AC;&#x153;Feleâ&#x20AC;? Hernandez died March 2, 2012. He was 76. Rosary will be recited at 7 p.m. March 5 at Oak Park Memorial Funeral Home, Beeville. Services will be at 10 a.m. March 6 at Oak Park Memorial Funeral Home. Burial will be in Pettus Cemetery. Dee D. Hill Jr.

KINGSVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dee Dawson Hill Jr. died Feb. 29, 2012. He was 84. Services will be at 2 p.m. March 7 at Coastal Bend State Veterans Cemetery. Kingsville Memorial Funeral Home Servando Lichtenberger

SAN DIEGO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Servando Lichtenberger died March 2, 2012. He was 66. Rosary will be recited at 6 p.m. March 4 at Mauro P. Garcia Funeral Home. Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. March 5 at St. Francis de Paula Catholic Church. Burial will be in San Diego Cemetery No. 2. Reynaldo Munoz Jr.

ALICE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Reynaldo Munoz Jr. died March 2, 2012. He was 49. Memorial rosary will be

recited at 6 p.m. March 4 at Rosas Funeral Home. Shari D. Munoz

FALFURRIAS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Shari Denise Munoz died Feb. 29, 2012. She was 50. Services will be at 11 a.m. March 6 at Funeraria del Angel Howard-Williams. Burial will be in Sacred Heart Cemetery. Doris W. Ozio

Doris Wagstaff Ozio died Feb. 26, 2012. He was 86. Services were Saturday at Seaside Funeral Home. Carlton Payne Jr.

Carlton Payne Jr. died Feb. 29, 2012. He was 52. Services will be at 2 p.m. March 4 at Seaside Funeral Home. Jesus D. Salinas

Jesus Davila Salinas died March 2, 2012. He was 80. Services will be at 1 p.m. March 5 at Guardian Funeral Home. Burial will be in Memory Gardens Cemetery.

School board names lone finalist By The Associated Press

DeSOTO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The DeSoto school board has selected a Beaumont administrator as the lone ďŹ nalist for the superintendent post. The Dallas Morning News reports that David Harris, an assistant superintendent in Beaumont, has been selected after a search that has lasted for months. The DeSoto public school district has been without a permanent superintendent since the district bought out the contract of former Superintendent Kathy Augustine last summer. The Dallas-area school board paid $188,000 to settle its contract with Augustine, who was caught in the fallout of a test-cheating scandal in her previous district in Atlanta. She worked one day on the job in DeSoto.

Janie A. Washington

Janie A. Washington died Feb. 29, 2012. She was 58. Services will be private. Guardian Funeral Home

     



Florentino Zamora Jr.

ROBSTOWN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Florentino Zamora Jr. died March 2, 2012. He was 56. Rosary will be recited at 7 p.m. March 5 at Ramon Funeral Home. Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. March 6 at St. Anthonyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Catholic Church. Burial will be in Memorial Park Cemetery.

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6B » Sunday, March 4, 2012 »

C A L L E R -T I M E S





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Sunday, March 4, 2012

Section C

■ Brittney Griner

and the Baylor Bears

Sports

clinched the first undefeated regular season in school history with a 77-53 victory over Iowa State. 8C

High School Basketball Playoffs

MATT YOUNG COLUMNIST

Billy the Kid strikes again PHOTOS BY MICHAEL ZAMORA/CALLER-TIMES

NOT DONE Miller’s Marquis Lewis scoops up a loose ball Saturday during the Bucs’ 61-59 overtime win in the regional championship at the American Bank Center.

■ Another stirring rally means state trip for Miller MILLER

By Greg Rajan

LIBERTY HILL

61 59

rajang@caller.com 361-886-3747

They are five words, elegantly etched in ink on Dale Perryman’s right biceps. “Failure is not an option,” the tattoo reads. Once again, Miller’s boys basketball team found a way to exemplify that motto. For the second time in as many days, Miller pulled off a rousing comeback, defeating Liberty Hill 61-59 in overtime in the Region IV3A final on Saturday afternoon at the American Bank Center. Their 10th consecutive victory put the 13th-ranked Bucs (31-8) into the state

R EG I O N I V- 3 A B OYS F I N A L OV E RT I M E

tournament for the first time since 1950. That year, the school — then known as Corpus Christi High — won the Class 2A championship with a 40-34 victory over Vernon. Miller will play a Class 3A state semifinal at 2 or 3:30 p.m. Thursday at the Frank Erwin Center in Austin, with the Bucs’ opponent announced today. “It’s awesome,” said Perryman, who finished with 16 points. “The fans are go-

ing to be there to support us in Austin. Everyone (in the city) is on our side at this point, so to be able to bring it home would be even better, to accomplish something like this at Miller High School.” While the Bucs’ 62-year state drought has been quenched, it certainly didn’t come easy, as they trailed for almost all of regulation and didn’t take their first lead until overtime. “That famous quote by Frederick Douglass, ‘Without struggle there is no progress,’ it definitely applied today,” Miller coach Maurice Bastian said. See MILLER, 6C

LEFT: Miller’s DaCain Levingston wrestles for control of the ball with Liberty Hill’s Blake Hare on Saturday during the Bucs’ 61-59 overtime win at the American Bank Center.

If you’re ever facing a big moment in your life — you have to march into your boss’s office and demand a raise, or it’s time to finally stare down the bully on the block — call up Billy Guzman. The kid can keep his cool under any pressurepacked situation, and he doesn’t mind sticking a figurative dagger in your opponent’s heart while keeping a smile on his face. He’ll be taking that ever-present smile and coldblooded shooting hand with him to Austin after Miller came back to beat Liberty Hill 61-59 in overtime Saturday at the American Bank Center. The never-blink Bucs will make their fi rst appearance in the boys basketball state tournament since 1950. Let’s be clear, Miller is far from a one-man show. The Bucs are more like a three-ring circus with Guzman, Dale Perryman and Marquis Lewis going 100 mph at all times and always providing entertainment you can’t stop watching. There was Perryman taking an inbounds pass and racing the length of the court for a game-tying layup with 11.5 seconds left in regulation. There was Lewis saving five of his team-high 18 points for the critical overtime period. And then there was Guzman. With his team down 10 points and just 1.8 seconds left in the third quarter, Guzman called a

See YOUNG, 6C

HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL

A Classic title for No. 1 Carroll

Mustangs to claim Mira’s final

CARROLL

6

KING

4

M I R A’S C L A S S I C

CHAMPIONSHIP GAME

By George Vondracek vondracekg@caller.com 361-886-3731

Lee Yeager and Gabe Perez continue to seek games that will hone their respective teams’ skills once the start of District 28-5A play comes on St. Patrick’s Day. Learning to win through some adversity will help in that respect, and the coaches at Carroll and King high schools got

that in Saturday’s championship game of the Mira’s Classic Baseball Tournament. The Mustangs scored first before Carroll, ranked No. 1 in the state in 5A, responded in its half of the first inning and held on for a 6-4 victory on a sunny, wind-whipped day at Whataburger Field. Both teams had to battle through three errors, with the Tigers stranding 10

runners, seven in scoring position. “I don’t know, our guys are pretty good. They play well when the pressure’s on. We’ve done pretty well,” said Yeager, whose Tigers improved to 7-0 by sweeping through the three-day tournament field. “When we’ve had to respond, we’ve responded. I don’t know where we need to go or what we need to do, but we need to keep testing them in a lot of different ways so we’re GEORGE TULEY/SPECIAL TO THE CALLER-TIMES ready to go in all the situCarroll catcher Michael Cantu looks to his left at a sliding Jack Wesley (27) in the ations.” See BASEBALL, 3C

sixth inning as he is about to turn with the ball to tag Wesley at Whataburger Field Saturday. Wesley was safe to pull King within 6-4 of Carroll in the championship. CAL567185

■ Tigers top


2C Âť Sunday, March 4, 2012 Âť

C A L L E R -T I M E S

QUICK HITS NASCAR SPRINT CUP LEADERS

CALENDAR TEXAS A&M-CORPUS CHRISTI (361-825-2255) TODAY MTEN vs. S. Alabama 5 p.m.

MON

TUE WED BASE vs. SOFT UH-Victoria vs. UTSA 6 p.m. 1 p.m. (DH)

THU

FRI BASE vs. UTSA 6 p.m.

SAT BASE vs. UTSA 2 p.m.

TEXAS A&M-KINGSVILLE (361-593-4030) TODAY

MON

TODAY

MON

TUE

WED SOFT @ St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4 p.m. (DH)

THU

FRI SAT SOFT vs. SOFT vs. Tarleton St Tarleton St 4 p.m. (DH) 1 p.m. (DH)

CORPUS CHRISTI ICERAYS (361-814-7825) TUE

WED

THU

FRI @ New Mexico 8:30 p.m.

SAT @ New Mexico 8:30 p.m.

DALLAS MAVERICKS (214-747-6287) TODAY

MON

TUE vs. Knicks 7:30 p.m.

@ Thunder 7 p.m.

WED

THU @ Suns 9:30 p.m.

FRI @ Kings 9 p.m.

SAT @ Warriors 9:30 p.m.

MON

TODAY vs. Nuggets 8:30 p.m.

MON

TUE

WED

@ Celtics 6:30 p.m.

THU

FRI

SAT

@ Raptors 6 p.m.

@ Nets 7 p.m.

SAN ANTONIO SPURS (210-444-5050) TUE

WED vs. Knicks 7:30 p.m.

THU

FRI vs. Clippers 7:30 p.m.

SAT

OTHER TICKET INFORMATION Corpus Christi Hammerheads 814-7277 Dallas Cowboys 817-892-8688 Houston Texans 832-667-2390 Houston Astros 713-259-8000

Texas Rangers University of Texas Texas A&M

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ON TELEVISION TODAY AUTO RACING 1:30 p.m. Sprint Cup: Subway Fresh Fit 500 FOX BASKETBALL 11 a.m. College: Kentucky at Florida CBS 11 a.m. College: Clemson at Florida State ESPN2 Noon NBA: Knicks at Celtics ABC Noon College: Michigan at Penn State ESPN Noon College women: Texas A&M at Texas FSN 1 p.m. College: Missouri Valley Conference championship game CBS 1 p.m. College women: ACC championship game ESPN2 2:30 p.m. NBA: Heat at Lakers ABC 2:30 p.m. College: Arizona at Arizona State FSN 3 p.m. College: Ohio State at Michigan CBS 3 p.m. College women: Big Ten Conference championship game ESPN2 5 p.m. College: SEC championship game ESPN2 6 p.m. NBA: Bulls at 76ers ESPN 8:30 p.m. NBA: Nuggets at Spurs ESPN, FSN CYCLING 2 p.m. Paris-Nice - stage 1 NBC Sports GOLF Noon PGA: The Honda Classic - ďŹ nal round Golf Channel 2 p.m. PGA: The Honda Classic - ďŹ nal round NBC HOCKEY 11:30 a.m. NHL: Bruins at Rangers NBC 5 p.m. NHL: Stars at Flames FSN 6 p.m. NHL: Flyers at Capitals NBC Sports LACROSSE 3:30 p.m. College: Syracuse at Virginia ESPN MONDAY BASKETBALL 4 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 7 p.m. 8 p.m. 8 p.m. CYCLING 3:30 p.m. HOCKEY 7 p.m. TENNIS 10:30 p.m.

College women: Atlantic 10 championship game ESPN2 College: Colonial Athletic Association championship game ESPN College: Metro Atlantic Athletics championship game ESPN2 NBA: Pacers at Bulls WGN College: West Coast Conference championship game ESPN College: Southern Conference championship game ESPN2 Paris-Nice - stage 2 (same-day tape)

NBC Sports

NHL: Sabres at Jets

NBC Sports

Exhibition: Roger Federer vs. Andy Roddick

ESPN2

TUESDAY BASKETBALL 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 8 p.m. 8 p.m. CYCLING 3:30 p.m. HOCKEY 8 p.m. 9 p.m. SOCCER 1:30 p.m.

College: Big East tournament - ďŹ rst round ESPN2 College: Big East tournament - ďŹ rst round ESPN2 College: Sun Belt tournament - championship game ESPN2 College women: Big East tournament - championship game ESPN College: Horizon League - championship game ESPN College: Summit League - championship game ESPN2 Paris-Nice - stage 3 (same-day tape)

NBC Sports

NHL: Wild at Avalanche NHL: Stars at Canucks

NBC Sports FSN

UEFA Champions League: BenďŹ ca vs. Zenit

FSN

WEDNESDAY BASKETBALL 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 2 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 8 p.m. 8 p.m. 10:30 p.m. CYCLING 3:30 p.m. HOCKEY 6:30 p.m. SOCCER 1:30 p.m.

College: Big East tournament - second round College: Big East tournament - second round College: Pac-12 tournament - ďŹ rst round College: Big East tournament - second round College: Northeast tournament - championship game NBA: Knicks at Spurs College: Big East tournament - second round College: Big Sky tournament - championship game College: Pac-12 tournament - ďŹ rst round

ESPN ESPN FSN ESPN ESPN2 FSN ESPN ESPN2 FSN

Paris-Nice - stage 4 (same-day tape)

NBC Sports

NHL: Maple Leafs at Penguins

NBC Sports

UEFA Champions League: APOEL vs. Lyon

FSN

The Lottery MEGA MILLION: MARCH 2

16-29-48-52-54 Mega Ball: 5 Megaplier: 2 NEXT JACKPOT: $127 million WINNERS

5 of 5 + MB 5 of 5 4 of 5 +MB 4 of 5 3 of 5 +MB 2 of 5 +MB 3 of 5 1 of 5 +MB 0 of 5 +MB

PAYOFF

0 $108 Million 0 $250,000 2 $10,000 107 $150 128 $150 2,238 $10 5,847 $7 14,013 $3 27,972 $2

POWERBALL: MARCH 3

29-30-45-47-49 Powerball: 35 JACKPOT: $50 million

THROUGH FEB. 27 POINTS 1, Matt Kenseth, 47. 2, Dale Earnhardt Jr., 42. 3, Greg BifďŹ&#x201A;e, 42. 4, Denny Hamlin, 42. 5, Jeff Burton, 40. 6, Paul Menard, 39. 7, Kevin Harvick, 37. 8, Carl Edwards, 36. 9, Joey Logano, 36. 10, Mark Martin, 35. 11, Clint Bowyer, 33. 12, Martin Truex Jr., 33. 13, Marcos Ambrose, 31. 14, Bobby Labonte, 30. 15, Dave Blaney, 30. 16, Tony Stewart, 29. 17, Kyle Busch, 27. 18, Terry Labonte, 27. 19, Tony Raines, 25. 20, Ryan Newman, 23. MONEY 1, Matt Kenseth, $1,667,138. 2, Dale Earnhardt Jr., $1,165,925. 3, Greg BifďŹ&#x201A;e, $877,276. 4, Denny Hamlin, $770,891. 5, Jeff Burton, $626,300. 6, Martin Truex Jr., $585,165. 7, Kyle Busch, $566,584. 8, Tony Stewart, $529,550. 9, Carl Edwards, $470,216. 10, Paul Menard, $469,680. 11, Kevin Harvick, $460,511. 12, Marcos Ambrose, $432,383. 13, Clint Bowyer, $404,065. 14, Ryan Newman, $403,459. 15, Joey Logano, $401,401. 16, Jimmie Johnson, $397,387. 17, Brad Keselowski, $392,195. 18, A J Allmendinger, $388,075. 19, Jeff Gordon, $375,787. 20, Jamie McMurray, $375,308.

SUBWAY FRESH FIT 500 LINEUP

HOUSTON ROCKETS (713-627-3865) TODAY vs. Clippers 6 p.m.

NBA

AUTO RACING

Schedule

LOTTO: MARCH 3

4-8-15-22-30-40 JACKPOT: $8 million TEXAS TWO STEP: MARCH 1

9-20-31-34 Bonus Ball: 19 PICK 3: MARCH 3

Afternoon Sum it up: 19 Evening Sum it up: 15

7-5-7 8-0-7

DAILY 4: MARCH 3

Afternoon Sum it up: 7 Evening Sum it up: 16

1-3-3-0 2-7-2-5

CASH 5: MARCH 3

9-27-28-34-36

After Saturday qualifying; race today At Phoenix International Raceway Avondale, Ariz. Lap length: 1 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 136.815. 2. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 136.126. 3. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 135.998. 4. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 135.583. 5. (42) J. Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 135.547. 6. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 135.491. 7. (16) Greg BifďŹ&#x201A;e, Ford, 135.074. 8. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 135.014. 9. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 134.998. 10. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 134.771. 11. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 134.615. 12. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 134.564. 13. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 134.499. 14. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 134.449. 15. (22) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 134.278. 16. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 134.268. 17. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 134.058. 18. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 134.048. 19. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 133.939. 20. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 133.814. 21. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 133.764. 22. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 133.665. 23. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 133.63. 24. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 133.615. 25. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 133.417. 26. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 132.871. 27. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 132.743. 28. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 132.709. 29. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 132.597. 30. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 132.441. 31. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 132.251. 32. (10) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 132.231. 33. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 132.081. 34. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 132.057. 35. (49) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, 131.685. 36. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 131.516. 37. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 131.502. 38. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 130.596. 39. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 130.364. 40. (33) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 128.824. 41. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, Owner Points. 42. (32) Mike Bliss, Ford, Owner Points. 43. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 129.092. Failed to Qualify 44. (37) Timmy Hill, Ford, 128.968.

BETTING LINE COLLEGE BASKETBALL FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG at Florida St. 6½ Clemson Kentucky 3 at Florida Michigan 3½ at Penn St. at Michigan St. 2½ Ohio St. at Wisconsin 11 Illinois Virginia 2 at Maryland Arizona 7½ at Arizona St. at Stanford Pk California at Indiana 6 Purdue at Virginia Tech 1½ NC State Colonial Athletic Association At Richmond, Va. SemiďŹ nals Drexel 1½ Old Dominion VCU 6½ Georgia St. or VCU 6½ George Mason or Georgia St. 6½ Northeastern or George Mason 6½ Northeastern Missouri Valley Conference At St. Louis Championship Creighton 3½ Illinois St. Sun Belt Conference At Hot Springs, Ark. QuarterďŹ nals Middle Tenn. 9½ Arkansas St. or Middle Tenn. 7 FAU North Texas 2 La.-Lafayette UALR 2½ FIU or UALR 1½ W. Kentucky Denver 10½ Troy or Denver 8 South Alabama Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference At SpringďŹ eld, Mass. SemiďŹ nals Iona 2½ FairďŹ eld or FairďŹ eld 11½ Marist Loyola (Md.) 6½ Siena or Loyola (Md.) 1 Manhattan or Siena 1 Niagara or Manhattan 6 Niagara Southern Conference At Ashville, N.C. SemiďŹ nals W. Carolina 1½ UNC Greensboro Davidson 12½ Georgia Southern or Furman 1½ Georgia Southern or Davidson 13½ Elon or Furman 2½ Elon Northeast Conference SemiďŹ nals at Wagner 6 Robert Morris at LIU 3 Quinnipiac America East Conference At Hartford, Conn. SemiďŹ nals Stony Brook 5½ Albany (NY) Vermont 6 at Hartford or at Hartford 3½ Maine or Vermont 2 Boston U. or Boston U. 7½ Maine Summit League At Sioux Falls, S.D. QuarterďŹ nals N. Dakota St. 3 W. Illinois Oakland 6½ S. Utah

FAVORITE at Boston Miami New Jersey Golden State at Houston Chicago at Phoenix at San Antonio

LINE 2½ 2 1 2 2 4 5½ 8

UNDERDOG New York at L.A. Lakers at Charlotte at Toronto L.A. Clippers at Philadelphia Sacramento Denver

NHL FAVORITE at N.Y. Rangers New Jersey at Detroit at Calgary Ottawa Philadelphia Colorado

LINE UNDERDOG 150-130 Boston 140-120 at N.Y. Islanders 170-150 Chicago 125-105 Dallas 120-100 at Florida 130-110 at Washington 115-105 at Minnesota

BASEBALL SPRING TRAINING GLANCE AMERICAN LEAGUE W L Pct Detroit 1 0 1.000 Minnesota 1 0 1.000 New York 1 0 1.000 Toronto 1 0 1.000 Oakland 1 1 .500 Seattle 1 1 .500 Baltimore 0 0 .000 Boston 0 0 .000 Chicago 0 0 .000 Cleveland 0 0 .000 Kansas City 0 0 .000 Los Angeles 0 0 .000 Texas 0 0 .000 Tampa Bay 0 1 .000 NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pct Arizona 1 0 1.000 Houston 1 0 1.000 Chicago 0 0 .000 Cincinnati 0 0 .000 Colorado 0 0 .000 Los Angeles 0 0 .000 Miami 0 0 .000 Milwaukee 0 0 .000 New York 0 0 .000 San Diego 0 0 .000 St. Louis 0 0 .000 Atlanta 0 1 .000 Philadelphia 0 1 .000 Pittsburgh 0 1 .000 San Francisco 0 1 .000 Washington 0 1 .000 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. FRIDAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GAMES Seattle 8, Oakland 5 SATURDAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GAMES Houston 3, Washington 1 Toronto 7, Pittsburgh 1 Detroit 2, Atlanta 0 Minnesota 7, Tampa Bay 3 N.Y. Yankees 8, Philadelphia 5 Cleveland 6, Cincinnat 6, tie, 9 innings Arizona (ss) 9, San Francisco 6 Oakland 9, Seattle 2 Colorado 1, Arizona (ss) 1, tie, 10 innings TODAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GAMES Houston vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Minnesota (ss) vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Toronto vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Minnesota (ss) vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 12:35 p.m. Kansas City vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. San Francisco (ss) vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 2:05 p.m. Oakland vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. San Francisco (ss) vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 2:10 p.m.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Prairie View 58, Alcorn St. 54 SE Louisiana 73, Nicholls St. 72 Southern U. 64, Texas Southern 59 S. F. Austin 70, Northwestern St. 68 MIDWEST Butler 81, Wright St. 66 Cleveland St. 79, Youngstown St. 69 Detroit 48, Valparaiso 42 Drake 54, Creighton 50 Green Bay 77, Ill.-Chicago 64 Illinois St. 72, S. Illinois 50 Indiana St. 58, Evansville 47 Loyola of Chicago 69, Milwaukee 62 Wichita St. 75, N. Iowa 53 SOUTHWEST Baylor 77, Iowa St. 53 Cent. Arkansas 66, Texas A&M-CC 45 McNeese St. 59, Lamar 40 Sam Houston St. 68, Texas St. 54 Texas-Arlington 75, UTSA 65 FAR WEST Arizona St. 70, Arizona 63 Colorado 67, Oregon St. 57 Fresno St. 79, New Mexico St. 43 Idaho 69, Hawaii 50 Idaho St. 63, E. Washington 58 Montana St. 84, Weber St. 55 N. Colorado 65, Portland St. 50 North Dakota 66, Utah Valley 53 Southern Cal 65, Washington St. 54 UC Santa Barbara 60, UC Davis 56 Utah 65, Oregon 47 Washington 67, UCLA 59 TOURNAMENT Atlantic 10 Conference QuarterďŹ nals Saint Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 69, Richmond 57 St. Bonaventure 68, La Salle 53 Temple 64, Duquesne 55 Atlantic Coast Conference SemiďŹ nals Georgia Tech 87, NC State 61 Maryland 73, Wake Forest 58 Atlantic Sun Conference Championship Florida Gulf Coast 67, Stetson 39 Big East Conference Second Round DePaul 76, South Florida 62 Louisville 63, Villanova 47 West Virginia 63, Syracuse 48 Big Ten Conference SemiďŹ nals Nebraska 77, Ohio St. 62 Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference SemiďŹ nals FairďŹ eld 63, Siena 48 Marist 68, Niagara 54, OT Mid-American Conference First Round Akron 96, Buffalo 82 Cent. Michigan 86, Ball St. 62 N. Illinois 68, W. Michigan 51 Ohio 58, Kent St. 40 Northeast Conference First Round Monmouth (NJ) 68, LIU 56 Quinnipiac 65, Mount St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 61 Robert Morris 92, St. Francis (Pa.) 82 Sacred Heart 62, Fairleigh Dickinson 58 Ohio Valley Conference Championship UT-Martin 82, Tennessee Tech 65 Southeastern Conference SemiďŹ nals LSU 72, Kentucky 61 Tennessee 74, South Carolina 58 Southern Conference QuarterďŹ nals Appalachian St. 61, W. Carolina 43 Davidson 69, Wofford 58 Samford 67, Elon 36 Summit League First Round S. Dakota St. 80, IPFW 59 W. Illinois 83, Oral Roberts 71 Sun Belt Conference First Round FIU 74, Louisiana-Lafayette 53 North Texas 75, Troy 61 South Alabama 62, Arkansas St. 38 W. Kentucky 66, Louisiana-Monroe 50 West Coast Conference SemiďŹ nals BYU 64, San Diego 46 Gonzaga 83, Saint Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (Cal) 78

GOLF

MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SCORES EAST Cincinnati 72, Villanova 68 La Salle 71, St. Bonaventure 61 NJIT 58, Chicago St. 50 Saint Louis 75, Duquesne 60 Syracuse 58, Louisville 49 Temple 80, Fordham 60 UConn 74, Pittsburgh 65 UMass 89, Rhode Island 83 SOUTH Auburn 67, LSU 52 Georgia 67, South Carolina 55 Georgia Tech 69, Wake Forest 62 Marshall 79, Southern Miss. 75 Miami 77, Boston College 56 Mississippi 60, Alabama 51 Mississippi St. 79, Arkansas 59 SE Louisiana 68, Nicholls St. 58 Tennessee 68, Vanderbilt 61 West Virginia 50, South Florida 44 MIDWEST Ball St. 71, Cent. Michigan 52 Bowling Green 56, Miami (Ohio) 51 Buffalo 74, Akron 70 Cincinnati 72, Marquette 61 E. Michigan 54, W. Michigan 53 Iowa 62, Nebraska 53 Kent St. 68, Ohio 61 Missouri 78, Iowa St. 72 N. Illinois 65, Toledo 61 Ohio St. 75, Northwestern 73 Purdue 80, Penn St. 56 SIU-Edwardsville 81, Chicago St. 70 W. Illinois 72, Nebraska-Omaha 51 SOUTHWEST Houston 82, Tulane 53 Lamar 81, Texas St. 65 Rice 68, UTEP 61 Stephen F. Austin 58, Sam Houston St. 47 Texas 72, Oklahoma 64 Texas-Arlington 78, Texas A&M-CC 64 UTSA 73, Cent. Arkansas 60 FAR WEST Colorado St. 75, Air Force 65 New Mexico 76, Boise St. 61 Oregon St. 83, Colorado 69 UCLA 75, Washington 69 TOURNAMENT Atlantic Sun Conference First Round Belmont 76, Jacksonville 62 Big South Conference QuarterďŹ nals UNC Asheville 86, High Point 61 VMI 85, Coastal Carolina 68 Winthrop 71, Campbell 55 Ohio Valley Conference First Round SE Missouri 75, E. Kentucky 65 Patriot League First Round Bucknell 87, Navy 63

WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SCORES EAST Harvard 65, Cornell 59 NJIT 69, Chicago St. 49 SOUTH Alabama St. 58, Jackson St. 48 Grambling St. 68, Alabama A&M 64, OT

PGA HONDA CLASSIC At PGA National Champion Course Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Purse: $5.7 million Yardage: 7,100 yards; Par 70 (35-35) Third Round Rory McIlroy ............... 66-67-66â&#x20AC;&#x201D;199 -11 Harris English ............. 66-69-66â&#x20AC;&#x201D;201 -9 Tom Gillis..................... 68-64-69â&#x20AC;&#x201D;201 -9 Keegan Bradley .......... 67-68-68â&#x20AC;&#x201D;203 -7 Brian Harman ............. 73-61-69â&#x20AC;&#x201D;203 -7 Justin Rose .................. 66-66-71â&#x20AC;&#x201D;203 -7 Charl Schwartzel ........ 71-66-67â&#x20AC;&#x201D;204 -6 Dicky Pride .................. 66-67-71â&#x20AC;&#x201D;204 -6 Greg Chalmers............ 68-69-68â&#x20AC;&#x201D;205 -5 Chris Stroud ................ 70-69-67â&#x20AC;&#x201D;206 -4 Kevin Stadler .............. 66-71-69â&#x20AC;&#x201D;206 -4 Graeme McDowell...... 73-64-69â&#x20AC;&#x201D;206 -4 Jeff Overton ................ 71-65-70â&#x20AC;&#x201D;206 -4 Gary Christian ............ 73-67-67â&#x20AC;&#x201D;207 -3 Davis Love III ............... 64-72-71â&#x20AC;&#x201D;207 -3 Charles Howell III ....... 68-67-72â&#x20AC;&#x201D;207 -3 Jimmy Walker ............. 67-67-73â&#x20AC;&#x201D;207 -3 Fredrik Jacobson ........ 70-71-67â&#x20AC;&#x201D;208 -2 Spencer Levin ............. 72-69-67â&#x20AC;&#x201D;208 -2 Rickie Fowler .............. 69-72-67â&#x20AC;&#x201D;208 -2 Mark Wilson................ 70-70-68â&#x20AC;&#x201D;208 -2 Brandt Jobe ................. 70-69-69â&#x20AC;&#x201D;208 -2 Tiger Woods ................ 71-68-69â&#x20AC;&#x201D;208 -2 Ernie Els....................... 70-68-70â&#x20AC;&#x201D;208 -2 Ted Potter, Jr. .............. 72-64-72â&#x20AC;&#x201D;208 -2 Vaughn Taylor............. 68-66-74â&#x20AC;&#x201D;208 -2 D.A. Points ................... 71-70-68â&#x20AC;&#x201D;209 -1 Henrik Stenson ........... 70-69-70â&#x20AC;&#x201D;209 -1 Lee Westwood ............ 70-69-70â&#x20AC;&#x201D;209 -1 Erik Compton .............. 67-71-71â&#x20AC;&#x201D;209 -1 Ryan Palmer ............... 66-71-72â&#x20AC;&#x201D;209 -1 Rocco Mediate............ 69-67-73â&#x20AC;&#x201D;209 -1 Bob Estes..................... 67-69-73â&#x20AC;&#x201D;209 -1 Rory Sabbatini ............ 69-72-69â&#x20AC;&#x201D;210 E John Mallinger ............ 74-67-69â&#x20AC;&#x201D;210 E Y.E. Yang ...................... 70-70-70â&#x20AC;&#x201D;210 E Robert Garrigus .......... 71-69-70â&#x20AC;&#x201D;210 E Jason Kokrak............... 71-68-71â&#x20AC;&#x201D;210 E Padraig Harrington .... 70-68-72â&#x20AC;&#x201D;210 E Ken Duke ..................... 67-69-74â&#x20AC;&#x201D;210 E Kenny Perry ................ 70-71-70â&#x20AC;&#x201D;211 +1 Cameron Tringale....... 72-69-70â&#x20AC;&#x201D;211 +1 Heath Slocum ............. 70-71-70â&#x20AC;&#x201D;211 +1 J.B. Holmes.................. 70-70-71â&#x20AC;&#x201D;211 +1 Stuart Appleby ........... 69-71-71â&#x20AC;&#x201D;211 +1 Rod Pampling ............. 69-71-71â&#x20AC;&#x201D;211 +1 Nick Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hern ................. 69-71-71â&#x20AC;&#x201D;211 +1 Tim Herron .................. 71-69-71â&#x20AC;&#x201D;211 +1 Sean Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hair ................. 70-69-72â&#x20AC;&#x201D;211 +1 Carl Pettersson........... 67-70-74â&#x20AC;&#x201D;211 +1 Ben Crane.................... 67-69-75â&#x20AC;&#x201D;211 +1 Ryan Moore................. 70-71-71â&#x20AC;&#x201D;212 +2 Louis Oosthuizen........ 67-74-71â&#x20AC;&#x201D;212 +2 Sang-Moon Bae .......... 70-71-71â&#x20AC;&#x201D;212 +2 Jason Bohn .................. 70-70-72â&#x20AC;&#x201D;212 +2 William McGirt ........... 69-71-72â&#x20AC;&#x201D;212 +2 Michael Thompson .... 74-66-72â&#x20AC;&#x201D;212 +2 Scott Langley .............. 70-69-73â&#x20AC;&#x201D;212 +2

Brian Davis .................. 68-70-74â&#x20AC;&#x201D;212 Martin Flores .............. 66-72-74â&#x20AC;&#x201D;212 Stewart Cink ............... 70-67-75â&#x20AC;&#x201D;212 John Huh...................... 68-69-75â&#x20AC;&#x201D;212 Chris Kirk..................... 71-70-72â&#x20AC;&#x201D;213 Kris Blanks .................. 69-72-72â&#x20AC;&#x201D;213 Jhonattan Vegas......... 71-69-73â&#x20AC;&#x201D;213 Michael Bradley ......... 70-70-73â&#x20AC;&#x201D;213 Robert Allenby ............ 72-68-73â&#x20AC;&#x201D;213 Brendon de Jonge....... 68-72-74â&#x20AC;&#x201D;214 Jose Maria Olazabal ... 73-67-74â&#x20AC;&#x201D;214 Anthony Kim ............... 70-69-75â&#x20AC;&#x201D;214 Charlie Wi ................... 71-68-75â&#x20AC;&#x201D;214 Troy Matteson............. 70-69-75â&#x20AC;&#x201D;214 Seung-Yul Noh ............ 66-74-75â&#x20AC;&#x201D;215 Ricky Barnes ............... 72-69-75â&#x20AC;&#x201D;216 Brendan Steele ........... 68-73-75â&#x20AC;&#x201D;216

+2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +6 +6

HOCKEY NHL GLANCE EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF N.Y. Rangers 63 41 15 7 89 175 Pittsburgh 63 37 21 5 79 202 Philadelphia 63 35 21 7 77 209 New Jersey 64 36 23 5 77 180 N.Y. Islanders 65 27 29 9 63 154 Northeast GP W L OT Pts GF Boston 63 38 22 3 79 206 Ottawa 66 34 24 8 76 200 Buffalo 64 29 27 8 66 157 Toronto 64 29 28 7 65 191 Montreal 65 25 30 10 60 169 Southeast GP W L OT Pts GF Florida 63 30 21 12 72 158 Winnipeg 66 31 27 8 70 173 Washington 64 32 27 5 69 172 Tampa Bay 64 30 28 6 66 180 Carolina 64 24 27 13 61 168 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF Detroit 65 43 19 3 89 208 St. Louis 65 40 18 7 87 166 Nashville 64 37 20 7 81 181 Chicago 66 35 24 7 77 200 Columbus 64 19 38 7 45 148 Northwest GP W L OT Pts GF Vancouver 65 41 16 8 90 206 Colorado 65 33 28 4 70 168 Calgary 65 29 25 11 69 157 Minnesota 65 28 27 10 66 143 Edmonton 64 25 33 6 56 170 PaciďŹ c GP W L OT Pts GF Phoenix 64 33 22 9 75 168 San Jose 63 33 23 7 73 178 Dallas 65 34 26 5 73 171 Los Angeles 64 29 23 12 70 138 Anaheim 65 28 27 10 66 164 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

GA 130 166 191 174 195 GA 146 194 180 200 181 GA 179 186 183 216 193 GA 151 130 165 194 212 GA 156 175 178 178 192 GA 160 160 176 137 182

SATURDAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GAMES

BLUE JACKETS 5, COYOTES 2

Columbus 1 1 3â&#x20AC;&#x201D;5 Phoenix 0 2 0â&#x20AC;&#x201D;2 First Periodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;1, Columbus, Nash 23 (MacKenzie, Moore), 16:21 (sh). Second Periodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;2, Columbus, Nash 24 (Brassard), 5:18. 3, Phoenix, Whitney 20 (Doan, Rundblad), 8:19 (pp). 4, Phoenix, Korpikoski 14 (Doan), 13:50. Third Periodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;5, Columbus, Nikitin 4 (Umberger), 9:12. 6, Columbus, Brassard 12 (Nash), 13:44. 7, Columbus, Gillies 2 (J.Johnson), 19:00 (en). Shots on Goalâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Columbus 11-7-8â&#x20AC;&#x201D;26. Phoenix 8-10-14â&#x20AC;&#x201D;32. Goaliesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Columbus, Mason 10-22-3 (32 shots-30 saves). Phoenix, M.Smith 29-16-7 (25-21). Aâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;13,579 (17,135). Tâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;2:17.

MAPLE LEAFS 3, CANADIENS 1

Toronto 0 1 2â&#x20AC;&#x201D;3 Montreal 1 0 0â&#x20AC;&#x201D;1 First Periodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;1, Montreal, Cole 23 (Desharnais, Pacioretty), 7:16. Second Periodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;2, Toronto, Frattin 6 (Grabovski), 6:30. Third Periodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;3, Toronto, Grabovski 19 (MacArthur, Gunnarsson), 11:45. 4, Toronto, Grabovski 20 (Frattin, Phaneuf), 19:07 (pp). Shots on Goalâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Toronto 13-12-17â&#x20AC;&#x201D;42. Montreal 7-10-5â&#x20AC;&#x201D;22. Goaliesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Toronto, Gustavsson. Montreal, Price. Aâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;21,273 (21,273). Tâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;2:25.

LIGHTNING 4, HURRICANES 3

Tampa Bay 1 1 2â&#x20AC;&#x201D;4 Carolina 0 3 0â&#x20AC;&#x201D;3 First Periodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;1, Tampa Bay, Wallace 1 (Shannon), 5:58. Second Periodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;2, Carolina, Stewart 8 (E.Staal, Spacek), 5:23. 3, Carolina, Jokinen 10, 15:02. 4, Carolina, Stewart 9 (E.Staal, Tlusty), 16:18. 5, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 46, 18:00. Third Periodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;6, Tampa Bay, Purcell 19 (St. Louis, Malone), 7:24 (pp). Overtimeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;7, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 47 (Purcell), 2:41 (pp). Shots on Goalâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Tampa Bay 8-7-6-2â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 23. Carolina 8-8-9-3â&#x20AC;&#x201D;28. Goaliesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Tampa Bay, Garon. Carolina, Ward. Aâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;17,116 (18,680). Tâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;2:27.

ISLANDERS 3, BRUINS 2

N.Y. Islanders 1 1 1â&#x20AC;&#x201D;3 Boston 1 0 1â&#x20AC;&#x201D;2 First Periodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;1, Boston, Lucic 22 (Rolston, Corvo), 15:10 (pp). 2, N.Y. Islanders, Bailey 10 (Nielsen, Ullstrom), 17:36. Second Periodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;3, N.Y. Islanders, Moulson 28 (Nielsen, Tavares), 15:35 (pp). Third Periodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;4, Boston, Seguin 22 (Chara, Krejci), 7:29. 5, N.Y. Islanders, Tavares 26 (Moulson, MacDonald), 15:21. Shots on Goalâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;N.Y. Islanders 10-78â&#x20AC;&#x201D;25. Boston 12-15-7â&#x20AC;&#x201D;34. Goaliesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;N.Y. Islanders, Nabokov. Boston, Rask, Thomas. Aâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;17,565 (17,565). Tâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;2:32.

PREDATORS 3,PANTHERS 1

Nashville 1 1 1â&#x20AC;&#x201D;3 Florida 0 1 0â&#x20AC;&#x201D;1 First Periodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;1, Nashville, A.Kostitsyn 13 (Gaustad, Gill), 11:35. Second Periodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;2, Nashville, Fisher 19 (Erat), :28. 3, Florida, Wolski 2 (Goc, Fleischmann), 7:49. Third Periodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;4, Nashville, Legwand 15 (A.Kostitsyn, Suter), 7:02. Shots on Goalâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Nashville 6-8-9â&#x20AC;&#x201D;23. Florida 15-9-16â&#x20AC;&#x201D;40. Goaliesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Nashville, Rinne. Florida, Clemmensen. Aâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;15,904 (17,040). Tâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;2:26.

LATE GAMES Pittsburgh at Colorado, late Buffalo at Vancouver, late Anaheim at Los Angeles, late St. Louis at San Jose, late

TODAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GAMES Boston at N.Y. Rangers, 11:30 a.m. New Jersey at N.Y. Islanders, 2 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 3 p.m. Ottawa at Florida, 5 p.m. Dallas at Calgary, 5 p.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 6 p.m. Colorado at Minnesota, 6 p.m

MONDAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GAMES Phoenix at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Anaheim, 9 p.m.

Totally Wire

Klitschko retains heavyweight titles

DUESSELDORF,Germanyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Wladimir Klitschko stopped JeanMarc Mormeck of France in the fourth round of a onesided ďŹ ght to retain his WBA and IBF heavyweight titles on Saturday. The Ukrainian put Mormeck down with a left-right combination. Mormeck beat the count but looked wobbly and referee Luis Pabon ended it.

Klitschko had already ďŹ&#x201A;oored Mormeck in the second and completely dominated the affair against the much smaller challenger, who never connected with a clean punch. Klitschko improved to 573, while Mormeck dropped to 36-5. TENNIS

Federer edges Murray in Dubai DUBAI, United Arab Emirates â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Roger Federer edged Andy

Murray 7-5, 6-4 Saturday to win his fifth Dubai Championships title. The second-seeded Federer didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t drop a set all week and kept Murray off balance much of the match. The win was Federerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ fth title in seven tournaments and his 72nd overall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is perfect. This is great. Any title is a good one, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll tell you that,â&#x20AC;? Federer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have a losing record against Murray.â&#x20AC;? Associated Press

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B OXI N G


C A L L E R -T I M E S

« Sunday, March 4, 2012 « 3C

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS

No. 13 T-M gets Mira’s title ■ Moody falls in

3rd-place game By Stuart Duncan

Special to the Caller-Times

GEORGE TULEY/SPECIAL TO THE CALLER-TIMES

King’s Ryan Thompson rounds second base after a Carroll fielding error allowed him to advance at Whataburger Field Saturday in the Mira’s Classic championship final.

BASEBALL from 1C

“Every game that you play is a good game. When you get good competition, it can only make you better,” said Perez, whose Mustangs are 8-2. “So we’re going to learn from this and get better throughout the year.” The Tigers had to bounce back from a 7-4 hole against Del Rio in pool play before dumping the Rams 12-7. Other than that, neither the state’s top-ranked 5A team nor the Mustangs had been tested before Saturday’s all- CCISD semifinals and championship game. The Tigers had to hit the gas midway through the semis to quash Ray 11-3, while the Mustangs scored four times in the fourth inning thanks to three Moody errors and two walks to rally past the Trojans 4-3. “It shows us what we actually need to work on,” said Carroll senior O’Shea Dumes, who turned in a completegame, 10-strikeout performance in the championship game. “Teams come out and put pressure on us, it gives us an idea on what we need to work on. We’ll go back to practice and work on them. That way, we’ll be ready for another situation like this.” Successive hits from Cou r t ney H awk i n s , Chris Cano, Dumes and Josh Cruz, and Trey Rodriguez’s sacrifice f ly gave Carroll a 3-1 lead after one inning. That came after Ryan Thompson’s single to right field, a two-base fielding error and pitcher Eric Perez’s run-scoring grounder had staked King to a 1-0 lead. “We got off to the right start,” Gabe Perez said. “We just made a few defensive mistakes early. But the kids rebounded and they fought hard.” Two of those errors caught up with the Mustangs in the fourth. Hawkins slapped a one-out single to center and advanced to third on Eric Perez’s wild pickoff throw. Cano reached on a fielder’s choice when a dancing Hawkins enticed a throw to third, to which he slid in safely. Hawkins scored on a wild pitch and Cano later scored when Cruz reached on an error, giving Carroll a 5-1 lead. Another King error in the fifth led to the Tigers’ sixth run. “We’ve been able to come from behind, we’ve been able to hold leads and we’ve just been able to do all the things we need to do to win games,” Yeager said, “so we feel pretty good about where we’re at.” The Tigers were in a bit of a snag in the sixth when King closed within 6-4, collecting three of its five hits off Dumes (2-0). A single by Marcus Zamudio, a f ielder’s choice, an error and an RBI single from Thompson scored the first run.

Perez drove home the second with a sacrifice fly and, an out later, Todd Wilkinson delivered an RBI single to bring the Mustangs within two runs. “I kind of lost my groove a little bit. They started hitting me. We weren’t making the plays we were supposed to,” Dumes said. “But that’s when we came together as a team and that’s when we came out with the ‘W.’” After Wilkinson’s RBI, Dumes set down the final four Mustangs he faced on strikes. Dumes threw only 87 pitches, 64 for strikes, in recording Carroll’s first complete game of the season. With a cast of six seniors who have started since their sophomore year, the season in which Carroll won the state championship, the Tigers are on a good course, Yeager said. “I mean, offensively, we’ve got all those veterans, so that helps us a little bit. I think we can do things that maybe some teams at this point in the year can’t do,” said Yeager, whose Tigers averaged 11.6 runs in the five tournament games. “So I feel like our guys are making good adjustments and we’re kind of in midseason form. “We just have to keep plugging away and playing hard.” The same goes for Perez and the Mustangs. “We feel good that we’re winning games, but we know there’s a lot of things to work out,” Perez said. “We’re always going to take a win and learn from it and we’ll take a loss and learn from this one, too. “But we know we have to get better than we are right now to be a playoff team.” MIRA’S CLASSIC BASEBALL TOURNAMENT Championship Carroll 6, King 4 King 100 003 0— 4 5 3 Carroll 300 210 x— 6 6 3 W — O’Shea Dumes (2-0). L — Eric Perez (0-1). Highlights — King, Ryan Thompson 2-3, RBI; Perez SF, 2RBI; Todd Wilkinson RBI. Carroll, Dumes RBI, 10Ks; Josh Cruz RBI 2B; Trey Rodriguez SF; Michael Cantu 2B. Records: King 8-2, Carroll 7-0. A: 886. Semifinals Carroll 7, Ray 3 (6 inn.) Ray 000 030 — 3 3 0 Carroll 003 404 — 11 18 1 Game called because of 2-hour time limit. W — Michael Cantu (1-0). L — Mark Munguia (0-2). Highlights — Ray, Aaron Watts RBI. Carroll, O’Shea Dumes 3-3, RBI; Josh Cruz 3-3, 2R; Cantu 2-4, 4RBI, 5Ks; Trey Rodriguez 2-3, 2RBI; Jared Lira 2-3, RBI; Rene Pineda 2-3; Courtney Hawkins 2-4. Records: Ray 4-5, Carroll 6-0. King 4, Moody 3 (4 inn.) Moody 012 0 — 3 5 4 King 000 4 — 4 5 2 Game called because of 2-hour time limit W — Benny Zamudio. L — Anthony Garcia (2-1). Highlights — King, Eric Perez 3B, RBI; Michael Lewis RBI; Todd Wilkinson 3B. Moody, Tres Luna 2B; Ruben Martinez SF. Record: Moody 6-3. Consolation Bracket Championship Sharyland 4, Del Rio 2 Del Rio 200 000 0— 2 3 3 Sharyland 000 040 x— 4 6 0 W — Alejandro Venegas. L — Tommy Murphy. Semifinals Del Rio 5, Sinton 0 Sinton 000 0000—0 5 2 Del Rio 202 001x—5 10 0 W — Aaron Gomez. L — Trey Gallegos. Highlights — Sinton, Cody Nedbalek 2B. DR, Eduardo Paez 4-4, RBI, 2R. Sharyland 8, Flour Bluff 1 Sharyland 050 210 — 8 5 1 F. Bluff 000 100 — 1 3 5 Game called because of 2-hour time limit. W — Eric Gutierrez. L — Tyler Hass. Highlights — Sharyland, Pancho Martinez 2-5, 2B, RBI, 2R. FB, Lucas Humpal R.

State-ranked Tuloso-Midway won the CCISD Mira’s Bayfront Bash softball tournament Saturday for just the second time. What’s more, the 13th-ranked Class 4A Cherokees beat a Division I college pitching prospect to do so. T-M scored two first-inning runs off Austin Westlake ace pitcher Elizabeth Carter, and then played near flawless defense in helping Cherokees pitcher Kirsten Schwirtlich shut down the Chaparrals, 2-0, in the title game at Cabaniss Field. The junior Carter, who has already committed to Texas A&MCorpus Christi, struck out five in six innings. “Our girls really played an allaround game and I’m very proud of them,” T-M coach Sally DeLeon said. “They played awesome.” T-M (12-1) also beat semifinal opponent Cedar Park Vista Ridge, 3-1, Saturday to reach the finals. “It’s a great feeling to know that all of our hard work in this tournament paid off,” said Cherokees freshman third baseman Alexa Vasquez, who had an RBI single and made two stellar defensive plays in the title game. Schwirtlich (11-1), the tournament’s MVP, retired the side in order in four of the seven innings and threw a three-hitter to get the win against the Chaparrals. “It’s amazing to do this my senior

year,” Schwirtlich said. “I was just hoping to win some games and do (well) in this tournament.” The Cherokees took a 2-0 firstinning lead on Jennifer Garcia’s RBI groundout and Vasquez’s runscoring single. That would be plenty of offensive support for Schwirtlich, who walked one and struck out three.

THIRD-PLACE GAME: CEDAR PARK VISTA RIDGE 5, MOODY 2 The Rangers scored three unearned runs in the first inning to build a lead before holding off stateranked Moody for third place in the tournament. No. 14 Moody (11-4) committed three errors, which led to five unearned runs for Cedar Park Vista Ridge. “Defensively, we’re usually pretty strong but we fell apart this last game,” Moody coach Paula Salinas said. “That first inning really killed us. It’s just something that the girls have got to realize — we’ve got to be up from the first inning to the last.” Two of those errors by the Trojans came in the first inning, which opened the door for Cedar Park Vista Ridge to score the first three runs of the game. Rangers starter Jordan Russell and relief pitcher Brittany Driscoll made that lead stand, as they combined to throw five innings, and allowed two runs, walked one and struck out two. The Trojans had eight hits, but left six on base and had another runner thrown out trying to get

back to third base in the third inning.

FIFTH-PLACE GAME: ALICE 5, CEDAR PARK 4 The Coyotes rallied to beat the Timberwolves on Saturday for fifth place in the tournament. Alice (7-1) erased an early 3-0 deficit in doing so, as it scored two runs in the last half-inning of the fiveinning game. Coyotes pitcher Selina Moreida got the win.

TULOSO-MIDWAY 2, AUSTIN WESTLAKE 0 Westlake 000 000 0— 0 3 1 T-M 200 000 x— 2 3 1 W – Kirsten Schwirtlich (11-1). L – Elizabeth Carter. 2B – T-M: Roxanne Curiel. HIGHLIGHTS: T-M: Schwirtlich 7 IP, 3 H, 3 K’s and R; Alexa Vasquez 1-2, RBI; Curiel 1-2, 2B; Ashley Elizondo 1-3, R; Jennifer Garcia RBI. AW, Carter 6 IP, 5 K’s and 1-3; Stephanie Wong 1-2, SB; Aaliyah Gibson 1-3, SB. Records – T-M, 12-1. Austin Westlake 9-2. CEDAR PARK VISTA RIDGE 5, MOODY 2 Vista Ridge 300 02 — 5 6 0 Moody 000 11 — 2 8 3 W – Jordan Russell. L – Brittany Martinez (11-4). 3B – Moody: Martinez. HIGHLIGHTS: Moody: Martinez 5 IP, 2 K’s and 2-3, 3B, R; Alexis Urtado 2-2; Delilah Pacheco 2-3; Jessica Mendez 1-3; Stephanie Negron 1-2, RBI. CPVR: Brittany Sudym 2-3, SB, 2 R, Rachel Gauspohl 2-3, SB, 2 R. Records – Moody, 11-4. ALICE 5, CEDAR PARK 4 CP 301 00 — 4 3 2 Alice 012 02 — 5 4 1 W – Selina Morieda. L – Courtnee Curl. 2B – CP: Curl. HIGHLIGHTS: Bianca Chapa 1-2, R, RBI; Leandra Trigo 1-2, R; Daisy Martinez 1-2, 2 R. Records – Alice 7-1. Cedar Park, 4-10. Consolation championship: Carroll 5, San Benito 4. Other scores: Santa Gertrudis Academy def. Robstown; Santa Gertrudis Academy 7, G-P 3. Tournament division Championship game: Port Lavaca Calhoun 7, King 4 Semifinal: King 1, Kingsville 0. Consolation championship: Sinton 6, Austin Akins 2. Consolation semifinal: Sinton 2, Flour Bluff 1 All-Tournament Team MVP – Kirsten Schwirtlich, P, Tuloso-Midway TEAM (Area athletes only listed) — Jennifer Garcia, 1B, T-M; Ashley Elizondo, OF, T-M. Moody, Brittany Martinez, P. Peyton Simms, OF Carroll; Bianca Frank, P, King.

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CAL563428

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4C » Sunday, March 4, 2012 »

C A L L E R -T I M E S

SPORTS

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Isles men finish on winning note

■ Senior

Hawkins-Mast scores 23 points By Lee Goddard goddardl@caller.com 361-886-3613

Chris Hawkins-Mast was able to walk away from his college basketball career a winner Saturday night with the belief the program he leaves behind is ascending. Freshman point guard Johnathan Jordan’s arcing shot in the lane with 4.9 seconds left allowed Hawkins-Mast to close his career on a winning note on Texas A&M-Corpus Christi’s Senior Night. As Central Arkansas missed a buzzer-beating 3-pointer from the left corner, the Islanders were able to hold on for a 67-65 victory at the

American Bank Center. Hawkins-Mast, a natural wing who has played everywhere but the point this season, rose to the occasion as the team’s only senior. He scored a career-high 23 points and was able to savor only the sixth victory for A&M-Corpus Christi (6-24, 4-12) this season. “Personally, to me, it means a heck of a lot,” Islanders coach Willis Wilson said of Hawkins-Mast leaving with a victory. “I think Chris made a lot of personal sacrifices over the course of the year. He really, really bought in to trying to grow and make changes — both personally and as a basketball player — that really paid off for him.” While the team obviously wanted to give Hawkins-Mast a memorable farewell, the 6-foot6 Washington, D.C. native

felt the victory was a pivotal launching point for the future of the program. “This is a big accomplishment for me and the whole team,” said Hawkins-Mast, who hit 10 of his 13 shots. “I wanted them to go out winners so they could build for next year. There’s going to be some big things to come next year.” Big things have been rare over the past five seasons. The Islanders were winless in Southland Conference play in February — they avoided the league basement this season by beating UCA (8-21, 3-13) — and have been out of the conference tournament field of eight three of the past five seasons. Wilson, just ending his first season with the school, had to reconfigure a team that lost four seniors from last season. In addition,

Wilson booted four from the team soon after taking control for not adhering to his policies. That wiped out all the team’s regulars except Hawkins-Mast and Terence Jones, a fourth-year junior who responded with 15 points and 10 rebounds Saturday. Of course that made for a rough season, with program lows for victories and league wins. But consider Saturday a bit of saving grace. A&M-Corpus Christi, with junior starting forward Myron Dempsey missing his second game in a row with a foot problem, had four freshmen on the court for much of the second half. The Islanders blew a 14-point lead they held 11 minutes into the contest and got involved in a game in which they swapped leads with the

Bears. Still, the ball was in the hands of the freshman point guard after UCA tied the game with 25.1 seconds left. After a timeout, Jordan took the ball, saw a nice opening at the top of the lane and burst through, lofting a shot that broke the deadlock. “I wanted the ball in my hands to make a play,” said Jordan, who closes the season as the school’s single-season assist leader with 138. “We wanted to get a good shot, whether it was me or any of my teammates. “I saw the opening. I took it. I was aggressive.” UCA’s Mark Rutledge had a look from the left corner as the seconds ticked off the clock, but his 3-pointer for the win missed badly. With that, HawkinsMast closed his college

IceRays fall in shootout to Odessa

■ CC picks up

point, still has playoff lead By staff reports

ODESSA — The IceRays weren’t able to get the four points they were looking for this weekend. The Odessa Jackalopes rallied to edge Corpus Christi 2-1 in a shootout on Saturday night at Ector

County Coliseum. The IceRays (23-24-5, 51 points) picked up a point for going to overtime and lead Odessa (20-25-5, 45) by six points and Wichita Falls (19-27-5, 43) by eight points for the final playoff spot in the North American Hockey League’s South Division. The IceRays have eight games left in the regular season, with six on the road.

A nt hony Stol a r z stopped 43 of 44 shots, and Eric Purcell scored his team-leading 18th goal of the year for the IceRays. Corpus Christi started the scoring 17:10 into the first period. After a faceoff win by A.J. Jarosz, Connor Kingsbury took a shot from the right point that was stopped by the left leg pad of Odessa goaltender Connor Hellebuyck. The rebound went right to a

waiting Purcell who buried the rebound. The IceRays had two breakaway opportunities in the second and third period that they could not convert on. Odessa then tied the score on a rebound that was put home by Taylor Portner with 7:27 left in the third period. The rest of regulation and overtime didn’t settle things. In the shootout’s fourth round, Tyler Cay-

emberg scored for Odessa and Hellebuyck stopped Jarosz for the win. Corpus Christi 1 0 0 00—1 Odessa 0 0 1 01 — 2 First Period — 1, CC, Purcell 18 (Kingsbury, Jarosz), 17:11. Penalties — Cornellier, Ode (hooking), 9:36; Lapic, Ode (hooking), 19:06. Second Period — None. Penalties — None. Third Period — 2, Ode, Portner 4 (Virtanen), 12:33. Penalties — None. Overtime — None. Penalties — None. Shootout — 3, Ode (Goal: Cayemberg) Shots on goal — Corpus Christi 11-98-2—30; Odessa 8-13-21-2-1—45. Goal-

career a winner and felt content his teammates would be in good hands next season. “I hope the best for these guys, I really do,” the senior said. “It was a pleasure playing for these guys. It was a pleasure playing for this program, period.” UCA (8-21, 3-13): Garner 7-13 1-1 15, Borden 0-1 0-0 0, Miles 7-18 4-6 18, Brown 1-2 0-0 2, Rutledge 2-6 7-8 12, Crawford 2-7 2-4 7, Nordman 1-3 0-0 2, Harks 2-4 4-6 8, Harris 0-1 0-0 0, Henson 0-2 1-2 1, Wells 0-3 0-0 0, Bremner 0-0 0-0 0, Williams 0-2 0-0 0. Totals: 22-62 19-27 65. A&M-CC (6-24, 4-12): Hawkins-Mast 10-13 5-9 25, Pope-Didier 0-3 0-0 0, Jones 5-12 3-4 15, Jordan 3-3 4-4 10, Kocher 1-4 0-0 2, Ali 3-5 2-2 9, Smith 0-1 0-1 0, Maxey 2-3 2-8 6, Wang 0-0 0-0 0. Totals: 24-44 16-28 67. Half — A&M-CC 32-29. 3-point goals — UCA 2-15 (Garner 0-4, Rutledge 1-3, Crawford 1-3, Nordman 0-2, Henson 0-1, Wells 0-1, Williams 0-1). A&M-CC 3-15 (Hawkins-Mast 0-1, Pope-Didier 0-1, Jones 2-7, Kocher 0-3, Ali 1-2, Smith 0-1). Fouled out — Pope-Didier. Rebounds — UCA 37 (Miles, Harks 7), A&M-CC 34 (Jones 10). Assists — UCA 13 (Miles 4), A&M-CC 14 (Jordan, Ali 4). Total fouls — UCA 21 A&M-CC 14. Technicals — None. A — 1,550.

ICERAYS’ NEXT GAME

Opponent: New Mexico Mustangs When: 8:30 p.m. Friday Where: Santa Ana Star Center; Rio Rancho, N.M. Radio: KEYS-AM 1440 Next home game: March 23 vs. Texas ies — Corpus Christi, Stolarz 20-17-4 (44 shots-43 saves); Odessa, Hellebuyck 19-19-5 (30-29). Power-play opportunities — Corpus Christi 0 of 2; Odessa 0 of 0. Referee — Andrew Howard. Linesmen — Josh Greco, Rick Lembo.

Islander women cap off season, fall to Sugar Bears Two local boxers win state South Texas report

■ A&M-Corpus Christi

ends year 9th in SLC By staff reports

CONWAY, Ark. — Texas A&M-Corpus Christi’s women’s basketball season ended with a 66-45 beating by Central Arkansas on Saturday afternoon. But the Islanders’ season effectively was over before that. As Southeastern Louisiana held off Nicholls 73-72 earlier in the day, that result eliminated A&MCorpus Christi from consideration for the Southland Conference tournament field of eight. A series of second-half leads that slipped away cost the Islanders (9-20, 5-11) a spot in the postseason, with the team needing to defeat regular-season

champion UCA and have SLU lose. Neither happened, and A&M-Corpus Christi ended its season ninth in the league. The Islanders grabbed a seven-point advantage early against UCA, with Imani Dunn converting a fast-break layup for a 16-9 edge. The Sugar Bears (24-5, 14-2) gained the momentum, answering with a 29-6 run to take a 38-22 halftime lead, and carried it over with a 9-0 start to the second half. Juniors Alisa Roberts and Verne’qua Taylor paced the Islanders, scoring 11 points apiece. Taylor dished out six assists to finish the season with 141. Senior Zoe Vega-Vega grabbed a team-best seven boards, and fellow senior Myeisha Myles, a Carroll High School product, finished her college career with six points and three rebounds.

ASTROS 3, NATIONALS 1

ASTROS 3, NATIONALS 1 WASH.

AB R H BI HOU.

Desmond ss 3 0 A.Blanco ss 1 0 Espinosa 2b 3 0 Lmbrdozi 2b 1 0 Ankiel cf 2 0 Carroll ph-cf 2 0 Tracy 1b 2 0 T.Moore 1b 2 0 Michaels dh 2 0 Rendn ph-dh2 0 Teahen 3b 2 0 C.Rivero 3b 2 0 Harper rf 3 0 Paul rf 1 0 Bernadina lf 3 1 C.Brown pr-lf0 0 Flores c 2 0 J.Solano c 1 0 Totals 34 1

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Washington 000 010 000—1 Houston 000 200 10x—3 E—C.Rivero (1). DP—Houston 3. LOB— Washington 6, Houston 5. 2B—Bernadina (1), Flores 2 (2). 3B—Ankiel (1), Lowrie (1). HR—C.Johnson (1). SB—Bourgeois (1). CS—Michaels (1). Washington IP H R ER BB SO E.Jackson 2 1 0 0 2 0 Detwiler L,0-1 2 2 2 2 1 3 Durbin 2 1 0 0 0 2 Severino 1 1 1 1 0 0 S.Burnett 1 0 0 0 1 2 Houston IP H R ER BB SO L.Hernandez 2 3 0 0 0 2 Weiland W,1-0 2 1 0 0 0 1 B.Myers 1 2 1 1 0 1 Abad 1 0 0 0 0 1 Lyon 1 1 0 0 0 0 W.Wright 1 1 0 0 0 0 W.Lopez S,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 2 HBP—by Severino (Bourgeois). A—3,582 (5,300).

BLUE JAYS 7, PIRATES 1

DUNEDIN, Fla. — Brett Lawrie hit a pair of two-run doubles and the Toronto Blue Jays beat the Pittsburgh Pirates 7-1 Saturday in a spring training opener. YANKEES 8, PHILLIES 5

CLEARWATER, Fla. — Hunter Pence hit a two-run homer and Jonathan Papelbon pitched a perfect inning in his Philadelphia debut before the Yankees rallied for a victory. TWINS 7, RAYS 3

FORT MYERS, Fla. — Joe Mauer, Justin Morneau and Denard Span all got hits in the spring training debuts and the Minnesota Twins beat the Tampa Bay Rays 7-3 Saturday. TIGERS 2, BRAVES 0

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. — Prince Fielder went 2 for 2 and Doug Fister combined

FORT WORTH — Two of the Corpus Christi Regional Golden Gloves champions took home state championships on Saturday. At 123 pounds, Oscar Cantu defeated Joseph Rodriguez of San Antonio. Cecil Vila, at 165 pounds, toppled Enrique Neira to win his weight class. Two other local fighters were runners-up in their weight classes. At 178 pounds, Andre August lost to Greg Soileau, and 201-pound Robert Gutierrez fell to Angelo Gutierrez (no relation). BASEBALL

Javelinas net doubleheader split

MLB spring training report

KISSIMMEE, Fla. — Bryce Harper had a single in his fi rst start for Washington but Chris Johnson hit a two-run homer that led Houston to a victory. Harper, the 19-year-old outfielder who was drafted fi rst overall in 2010, went 1 for 3 with a hit off Astros starter Livan Hernandez in the Grapefruit League opener for both teams. Free agent signee Edwin Jackson pitched two scoreless innings for the Nationals. Johnson, competing for Houston’s third base job after a disappointing 2011 season, hit a drive over the center field fence off Ross Detwiler in the fourth inning. Catcher Jason Castro, who missed the entire 2011 season with a knee injury, played the fi rst three innings for Houston.

By staff reports

with seven pitchers to throw a one-hitter, leading the Detroit Tigers to a 2-0 victory over the Atlanta Braves on Saturday. DIAMONDBACKS (SS) 9, GIANTS 6

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Chris Young and Ryan Roberts homered and Arizona’s split-squad beat Tim Lincecum and San Francisco ATHLETICS 9, MARINERS 2

PEORIA, Ariz. — Jonny Gomes and Jemile Weeks each hit two-run homers and Oakland beat Seattle. INDIANS 6, REDS 6 (9)

GOODYEAR, Ariz. — Scott Rolen went 2 for 2 in his return to the Reds’ lineup as Cincinnati and Cleveland played to a 6-all tie. DIAMONDBACKS (SS) 1, ROCKIES 1, 10

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Top prospect Trevor Bauer retired all six batters he faced in his spring training debut Saturday and Arizona’s split-squad and Colorado tied in 10 innings. RED SOX 25, NORTHEASTERN 0

FORT MYERS, Fla. — Cody Ross hit two homers and Adrian Gonzalez connected for another of the Red Sox’s five home runs in a victory over Northeastern. Associated Press

KINGSVILLE — The Texas A&M-Kingsville baseball team wrapped up a three-game series with Northwood University by splitting a doubleheader on Saturday at Nolan Ryan Field. The Javelinas won the nightcap 10-8 after dropping the opener 7-4 and the Javelinas won the second game, 10-8. With the 2-1 series victory the Javelinas are now 9-3 overall. In the first game, which ran nine innings, the Knights did all their work in the first two innings, where they scored seven runs on as many hits. Cutter Forman and Adam Hughes led the charge with two runs batted in apiece. In the second game, a seven-inning contest, a 4-4 tie was broken by the Javelinas in the bottom of the fourth, when they scored five runs. They would never relinquish the lead afterward. Clay Stephens picked up the victory for the Javelinas, evening his record at 1-1 on the year. Jeremy Flores earned his first save. SOFTBALL

TWU sweeps Javs DENTON — Despite outhitting Texas Woman’s, 13-9 the Texas A&M-Kingsville softball team could not overcome the five home runs hit by the Pioneers in an 8-5 loss

in Lone Star Conference action. Once again, the Javelinas (8-11, 0-3) were the first team to score. In the top of the second inning both Ali Bodnar and Kodie Garner came through with two-out, run-scoring singles. The Pioneers (15-4, 3-0) put a run on the board in the bottom of the second inning on Katie Hines’ solo home run. Hines homer was just a prelude of what was to come in the third inning. Lizzie Kelly got the bottom of the third started with a solo home run after an out had been recorded. Kendra Sancet followed three batters later with a three-run shot and then Jordan Readicker slammed a two-run homer two batters later. Readicker would add another solo homer in the bottom of the fifth inning. The Javelinas rallied in the top of the sixth inning. After two outs were recorded, Gregory-Portland product Roxanne Rodriguez, Garner and Amber Cherry all singled to load the bases. Rose Stubbs followed with a bases clearing triple to make it 8-5. In the top of the seventh, the Hoggies got the first two batters of the inning on base, but then Larisa Garcia was able to retire the next three batters to earn the save. TENNIS

Isles men knock off Oklahoma State The Texas A&M — Corpus Christi men’s tennis team earned a 4-3 victory over No. 64 Oklahoma State to take third place in the 46th Annual H-E-B Tournament of Champions at the Thomas J. Henry Tennis Center. A&M — Corpus Christi (7-7) took two matches from nationally ranked teams over weekend and has played 10 of its 14 matches against teams in the Top 75 of the Intercollegiate Tennis Association rankings. New Mexico took the title at the H-E-B with a 4-1 victory over LouisianaLafayette, which finished as runner-up. In the fifthplace match, South Alabama knocked off Middle Tennessee State 4-2, while

DePaul posted a 4-2 win over Western Michigan to garner seventh place.

Northwestern St. edges Isles women

NATCHITOCHES, La. — The Texas A&M — Corpus Christi women’s tennis team dropped a hard-fought, 4-3 match against Northwestern State in a Southland Conference match. The Islanders fell to 6-2 on the year, and 1-1 in Southland matches, with the loss. The Lady Demons improved to 5-1, 1-0. T R ACK A N D F I E L D

Javelinas take nine golds at UIW meet

SAN ANTONIO — The Texas A&M-Kingsville men’s and women’s track teams won a combined total of nine events on the final day of the Incarnate Word Invitational. The Javelina men won the team title with 171 points while the women took second with 114 points. Sophomore Tim Price from Carroll had the best performance of the day winning the 100-meter dash in a provisional qualifying time of 10.53 despite dealing with windy, cool conditions. He also was a part of the winning 4x200 relay team (1:26.06) with Anthony Washington, Randy Lighteard and Jonathan Woodson. Tyler Garibay joined Washington, Lighteard and Woodson on the 4x400 team that clocked a 3:17.35. The Javs won the team title by 39 points over host Incarnate Word. A&MCommerce was third with 70 points. The Javelinas women nabbed a pair of first place finishes and three second place honors on the final day of competition. Freshman Amber Perry easily won the 400-meter dash in a time of 59.16, over two seconds faster than the next closest finisher. Freshman Brianna Bartosch took the 100-meter hurdles in a time of 15.21. The Javelinas finished 50 points behind Incarnate Word in the team standings. Trinity (91) took third place and A&M-Commerce was fourth with 90 points.


â&#x2DC;&#x2026;

C A L L E R -T I M E S

ÂŤ Sunday, March 4, 2012 ÂŤ 5C

SPORTS

GOLF

NASCAR

McIlroy close to No. 1 ranking

Sadler back in victory lane

By Doug Ferguson Associated Press

â&#x2013; Earns first Nationwide win in

14 years at Phoenix International By John Marshall Associated Press

AVONDALE, Ariz. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Elliott Sadler took the lead after a late caution and held on down the stretch to earn his ďŹ rst Nationwide win in 14 years at Phoenix International Raceway on Saturday. A former full-time driver in the Sprint Cup series, Sadler started eighth and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get near the lead until the end of the race. He passed Brad Keselowski after a caution with 33 laps left and wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really challenged on the way to his sixth career Nationwide win â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ďŹ rst in 91 races in the series. Keselowski ďŹ nished second and defending series champion Ricky Stenhouse Jr. was third. Kevin Harvick

led the most laps, but ďŹ nished ďŹ fth behind Austin Dillon after pit strategy at the last caution backďŹ red. Sadler signed on with Kevin Harvickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nationwide team in 2011 and was the runner-up to Stenhouse in the season standings despite not winning a race. Harvick got out of ownership to start a family and his team was absorbed by Richard Childress Racing this season. Sadler had a strong start for his new owners, ďŹ nishing third at the seasonopener in Daytona last week after starting in the same spot. He started eighth in Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s race and was all the way back to 18th with 50 laps left. Sadler started making his way toward the front and was in position to

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Elliott Sadler celebrates in victory lane after winning a NASCAR Nationwide Series auto race at Phoenix International Raceway on Saturday in Avondale, Ariz.

make a move after some pit strategy on a caution with 36 laps left. Harvick dominated the middle part of the race, leading 93 laps until the last caution sent everyone into the pits for a ďŹ nal stop. Harvick opted for four tires and fuel, but all the other leaders either took two tires or just fuel to get back out quickly. Harvick came out of the pits in seventh and nearly got taken out shortly after the restart, heading down to the inside apron to avoid contact. He moved up to fourth after that, but couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make up any more ground. Keselowski took the lead the after the caution, but was quickly passed by

Sadler. Keselowski and Stenhouse stayed with Sadler over the ďŹ nal 25 laps, but werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t able to get close enough to make a move. Sadler celebrated his long-awaited victory with a massive burnout at the ďŹ&#x201A;ag, covering the rest of the cars in a layer of white smoke along pit road. He hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t won on the Nationwide series since Oct. 31, 1998, at North Carolina Motor Speedway. Danica Patrick was never a factor after a wreck-ďŹ lled run through Daytona. The former IndyCar star started 30th and was a lap down before the midpoint of the race. She ďŹ nished 21st after wrecking in all three races at Daytona.

Martin nabs pole at Phoenix By John Marshall Associated Press

AVONDALE, Ariz. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark Martin followed a solid run at the Daytona 500 by capturing the pole at Phoenix International Raceway on Saturday. Martin ďŹ nished 10th at Monday nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ ery and foaming Daytona 500 and kept his roll going, capturing his 52nd career pole with a top speed of 136.81 mph. Regan Smith was in line to earn his ďŹ rst career pole until Martin bettered his time late in the qualifying session. Defending NASCAR Sprint Cup champion Tony Stewart also passed

Smith on the ďŹ nal qualifying run of the day and will start up front with Martin in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 312-mile race around the mile oval. Five-time NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson, coming off a rough run at the Daytona 500, will start fourth, next to Smith on the second row. Daytona 500 winner Matt Kenseth was 26th in qualifying. After three years with Hendrick Motorsports, Martin joined Michael Waltrip Racing to run a limited schedule this season. Martin wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t great in qualifying at Daytona, but had a good run in one of the few

races he hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t won. He led two laps and ďŹ nished in the top 10 after waiting out the two-hour delay caused by an inferno after Juan Pablo Montoya wrecked into a safety truck. Stewart pulled out his third Sprint Cup title in the last race of the 2011 season, edging Carl Edwards. He had a busy offseason, though, ďŹ ring crew chief Darian Grubb a week after winning the title, then hiring Steve Addington from Penske Racing. Stewart qualiďŹ ed third at Daytona with Addington at the helm and led two laps early in the race, but was never a factor while try-

Martin captured his 52nd career pole with a top speed of 136.81 mph on Saturday.

ing to end his 14-year winless streak in NASCARâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest race. Johnson had his run of ďŹ ve straight Sprint Cup titles end last season with his worst season in NASCAR, winning just one race and ďŹ nishing sixth in the Sprint Cup standings. He opened Daytona Speedweeks by having his car fail inspection on the ďŹ rst day and was knocked out of the Daytona 500 on the second lap when he was bumped by Elliott Sadler.

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tiger Woods ďŹ nished his round before the leaders made the turn Saturday in the Honda Classic, only this time, thousands of fans didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t head for the parking lot. They went looking for the kid who already looks the part as golfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next star. U.S. Open champion Rory McIlroy put on quite a show at PGA National. From mangled rough right of the 11th fairway, he measured up a 7-iron from 181 yards and ďŹ gured it was worth the risk to take on the water in front of the green. The ball cleared the hazard by no more than a yard, and McIlroy seized on the moment by holing a 50-foot birdie from the back of the fringe. Two par saves were equally important on the back nine, and a birdie from the front bunker on the par-5 18th gave him a 4-under 66, matching the low round of a windy afternoon and giving him a two-shot lead. That left the 22-year-old from Northern Ireland one

round away from becoming the second-youngest player behind Woods to reach No. 1 in the world. He would have to win the Honda Classic to replace Luke Donald atop the ranking. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I definitely feel like I need to put it out of my mind tomorrow,â&#x20AC;? McIlroy said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I need to focus on just trying to win this golf tournament. It might be a little difficult.â&#x20AC;? McIlroy was in a similar spot last week when he reached the ďŹ nal of the Match Play Championship, knowing a win would make him No. 1. Only this time, there is more than Hunter Mahan in this way. McIlroy, at 11-under 199, had a two-shot lead over 22-year-old rookie Harris English (66) and 43-yearold Tom Gillis (69). Seven players were within ďŹ ve shots of the lead, a group that includes PGA champion Keegan Bradley and Masters champion Charl Schwartzel. The difference from last week? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t standing up 2 up on the ďŹ rst tee in the ďŹ nal,â&#x20AC;? McIlroy said, smiling.

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6C » Sunday, March 4, 2012 »

C A L L E R -T I M E S

HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL PLAYOFFS I just grabbed it and went to the hole as hard as I could and was hoping it went in and it did.” Dale Perryman, Miller guard, on his tying layup with 11.5 seconds remaining

MILLER from 1C

MICHAEL ZAMORA/CALLER-TIMES

Miller’s Dale Perryman slides between a pair of Liberty Hill defenders for a layup Saturday during the Bucs’ 61-59 overtime win at the American Bank Center.

YOUNG from 1C

timeout after he grabbed a loose ball. Instead of moping back to the bench, he jogged over to his teammates and had a message for them. “We were down 10, and I saw a couple of my teammates putting their heads down,” he said. “I called timeout, brought them to the huddle and told them to keep their heads up.” Then Guzman trotted back on the court and did something to pick up all their heads. Instead of running some kind of complicated, quick-hitting play in that final second of the third quarter, Miller coach Maurice Bastian called the simplest play of all. He had his team inbound the ball to Guzman 30 feet from the basket at the top of the key and told him to let it fly. Nothing but net. “He’s done that for years here at Miller,” Bastian said of his junior point guard. “He even did stuff like that in middle school. Anyone who gives him space from 23 feet and in, he can make those shots, especially if his feet are set. It’s nothing new that he made that shot. He’s been doing that on a regular basis.” It certainly looked routine for him Saturday. He scored 16 points,

with 15 of those coming on five 3-pointers, including a pair in the final four minutes of regulation. The biggest one came in the midst of a Liberty Hill meltdown. The Panthers had a six-point lead and were just 2:49 away from punching their ticket to Austin when they inexplicably went to a four corners offense. Liberty Hill coach Barry Boren spread the floor and had his players turn down easy looks at shots and open lanes at the basket to pass the ball around and milk some clock. Seeing a team playing not to lose gave Guzman and the Bucs new life. Here’s a hint for future opponents: If you have Guzman down, kick him one more time just to make sure you keep him down. “They had the game; they didn’t want it,” Guzman said. “They had a chance to put it away. They didn’t, so we took it.” First, Perryman turned a Liberty Hill turnover into a layup that cut the lead to 53-49. Then, with precious time ticking away, Guzman stepped up and calmly knocked down a 23-footer from the top of the key that dropped the deficit to one with 41 seconds left in regulation. “I’ve never been afraid to take a shot like that,” Guzman said. “I got the ball in a big moment, and put it up there, gave it a chance to go in and it fell for me.” Perryman went on to push the game into overtime, and Lewis did

CLASS 4A

AUSTIN — Maya Hawkins scored 19 points to carry Mansfield Summit to the Class 4A girls’ state championship Saturday with a 45-42 win over Rockwall. Hawkins’ 3-pointer early in the fourth quarter gave Summit a 39-38 lead. Summit (37-3) didn’t make another basket but made six of 10 free throws down the stretch to hold off Rockwall (34-8). Alyssa Lang scored 25 points and grabbed 10 rebounds to lead Rockwall. Summit won its second title since 2009. A free throw by Hawkins put Summit ahead 42-40. After a miss by Lang, Summit’s Ashley Eli, who was on the 2009 title-winning team, made two more free throws for a four-point cushion with 32 seconds left. CLASS 2A BROCK 52, POTH 49

AUSTIN — Taylor Fulmer converted a 3-point play with 20 seconds left, lifting Brock to its fourth consecutive girls’ Class 2A state championship Saturday with a 52-49 win over Poth.

MILLER 61, LIBERTY HILL 59 (OT) Liberty Hill 18 15 14 7 5 — 59 Miller 14 13 13 14 7 — 61 Liberty Hill — Stephen Graves 14, Shane LaCaille 16, Blake Hare 2, Corey McKinzey 2, Tyeler Greenstreet 6, Blake Danielak 19. Miller — Tyrell Clay 4, Jesse Franco 2, Billy Guzman 16, Dale Perryman 16, Storm Watson 2, DaCain Levingston 3, Marquis Lewis 18. 3-pointers — LH, Graves 2, LaCaille 2, Danielak 2; M, Guzman 5, Clay 1. Records — Liberty Hill 32-4, Miller 31-8. A — 1,340

most of the damage in the extra session to lock up the trip to Austin, but Guzman delivered one more time in the clutch. This time, he did it with his words, instead of his shooting hand. Miller had a 59-57 lead with 48 seconds left in overtime when Liberty Hill called a timeout. The Bucs were going to have to inbound the ball, and Bastian reminded his players in the huddle they didn’t have any more timeouts. Then Guzman threw in his two cents. He let his teammates know that the possession arrow was pointing the Bucs’ way, so if they got in trouble after the inbounds pass to let a Liberty Hill player tie them up to get a jump ball call so Miller could inbound the ball over again. “I’m the leader of the team. I’ve been here before and I’ve played a lot of basketball, so it just comes from experience,” Guzman said. “We’ve got no more timeouts, but we do have the possession arrow. You get in trouble, go down and let them tie you up.” As it turns out, Miller never needed that tidbit of information, but Guzman offered it just in case. Now he hopes to dish out equal parts knowledge and equal parts big shots at the Erwin Center later next week. And he’ll do so with a smile. Contact sports editor Matt Young at 886-3702 or youngm@caller.com

MICHAEL ZAMORA/CALLER-TIMES

Miller’s Billy Guzman (10) scored 16 points, with 15 of those coming on five 3-pointers, including a pair in the final four minutes of regulation.

State playoff scores

Girls roundup SUMMIT 45, ROCKWALL 42

“It’s the constant preaching to never give up, persevere, and stay together. Earlier in the season, I thought we would’ve lost our composure and maybe thrown the ball away or given up. “However, these guys knew that what I’d been preaching would come to fruition — never give up, play hard until the end because you’ll never know what happens.” After beating San Antonio Sam Houston 72-71 in Friday’s regional semifinal on reserve Jesse Franco’s buzzer-beating shot, the Bucs found themselves in an eerily familiar situation: A regional final that was going down to the wire. Last year against eventual state champion West Oso, Miller fell short in the final minutes. Against Liberty Hill, Miller trailed by 10 in the dying seconds of the third quarter before point guard Billy Guzman hit a 3-pointer from well beyond the arc at the buzzer to give the Bucs life heading into the final eight minutes. However, Miller, despite holding No. 8 Liberty Hill (324) without a field goal the entire fourth quarter, still trailed 53-47 with 2:48 left after the Panthers’ Shane LaCaille made two free throws. Liberty Hill appeared to sit on the lead with roughly threeplus minutes left, spreading the floor and passing up open shots to run off more time. That had many observers wondering if the Panthers got too conservative. “Probably,” Liberty Hill coach Barry Boren said. “I don’t know if we got conservative. We put the ball in our best free-throw shooters’ hands and we thought (the officials) might call a foul, but they didn’t. We had opportunities; we just didn’t take advantage of them.

“I feel like I let (my players) down. I feel horrible. At the same time, I can’t get out there and play for them. It’s a game — there are people who win and people who lose.” Miller got within 53-49 after Perryman’s layup with 1:19 left, and after an out-of-bounds violation by Liberty Hill, Guzman nailed his fifth 3-pointer to make it 53-52. After Stephen Graves made one of two free throws, Perryman took the inbounds pass and drove the length of the floor for the tying layup with 11.5 seconds left, bringing Miller even for the first time since the opening tip. “I just grabbed it and went to the hole as hard as I could and was hoping it went in, and it did,” Perryman said. Miller then controlled the overtime, with the bulk of the Bucs’ points ironically coming from the foul line. For the game, Miller made just 14 of 27 free throws to Liberty Hill’s 15 of 17. However, the Bucs got four pivotal free throws from Marquis Lewis and Franco during the final minute of overtime to salt the victory. Lewis, who finished with a team-high 18 points, scored five of Miller’s seven points in the extra session. “When we hit overtime, we told each other, ‘We can’t lose again in the same (round) and start all over again next year. So let’s do it this year and do it next year, too,’” Lewis said. “It means a lot. Hopefully we can just focus and take it one game at a time in Austin. Hopefully we get the wins so we can have a state title. That’s the next step.”

Kamy Cole scored 19 points and fired the halfcourt pass to Fulmer that beat a defensive trap for the winning basket. Brock’s victory wasn’t secure until Ashley Fuller’s 3-pointer in the final seconds bounced off the back of the rim and Cole grabbed the rebound. Cole made two free throws to put Brock (35-5) ahead 49-47 before Poth’s Claire Raabe tied it with a layup with 30 seconds left. CLASS A SUDAN 70, MARTIN’S MILL 40

AUSTIN — Danielle Logan scored 36 points as Sudan defeated Martin’s Mill 70-40 for the UIL Class 1A Division 1 state girls basketball championship. Logan, named the championship game MVP, added five rebounds as Sudan finished the season at 34-3 with its second championship since 2009. Bailey Black added 16 points while Jasmine Weaver finished with 14 points and 16 boards for the victorious Nettes. Sudan outscored Martin’s Mill 21-10 in the second quarter to break a 16-16 tie and take control of the contest.

BOYS BASKETBALL REGION FINALS CLASS 5A REGION I

Flower Mound Marcus 39, South Grand Prairie 38 REGION II

Garland Naaman Forest 56, DeSoto 49 REGION III

Fort Bend Travis 57, Fort Bend Hightower 34 REGION IV

S.A. Warren 65, S.A. Clark 56 CLASS 4A REGION I

Denton Ryan 71, Fort Worth Arlington Heights 68 REGION II

Dallas Kimball 84, Dallas

South Oak Cliff 63 REGION III

Houston Yates 113, Houston Jones 83 REGION IV

S.A. Alamo Heights 50, S.A. Edison 39 CLASS 3A REGION I

Lubbock Estacado 56, Abilene Wylie 61 REGION II

Argyle 48, Dallas Hutchins 34 REGION III

Waco La Vega 61, Silsbee 59 REGION IV

Miller 61, Liberty Hill 59 (OT) CLASS 2A REGION I

Idalou 52, Jim Ned 49 REGION II

Brock 57, Whitewright 47

REGION III

White Oak 65, Kountze 63 REGION IV

S.A. Cole 53, Hallettsville 52 CLASS 1A, DIVISION I REGION I

Olton 62, Seagraves 56 REGION II

Kerens 43, Mart 37 REGION III

Clarksville 72, Tenaha 61 REGION IV

Mumford 64, Milano 47 CLASS 1A, DIVISION II REGION I

Grady 45, Sands 43 REGION II

Graford 61, Lipan 42 REGION III

Roxton 57, Dodd City 51 REGION IV

Calvert 69, Moulton 46


★ C A L L E R - T I M E S « Sunday, March 4, 2012 « 7C

HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL PLAYOFFS

Miller’s players and cheerleaders gather around the championship trophy Saturday after the Bucs won the regional final and a trip to the state tournament.

Miller feasts on win Photos by Michael Zamora/Caller-Times After a 62-year absence, the Miller Bucs basketball team is returning to the state tournament. Miller overcame a sevenpoint deficit in the fourth quarter to beat Liberty Hill 61-59 in overtime Saturday at the American Bank Center.

Players hoist the Region IV-3A championship trophy after they earned Miller’s first trip to the state tournament since 1950. Miller’s Dale Perryman gets a hug from his father, Dale Perryman Sr., after the Bucs’ 61-59 overtime win Saturday over Liberty Hill in the regional final.

Liberty Hill players Blake Hare (left) and Austin Davis react after blowing a seven-point fourth quarter lead in the loss to Miller.

Fans cheer on Miller during the Bucs’ thrilling overtime victory over Liberty Hill in the region final Saturday at the American Bank Center. Miller will play in the state semfiinals Thursday.


8C » Sunday, March 4, 2012 »

C A L L E R -T I M E S ★

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

BIG 12

Griner scores 41 in No. 1 Baylor’s win over Iowa St.

■ Lady Bears

Men’s Standings

have first-ever unbeaten year

Kansas Missouri Baylor Iowa St. Kansas St. Texas Oklahoma St. Oklahoma Texas A&M Texas Tech

By The Associated Press

WACO — Brittney Griner excitedly pounded her chest so hard with both fists that she pulled a teammate to the side and joked that she almost hurt herself. Griner and top-ranked Baylor have plenty of reason to be excited about after completing its first undefeated regular season in school history. That chest-pounding moment for Griner came during a game-clinching run after halftime for the Lady Bears, who got a career-high 41 points from their 6-foot-8 junior phenom and took control with some tenacious defense in a 77-53 win over Iowa State on Saturday. “I don’t know, I guess I was just feeling it,” Griner said of the reaction after her putback basket when Baylor started pulling away. The Lady Bears (30-1, 18-0), who have won their games by an average margin of nearly 28 points, also stretched their home-court winning streak to 40 in a row. But Iowa State didn’t make it easy for them. The Cyclones (18-11, 9-9) made seven 3-pointers before halftime, including Chelsea Poppens’ shot in the final minute that tied the game at 32. Iowa State still led 40-38 after Griner made a short jumper and Baylor coach Kim Mulkey called timeout with 17:24 left. Baylor then went with a full-court pressure defense, something her assistant coaches had been bugging her to do. It worked with the Lady Bears forcing three turnovers in less than a minute. “Being hard-headed or

Men

Pct. .839 .871 .806 .710 .700 .613 .452 .500 .433 .267

NO. 3 KANSAS 73, TEXAS 63

IOWA STATE 80, NO. 9 BAYLOR 72

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Baylor’s Brittney Griner (42) drives against Iowa State guard Lauren Mansfield (left) in the second half of Saturday’s game.

stubborn or whatever you want to call me, I didn’t do it,” Mulkey said. “Then I didn’t do it to start the second half, and I had them in my ear wanting me to change the pace of the game, and it was a great decision. “Because we were playing at Iowa State’s pace and they were getting 3s all over the floor and penetrating and we were getting suckered in and helping and they were kicking out for 3s.” With the pressure, Jordan Madden almost immediately had a steal. After Griner missed a potential tying free throw on

that possession, Kimetria Hayden got a rebound and missed a 3-pointer before Griner missed a putback. But Destiny Williams grabbed the ball under the basket and made a quick step for a reverse layup and a 41-40 lead with 16:38 left, and the Lady Bears soon put the game away with a 26-4 run. After Williams had a steal, Odyssey Sims was fouled on a breakaway drive and made both free throws. “When they started pressing, we panicked a little bit,” coach Bill Fennelly said. The Cyclones were only

3-of-15 on 3-pointers after halftime. “It’s a mix of emotion and things started to go bad,” said Anna Prins, who led Iowa State with 17 points. “It just kind of spiraled down.” Griner’s previous career high was 40 points, against Green Bay in last year’s NCAA tournament. She made 15 of 18 field goals and 11 of 13 free throws against Iowa State, plus had eight rebounds. The 15 field goals matched her career high. Williams had 15 points and 11 rebounds. Despite going 1 of 9 from the field, Sims had nine points with five steals.

AMES, Iowa — Scott Christopherson had 23 points in his final home game and Iowa State rallied to beat No. 9 Baylor for its second win over a top-10 opponent this season. Melvin Ejim added 15 points for the Cyclones (22-9, 12-6 Big 12), who also secured the No. 3 seed for next week’s conference tournament. Baylor led by as much as nine late in the second half, but the Bears went nearly 5 minutes without a point down the stretch. Baylor pulled to 66-64, but Tyrus McGee drilled a 3 with 1:24 left and the Bears followed with a crushing offensive foul. KANSAS STATE 77, OKLAHOMA STATE 58

MANHATTAN, Kan. — Rodney McGruder scored 24 points, Jamar Samuels had 17 points and 12 rebounds and Kansas State used a big run out of halftime to beat short-handed Oklahoma State. Jordan Henriquez had 16 points and eight boards for the Wildcats, who added another impressive win to their resume heading into next week’s Big 12 tournament. OKLAHOMA 65, TEXAS A&M 62

NORMAN, Okla. — Romero Osby scored a career-high 24 points and Oklahoma held off Texas A&M for a win in a preview of the first round of next week’s Big 12 tournament. The Sooners led by as many as 14 early in the second half before A&M rallied and had a chance to take the lead in the final minute. Associated Press

Women’s Top 25

DURHAM, N.C. — Kendall Marshall had 20 points and 10 assists, and No. 6 North Carolina beat No. 4 Duke 88-70 on Saturday night to win the Atlantic Coast Conference regular-season title. Tyler Zeller had 19 points and 10 rebounds, and Harrison Barnes added 16 points for the Tar Heels (27-4, 14-2). They never trailed, and for the second straight year they rolled in a winner-take-all season finale with the ACC tournament’s top seed on the line. North Carolina shot 54.5 percent, built a 45-28 rebounding advantage and sent Duke to its

MILWAUKEE — Jae Crowder had 26 points and 14 rebounds in his final home game as a senior, helping No. 8 Marquette beat No. 11 Georgetown and clinch the No. 2 seed in the Big East tournament. Fellow senior Darius Johnson-Odom added 17 points for the Golden Eagles, (25-6, 14-4 Big East). Marquette was 33 of 45 from the free-throw line. Otto Porter and Hollis Thompson scored 19 points each for the Hoyas (22-7, 12-6), who could have clinched a doublebye in the conference tournament with a victo-

All Games L 5 4 6 9 9 12 17 15 17 22

LUBBOCK — Kim English scored 20 points, Marcus Denman added 17 and No. 7 Missouri hit a season-best 16 3-pointers to beat Texas Tech. Denmon scored all his points in the second half and Ricardo Ratliffe had a career-high 15 rebounds. The Tigers slowly pulled away in the second half with 12 of their 3s coming after halftime. The win gave Missouri a school record for victories in the regular season.

By The Associated Press

NO. 8 MARQUETTE 83, NO. 11 GEORGETOWN 69

W 26 27 25 22 21 19 14 15 13 8

NO. 7 MISSOURI 81, TEXAS TECH 59

North Carolina tops Duke, Heels take ACC title

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Brandon Triche scored 18 points, Kris Joseph added 11 in the final home game of his career, and second-ranked Syracuse beat No. 19 Louisville 58-49 on Saturday. Syracuse (30-1, 17-1) matched the Big East record for victories — Connecticut also won 17 conference games in 1995-96 — and the Orange also finished the regular season with 30 wins for the first time in coach Jim Boeheim’s 36-year tenure.

Pct. .889 .778 .667 .667 .556 .500 .389 .278 .222 .056

LAWRENCE, Kan. — Thomas Robinson had 25 points and 14 rebounds in his likely Allen Fieldhouse finale, Tyshawn Taylor added 22 points and No. 3 Kansas rolled to a win over Texas. Robinson scored 18 of his points in the second half as the Big 12 champion Jayhawks tuned up for the conference tournament in style. Kansas has won eight straight overall, 22 in a row at home and improved to 20-7 all-time against the Longhorns.

Men’s Top 25

NO. 2 SYRACUSE 58, NO. 19 LOUISVILLE 49

Conference L 2 4 6 6 8 9 11 13 14 17

W 16 14 12 12 10 9 7 5 4 1

deepest halftime deficit ever at Cameron Indoor Stadium — 24 points — while winning its seventh straight since last month’s loss to the Blue Devils. Mason Plumlee had 17 points, brother Miles Plumlee added 16 points and 11 rebounds and freshman Austin Rivers — the hero of that last meeting — had 15 points for the Blue Devils (26-5, 13-3). But Duke couldn’t come up with another improbable escape and instead had its seven-game winning streak snapped. The perimeter-reliant Blue Devils finished 6 of 21 from 3-point range. They missed 15 consecutive attempts, including their

ry. Marquette already had clinched the double-bye. NO. 12 MURRAY STATE 54, TENNESSEE STATE 52

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Jewuan Long drove the baseline for a layup with 4.4 seconds left, and 12th-ranked Murray State rallied from seven points down in the final 5:28 to beat Tennessee State for the Ohio Valley Conference tournament championship and an automatic NCAA tournament berth. Long also stripped Tigers guard Patrick Miller of the ball and guarded Robert Covington on the final long shot at the buzzer to preserve the win, getting the Racers to 30-1 and avoiding a second loss to the only team to beat them this season. ILLINOIS STATE 65, NO. 15 WICHITA STATE 64

ST. LOUIS — Tyler Brown made two free throws with 6.4 seconds left and finished with 25 points as Illinois State upset No. 15 Wichita State in the semifinals of the Missouri Valley Conference tournament. Jackie Carmichael added 12 points and 11 rebounds for the fourth-

first seven 3-pointers, and had two 7-minute field goal droughts in the opening half. That left them down 48-24 at the break — their largest halftime deficit anywhere since the 1990 team trailed the Tar Heels by 24 in Chapel Hill. The closest they got in the second half was 75-64 on Miles Plumlee’s free throw with 6:01 left. But Seth Curry missed an open 3-pointer roughly 30 seconds later that would have brought down the house. Marshall then hit a 19-footer with 4 minutes left, James Michael McAdoo added a layup and Barnes swished a deep 3 to stretch it to 82-64 with 2 minutes left.

seeded Redbirds (20-12), who rallied from 13 points down early in the second half. Illinois State, which lost at home to the Shockers by 13 points on Feb. 22, snapped a 24-game losing streak against ranked teams, dating to 1987. The Redbirds head into the tournament championship game on Sunday seeking their first NCAA tournament berth since 1998. NO. 21 SAN DIEGO STATE 98, TCU 92, OT

FORT WORTH — Jamaal Franklin scored a careerhigh 35 points, including the go-ahead three-point play in overtime, and No. 21 San Diego State claimed a share of its second consecutive Mountain West Conference title with a victory over TCU. The Aztecs (24-6, 10-4 MWC) blew an 18-point lead in the second half. Franklin made a driving layup while being fouled with 3:34 left in overtime, then hit the free throw for an 88-85 lead. After a TCU miss, Xavier Thames added another layup for San Diego State. TCU (17-13, 7-7) had won eight straight home games, the last two over Top 25 teams.

NO. 23 TEMPLE 80, FORDHAM 60

NEW YORK — Juan Fernandez scored 19 points, backcourt mate Ramone Moore added 16 and No. 23 Temple beat Fordham to win the outright Atlantic 10 regular-season title for the first time since 1989-90. The Owls (24-6, 13-3) had clinched at least a share of their conferencerecord 10th title with a win over Massachusetts on Wednesday. The Owls, who have won 13 of their last 14 games, will be the No. 1 seed for the Atlantic 10 tournament.

NO. 6 MARYLAND 73, WAKE FOREST 58

GREENSBORO, N.C. — Alyssa Thomas had 18 points and 12 rebounds to help sixthranked Maryland beat Wake Forest in the semifinals of the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament. Laurin Mincy added 13 for the third-seeded Terrapins (27-4). NO. 21 PURDUE 68, NO. 9 PENN STATE 66

INDIANAPOLIS — Brittany Rayburn’s driving layup with 1.4 seconds left gave No. 21 Purdue a win over No. 9 Penn State in a Big Ten tournament semifinal. Rayburn finished with 14 points, while Courtney Moses scored 21 and Antionette Howard had 13 points and a career-high 13 rebounds for the Boilermakers (23-8). LSU 72, NO. 10 KENTUCKY 61

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Courtney Jones scored 18 points and LSU beat No. 10 Kentucky to advance to its ninth Southeastern Conference tournament championship game. NO. 11 GREEN BAY 77, ILLINOIS-CHICAGO 64

CHICAGO — Julie Wojta had 27 points and 10 rebounds to pace No. 11 Green Bay to its seventh straight victory with a win over Illinois-Chicago.

NO. 25 CREIGHTON 99, EVANSVILLE 71

NO. 13 TENNESSEE 74, NO. 25 SOUTH CAROLINA 58

ST. LOUIS — Gregory Echenique had a season-best 20 points, nine rebounds and three blocked shots in just 20 minutes, and No. 25 Creighton also clicked from outside in a rout of Evansville in the Missouri Valley Conference tournament semifinal. Doug McDermott added 14 points and Antoine Young 13 for the second seeded Bluejays (27-5), who were 8 for 10 from 3-point range in the first half.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Glory Johnson had 23 points and 10 rebounds as No. 13 Tennessee beat No. 25 South Carolina 74-58 on Saturday to advance to its 21st Southeastern Conference championship game. The second-seeded Lady Volunteers (23-8) will face fourth-seeded LSU. NO. 24 NEBRASKA 77, NO. 14 OHIO STATE 62

INDIANAPOLIS — Jordan Hooper had 21 points and 10 rebounds as No. 24 Nebraska knocked off No. 14

Ohio State in the semifinals of the Big Ten women’s tournament. Kaitlyn Burke scored 20 points and Emily Cady 10 for the sixth-seeded Cornhuskers (24-7). NO. 15 GEORGIA TECH 87, NORTH CAROLINA STATE 61

GREENSBORO, N.C. — Tyaunna Marshall scored 16 of her 20 points in the first half and No. 15 Georgia Tech claimed a spot in the Atlantic Coast Conference championship game by routing North Carolina State. NO. 19 ST. BONAVENTURE 68, LA SALLE 53

PHILADELPHIA — Megan Van Tatenhove led five players in double figures with 13 points and St. Bonaventure pulled away in the second half, beating La Salle in the quarterfinals of the Atlantic 10 Women’s conference tournament. NO. 20 LOUISVILLE 63, VILLANOVA 47

HARTFORD, Conn. — Shoni Schimmel scored 15 of her 20 points in the first half and No. 20 Louisville beat Villanova in the second round of the Big East tournament. NO. 22 GONZAGA 83, SAINT MARY’S (CALIF.) 78

LAS VEGAS — K ayl a Standish scored 31 points as No. 22 Gonzaga held off Saint Mary’s (Calif.) in the semifinals of the West Coast Conference women’s tournament. NO. 23 RUTGERS 52, MARQUETTE 43

HARTFORD, Conn. — Monique Oliver had 18 of her 23 points in the second half to help No. 23 Rutgers rally to beat Marquette in the second round of the Big East tournament. K hadijah Rushdan added nine points and 12 rebounds for the Scarlet Knights (22-8). Associated Press


C A L L E R -T I M E S

« Sunday, March 4, 2012 « 9C

NBA

Nowitzki scores 40 as Mavs beat Jazz

Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE

Philadelphia Boston New York Toronto New Jersey

W 22 18 18 11 11

L 15 17 18 25 26

Miami Orlando Atlanta Washington Charlotte

W 28 24 22 8 4

L 8 14 15 28 30

Chicago Indiana Milwaukee Cleveland Detroit

W 30 23 14 13 12

L 8 12 23 22 26

ATLANTIC DIVISION Pct GB L10 Str .595 — 4-6 W-1 .514 3 4-6 W-3 .500 3½ 7-3 W-1 .306 10½ 3-7 L-1 .297 11 3-7 L-1 SOUTHEAST DIVISION Pct GB L10 Str .778 — 9-1 L-1 .632 5 7-3 W-1 .595 6½ 4-6 W-2 .222 20 3-7 W-1 .118 23 1-9 L-4 CENTRAL DIVISION Pct GB L10 Str .789 — 8-2 W-5 .657 5½ 6-4 W-6 .378 15½ 2-8 L-3 .371 15½ 3-7 L-5 .316 18 4-6 L-1

Away 8-8 5-9 7-9 6-13 8-13

Conf 16-5 17-10 12-10 7-16 8-19

Home 15-2 13-7 12-6 5-14 2-12

Away 13-6 11-7 10-9 3-14 2-18

Conf 21-4 18-9 17-8 6-19 3-23

Home 14-2 11-4 8-8 8-11 9-11

Away 16-6 12-8 6-15 5-11 3-15

Conf 20-6 15-9 10-14 8-17 9-18

Home 14-2 15-5 14-7 15-5 4-16

Away 11-9 7-10 8-9 6-11 5-12

Conf 18-8 13-13 16-11 13-14 4-19

Home 15-1 10-8 13-6 10-10 14-6

Away 14-7 10-9 5-12 8-9 3-13

Conf 21-6 11-17 13-13 13-10 11-16

Home 12-5 16-2 9-9 9-9 8-6

Away 9-8 6-12 7-11 5-10 4-18

Conf 12-11 16-7 9-14 8-12 8-15

WESTERN CONFERENCE

San Antonio Memphis Dallas Houston New Orleans

W 25 22 22 21 9

L 11 15 16 16 28

Oklahoma City Denver Portland Minnesota Utah

W 29 20 18 18 17

L 8 17 18 19 19

L.A. Clippers L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State Sacramento

W 21 22 16 14 12

L 13 14 20 19 24

SOUTHWEST DIVISION Pct GB L10 Str .694 — 8-2 W-1 .595 3½ 8-2 W-4 .579 4 6-4 W-1 .568 4½ 5-5 L-2 .243 16½ 4-6 L-1 NORTHWEST DIVISION Pct GB L10 Str .784 — 8-2 L-1 .541 9 5-5 W-2 .500 10½ 4-6 L-2 .486 11 5-5 L-2 .472 11½ 3-7 L-1 PACIFIC DIVISION Pct GB L10 Str .618 — 5-5 L-1 .611 — 7-3 W-2 .444 6 5-5 W-2 .424 6½ 5-5 L-1 .333 10 2-8 L-2

SCORES AND SCHEDULE

Friday’s Games Memphis 102, Toronto 99 Atlanta 99, Milwaukee 94 Boston 107, New Jersey 94 Chicago 112, Cleveland 91 Denver 117, Houston 105 New Orleans 97, Dallas 92 Philadelphia 105, Golden State 83 San Antonio 102, Charlotte 72 Utah 99, Miami 98 L.A. Lakers 115, Sacramento 107 Phoenix 81, L.A. Clippers 78 Saturday’s Games Atlanta 97, Oklahoma City 90 Orlando 114, Milwaukee 98 Washington 101, Cleveland 98 Indiana 102, New Orleans 84 Memphis 100, Detroit 83 Dallas 102, Utah 96 Minnesota at Portland, late

WIZARDS 101, CAVALIERS 98

By The Associated Press Home 14-7 13-8 11-9 5-12 3-13

Sunday’s Games New York at Boston, 1 p.m. Miami at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m. New Jersey at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Golden State at Toronto, 6 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Houston, 7 p.m. Chicago at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Denver at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m. Monday’s Games Utah at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Orlando at Toronto, 7 p.m. Golden State at Washington, 7 p.m. Indiana at Chicago, 8 p.m. Dallas at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Sacramento at Denver, 9 p.m. New Orleans at Portland, 10 p.m.

Notebook

DALLAS — Dirk Nowitzki scored a season-high 40 points and the Dallas Mavericks beat the Utah Jazz 102-96 on Saturday night to snap a four-game losing streak. Nowitzki scored 10 points in the fourth quarter as the Mavericks turned away a late rally by the Jazz, who sliced a 23-point deficit down to five points. Dallas forward Lamar Odom played for the first time after missing four games because of a family matter and personal reasons. Odom was supposed to play Saturday night in the NBA Development League. Instead, he was recalled to play against the Jazz and scored nine points in 18 minutes. Paul Millsap scored 24 points and Derrick Favors added 14 points for Utah, which beat the Miami Heat 99-98 on Friday night. Jason Terry scored 22 points as the Mavericks won the first time since Feb. 20. Dallas had been in an offensive slump before Saturday night. The Mavs had averaged less than 90 points over their last seven games. Nowitzki responded by making his first three shots of the game and scoring 13 in a row at one point during the second quarter. He finished 14 for 21 from the floor and 9 for 10 from the line. Nowitzki’s previous season high was 34 points against the New York Knicks on Feb. 19.

WASHINGTON — Jordan Crawford scored 31 points and John Wall added 24 to lead Washington to a victory over Cleveland. A nt aw n Ja m i s on scored 29 in his return to Washington but missed a 3-point attempt to tie the game with 35 seconds to play. It was Jamison’s first appearance in the Verizon Center since being traded from the Wizards to Cleveland in February 2010. JaVale McGee had nine points and 12 rebounds for Washington, which snapped a six-game losing streak. Kyrie Irving scored 20 points, 12 in the fourth quarter, and Ryan Hollins had 15 for the Cavaliers, who lost their fifth straight. HAKWS 97, THUNDER 90

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mavericks’ Dirk Nowitzki (41) shoots over Jazz forward Paul Millsap (24) during the first half of their game in Dallas Saturday night.

The Jazz outscored the Mavericks 41-28 in the fourth quarter and went on a 24-8 run to cut Dallas’ lead to 93-88 with 1:41 left. Terry answered with a layup and Nowitzki hit four free throws to help Dallas push ahead 99-90 with 19.4 seconds left.

CJ Miles scored 13 points and Al Jefferson had 11 points and 10 rebounds for the Jazz, who have lost seven in a row to the Mavericks. Utah was down 53-47 in the third quarter when Dallas broke the game open.

WIZARDS 101, CAVALIERS 98

MAGIC 114, BUCKS 98

GRIZZLIES 100, PISTONS 83

CLEVELAND

MILWAUKEE

DETROIT

CLE Gee Jamison Hollins Irving Parker Thmpsn Gibson Sessions Samuels Casspi Totals

Min 33:19 38:18 31:01 30:54 33:28 16:54 21:52 18:22 6:11 9:41 240:00

FG FT Reb M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS 5-8 0-0 2-5 2 2 11 11-24 6-8 2-9 5 1 29 5-7 5-8 3-7 0 4 15 8-14 2-4 0-1 6 2 20 2-9 1-4 0-8 3 1 7 0-5 0-0 1-3 0 1 0 0-4 0-0 0-4 1 1 0 5-8 0-0 1-1 1 1 11 0-1 2-2 1-2 0 1 2 1-3 0-0 1-3 0 3 3 37-83 16-26 11-43 18 17 98

Percentages: FG .446, FT .615. 3-Point Goals: 8-21, .381 (Irving 2-3, Parker 2-6, Casspi 1-2, Sessions 1-2, Gee 1-3, Jamison 1-3, Gibson 0-2). Team Rebounds: 10. Team Turnovers: 14 (22 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Jamison 2, Samuels, Thmpsn). Turnovers: 14 (Irving 3, Gibson 2, Hollins 2, Thmpsn 2, Casspi, Gee, Jamison, Parker, Sessions). Steals: 9 (Jamison 4, Irving 2, Gee, Gibson, Parker). Technical Fouls: None.

MIL Min Harris 21:05 Ilyasova 31:07 Gooden 29:47 Jennings 32:24 Delfino 28:37 Dunleavy 29:33 MbaMoute 24:16 Udrih 22:20 Sanders 11:35 Brockman 6:40 Leuer 2:37 Totals 240:01

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mavericks forward Lamar Odom warms up for their game against the Jazz Saturday night.

M AV E R I CK S

Forward Odom rejoins team

DALLAS — Lamar Odom is rejoining the Dallas Mavericks without playing a planned game in the NBA Development League. The Mavericks said Saturday that Odom has been recalled and will be in uniform for their game that night against Utah. Odom had been set to play for the Texas Legends on Saturday night after missing four straight games for the Mavericks. He was assigned to the D-League team Friday. Odom’s last game was Feb. 20. The Mavericks have said he was away for a family matter and personal reasons. After missing the Mavericks’ last game before the All-Star break against his former team, the Los Angeles Lakers, Odom has missed all three games since the break. C AVA L I E R S

Irving back in starting lineup WASHINGTON — Rookie guard Kyrie Irving is in the starting lineup for

the Cleveland Cavaliers’ game at Washington a day after he rested with an illness. Irving missed Friday’s game against Chicago. Cleveland coach Byron Scott says Irving caught “a bug” during the All-Star weekend in Orlando and needed a day to recover, but the No. 1 overall pick in last year’s draft says he is fine now. WIZARDS

F Blatche back from calf injury WASHINGTON — Washington Wizards forward Andray Blatche will return against the Cleveland Cavaliers after missing more than a month with a strained left calf. Blatche is not in the Wizards’ starting lineup for Saturday’s game, but coach Randy Wittman says he will play. Wittman says he expects Blatche’s playing time to be limited to short stretches as he works on his conditioning. Blatche is averaging 10.3 points and 7.1 rebounds in 17 games this season. He hasn’t played since injuring his calf on Jan. 28 against Charlotte. Associated Press

Min 19:44 27:07 25:22 35:32 34:13 21:11 22:08 12:33 13:55 28:16 240:01

FG FT Reb M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS 0-2 0-0 1-5 1 2 0 4-9 1-2 3-6 3 6 9 4-10 1-3 4-12 1 3 9 8-17 8-10 2-5 5 3 24 13-22 0-1 0-3 3 1 31 0-3 1-2 4-9 5 0 1 4-7 1-2 1-5 1 4 9 0-3 0-0 0-3 5 1 0 4-7 1-1 0-3 0 1 11 3-7 0-0 0-1 2 3 7 40-87 13-21 15-52 26 24 101

Percentages: FG .460, FT .619. 3-Point Goals: 8-21, .381 (Crawford 5-11, Mason 2-4, Evans 1-4, Mack 0-1, Singleton 0-1). Team Rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 18 (11 PTS). Blocked Shots: 9 (McGee 4, Vesely 2, Blatche, Booker, Wall). Turnovers: 18 (Crawford 4, McGee 3, Vesely 3, Wall 3, Mason 2, Blatche, Booker, Mack). Steals: 10 (Evans 2, Singleton 2, Wall 2, Booker, Crawford, McGee, Vesely). Technical Fouls: None. Cleveland 33 22 23 20— 98 Washington 24 26 28 23—101 A—17,759 (20,278). T—2:16.

FG FT Reb M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS 2-4 0-0 1-2 1 2 4 7-13 3-3 3-7 3 3 18 2-7 3-4 2-5 1 5 7 9-17 8-12 0-3 5 2 27 3-9 2-2 0-2 4 2 10 3-7 0-0 0-4 1 0 8 3-5 2-5 2-6 2 1 8 2-8 0-0 1-2 4 0 4 4-5 0-1 0-1 0 4 8 2-3 0-0 1-1 0 2 4 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 37-79 18-27 10-33 21 21 98

Percentages: FG .468, FT .667. 3-Point Goals: 6-16, .375 (Dunleavy 2-2, Delfino 2-5, Ilyasova 1-1, Jennings 1-5, Gooden 0-1, Udrih 0-2). Team Rebounds: 13. Team Turnovers: 20 (20 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Sanders 2, Ilyasova). Turnovers: 20 (Gooden 4, Ilyasova 4, Harris 3, Jennings 3, Udrih 3, Delfino, Dunleavy, MbaMoute). Steals: 10 (Gooden 3, Harris 2, Udrih 2, Dunleavy, Ilyasova, MbaMoute). Technical Fouls: Gooden, 3:04 first.

ORLANDO

WASHINGTON WAS Singleton Booker McGee Wall Crawford Blatche Vesely Mack Mason Evans Totals

ORL Turkoglu Anderson Howard Nelson JRchrdsn Davis Redick Duhon Clark Wafer Smith Orton Totals

Min 30:05 27:21 39:16 24:30 34:11 18:33 28:49 22:01 6:42 5:34 1:29 1:29 240:00

FG FT Reb M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS 6-10 2-3 1-5 9 4 16 4-9 5-5 1-6 1 3 16 11-17 6-14 4-14 0 4 28 3-6 1-2 1-2 10 4 8 8-15 0-0 2-5 3 2 18 1-5 0-1 3-9 1 2 2 5-11 2-2 0-2 1 2 14 4-6 0-0 1-1 1 1 12 0-0 0-0 1-1 0 2 0 0-2 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 0 0 42-81 16-27 14-46 26 24 114

FG FT Reb ATL Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Williams 29:42 2-7 5-5 1-3 1 2 9 Smith 36:57 10-22 9-13 1-12 4 4 30 Pachulia 41:06 5-11 0-0 9-14 2 4 10 Teague 33:17 7-13 1-2 0-2 2 3 16 Hinrich 25:59 4-7 0-0 0-2 1 4 10 IJohnson 20:47 4-10 0-0 0-5 3 3 8 Stackhouse19:55 0-4 0-0 0-2 5 0 0 Pargo 16:49 3-7 0-0 0-0 1 0 8 McGrady 1:52 0-1 0-2 0-0 0 0 0 Radmanovic13:36 2-3 0-0 0-1 2 2 6 Totals 240:00 37-85 15-22 11-41 21 22 97

Percentages: FG .435, FT .682. 3-Point Goals: 8-17, .471 (Hinrich 2-2, Radmanovic 2-3, Pargo 2-4, Smith 1-1, Teague 1-3, Stackhouse 0-2, Williams 0-2). Team Rebounds: 10. Team Turnovers: 14 (16 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Smith, Williams). Turnovers: 12 (Smith 5, Pachulia 3, Teague 2, I.Johnson, Stackhouse). Steals: 9 (Teague 3, Stackhouse 2, I.Johnson, Pachulia, Smith, Williams). Technical Fouls: None. Oklahoma City 24 23 28 15—90 Atlanta 27 26 23 21—97 A—18,087 (18,729). T—2:20.

Percentages: FG .382, FT .793. 3-Point Goals: 2-9, .222 (Stuckey 1-2, Knight 1-4, Jerebko 0-3). Team Rebounds: 16. Team Turnovers: 21 (25 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Monroe, Stuckey, Wilkins). Turnovers: 17 (Monroe 4, Stuckey 4, Jerebko 2, Knight 2, Maxiell 2, Wallace 2, Gordon). Steals: 6 (Stuckey 2, Wilkins 2, Knight, Maxiell). Technical Fouls: None.

MEMPHIS FG FT MEM Min M-A M-A Gay 31:08 6-12 2-2 Speights 20:11 6-11 4-4 Gasol 34:58 7-13 3-3 Conley 38:08 5-11 0-0 Allen 30:23 4-8 3-4 Mayo 28:46 4-9 5-6 Pondexter 27:34 4-5 3-3 Cunningham22:59 0-4 0-0 Haddadi 5:52 1-2 0-0 Totals 239:59 37-75 20-22

Reb O-T 2-5 2-7 0-9 0-0 1-2 0-4 1-3 0-0 1-2 7-32

A PF PTS 2 4 15 0 4 16 2 3 17 12 2 10 2 4 11 1 3 17 0 1 12 0 3 0 0 0 2 19 24 100

A—17,569 (18,119). T—2:23.

INDIANA

ATLANTA

FG FT Reb M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS 6-10 1-2 0-3 4 1 13 4-6 2-2 1-4 1 4 10 4-12 6-6 6-11 1 3 14 5-16 4-6 3-7 2 1 15 6-22 7-9 3-4 4 3 20 2-6 0-0 1-5 1 1 4 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 2 0 1-2 3-4 0-0 0 2 5 0-0 0-0 0-4 1 1 0 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 0 0 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 29-76 23-29 14-38 15 18 83

A—18,846 (18,500). T—2:12.

PACERS 102, HORNETS 84

Percentages: FG .411, FT .828. 3-Point Goals: 6-23, .261 (Westbrook 3-8, Durant 3-10, Ivey 0-1, Jackson 0-1, Harden 0-3). Team Rebounds: 12. Team Turnovers: 21 (22 PTS). Blocked Shots: 10 (Aldrich 3, Ibaka 3, Collison, Durant, Perkins, Westbrook). Turnovers: 21 (Collison 4, Durant 4, Ibaka 3, Perkins 3, Aldrich 2, Harden 2, Westbrook 2, Cook). Steals: 7 (Durant 3, Harden 2, Ibaka, Ivey). Technical Fouls: None.

Min 38:29 21:59 35:33 41:25 37:54 22:22 15:11 13:24 10:07 1:12 1:12 1:12 240:00

Percentages: FG .493, FT .909. 3-Point Goals: 6-11, .545 (Mayo 4-5, Gay 1-1, Pondexter 1-2, Allen 0-1, Conley 0-2). Team Rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 14 (11 PTS). Blocked Shots: 9 (Allen 2, Cunningham 2, Gasol 2, Gay, Haddadi, Mayo). Turnovers: 14 (Gay 5, Speights 3, Mayo 2, Allen, Conley, Gasol, Pondexter). Steals: 8 (Conley 4, Cunningham, Gasol, Mayo, Pondexter). Technical Fouls: Defensive three second, 4:24 first. Detroit 28 19 23 13— 83 Memphis 28 18 23 31—100

OKLAHOMA CITY OKC Min Durant 42:53 Ibaka 29:36 Perkins 15:30 Westbrook 37:42 Cook 13:55 Harden 27:16 Collison 25:16 Jackson 10:18 Mohmed 7:01 Aldrich 14:28 Ivey 16:05 Totals 240:00

DET Prince Maxiell Monroe Knight Stuckey Jerebko Gordon Wilkins Wallace Russell Jr Macklin Daye Totals

Percentages: FG .519, FT .593. 3-Point Goals: 14-27, .519 (Duhon 4-5, Anderson 3-6, Redick 2-4, Turkoglu 2-4, J.Richardson 2-6, Nelson 1-2). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 22 (18 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Anderson, Davis, Howard, J.Richardson). Turnovers: 19 (Howard 5, Davis 3, Clark 2, Duhon 2, J.Richardson 2, Turkoglu 2, Anderson, Nelson, Wafer). Steals: 12 (Anderson 5, Howard 4, J.Richardson 2, Smith). Technical Fouls: None. Milwaukee 21 39 20 18— 98 Orlando 36 25 24 29—114

HAWKS 97, THUNDER 90 FG FT Reb M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS 9-23 14-17 1-8 2 2 35 4-5 2-4 1-6 0 2 10 1-3 0-0 1-5 1 6 2 10-21 2-2 0-0 4 2 25 0-0 0-0 0-3 0 2 0 4-8 2-2 1-6 2 1 10 0-3 0-0 1-2 1 2 0 0-2 0-0 0-0 1 1 0 1-2 0-0 0-3 0 0 2 1-5 4-4 5-7 0 2 6 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 3 0 30-73 24-29 10-40 11 23 90

Roundup

FG FT Reb IND Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Granger 29:42 7-14 2-3 0-3 1 1 20 West 29:00 6-11 2-4 3-13 3 1 14 Hibbert 27:42 0-4 4-6 6-10 2 2 4 Collison 27:02 6-11 0-0 2-4 4 0 13 George 23:46 3-10 4-4 0-1 3 1 11 Hill 20:56 3-5 3-3 0-4 3 2 10 Price 20:58 1-5 0-0 0-0 3 1 3 Amundsn 16:06 3-5 5-7 1-10 1 1 11 Hnsbrogh 17:10 3-8 1-1 1-1 0 3 7 DJones 15:34 2-3 2-4 0-1 2 2 7 Stephenson6:02 0-0 0-0 0-0 2 0 0 Pendergraph6:02 1-4 0-0 2-2 0 3 2 Totals 240:00 35-80 23-32 15-49 24 17 102

Percentages: FG .438, FT .719. 3-Point Goals: 9-19, .474 (Granger 4-7, Collison 1-1, D.Jones 1-1, Hill 1-2, George 1-4, Price 1-4). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 14 (16 PTS). Blocked Shots: 10 (Amundsn 2, Granger 2, Hibbert 2, D.Jones 2, West 2). Turnovers: 14 (Amundsn 3, Collison 3, Granger 3, Price 2, George, Hibbert, Hill). Steals: 8 (George 5, Collison, Hibbert, Hill). Technical Fouls: None.

NEW ORLEANS NO Min Aminu 21:44 Ayon 32:37 Kaman 25:48 Jack 35:05 Belinelli 37:58 SJones 23:59 Henry 26:16 Vasquez 22:57 Thomas 13:36 Totals 240:00

FG FT Reb M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS 0-5 0-0 2-6 3 1 0 5-10 0-0 3-6 4 4 10 5-15 0-0 2-6 3 3 10 6-11 5-6 0-4 3 3 18 6-16 1-4 0-1 2 2 15 5-6 2-2 4-9 2 2 12 4-11 0-1 3-6 2 3 9 1-5 0-0 0-2 3 0 2 1-2 6-8 0-3 0 3 8 33-81 14-21 14-43 22 21 84

MAVERICKS 102, JAZZ 96 UTAH UT Howard Millsap Jefferson Harris Hayward Miles Favors Watson Kanter Burks Totals

Min 26:28 30:01 33:57 27:09 15:36 25:20 17:59 20:51 14:03 28:36 240:00

FG FT Reb M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS 5-9 0-0 1-6 1 2 10 11-17 1-1 3-6 2 5 24 4-12 3-3 0-10 1 1 11 3-9 1-1 0-0 5 2 7 1-3 0-0 0-0 0 0 3 4-12 3-3 0-2 2 1 13 5-11 4-7 4-5 0 2 14 2-4 1-2 1-4 1 1 5 0-1 1-2 1-4 0 0 1 3-7 2-2 2-2 1 4 8 38-85 16-21 12-39 13 18 96

Percentages: FG .447, FT .762. 3-Point Goals: 4-16, .250 (Miles 2-5, Hayward 1-2, Millsap 1-4, Watson 0-1, Harris 0-2, Howard 0-2). Team Rebounds: 11. Team Turnovers: 15 (11 PTS). Blocked Shots: 1 (Watson). Turnovers: 14 (Burks 4, Harris 2, Howard 2, Jefferson 2, Miles 2, Watson 2). Steals: 10 (Millsap 4, Favors 3, Miles 2, Jefferson). Technical Fouls: None.

DALLAS DAL Marion Nowitzki Haywood Kidd Carter Odom Terry Beaubois Mahinmi Yi Totals

Min 32:46 28:50 30:33 27:50 28:14 18:02 33:49 20:10 17:27 2:19 240:00

FG FT Reb M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS 3-9 1-2 3-6 4 2 7 14-21 9-10 1-6 0 2 40 2-4 2-2 3-7 0 3 6 1-5 1-2 0-4 8 1 4 3-8 2-2 0-3 4 3 9 3-5 2-2 0-5 3 1 9 8-15 3-4 0-0 2 0 22 1-4 0-0 0-1 2 3 3 1-4 0-0 3-8 1 5 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 36-75 20-24 10-40 24 20 102

Percentages: FG .407, FT .667. 3-Point Goals: 4-12, .333 (Belinelli 2-6, Henry 1-2, Jack 1-2, Vasquez 0-2). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 14 (18 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Ayon 2, Kaman 2, Jack). Turnovers: 13 (Kaman 4, Ayon 3, Jack 3, Aminu, S.Jones, Vasquez). Steals: 3 (Aminu, Ayon, Henry). Technical Fouls: Defensive three second, 9:41 second. Indiana 25 29 25 23—102 New Orleans 23 14 17 30— 84

Percentages: FG .480, FT .833. 3-Point Goals: 10-23, .435 (Terry 3-6, Nowitzki 3-8, Beaubois 1-2, Kidd 1-2, Odom 1-2, Carter 1-3). Team Rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 16 (22 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Odom 3, Haywood, Marion). Turnovers: 15 (Nowitzki 4, Carter 2, Haywood 2, Kidd 2, Terry 2, Beaubois, Mahinmi, Marion). Steals: 11 (Carter 3, Kidd 2, Marion 2, Terry 2, Haywood, Nowitzki). Technical Fouls: None. Utah 20 16 19 41— 96 Dallas 24 19 31 28—102

A—16,379 (17,188). T—2:07.

A—20,560 (19,200). T—2:12.

ATLANTA — Josh Smith scored 13 of his 30 points in the fourth quarter, Jeff Teague added 16 points and Atlanta snapped Oklahoma City’s sevengame winning streak with a victory. Kevin Durant finished with 35 points, going 14 of 17 on free throw attempts, and Russell Westbrook had 25 points for league-best Oklahoma City. Smith, who matched a season-high in scoring and pulled down seven of his 12 rebounds in the fourth, had dunks on consecutive possessions to give the Hawks an 87-79 lead with 4:43 remaining. MAGIC 114, BUCKS 98

ORLANDO, Fla. — Dwight Howard had 28 points and 14 rebounds to lead six Magic players in double figures, and Orlando beat Milwaukee. The game was close until the Magic pulled away in the fourth quarter thanks to some hot 3-point shooting and dominant play from Howard. Jason Richardson had 18 points for the Magic, while Hedo Turkoglu and Ryan Anderson chipped in 16 points apiece. The Magic shot 51.7 percent (14 of 27) from 3-point distance. It was the Magic’s fourth victory over the Bucks in 22 days. The Magic overcame fourth-quarter deficits in the first three wins, but they didn’t need a comeback on Saturday night. Bra ndon Jen n i ngs led Milwaukee with 27 points. PACERS 102, HORNETS 84

NEW ORLEANS — Danny Granger scored 20 points and Indiana beat New Orleans for its first six-game winning streak in seven years. David West had 14 points and 13 rebounds in his first game back in New Orleans after playing the first eight years of his career with the Hornets. Darren Collison added 13 points, including a circus shot at the halftime buzzer. Indiana, playing only its second game in the last 10 days, blew it open with a 21-4 run to take a 54-37 lead at the half. Jarrett Jack scored 18 and Marco Belinelli added 15 for New Orleans. GRIZZLIES 100, PISTONS 83

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — O.J. Mayo scored 17 points and sparked a fourth-quarter rally with his 3-point shooting, and Memphis won its fourth straight with a victory over Detroit. Mayo was 4 of 5 outside the arc, connecting on all three attempts in the fourth quarter, when Memphis broke open a close game with 17 unanswered points. Marc Gasol added 17 points and nine rebounds. Marreese Speights had 16 points, and Rudy Gay added 12. Quincy Pondexter had 10 of his 12 points in the fourth quarter, while Mike Conley finished with 10 points and 12 assists. Rodney Stuckey led the Pistons with 20 points, although he was 6 of 22 from the field. Associated Press


10C » Sunday, March 4, 2012 »

C A L L E R -T I M E S

BACKTRACK D-TOUR The portable Bushnell BackTrack D-Tour personal GPS promises to help find your way when your sense of direction and cell service fails. With five storable locations, it allows you to save trailheads and campsites, along with other key locations. It maintains a self-calibrating digital compass, time, temperature, altitude and latitude/longitude coordinates, all uploadable on a PC or Mac. $119; Online: www.backtrackgps.com.

Outdoors

PHOTOS BY DAVID SIKES/CALLER-TIMES

A FISHY REPORT The first leg of our paddle was easy, but brief. About 100 yards from the 59 Bridge, the river was impassible.

■ Seeing is believing when it comes to an adventure to chase white bass GEORGE WEST — There was a time when I read fishing reports for entertainment. I read them for the same reason I believe most people consult the daily horoscopes. Generally I consider the two as equally reliable. Plus, I was living in Houston at a time when my schedule and transportation constraints would not have allowed me to go fishing, even if a particular marina on Lake Livingston said the spawn was on. Before that, I had no need for fishing reports. I was going regardless of what someone had written for the newspaper the previous day. These days I pay a little more attention to fishing reports, but only a little. Because of the Internet, the information certainly is more immediate. Whether this makes the reports more reliable, I’m not so sure. But even if fishing reports are timely enough, specific enough and just plain truthful enough to be useful, rarely can I drop what I’m doing to go check. Even if I could, I’m not sure I would. It might depend on the content and source of the report. I couldn’t tell you why this time was different. The report certainly was not first hand. And it was passed along to a friend who tends to believe everything he wants to believe, particularly if it fits his urge to play or his politics. I might not call Buddy Toepfer gullible, but some of you might if you knew him. And Toepfer has a penchant for the unusual. It’s probably his Louisiana roots that lead him off the beaten path so often. He considers the ditches, creeks, lakes, ponds and bays of the Coastal Bend his seafood market. And it’s not just seafood. He catches more than his share of crayfish, giant freshwater prawns and alligator gar, along with a host of other fish, both native and exotic. He is the consummate meat hauler. And proud of it. Which is why he watches fishing reports closely

This was Buddy Toepfer’s first catch of the day. I was downstream still trying to catch white bass on minnows and Road Runners at the time.

DAVID SIKES OUTDOORS

for the early signs of the annual white bass run up the Nueces River. White bass, along with most catfish varieties, share the most liberal bag limit of any fish that carries a daily catch restriction in Texas. The limit is 25, and the minimum length is 10 inches. And according to Toepfer’s source, the spawning run had begun below the Highway 59 bridge. Generally the spawning run begins in December, when it’s easy to intercept these aggressive pan fish that annually swim upstream in the Nueces and Frio rivers, as well as up creeks that feed our reservoirs. When river temperatures dip into the 65-degree range, schools of male white bass leave their home reservoirs to begin searching for shallow rocky riffles.

Soon the females follow. The journey’s end could be 10 miles or more upstream. The height of the run usually comes around Valentine’s Day. But biologist John Findeisen, who directs the Texas Parks & Wildlife Inland Fisheries team in Mathis, suggested that low water flow and unseasonably high temperatures might have delayed this year’s run. He said the main run seems to be upon us now. Two weeks ago, armed with Toepfer’s enthusiasm and dubious fishing report, I agreed to go see. When one of our family dogs perk up from their slumber or starts barking at something outside the house, my wife always says “Well, go see! Go see!” And always one, or both, of them eagerly race to the backyard to investigate. I felt a little like that on our way to the river, despite threatening gray skies. My eagerness for adventure slipped slightly at the muddy end of a long steep boat ramp under the 59 Bridge. The river was really low and really brown — so low that we had to walk

Imagine a backwoods Cajun poling a pirogue down a bayou. In this case, it’s a Calallen Cajun paddling a fiberglass boat on the muddy Nueces.

the flat-bottom, fiberglass john boat over a mud bar at the end of the ramp into deeper water, which was a harbinger of the day. It didn’t help that Toepfer had loaded the boat with too much clutter. The first leg of our paddle was easy, but far too brief. Within the first 100 yards downstream, the river became impassable because of shallow mud and fallen trees. Thankfully the bottom was fairly firm, making our portage to the next floatable section a little more tolerable. The Nueces is a winding river, and river bends usually deepen a stream. So we had something to keep us going other than that dubious fishing report.

We spotted a half dozen of these green kingfi shers along a certain stretch of river below the bridge. Green kingfi shers are fairly rare in this area. I assume they were there because the fi shing was good for them.

Seriously, this was not all drudgery. Everyone appreciates a full-bodied flowing river. But streams can be just as fascinating when they’re feeble and

struggling. We had entered a rich ecosystem, albeit a really muddy one lacking some

See SIKES, 11C


C A L L E R -T I M E S

ÂŤ Sunday, March 4, 2012 ÂŤ 11C

OUTDOORS South Texas ďŹ shing guidelines

Calendar

Xxxxxxx

WADE FISHING

HUNTING & FISHING EXPO

TOM CHROBOCINSKI

The Sunset Masonic Lodgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hunting and ďŹ shing expo continues today from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Al Amin Shrine Temple and Pavilion on Suntide Road off Interstate Highway 37. Admission is free. Booths will include hunting and ďŹ shing gear, outďŹ tters, arts and crafts, and more. A ďŹ sh fry is scheduled for 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Silent and live auctions. Proceeds will beneďŹ t scholarship funds for Tuloso-Midway and Calallen schools. Call 960-5838.

After the front passes through on Saturday, I would target the west shoreline of the Laguna Madre from the Boathole southward to Laguna Shores Road. If the water has some color to it, I would throw pumpkinseed/chartreuse or red/white soft plastics for trout. Even though bay temperatures are up, the bite has been really soft. I recommend a really slow retrieve. And work the potholes thoroughly. If you feel any resistance at all, set the hook. I would bring along some crab Fishbites for any drum that might be cruising the same area. I also would ďŹ sh the ďŹ rst and second guts on PINS using a Fishbite/shrimp combo for whiting and pompano. A lot of smaller sharks are showing up in the surf. To catch them, I would use cut mullet in the same guts. Tom is a member of Team Oso Hardcore Wade Fishing Club. Call 939-9830 or visit www.teamoso.com and the Laguna Madre Fly Fishers, 334-2336 or LagunaMadreFlyďŹ shersCC.com. ROCKPORT/ARANSAS BAY AND NORTHWARD CAPT. CHIP HARMON

Wait for the fog to clear somewhat. Then ďŹ nd a good mud/shell bottom near where you launch. The fog has been very thick early. Even with a good GPS, its is hard to navigate and see what is out there. Areas near the Intercoastal right around the corner from Cove Harbor have been holding ďŹ sh. Or if the fog clears, try Copano Bay or California Hole. Try for trout using a Corky (Paul Brown Original by MirrOLure) or shrimp under a popping cork. I recommend drifting to cover more water. If you throw plastics, I like a white or light colored Bass Assassin or darker colors in murky water. Skitterwalk plugs and other topwaters are starting to work on warmer days. Reach Chip at 244-7714 or www.elpescadoroutdoors.com. PORT ARANSAS/ARANSAS PASS CAPT. BILLIE KOCIAN

After this cold front, I think Sunday will be the best day to fish this week. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d start out wading Stedmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Reef or along the Lydia Ann Channel opposite the lighthouse. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been catching mostly trout in these spots. Throw the green/ silver flake or black/silver flake Exude Dart lure. Or throw a Paul Brown Original (Corky). The fish are near the bottom. Work the sand pockets in the seagrass. Concentrate on depths of about 1 to 3 feet. Also try the inside of Dagger, drifting with soft plastics. Expect to catch both trout and redfish. Reach Billie at 361-688-8859 or www.sportďŹ shingtexas.com. INGLESIDE/PORTLAND CAPT. KEVIN MCCOY

COASTAL BEND AUDUBON SOCIETY MEETING

The Coastal Bend Chapter of the Audubon Society has scheduled its next meeting for 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Corpus Christi Museum of Science and History, 1900 North Chaparral Street. The scheduled speaker is Daniel Reed with the Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute, Department of Animal and Wildlife Sciences, Texas A&M University-Kingsville. His topic is reddish egrets, new information on their movements, migratory routes and wintering areas after they leave the Texas Laguna Madre. This meeting is free and open to the public. Call 728-4635; email linda.fuiman@mail.utexas.edu; Online, www.coastalbendaudubon.org. FLY-FISHING CLUB

The next Laguna Madre Fly Fishers meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. March 8 at Nolanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Restaurant, 2330 Airline Road. Prospective members welcome. The group meets every third Thursday of each month for a ďŹ&#x201A;y-tying round table at Jerry Bâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kayaks (937-5340), 9906 So. Padre Island Drive. A free Fly Fling is scheduled each ďŹ rst Saturday at Royâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bait & Tackle (992-2960), 7613 SPID, with free casting lessons and ďŹ&#x201A;y tying. The club has regularly scheduled ďŹ shing trips on the third Saturday of each month. For details, call Steve Utley at 361-334-2336 or visit LagunaMadreFlyďŹ shersCC.com. PORT ARANSAS TARPON TALK

The Port Aransas Preservation and Historical Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Winter Lecture Series will feature Brandon Shuler, editor of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Glory of the Silver King: The Golden Age of Tarpon Fishingâ&#x20AC;? by Hart Stillwell at 7 p.m. March 8 at the Port Aransas Museum, at the corner of Alister and Brundrett streets. A wine and dessert reception is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. The lectures are free to museum members; $4 for nonmembers. Call 749-3800 or email portamuseum@ centurytel.net. PORT MANSFIELD/EAST CUT CLEANUP

I would start in Lower Dagger using pin perch or sea lice (mantis shrimp) if you can find them and targeting the potholes for redfish. Just anchor up in depths of 2 to 3 feet and be patient. If this does not work, then Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d move north and hit the flats using the same bait and method for redfish. You also might try for trout on the East Shore or in East Flats. Set up a drift and throw your favorite soft plastics on lightweight jigheads. Reach Kevin at 361-775-2027 or reelmccoy@cableone.net.

The fourth annual Port MansďŹ eld East Cut & Beach Cleanup is scheduled fo March 17. Sign-up and free breakfast is scheduled for 7 a.m. at the Port MansďŹ eld Chamber of Commerce Pavilion. A free box lunch will also be provided. They need boat captains willing to provide ferry service across the cut to the south end of Padre Island National Seashore, volunteers for the cleanup and sponsors to help cover food and lodging. Free housing will be provided to sponsors when availability,

SALTWATER BASICS FLY-FISHING COURSE

with priority given to youth groups. Call Miller and Kathy Bassler at 979-535-4593 or 979-204-5185. For a free Sam Caldwell T-shirt, please register by emailing kathieb@basslerenergyservices.com. CCA CORPUS CHRISTI BANQUET

The 34th annual banquet for the Corpus Christi Chapter of the Coastal Conservation Association is scheduled for March 29 at the American Bank Center. Admission is $125. Tables and sponsorships are available by emailing blaird@ďŹ rstvictoria.com. Proceeds beneďŹ t conservation of critical habitat other ďŹ sheries conservation work such as oyster reef, seagrass and marsh restoration and near shore artiďŹ cial reefs along the Texas Coast. Call 882-5199. Online: ccatexas.org/corpus-christi BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS FISHING TOURNEY

The Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Texas has scheduled its annual Hooked On Big Brothers Big Sisters Fishing Tournament on April 14 at Marker 37 Marina under the JFK Causeway. A VIP party is scheduled from 6-9 p.m. April 13 at the marina, with free food and beverages, silent auction, giveaways and live music. On tournament day, ďŹ shing begins at 5 a.m. and ends at 3:30 p.m. with a weigh-in at the marina. A weigh-in party is scheduled from noon to 4 p.m. on tournament day with food and beverages. Proceeds beneďŹ t the local Big Brothers Big Sisters effort. Entry fee for four-angler teams is $400. Individual entry fee is $125. FireďŹ ghters and law enforcement ofďŹ cers can enter a separate Guns and Hoses Category. And there is a womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only division. Sponsors are welcome. Please register by April 9 online at www.bigmentor.org or call 888-8500; email tony.elizondo@bigmentor.org. WOMEN IN THE WILD

The fourth annual Women in the Wild workshop is scheduled for April 14-15 at the Port Bay Hunting & Fishing Club near Rockport. This event is hosted by the Rockport Chapter of the Texas Outdoors Woman Network, a nonproďŹ t group that promotes women in the outdoors. Texas Game Warden Brandi Reeder coordinates the weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s events, which include shotgun training, kayaking, Dutch oven cooking, ďŹ shing, game processing, selfdefense, ďŹ rst-aid, archery, boat operation, photography and more. Registration fee is $125, which covers meals, T-shirt, gift bag and your choice of four classes. Each year, the chapter awards a $500 scholarship to a local female student. Contact Brandi at 888-630-4537 or info@townrockport.org. Online: www.townrockport.org. OIL FIELD WORKERS CLEANUP

Don Kennedy with El Paso Corp. has scheduled a roadside cleanup called 10 Miles at a Time from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 14-15 at the intersection of Farm-toMarket Road 624 and Highway 97. Anyone and everyone is welcome. Contact Don at 443-9746 or don.kennedy@elpaso.com.

Texas A&M-Corpus Christiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Community Outreach program has scheduled a course on basic ďŹ&#x201A;y-tying and casting techniques starting March 21 and running each Wednesday evening through May 9 in Room 1003 of the Natural Resources Center on campus. Class time is 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The course fee is $120 for all eight sessions. Course instructors are ďŹ&#x201A;y guide Steven Utley and Don Alcala, president of the local Laguna Madre Fly Fishers club. Call 361825-5967 or email joseph.miller@tamucc. edu. FUNDRAISER SKEET SHOOT

The Coastal Bend Wildlife Photo Contest has scheduled a Ranch Party and Skeet Shoot to beneďŹ t its Kritters 4 Kids education program for March 24 at Bruce & Gail Hoffmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rockin h Ranch near Alice. Bryan Bracht will be on hand to toss clay targets in this fast-paced, two-shooter ďŹ&#x201A;urry competition. The winner gets a Benelli shotgun. Other prizes include a Yeti cooler. Entry fee is $250 for a twoshooter team ($300 at the gate); $2,000 for a four-team corporate package, which includes a set of 30 Wildlife in Focus books and curriculum for a classroom of your choice; or $1,500 for a two-team corporate package, which also includes the K4K classroom sponsorship. The Ranch Party will feature all-day eats at Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chuck Wagon, plus a wild game, sausage and chicken barbecue by the Texas Game Wardens Cooking team, dinner at 6 p.m., silent auction, scavenger/photo hunt for the kids, hayrides and a washer-tossing competition. Party fee for non-shooters is $25 if you preregister; $30 at the gate; and $10 for kids 13 and younger. Leon Measures will offer his Shoot Where You Look seminar for a separate fee Friday and Saturday. Call Patti Young at 881-9316 or email wildlifephoto@sbcglobal.net. LEON MEASURES SHOOT WHERE YOU LOOK

Renowned Texas shooting instructor Leon Measures is offering open registration for his next visit to the Coastal Bend March 23-25 near Alice, in conjunction with the Coastal Bend Wildlife Photo Contestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ranch Party and Skeet Shoot at the Rockin h Ranch. Leon teaches shooters to trust and follow their natural ability to hit a target, while eliminating bad habits and developing new consistent shooting routines and techniques. The course is divided into two sessions. He starts with a BB gun and graduates to a shotgun. Bring your own shotgun and six boxes or 150 shells. This is for novice or beginner shotgunners, as well as experienced shooters and hunters. Leon would like to ďŹ ll three classes with six shooters in each. Clinics start at 8 a.m. and end at noon. If he offers a second class, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll run from 2-6 p.m. The individual fee is $250 (plus clay targets) per student or $1,500 for groups. Class size is limited. Instruction comes with a money-back guarantee to get your moneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth. Call Leon at 800-201-5535; email info@shootwhereyoulook.com; Online: www.shootwhereyoulook.com.

UPPER LAGUNA MADRE/BAFFIN BAY CAPT. AUBREY BLACK

Good weather has produced good catches, but when these strong fronts come through, hang on tight. This is the season for grinding it out in the mud. Patience and persistence have been paying off. For trout up to 28 inches Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d recommend small white soft plastics or large topwater plugs. Soft mud bottoms with seagrass is still the key. Water color is off in the bay, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not affecting the fish or the fishing. For redfish, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d use the same lures and expand your wade into shallower waters if you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find them deeper. Reach Aubrey at 297-5117 or www.captblack.com. KAYAK FISHING CAPT. STEVEN UTLEY

Start out early working the shallows around shorelines and spoil islands from the Fish Pass to East Flats for redfish and speckled trout. As the day progresses and traffic heightens move to depths of 2 to 3 feet looking for sand and grass spots. Fly rodders: medium poppers on a Mustad Streamer hook #2 in chartreuse with a white tail. Make sure the tail material extends just a little past the hook point. Use shrimp and crab patterns in dark colors over sand; light colors over seagrass. Conventional tackle: use a Spook Jr. in bone/silver or pink/white; DOA paddletails in root beer/chartreuse or black/gold rigged weedless on an Owner Twistlok #3 sixteenth-ounce jighead. Reach Steven at 334-2336 or www.blueheronadventures.com. FRESHWATER (CHOKE CANYON)

DAVID SIKES/CALLER-TIMES

This pair of kayakers knew better than to go far downstream. They were catching white bass within sight of the 59 Bridge.

SIKES

CAPT. CARROLL ATKINSON

Start the morning behind Hog Island throwing white or chartreuse spinnerbaits into the submerged timber and laydowns. Look for depths of 1 to 4 feet early. Later in the day, especially if the sun comes out, move to deeper hardwoods in depths of 4 to 8 feet and switch to a Texas-rigged worm or lizard. Work the trees thoroughly. Also try the east side of Three Fingers with spinnerbaits or shallow crankbaits along banks. In the coves throw Rat-L-Traps or Texas-rigged plastics. Reach Carroll at 215-0766 or rcadja@hughes.net

from 10C

of the expected aesthetics. The absence of water in a riverbed reveals a usually hidden world. I might argue that when the river shrivels during drought, its role is even more vital to wildlife. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the only watering hole to be found. We saw snakes, turtles, egrets and herons, lots of unidentiďŹ able small birds

and more kingďŹ shers than I usually see in one place. Maybe the ďŹ shing is easy for them when the water is so low. I wish I could say the same for us. We paddled and dragged the boat about two miles downstream. We did ďŹ nd deeper water in several places. And we did catch some ďŹ sh, but no white bass. We tried tiny spinnerbaits, Road Runners, small Rat-L-Traps and, of course,

minnows. But it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t until Toepfer switched to his homemade stink bait that he caught our ďŹ rst ďŹ sh. It was catďŹ sh. I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t catch anything, even after giving in to my stink bait urge. Toepfer caught several more catďŹ sh on minnows. I think we could have caught a limit of catďŹ sh if we had started trying earlier. Funny, Toepferâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ shing report didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say anything about catďŹ sh.

The way back was not nearly as enjoyable. We were going against the current, and the scenery was a rerun. To top it off, we ran into a pair of leisurely kayakers near the bridge who were catching white bass. But no regrets. Lessens come in many forms. Sometimes you just gotta go see. David Sikesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Outdoors columns run on Thursday and Sunday. Contact David at 361-886-3616 or sikesd@caller.com.

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12C » Sunday, March 4, 2012 »

C A L L E R -T I M E S

NFL

Bounty hunters have to pay

ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE

New Orleans Saints defensive coordinator Gregg Williams shouts during a preseason game against the San Francisco 49ers at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans on Aug. 12. Williams apologized for running a bounty program that targeted opposing players for injuries.

Saints case puts scrutiny on bounties for hard hits

■ Players say

such things are part of game By Paul Newberry Associated Press

The revelations were shocking and appalling to those outside the NFL: A team paid bounties to knock opponents out of the game, including some of football’s biggest stars. For those who suit up, however, it sounded more like the long-accepted cost of doing business in a brutal sport, a dirty little secret that everyone kept on the down low. Atlanta Falcons star Roddy White called it a “league thing” that goes far beyond the New Orleans Saints. Shawne Merriman of the Buffalo Bills wondered what all the fuss was about, having long maintained he was targeted and sustained a careeraltering injury. Former All-Pro guard Alan Faneca said he wasn’t surprised at all that a sordid system had finally been exposed. “It’s a violent game we play. Whether people want to think about it or not, part of the game is to exert physical dominance over your opponent,” Faneca, who retired after the 2010 season, told The Associated Press on Saturday. “If it results in a guy not finishing the game, then that’s what happened in the course of playing the game.” Former NFL player Matt Bowen was the bluntest one of all. “Bounties, cheap shots, whatever you want to call them, they are a part of this game,” Bowen wrote Saturday in a column in the Chicago Tribune. The NFL said Friday that Saints players and at least one assistant coach maintained a bounty pool of up to $50,000 the past three seasons to reward

game-ending injuries inflicted on opposing players, including star quarterbacks Brett Favre and Kurt Warner. “Knockouts” were worth $1,500 and “cart-offs” $1,000, with payments doubled or tripled for the playoffs. According to the NFL, the pool amounts reached their height in 2009, the year the Saints won the Super Bowl. The NFL investigation, by its own security department, delivered a blow to a league that has placed increased emphasis on safety, especially concerning concussions and dirty hits. But as objectionable as many find the activity, is it a crime? There was no immediate sign that prosecutors would investigate. The NFL has yet to hand out punishments, which could include suspensions, fines and loss of draft picks. “I haven’t studied the issue yet and it’s not before us,” said Leon Cannizzaro, the district attorney of Orleans Parish in New Orleans. Another government agency to keep an eye on: the Internal Revenue Service, which might view bounties as extra income that wasn’t reported on tax returns. Asked whether there is a culture of “bounties” that goes beyond the Saints, NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said: “If we find other violations of league rules, we will take action.” He declined to comment on whether other teams are being investigated. If the news stunned NFL fans, it didn’t evoke the same reaction in seasoned players. “It’s a league thing, but it’s about to end because of the Saints story,” White tweeted Saturday. He also posted, “I got my own bounty on the Saints defense I want to kill them every year.”

The Falcons have a bitter rivalry with the Saints that dates to the 1960s, when they entered the league a year apart as expansion teams. They have long been in the same division, facing each other twice a season. When one of White’s Twitter followers asked if he knew how much the Saints might’ve paid to knock him out of a game, he replied, “At least a million dollars.” Merriman, a three-time Pro Bowler, claims he was intentionally injured in 2007 while with the San Diego Chargers. in retaliation for hitting Tennessee quarterback Vince Young after a handoff. Merriman hasn’t been the same dominating player since the knee injury. “Why is this a big deal now? Bounties been going on forever,” Merriman tweeted. Former Saints defense coordinator Gregg Williams apologized and admitted overseeing the sordid program, which involved between 22 and 27 defensive players and, according to the NFL, was carried out with the knowledge of head coach Sean Payton. “It was a terrible mistake, and we knew it was wrong while we were doing it,” said Williams, who is now defensive coordinator of the St. Louis Rams. Bowen, who played strong safety in the NFL for seven years, said Williams had a similar bounty system during his tenure with the Washington Redskins. “Prices were set on Saturday nights in the team hotel,” Bowen wrote in the Tribune. “In a makeshift meeting room, with the whisper of evening traffic pouring in from the Beltway, we laid our bounties on opposing players. We targeted big names, our sights set on taking them out of the game.”

As paydays go, they weren’t bad. A thousand bucks if your guy is carted off the field, $500 extra for a clean knockout. End someone’s season or career? Priceless. There was a lot to like about the New Orleans Saints offering up cash for big hits. The scheme made for tougher players and helped them on a stirring playoff run that ended with their hands wrapped around the NFL trophy in 2010. Yes, it left Kurt Warner sprawled for several minutes on the turf in the playoffs two years ago, surer than ever that it was time to hang up his cleats. Brett Favre escaped with a good old fashioned beating, though one pass short of making the Super Bowl. But, as Mike Tyson loves to say about his sport, football is a hurt business. Way too much of a hurt business if you listen to former players who often end up sounding like former fighters. The courts are full of concussion-related lawsuits against the NFL and its teams, and former players such as Hall of Fame running back Tony Dorsett worry publicly that they may end up with dementia or Alzheimer’s because of hits they’ve taken to the head. So when the NFL was tipped off to the bounty system employed by the Saints, the league had no choice but to put its talented team of investigators on the trail. They looked at 18,000 documents, interviewed scores of players and coaches, and even brought in forensic experts to make sure what they were seeing was the real thing. It was, and now it’s time to make the bounty hunters pay. Not with fines, because this was so egregious that depleting a few wallets is meaningless. Not with suspensions, either, because missing a few games is almost as meaningless. And taking away draft picks doesn’t target the people who need to be targeted. The people in charge of

TIM DAHLBERG COLUMNIST

the scheme put the very foundation of the league in jeopardy. And if NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell is to have any kind of credibility on the issue of injured players in the NFL, they need to go away for a long, long time. Goodell himself indicated Friday that some tough penalties will come for violating the league rule on bounty payments. When they do, they likely will make the sanctions imposed on Bill Belichick and the Patriots for Spygate look tame by comparison. “It is our responsibility to protect player safety and the integrity of our game, and this type of conduct will not be tolerated,” Goodell said. “We have made significant progress in changing the culture with respect to player safety, and we are not going to relent. We have more work to do, and we will do it.” Just how far the commissioner intends to go, only he knows. But here are a few suggestions in what might be his best chance to end a culture of bounty hunting that has festered underground in the league for decades. Start by banning former Saints defensive coordinator Gregg Williams from the NFL for life. He’s the one who oversaw the scheme to reward players for hurting other players, and New Orleans may not have been the only place he did it. Several Redskins who played under Williams told The Washington Post a similar reward system was in place when Williams — now with the St. Louis Rams — was the defensive coordinator there. Give Williams some credit for immediately apologizing and saying he realized what he did was wrong. Offer him a chance

to come back in, say, five years and plead his case for employment again. But send a message that if you care about your livelihood, you don’t pay players extra money to hurt other players. Next to go should be Saints general manager Mickey Loomis. The NFL said Loomis denied any knowledge of the bounty program when first questioned in 2010 and said if he found it was happening he would put an end to it. The league says Loomis did nothing then and did nothing again earlier this year when Saints owner Tom Benson told him to make sure the payments were stopped. Tell the Saints they can no longer employ Loomis. Tell Loomis he can sit out a year before trying for another job in the NFL. And then there’s Sean Payton. The coach who led the Saints to their Super Bowl win. The coach the NFL says knew what was going on when the injury pot peaked at $50,000 or more during the 2009 playoff run to the championship game. The coach who himself was carted off the field in an ironic twist last season after being accidentally leveled on the sidelines by one of his own players. Give him the same year off that Loomis gets. Let him use the time to think about the difference between hitting hard and hitting to hurt. Goodell surely didn’t want this scandal, not after the NFL came off a triumphant season with labor peace and television contracts wrapped up for much of the next decade. He would have much preferred to bask in the glow of a thrilling Super Bowl and watch proudly as NFL draft talk dominated the offseason. But it has given him the perfect opportunity to take a stand, a great chance to show he’s serious about protecting players. He can be tough, and he should be tough. Send the message that hitting to hurt no longer pays.

Peyton not the only difficult decision By Barry Wilner Associated Press

Decisions, decisions. The Indianapolis Colts have a doozy, of course, and if they don’t pay Peyton Manning a $28 million roster bonus by Thursday — or renegotiate it, a long shot — the four-time league MVP becomes a free agent. If they do ante up, and Manning’s neck problems prohibit him from playing in 2012, or ever, Indy’s salary cap structure is shot. “Peyton has to be healthy. It has to be something that’s spoken on, investigated and talked about,” new Colts GM Ryan Grigson said last week at the scouting combine. “But right now, like I said, it’s a process that we’re waiting for things to happen and doing the things that we have control of.” Lots of teams will have tough choices when free agency begins March 13, whether it involves re-signing a quarterback who could

reach the open market (Alex Smith in San Francisco, Rex Grossman in Washington, and a guy named Brees in New Orleans); holding on to a franchise performer at another position (running back Ray Rice in Baltimore, defensive end/linebacker Mario Williams in Houston, receiver Wes Welker in New England); or keeping players who made timely contributions in 2011 (receiver Mario Manningham with the Super Bowl champion Giants, cornerback Carlos Rogers in San Francisco). With the salary cap unlikely to increase much, if at all, over 2011 (about $123 million, including a cap credit negotiated at the end of the lockout), and more than 500 players becoming available, a strange dichotomy has been created: lots of places to spend money, but not a lot of money to spend. “The assumption is the market won’t be that great,” said Steelers general manager Kevin Colbert, whose

team rarely is a major player in free agency. “But the market for the very valuable players will still be a high market.” A few of the biggest names become free agents because they have been given franchise tags, or will be. Does anyone believe the Saints will allow Drew Brees to escape the Big Easy, or that Rice won’t be the workhorse in Baltimore for years to come? Some decisions that would appear easy actually are complex. Houston has to pony up big time to retain Williams, the top overall draft pick in 2006 and the best defensive player in franchise history. But Williams missed all but the first five games in 2011, even as the Texans were ranking second in overall defense and several young players emerged. Williams will command top dollar, and might not be the critical component he once was for Houston.

Notebook

CO LT S

QB Manning throws on Duke campus DURHAM, N.C. — Colts quarterback Peyton Manning threw to receivers in a recent workout on Duke’s campus. Athletic department spokesman Art Chase says Manning returned less than a month after he came to throw with college offensive coordinator David Cutcliffe, who is now Duke’s head coach. Chase confirmed the veracity of a video posted Friday to YouTube and reported on by Yahoo Sports. Manning has spent the past six months recovering from his third neck operation in less than two years, and the Colts have to decide by Thursday whether to

pay the four-time league MVP a $28 million roster bonus or let him become a free agent. Chase made his remarks on Saturday. SAINTS

Franchise tag placed on quarterback Brees METAIRIE, La. — The New Orleans Saints have placed the franchise tag on Drew Brees — giving them exclusive negotiating rights with their Pro Bowl quarterback for the next year. Brees has been involved in lengthy contract talks with the Saints and, without the tag, could have negotiated with other teams as a free agent. Team spokesman Greg Bensel said Saturday that the Saints were

officially notifying the NFL of the designation. The New Orleans TimesPicayune and ESPN.com previously reported that Brees would get the tag. In January, Brees said he would be “beyond stunned” if he and the Saints are unable to agree on a contract extension during this offseason. CH A R G E R S

G Dielman retires due to concussion SAN DIEGO — As tough and nasty as any player in the NFL, whether it was putting Albert Haynesworth on his back or getting in the last shot in a tangle of large bodies, Kris Dielman found it hard to end his NFL career.

With one of his young sons babbling in the background, the four-time Pro Bowl left guard for the San Diego Chargers choked up as he announced Thursday that he was retiring due to a scary concussion that led to changes by the NFL. “I had nine great years,” said Dielman, who recalled that no one thought he’d make it past his first training camp after signing as an undrafted rookie in 2003. “It just sucks that it has to end this way, but it is.” Dielman said it was his decision to retire 4½ months after sustaining a concussion in a helmet-to-helmet collision with a New York Jets defender. “I’ve got to get out when the getting out’s good still,” he said. “It wasn’t worth what would happen if I would have kept on playing. I’ve got a beautiful fam-

ily I want to be around. I live in a great place, so I want to enjoy it. It’s been a great nine years. I had a lot of fun; a lot of memories.” CHIEFS

Shields newest inductee to KC Chiefs Hall of Fame

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The Kansas City Chiefs have announced that right guard Will Shields, who made the trip to the Pro Bowl a club record 12 times, is the newest inductee into the team’s hall of fame. Shields was the Chiefs’ first draft pick in 1993, taken in the third round out of Nebraska. He played in 224 regular-season games during his 14-year career, another team record. Associated Press


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Sunday Homes

Section F

INSIDE:

Neighborhoods: Coquina Bay. 4F

Sunday, March 4, 2012

WATER-SIDE DREAMS

Story and photos by EDDIE SEAL /Special to the Caller-Times

ENGULFING

VIEWS Couple can escape in Port Aransas home

Ever changing skies and incredible panoramic gulf views are offered from the third fl oor master bedroom balcony.

Bill and Franke Albrecht both love being near the water, and having a home with Gulf of Mexico views is a dream come true. Their decorator and cousin, Carol Albrecht of My Coastal Home, helped them choose furnishings that are practical and comfortable, with colors that give a serene aura to the home. Walking into the 4,000-squarefoot home is like taking a step out of the hustle and bustle of everyday life and into a peaceful tropical hideaway. See HOME, 6F

The Albrechts describe their home as comfortable, with relaxing colors and a great view.

Cypress panelling and incredible gulf views are one of the best features in the Albrechts’ beach house.

4662 OSO PARKWAY

The Lakes - 5BR/3.5BA Cape Cod overlooking Oso Creek. Library/study adjoins downstrs master suite. Rich wood flooring, 2 FP, stone deck around in-ground pool/hot tub. Custom kitchen offers top of the line cabinetry, appliances, counters, etc. Also, dormers w/window seats, bookshelves & terrific storage; 3-car gar to please any man! MLS 175194

4725 SCHWERIN LAKE DR

The Lakes - This beautiful family home has all the upgrades. Master down & 3BR up + Bonus/ Office. Custom mosaic on FP face; custom decorator colors throughout; granite in kitchen w/newer appliances; Beautiful pool/deck area. $270,000 MLS 171272

• 3110 QUEBEC 4/2/2 home w/split floor plan. Ceramic tile in living area. Kitchen has updated granite counters & ceramic tile floor. All bedrooms carpeted. Outside back patio is ready for family gatherings. $144,900 MLS 175304 • 4543 DOBBIN 3BR/3BA Country Home on almost 1.0 acre. Comes w/ storage building & storage barn, RV Parking w/electric pole, pump house for yard sprinkler system & Propane Gas. Recent updates inc Hardi-Plank siding & 45 yr. roof. Two decks, enclosed sun porch. Also inc Jacuzzi & built-in cabinets in Master; custom windows & storm shutters. $118,000 MLS 173658 • 14502 E CABANA A-103 Shores Island Condo on the water with private boat dock & fabulous views! 2BR/1BA Condo offers open living with tiled floors & designer fixtures. Kitchen w/ all appliances, counterspace, a pantry & separate utility room. Sliders open to deck; also a lower deck directly over the water. $82,900 MLS 175148 • 3701 MACLEOD Very large corner home in a compound arrangement - pool centered in the courtyard w/ mature foliage, trees & palms. Org house apparently added onto & renovated in 1957. 5 BR/4BA, this house offers abundant space & is ready for that special investor or homeowner who can see it’s great potential. Being Offered AS IS. $76,000 MLS 173698 • 605 LOPEZ Robstown - Charming 2BR/1.5BA home w/ huge back yard & open concrete patio slab for extra parking. Open living/dining areas w/plenty of windows & natural light. Shady mature trees & landscaping. Nice covered patio. Robstown SD & just a short drive to CC, Kingsville, Calallen & surrounding areas. $37,800 MLS 175252

5302 Everhart • 361-991-9111 • view online: www.grouponecc.com

Group One Real Estate

Leading Real Estate Companies of the World CAL556695


2F » Sunday, March 4, 2012 »

C A L L E R -T I M E S

Sunday Homes

OPEN HOUSES CENTRAL

SOUTH 2538 Las Brisas, Los Vientos at Terra Mar 3/2/2 $179,900 Square Feet: 1,765 Open House: 2 to 5 p.m. Information: 549-9329 Coldwell Banker Pacesetter Steel

7605 Bayonne, Kings Crossing 4/3/2 $257,400 Square Feet: 2,340 Open House: 2 to 5 p.m. Information: 815-6728 Coldwell Banker Pacesetter Steel 3810 Greystone, Greystone 3/2.5/2 $227,500 Square Feet: 2,161 Open House: 2 to 5 p.m. Information: 765-7208 Coldwell Banker Pacesetter Steel 2614 Reveille, Greenfields by the Bay 4/2.5/2 $197,616 Square feet: 2,148 Open house: 2 to 5 p.m. Information: 232-3121, Keller Williams Realty

901 N. Upper Broadway #201, Atlantic Lofts 1/1.5/1 $219,000 Square Feet: 1,673 Open House: 2 to 5 p.m. Information: 443-4431 Coldwell Banker Pacesetter Steel

7206 Sebastian, Greenfields by the Bay 3/2/2 $179,216 Square feet: 1.948 Open house: 2 to 5 p.m. Information: 232-3121, Keller Williams Realty

434 Dolphin, Lamar Park 3/2/2 $209,000 Square feet: 1,867 Open house: 2 to 4 p.m. Information: 816-1224, Re/ Max Associates

6929 Windy Way, Summer Wind Village 3/2/2 $161,500 Square Feet: 1,458 Open House: 2 to 5 p.m. Information: 658-0188 Coldwell Banker Pacesetter Steel

645 Sorrell, Lindale Park 2/1/2 $112,000 Square Feet: 1,619 Open House: 2 to 5 p.m. Information: 215-4238/2151914/774-7355 Coldwell Banker Pacesetter Steel

7710 Las Miras, Rancho Las Brisas 3/2/2 $142,900 Square Feet: 1,316 Open House: 2 to 5 p.m. Information: 774-4514 Coldwell Banker Pacesetter Steel

2613 Bruin, Greenfields by the Bay 3/2/2 $185,840 Square feet: 2,020 Open house: 2 to 5 p.m. Information: 232-3121, Keller Williams Realty

Odem Gregory / Portland

Ingleside / Aransas Pass

Calallen / Annaville / Robstown Nueces Bay

1030 McClendon, Lindale Park 3/2/1 $112,500 Square Feet: 1,277 Open House: 2 to 5 p.m. Information: 215-4238/2151914 Coldwell Banker Pacesetter Steel

3021 Quail Hollow, South Fork 3/2/2 $144,900 Square Feet: 1,446 Open House: 2 to 5 p.m. Information: 945-2082 Coldwell Banker Pacesetter Steel

7209 Clancy, Greenfields by the Bay 4/2.5/2 $195,000 Square feet: 2100 Open house: 2 to 5 p.m. Information: 232-3121, Keller Williams Realty

Rockport / Fulton

Corpus Christi Bay

Central

NAC-CC

South

PADRE ISLAND

Flour Bluff

15226 Caravel, Barataria Bay 3/2/2 $267,900 Square feet: 2,374 Open house: 1 to 4 p.m. Information: 290-2789, Keller Williams Realty

Port Aransas / Mustang Island

Gulf of Mexico

Padre Island

CAL556719

SOUTH 2806 Bretshire, Bent Tree 3/3.5/3 $277,000 Square feet: 2,713 Open house: 1 to 4 p.m. Information: 774-0424, Keller Williams Realty

Coastal Bend Premier Homes 7725 Lovain

6101 Garden Court

CAL557443

WOW what a great house! Great Kings Crossing street. +/- 35’x14’ pool w/ separate hot tub.Wood burning fireplace in one of the three living areas. Large covered patio and playground. Zoned sprinkler system. Professional landscaping. Iron fencing w/ gates. Custom blinds. Alarm system. $369,000 Gene Guernsey 361-993-8018 MLS 175350

5309 Stonemill Circle

CAL557442

Low maintenance, Kings Crossing home in mature gated Garden Court community. 3/2/2 w/ spacious open floorplan. Custom crown molding. Chef’s kitchen w/ granite counter tops, island, & stainless steel appliances. $219,500 Gene Guernsey 361-993-8018 MLS 174581

CAL557441

4/3.5/2 Beautiful home on quiet cul-de-sac. Open floor plan. Oversized garage with workshop. Recently upgraded kitchen, sprinkler system, trailer/boat pad, and workshop. 2834 square feet. $229,900 Gene Guernsey 361-993-8018 MLS#174939

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Interested in advertising on this page?

CAL557444

15310 Bonasse Court #D

MLS #: 174950

Associates

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CAL556730

Beach living. 3 bedoom 2 bath brick home on canal. Fireplace, tile floors, plantation shutters with french doors leading to covered patio and a boat dock. Call Today! vegarealtygroup.com $217,700

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Becky Lopez

886-3621

CE

CAL556727

5127 Cape Ann - “South Shore Estates”

by Owner

OPE

NH

CAL556728

Ready for new owners. 3/2/2 in established neighborhood. This home offers split bedrooms for privacy & living rm has cornered fireplace which opens to dining area. All tile floors, new paint inside. Bedrooms are roomy w/great closet space. Screened patio w/ g yard for kids to play. Dog kennel stays. 1yr home warranty & closing cost allowance. Move in Ready! $119,000 Corina Montalvo 361-765-0846 MLS 174173

906 Summitt

CAL556729

Quiet culdesac in Portland. 3 bdrm, 2 ba, 2 car garage, 1,662 sq ft, 2 story offers Master down stairs & 2 bdrms upstairs. Large vaulted ceiling living room w/fireplace & separate large dining area. Kitchen has breakfast bar & breakfast nook. Bedrooms are spacious & have double closet & walk in closet. Sprinkler system. Large back yard w/covered patio. $129,000 Corina Montalvo 361-765-0846 MLS #: 174901

3810 GREYSTONE

CAL556726

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CAL556725

Warm & inviting 3 bedroom home in Greystone w/soaring ceilings, split bedrooms, 2 eating areas & office. Open living room features fireplace w/lighted art niche. Master bedroom is expansive, w/jet tub, separate shower. Kitchen features beautiful cabinetry, granite counters, stainless steel appliances. Looking for extra parking...this home has it. Side gate opens to concrete pad for RV or boat. $227,500

Karen Randolph 361.765.7208 MLS 174786

To advertise in this section please contact:

Becky Lopez at 361.886.3621

D

4 bdrm, 3 full baths, 2 half baths, 3 car garage close to Montclair Elementary, Cullen Middle School, King High School. Lg spacious bdrms & closets, 2 living areas, formal dining. Huge backyard, lot size: 130x180 ft, 2 A/C units, 2 new AC compressors. $479,000 For Sale

By appointment only Abby Saenz 361-991-6347

Diane Fuentes 361/742-6600

7314 Ursa

-4

CAL556724

Cecile Pesek 361.816.1224 MLS 171233

Op

14122 Cutlass

434 Dolphin

e2

LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION! Well maintained 3-2-2 home in LAMAR PARK!! Lovely parquet floors with large living and dining rooms. Inviting sunroom with french doors overlooking beautifully landscaped backyard. Extra large lot! Additional screened patio for outdoor relaxation. Roof in ‘05, plumbing reroute‘02. One year home warranty! WELCOME HOME!! $209,000

Townhome on a wide canal closest to ICW/Laguna Madre & Yacht Club. Lots of extras: Motorized boat lift for sailboat or large boat + boat slip, granite counters, SS appliances & wine fridge, tri-level decks, master bedroom leads to upper deck & master bath w/his/hers vanities, garden tub & separate shower. $289,900

Wendie Swift 765-5331

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C A L L E R -T I M E S

« Sunday, March 4, 2012 « 3F

Sunday Homes

Using pretty plates, platters in decor If the only time you see your china plates and platters is when they’re filled with food, you’re missing out on a sensational decorating tool. Wash off those gorgeous works of art, and use them in your everyday decor. Here are three ideas to get you started: 1. Hang plates and platters just like art

Whether you have a full set of beautiful patterned dishes you never use or a number of unique singles, hang them on the wall to transform your artwork displays. The round shape and curved edges of dishes do wonders for breaking up a sea of square or rectangle artwork, adding texture and dimension. Showcase a few individual plates by tucking one or two into a montage of

Homestyle

MARY CAROL GARRITY SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE

artwork that crawls up the wall, down the hall or over the doorway. Or, fan similarly sized dishes around a central piece of art, like a painting, mirror or even a hunting trophy. Sometimes more is less ... and sometimes more is better, like when you pick out a number of great plates and group them together to create a dramatic display. Don’t hang them in rows; instead, place them randomly. This approach is easy on the eye, and easy to create -- no

measuring, no stress. When you’re amassing a large grouping of plates, play with the design. You may be drawn to a grid with crisp lines and rows. Or, you may prefer the plates take on a shape of their own, like a circle or oval. If your display is less structured, include a variety of sizes and mix finer pieces with those that are less expensive. 2. Use plates and platters as layering tools in displays

Another trick is to in-

corporate artwork into the background for vertical height. Plates propped in easels are the perfect layering tool. Get a few easels and add a plate here and there in a variety of places throughout your home. Include one in the display on a mantel. Stick one on a side table, an entry table or a nightstand, paired with other accents. Or build a display out of plates alone, layering a variety of sizes and styles together. Who says storage has to be boring and utilitarian? When you are filling a hutch or china cabinet with dishes and serving pieces, prop a few plates on end to make the arrangement look like art. Rest single plates on easels as backdrops or layer several together, placing

the largest plate or platter in the background and working your way forward, with the smallest in front. 3. Put plates and platters to work as trays

Since plates and platters were designed to hold food, why not put them to work in your home holding other stuff ? I think displays look most lovely when they are grounded on a tray or platter of some type. What better use can you fi nd for an amazing platter than putting it out where everyone can see? On top of my coffee-table ottoman, you’ll find a large wooden tray. Perched on top of that is a beautiful blue-and-white platter. The platter holds a silver vase that I like to fill with flowers when I enter-

tain. The display is simple, yet looks stunning. Dishes of all sizes and shapes also make excellent organizational tools. A shallow bowl atop a stack of books is an excellent spot to stick a cellphone and car keys. Where could you use a bowl or plate to fi ll with odds and ends? Maybe you could put a hand-painted plate in your powder room to hold soaps, or a platter on an entry table to collect outgoing mail. Put little saucers or sorbet cups on a desk to fi ll with paperclips. The options are endless. The column has been adapted from Mary Carol Garrity’s blog at www.nellhills.com. She can be reached at marycarol@ nellhills.com.

BUILDER HOMES PORTLAND

2007 Bay Breeze, Bay Ridge 4/2.5/2 From the $220’s Square feet: 2,687 Open house: 1 to 5 p.m. Information: 443-0440, Hogan Homes 313 Erie Drive, Northshore 4/2/2 $222,900 Square feet: 2,002 Open house: Noon to 6 p.m. Information: 816-3848, Braselton Homes

SOUTH

7545 Rancho Vista Blvd., Rancho Vista 4/2.5/2 From the $170s to $370s, model home Square feet: 2,585 Open house: Noon to 6 p.m. Information: 774-2266, Braselton Homes 7625 Cattlemen Drive, Rancho Vista 3/2/2 $189,900 Square feet: 1,900 Open house: Noon to 6 pm Information: 774-2266, Braselton Homes 7906 Pato St., Monte Verde 4/2.5/2 From the 180s Square feet: from the 1,900s Open house: 1 to 5 p.m Information: 944-2629, Hogan Homes 7222 Brown Drive, Rancho Vista 4/2/2 $174,950 Square feet: 1,701 Open house: Noon to 6 p.m. Information: 774-2266, Braselton Homes

1942 Westwood Drive, Moore’s Landing 3/2/2 $166,900 Square feet: 1,560 Open house: Noon to 6 p.m. Information: 816-3848, Braselton Homes 1928 Westwood Drive, Moore’s Landing 4/2.5/2 From the $150s, model home Square feet: 1,801 Open house: Noon to 6 p.m. Information: 816-3848, Braselton Homes SOUTH

2801 N. Oso Parkway, San Sebastian at Terra Mar 4/3/3 $639,428 Square feet: 3,021 Open house: 1 to 5 p.m. Information: 944-2629, Hogan Homes Custom Division 8106 Calgary Drive, San Cristobal 4/3.5/3 From the $300s Square feet: 3,000+ Open house: 1 to 5 p.m. Information: 944-2629, Hogan Homes Custom Division 7522 Rancho Vista Drive, Rancho Vista 4/2.5/3 $314,900 Square feet: 3,101 Open house: Noon to 6 p.m. Information: 774-2266, Braselton Homes 7702 Fred’s Folly Drive, Rancho Vista 4/2/2 $242,300 Square feet: 2,400 Open house: Noon to 6 p.m. Information: 774-2266, Braselton Homes 7314 Aborigine, Greystone 3/2/2 $241,000 Square feet: 2,260 Open house: 1 to 6 p.m. Information: 985-0515, Alty Enterprises 6018 Natchez Drive, Barclay Grove 4/2/2 $202,805 Square feet: 2,068 Open house: 1 to 5 p.m. Information: 944-2629, Hogan Homes 2105 Halcon, Monte Verde 4/2.5/2 From the $190,000s Square Feet: From the 1800’s Open House: 1 to 5 p.m. Information: 548-4366, Hogan Homes

3913 Fred’s Folly, Rancho Vista North 3/2.5/2 $171,900 Square feet: 1,670 Open house: Noon to 6 p.m. Information: 739-0549, Braselton Homes 2106 Anacua St., Los Arboles 3/2/2 From the $150’s Square feet: 1,331 Open house: 1 to 5 p.m. Information: 944-2629, Hogan Homes 3925 Las Bahias Drive, Rancho Vista North 3/2/2 $148,900 Square feet: 1,501 Open house: Noon to 6 pm Information: 739-0549, Braselton Homes 3925 Fred’s Folly Drive, Rancho Vista North 3/2/2 $136,900 Square feet: 1,235 Open house: Noon to 6 p.m. Information: 739-0549, Braselton Homes FEATURED HOME

3806 FRED’S FOLLY, RANCHO VISTA NORTH 3/2/2 From the $130s Square feet: 1,560 Open house: Noon to 6 p.m. (model home) Information: 739-0549, Braselton Homes bart@braseltonhomes.com

www.braseltonhomes.com FLOUR BLUFF

2606 Retta, Tropic Winds 4/2/2 $208,900 Square Feet: 2,058 Open house: 1 to 5 p.m. Information: 765-3339, Re/ Max Associates 2441 Luzius Drive, Homedale Estates 4/2/2, $174,900 Square feet: 1,800 Open house: 1 to 5 p.m. Information: 288-0934, Fleet Landing Homes CALALLEN/ANNAVILLE

1917 Barlow Trail, Northwest Crossing 4/2/2, $169,945 Square Feet: 1,775 Open House: 1 to 5 p.m. Information: 813-0832, Hogan Homes

1933 Barlow Trail, Northwest Crossing 4/2/2 From the $140s Square feet: 1,521

Open house: Noon to 5 p.m. Info: 813-0832, Hogan Homes

CAL556722

1946 Westwood Drive, Moore’s Landing 4/2/2 $178,700 Square feet: 1,704 Open house: Noon to 6 pm Information: 816-3848, Braselton Homes


4F Âť Sunday, March 4, 2012 Âť

C A L L E R -T I M E S

Sunday Homes

Larry McGurk walks Taffy, on left, and Andy along San Felipe in the Coquina Bay neighborhood.

COQUINA BAY

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Living on the island can pose a few problems. For John Niro, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s which group of friends he will choose to join for the day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have a group of golfing friends and a ďŹ shing group,â&#x20AC;? Niro said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my biggest problem if they both want to do it on the same day,â&#x20AC;? he said, laughing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life is good.â&#x20AC;? Niro and his wife are both retirees from Connecticut. They moved to South Texas in 2008 and purchased a house on the island in Coquina Bay. Coquina Bay is the last neighborhood off of Sea Pines Avenue and South Padre Island Drive. The trail of young palm trees leads to the subdivision with nice-sized homes built from the early 1990s to present. New homes are being built and homes on a wet or dry lot are available. The front lawns are mostly landscaped with large rock and lots of palm trees. Many houses, like the Nirosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, are equipped with a boat lift in the water canal in their backyard. This

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Special to the Caller-Times

Average list price: $376,907 Average sales price: $311,643

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By Anissa Hernandez

COQUINA BAY ina qu Co

Neighbors take advantage of island setting

makes boating easier for him to enjoy ďŹ shing on the Laguna Madre. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have a boat on the lift and it beats the heck out of trailing and off-loading a boat,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For me, I drop the boat in the water and get in and go.â&#x20AC;? He said since Coquina Bay is farther out from the Laguna Madre his ride takes about 15 to 20 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being at the end of the canal system, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a little bit of a trip,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s part of the enjoyment.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;An interesting one, too,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of homes treat the canal side like the front side so the houses look so different. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Very often, I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see which is which,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They look different from front to back.â&#x20AC;? Homes here seem larger. The homes on a canal have a decent size backyard and those on a dry lot

also have room to run. All of the homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s garages are located in the front. Coquina Bay is located about ďŹ ve miles to the Padre Island National Seashore and less than a mile to Padre Balli Park. Padre Island National Seashore is the longest stretch of undeveloped barrier island in the world. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 70 miles of protected coastline is a habitat for marine and terrestrial plants and animals, has more than 380 migratory, overwintering and resident bird species and it is one of the few places to view newly hatched Kempâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ridleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s released into the wild, which nests on the beach from late April through mid-July. The nearest grocery store is about seven miles away and over the JFK Causeway from Coquina Bay. However, there are numerous and various

restaurants before heading over the causeway. Children can attend Seashore Learning Center, a charter school, or schools in the Flour Bluff Independent School District. One sunny, morning, Carole Taylor was chatting outside with her neighbor, Marta Kay Wolthoff. They were catching up as Wolthoff had just returned from Colorado, from which she moved to enjoy the Coastal Bendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s warm weather. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We lived in the mountains with no other neighbors around us,â&#x20AC;? Wolthoff said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is like having our own city out here.â&#x20AC;? Every day, she walks

over the highway to Bob Hall Pier to walk her dog. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We like South Texas and we want to stay,â&#x20AC;? she said. Taylor was also outside waiting for her husband to clean up their front yard so they could go boating. The Taylors have lived in their Coquina Bay home for 14 years. They moved here from Shreveport, La. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We picked this area because it seems like we have more room,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We love it here.â&#x20AC;? Taylor said the relaxed lifestyle is so nice they want to permanently retire here. She and Wolthoff said they know all of their

neighbors on their quiet street. Sometimes, they meet for dinner or meet at each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. Niro said he and his neighbors also know each other by name. Another minor problem he faces on occasion, he said, is which neighbor he will ask to retrieve his mail while he is out. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We look out for each other,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For some reason, if you forget to put out your trash, someone will put it out for you. That is just the situation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We like it an awful lot here,â&#x20AC;? Niro said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so relaxed and congenial.â&#x20AC;?

Some of the homes in Coquina Bay have dry lots while others have canals in their back yards with easy access to ďŹ shing.

A different kind of bubble bath

A: The product you are asking about is called a â&#x20AC;&#x153;BubbleMassageâ&#x20AC;? tub, and like the name says, it uses â&#x20AC;&#x153;air bubblesâ&#x20AC;? to massage and relax the user, instead of â&#x20AC;&#x153;jet pumpsâ&#x20AC;? like a traditional whirlpool tub. Basically, the tub bottom is dotted with dozens of tiny holes, and has a hol-

Ask the Plumber ED DEL GRANDE DIY NETWORK

low watertight chamber under those holes. When the tub is ďŹ lled and turned on, an air blower pressurizes this chamber and bubbles of air escape through the holes and gently massage the user. Simply put, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like taking a bath in a glass of champagne! Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very relaxing, but less intense than a water-jet style of whirlpool. This makes it

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A BubbleMassage tub is designed to massage and relax the user.

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a very popular choice for more sensitive users. Another great feature is that after the tub is drained, the air blower also purges the used water from the chamber, so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to keep clean.

Master plumber Ed Del Grande is the author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ed Del Grandeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s House Call,â&#x20AC;? the host of TV and Internet shows, and a LEED green associate. Visit eddelgrande.com or write eadelg@cs.com. Always consult local contractors and codes.

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While installation costs can be less than a traditional whirlpool, still plan your spending carefully so you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t burst your remodeling-budget bubble!

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Ă&#x17E;Â&#x201E; 0ÂŹĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x2022;oÂ&#x153;Â&#x153; ´Ä&#x201E;ĂĽÄ&#x201E; !\ Â&#x153;o§f§ Ă?Ă?´Ä&#x201E; AĂ&#x2122; !Â&#x201C;Ă&#x2022;AĂ&#x2122; ĂĽÄ&#x201E;Í´ .ĂŽAÂ&#x201C;Â&#x153; ÂŹÂ&#x153;Â&#x153;ÂŹĂź Ă&#x17E;¨Í¨ :Â&#x201C;§fĂž :AĂž ĂŤÂ ĂĽt AĂ&#x2122; Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x2122;AĂ&#x2122; ¨Ä&#x201E;´ "Ă&#x192; 4½½oĂ&#x2022; Ă&#x2022;ÂŹAfĂźAĂž ÂŤĂŤÄ&#x201E;´ ĂĽt´Ä&#x201E; Ă&#x2022;oĂžĂ&#x2122;㏧o Ă?Ă&#x17E;Ä&#x201E; Aޏ§§o

l´´ÍcÄ&#x201E;Ä&#x201E;Ä&#x201E; l´´Íc Ä&#x201E;Ä&#x201E; l´Â&#x201E;ĂŤc¨Ä&#x201E;Ä&#x201E; l´Â&#x201E;Â&#x201E;c¨Ä&#x201E;Ä&#x201E; l´Ă&#x17E;´c Ä&#x201E;Ä&#x201E; l´Ă?Â&#x201E;c¨Ä&#x201E;Ä&#x201E; lÍ´¨cÄ&#x201E;Ä&#x201E;Ä&#x201E; lĂŤĂŤĂ?c Ä&#x201E;Ä&#x201E; lĂŤÂ Ă?cÂ&#x201E;Ä&#x201E;Ä&#x201E;

Ć?Ć?Ć?Ĺ&#x201A;ÂĽÄ Ĺ&#x2014;ĝŝĹ?ÂĽĂ´Ĺ&#x2014;ĂšĹ?ōÚøôĠÄ&#x2018;Ă&#x192;Ĺ?Ĺ&#x201A;ÂĽÄ Ä&#x2018;

ĂŤĂ&#x;´Ă&#x;ĂŤ ĂĽĂ&#x;ĂŤĂ&#x;´ ĂĽĂ&#x;ĂŤĂ&#x;ĂŤ ĂĽĂ&#x;ĂŤĂ&#x;ĂŤ ĂĽĂ&#x;ĂŤĂ&#x;ĂŤ ĂĽĂ&#x;ĂŤĂ&#x;ĂŤ ´Ă&#x;´Ă&#x192; üĂ&#x;ĂŤĂ&#x192; Ă&#x;ĂŤ Â&#x201E;Ă&#x;ĂĽĂ&#x;ĂŤ

~~Ă&#x161;Ă&#x2122;çÄ&#x201A;

Q: Dear Ed, we ďŹ nd your plumbing column fun and educational. My question is about a new product that I would like to have more information on. I believe itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called a â&#x20AC;&#x153;bubbleâ&#x20AC;? style bath. But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a little confused. Is there a difference between these bubble tubs and a regular whirlpool tub? It sounds like the same thing to me. -- Jack, Alabama


       



  

 



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6F » Sunday, March 4, 2012 »

C A L L E R -T I M E S

Sunday Homes

FROM THE COVER

The first stop in this amazing home is the colorful first floor living area.

Subtle hues and a luxurious finish complete this bath in the Albrecht home.

from 1F

Why did you decide on this home: We wanted a

home on the beach and loved the design and floor plan. One thing I’d change about my house: Move it

closer to Houston.

I get ideas/inspiration for my house by... talking

with my decorator, Carol Albrecht.

Places where I find home furnishings: My Coastal

Home, ZGallerie, Pottery Barn.

My home’s best features:

The view and the cypress paneling and ceilings. My dream home would

include... everything I have

warm, comfortable, welcoming.

If my kitchen walls could talk... they would tell you

I’ll never throw out my.. . HAH! Palm tree wicker/ cane chairs that I made Carol figure out a place to use. These chairs were ridiculously expensive because of the fabric.

here.

that we love cooking here.

What I like most about my home: I got to start

almost from scratch and use the spa colors that I have never been able to incorporate into any of our homes before. My home’s most complimented feature: The view

and the furnishings.

Favorite room: The living room... spa colors, relax-

ing, comfortable furniture, open to the kitchen and dining areas. (It’s) great for family interaction and entertaining.

Unannounced guests would find my home...

I can’t believe I put this in my home... Carol used

some modern artwork that I would never have chosen but it really works in this house. I will always have space in my home for: Family pic-

tures.

My home can never have too many: Comfortable

couches and chairs.

Send home nominations to Eddie Seal at eddieseal@gmail.com or 688-0887.

A nautical theme dominates a third floor sleeping/sitting area overlooking the atrium. A great spot to nap or relax with a good book.

The center atrium, lined in beautiful cypress panelling, soars two stories over the living, kitchen and dining area.

BABA Chairs

Bar Stools, Dining, Antique 7021 TOCKEN -- 4/2.5/2 – Wood floors! Large corner lot!! Split bedrooms; master down.3 liv areas; kit w/ granite counters, lrg isle, large breakfast bar, gas cooktop; master retreat w/ garden tub & sep shower. Sprinkler system and large screened patio! $212,900

16022 CUTTYSARK; P.I. – 3/2/2 --In-ground pool! Open plan, split bedrooms; 3 skylights; jetted tub in master; tile and laminate floors. Large kitchen; 2 covered patios; guest quarters w/kitchen & full bath. Gar w/ AC; sprinkler system. $219,900 Open House

www.c21bestofthebest.com Best of the Best

(361) 994-0204

2-5

CAL556723

CAL556721

HOME

$185 Recycled and Original Old Teak 2756 Santa Fe, Ph. 361.884.1000 www.babaoneofakind.com


Dear Abby

Frommer

Play inside!

Retiree looks for ways to revive her self-worth. 5G

High-speed rail corridorAbilene a turning Abilene Reporter-News Reporter-News point for U.S. 3G Weddings and celebrations. 4G

Crossword 5G Jumble 5G Scrimmage 5G Horoscopes 5G

Charity League recreates an evening in Morocco

SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012

By Sarah Tindall Special to the Caller-Times

Simply

elegant Brittney Wells loves vintage clothes and has shopped all over the world, including in Paris, the fashion capital of the world. So it was a natural fit for her to be chosen for the Junior League of Corpus Christi’s annual Rummage Sale committee. Wells loves frequenting local shops and looking for the latest fashion must-haves such as brightly colored jeans. She said it has been fun helping her fellow leaguers gather gently used items from lo-

cal closets and new clothes from boutiques. “It’s going to be a great event,” she said. “We have received awesome donations from some of our local businesses that have really set the sale over the top this year.” Some of the items Wells is modeling will be available at the Rummage Sale. The sale will be held from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at Sunrise Mall, 5858 South Padre Island Drive.

RACHEL DENNY CLOW/CALLER-TIMES

A graphic print can brighten up the foggiest day. Wells wears a Collective Concepts dress from Market Boutique with from a white beaded necklace from Uptown Girl Fashion Boutique.

Charity League week may be my favorite event week of the year. The 40 ladies who comprise the organization always do a spectacular job of making their cocktail party and luncheon stand out — everything from the lovely bejeweled invitation to the showstopping table decorations, bespeaks a group who are dedicated to its mission, but also truly creative. The cocktail party was Feb. 21 at the beautiful home of Biby and John Dykema. This year’s theme was “An Evening of Moroccan Treasures.” From the moment I stepped out of the car onto the lawn, the theme was carried out so well that, by the end of the night, I was ready to catch a plane to Casablanca . Shannon Mayo was in the luxurious tent set up on the lawn and found my adorable name tag for me to put on so I could make my way into the party. Members Jennifer Miskovsky and Tracy Fraiche were at the door to greet guests with a smile and a delicious vodka and tea cocktail in a gorgeous Moroccan-style glass. In the foyer, Biby Dykema made me laugh, saying that the Charity League decorations committee had done such a great job making her house look amazing that she wished she had invited more guests over for the weekend so more folks could enjoy it. She was right. From the orchids artfully arranged in vases around the house to the Moroccan tents, lamps and carpets out by the pool (which was filled with flower petals) the house was transformed to an exotic, breathtaking wonderland. Stacey Lesly of the Social Committee then introduced herself and took me to meet Tom Klassen,

SARAH TINDALL INSIDE SOCIETY

the executive director of HALO-Flight, the organization selected to receive funds raised by Charity League this year. He told me they would use the donation to buy two autopilots for two of their helicopters. Apparently, if the weather is bad it is too dangerous for the helicopters to go on their lifesaving missions, so having these autopilot instruments would make HALOFlight even more effective. He also said HALO-Flight made 800 flights last year. That’s 800 people who were in life-threatening danger because of a car crash or medical emergency who got to the hospital fast. Next year, because of the new instruments, that number will be higher. It was amazing as I cruised through the party how many guests told me that they or their children or other family members had been on a HALOFlight. Klassen told me the idea came to him 25 years ago on a cocktail napkin, and now countless lives have been saved because of his and the rest of the HALO-Flight team’s perseverance. Kari Morrison , vice president and store director of Julian Gold, was there looking fabulous as usual, and she told me that the style show the next day featuring kate spade new york was going to be amazing. It was hard to leave the party when it was over, but we looked forward to more fun that Morrison and the Charity League ladies had in store for us the next day.

See SOCIETY, 2G

PHOTOS AND Q&A ON PAGE 6G

Travel

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

Gene and Kim Cran.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

John and Biby Dykema .

Society scene ASSOCIATED PRESS

Visitors look at art at the Hispanic Society of America in the Washington Heights section of New York.

HIDDEN TREASURES

■ N.Y.’s Hispanic

museum tries to raise its profile

By Ula Ilnytzky Associated Press

NEW YORK — Situated behind a wrought-iron gate on an attractive brick terrace in upper Manhattan, the Hispanic Society of America is an imposing museum and research library.

It has a world-class collection of Iberian art that includes works from such masters as Goya, Velazquez and El Greco, and monumental sculptures by Anna Hyatt Huntington, the wife of the society’s founder. Yet the 104-year-old institution in Washington Heights, just blocks from the Audubon Ballroom where Malcolm X was assassinated, is not high on the itinerary of many tourists — or even New Yorkers. Some don’t even know it exists. The society had briefly contem-

United Married Couples Club holds 54th annual ball. 2G

plated abandoning the area for more tourist-accessible locations downtown like some of its former neighbors: the American Numismatic Society and the Museum of the American Indian. But it has resolved to stay. It has a new advisory board and marketing strategy and a magnificent renovated gallery dedicated to 14 huge paintings by revered Spanish artist Joaquin Sorolla, works founder See MUSEUM, 3G

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Mr. and Mrs. Ricardo Almendarez.


2G » Sunday, March 4, 2012 »

C A L L E R -T I M E S

Inside Society Calendar Today: Whoop it Up! dinner, dancing, silent and live auctions, 6 to 10 p.m., Whiskey River, Staples and Holly. Cost: $35. Proceeds benefit Island Foundation Schools. Information: 949-0076. March 6: Sushi tasting fundraiser, 6 and 8:30 p.m., Pelican Club, 914 Tarpon Ave., Port Aransas. Cost: $35. Proceeds benefit The Port Aransas Art Center. Information: 361-7490580. March 9: Red Cross Bash fundraiser; dinner, live and silent auctions, photo opportunities with military vehicles, dancing and entertainment by Skyrocket!; American Bank Center; www.cbtredcross.org or 246-9969. March 24: P.E.O. Chapter AV annual style show and luncheon featuring fashions and accessories by Julian Gold; Corpus Christi Country Club. Cost: $40. Information: 992-8469. March 29: Corpus Christi Chapter of the Coastal Conservation Association 34th annual banquet; American Bank Center. Cost: $125. Tables and sponsorships available. Information: blaird@firstvictoria.com or 882-5199 March 30: Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi’s “President’s Blue and White Ball,” 6:30 p.m., Art Museum of South Texas, 1902 N. Shoreline Blvd. Entertainment by Tommy-O. The event will recognize this year’s inductees to the Inner Circle of Excellence. Cost: $100. Sponsorship tables available. Information: 825-5894. March 31: Knights of Columbus Council 3110 golf tournament; 8 a.m. March 31, Alice Municipal Golf Course. Cost: $65/player; $260/team. Proceeds benefit Catholic Charity and the Ark Assessment Center and Emergency Shelter for Youth. Information: 361-726-0913 or 361-537-3918. April 3: Inaugural Champions of Children Gala — Honoring the Unsung Heroes; fundraiser for Communities In Schools; dinner and award ceremony; Congressman Solomon P. Ortiz International Center; 696-4050 April 13: Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Texas, Hooked On Big Brothers Big Sisters Fishing Tournament, April 14, Marker 37 Marina under the JFK Causeway; VIP party April 13 at the marina. Cost: $125. Information: www.bigmentor. org; 888-8500; tony.elizondo@bigmentor.org April 13: Beach Ball 2012, 5:30 p.m., Texas State Aquarium, live, silent and blackboard auctions, food. Cost: $250/ person; tables start at $2,500 for 10 seats. Information: 881-1200. April 14: K-Space Contemporary fundraiser Wig Out is 8 p.m. to midnight. Cost: $50. Information: 887-6834 April 14: Big Bloom Plant Sale!, South Texas Botanical Gardens & Nature Center fundraiser, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 8545 S. Staples St. Members admitted free and may begin shopping at 8 a.m. Information: 852-2100. April 20: Art, Music, Dance, Food and Wine, 6 p.m. Guests will be bussed from Laz Parking to the Art Museum of South Texas, Art Center of Corpus Christi, K Space Contemporary Art Gallery and Havana Club. Cost: $100-$175. Information: www.artwalkcc.com/special-events/art-hop-and-drop/ April 25: Administrative Professionals Day, Ronald McDonald House presents Stedman Graham, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Congressman Solomon P. Ortiz International Center. Cost: $75; $125/with VIP reception. Sponsorships available from $500 to $2,500. Information: 854-4073 or www. corpuschristirmhc.org April 28: Harvey Weil Sportsman Conservationist Award Dinner, Welder Wildlife Foundation Refuge, Sinton. Karen J. Hixon is Conservationist of the Year; Caller-Times outdoors columnist David Sikes is Professional Conservationist of the Year. Cost: $200. Reservations must be made in advance. Information: 882-8672; lysa@rotarycc.com or www. rotarycc.com/harvey-weil-banquet/ May 3: Las Donas de la Corte, “Court From Splendorous Royal Palaces;” American Bank Center Selena Auditorium. Cost: $60. Information: 852-1147 or swwilliams@stx.rr.com May 26: South Texas Lighthouse for the Blind Rubber Duck Round-Up; 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Cole Park. Cost: $20-$100. Register at www.rubberduckroundup.charityhappenings. org/ Oct. 26: Moonlight in the Gardens, South Texas Botanical Gardens & Nature Center premier fundraiser; musical entertainment, starlight silent auction, dinner and dancing. Sponsorships from $1,000 and higher, individual tickets also available. Information: 852-2100.

Cotillion Club

Mr. and Mrs. John and Mary Ann McGregor, Mary Anne Sinclair and Mr. and Mrs. Clydell and A.C. Gilmore.

celebrates

The Corpus Christi Cotillion Club had an invitation-only event Feb. 25 at the Islander Art Gallery. PHOTOS BY PAUL IVERSON/ SPECIAL TO THE CALLER-TIMES

Compiled by Tina Vasquez. Planning a society event? Contact metrodesk@caller.com

Michelle Locke, Nancy Eshleman, Kathy Hooper and Dian Steret.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

Allison Webster, Tom Klassen, Dana Madry and Debbie Vickery enjoy the Charity League cocktail party.

SOCIETY from 1G

NEAL TO DELIVER STATE OF THE COUNTY The Corpus Christi Hispanic Chamber of Commerce State of the County Luncheon is at 11:30 a.m. March 27. The luncheon event will benefit the chamber. Jessica Davila-Burnett , AEP Texas spokeswoman and chamber chairwoman-elect, has been named event chairwoman for the luncheon. Nueces County Judge Loyd Neal will deliver the keynote address. Cost: $40/members and

Pam Leshin, Robert Browning, Kathy Porter and Mary Clark.

$45/nonmembers. Information: 887-7408.

FUNDRAISER WHOOPS IT UP FOR SCHOOLS Whoop It Up, the annual fundraiser for the Island Foundation and its schools, is at 6 p.m. today at Whiskey River. Join more than 300 friends of the Seashore Charter Schools for barbecue, dancing and silent and live auctions. Cost: $35. Information: 549-8341. Freelancer Sarah Tindall writes about charity events, social organizations and local nonprofits. Contact her at srjtindall@gmail.com

Di Morrison, Robin Kennedy, John Kennedy and Herb Morrison at the Charity League cocktail party.

Sally Gill, Carol Thaxton, Nancy McBrown and Becky Gardner.

Kathy Tate, JoAnne Rhoe and Berna Stone.


C A L L E R -T I M E S

ÂŤ Sunday, March 4, 2012 ÂŤ 3G

Inside Society/Travel

Rail system speeds toward decision

Chris and Leslie McClanahan.

BLACK GOLD BALL The Centuria Club held its Texas Black Gold Ball and reception Feb. 4 at the Congressman Solomon P. Ortiz Center, a night after a cocktail party where ďŹ ve new members were introduced. The new members are: â&#x2013; Douglas A. Allison â&#x2013;  R. Drake Beauchamp â&#x2013;  Zachary C. Gilmore â&#x2013;  Chris McClanahan â&#x2013;  A. James Sedwick Jr. The partyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme highlighted the history of Texasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; oil and gas exploration. William P. Moffitt is Centuria Clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s president. Michelle and William P. MofďŹ tt.

Archer Huntington commissioned in 1911 speciďŹ cally for the room. Executive director Mitchell Codding said the institutionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sorolla collection is the largest outside of Spain. The Hispanic Society of America is ďŹ ghting to make itself and its treasures known to a wider audience.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;A WHOLE NEW WORLDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Deborah Miller of Wilton, Conn., who was visiting the museum on a recent Saturday, said she knew about it only because her daughter had worked there as an intern. The museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neighborhood runs from 155th Street to above 190th Street and from the Hudson to the Harlem rivers. It was one of the last areas of Manhattan to be developed and was largely rural when the Hispanic Society opened in 1908 on land once owned by naturalist John James Audubon across from Trinity Cemetery, the burial grounds for New Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s social elite.

Huntington lived in a mansion along Manhattanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum Mile but wanted an institution away from Fifth Avenueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hubbub. Michael Mowatt-Wynn, the Hispanic societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s community outreach advocate, said the museum became mired in the changing demographics and economic downturn that struck New York City in the late 1960s and 1970s. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But now the economic pendulum has swung the other way,â&#x20AC;? and the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s predominantly Dominican and Mexican population is becoming more gentriďŹ ed, he said. The museum has 6,800 paintings and drawings, 1,000 sculptures, including pieces from the ďŹ rst millennium B.C., thousands of decorative arts objects, including ceramics, textiles and furniture, and 175,000 photographs. The library has 250,000 books, including 15,000 printed before 1701, plus 200,000 manuscripts from the 12th century to the present. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bigger than anything anyone in the U.S. has in Spanish material,â&#x20AC;? Codding said.

BUDGET TRAVEL

be advanced by people of all political persuasions.

LEARNING VACATIONS Add Annapolis, Md., to the sites for learning vacations. St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College, the awesome â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great Books Schoolâ&#x20AC;? of America, with campuses in Santa Fe, N.M., and Annapolis, has just released details of its program of summer vacation learning, and the opportunities it offers are as impressive as ever. For three successive weeklong periods in July, adults will gather in Santa Fe to discuss books ranging from Charles Darwinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Origin of the Speciesâ&#x20AC;? to Dostoevkyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Demonsâ&#x20AC;? to â&#x20AC;&#x153;DeTocquevilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Democracy in America.â&#x20AC;? As taught by the famed â&#x20AC;&#x153;tutorsâ&#x20AC;? of St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s faculty, here is a summer travel opportunity fully as profound, fully as memorable as anything offered in the betterknown summer adult programs offered by Oxford and Cambridge. And I say this as someone who has spent two summers in St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, and another summer at Oxford. The college at Santa Fe (on a mountainside campus overlooking the enthralling New Mexico desert) will operate its â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer Classicsâ&#x20AC;? from July 9 to 13, July 16 to 20, and July 23 to 27. The de-

Arthur Frommer is the pioneering founder of the Frommerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Travel Guide book series. He co-hosts the radio program, The Travel Show, with his travel correspondent daughter Pauline Frommer. Find more destinations online and read Arthur Frommerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blog at frommers.com.

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Staff reports

tails of its programs (for which tuition is $1,250, with scholarship assistance extended to licensed teachers of any public school in America) are found in an attractive, small catalog obtained by writing to Summer Classics, St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College, 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca, Santa Fe, NM 87505-4599 (or by writing to mspray@ sjcsf.edju). But this year thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another twist. For the ďŹ rst time, St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other campus, in Annapolis also will be offering a summer program, this time for one week only, from June 4 to June 8, studying D.H. Lawrenceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Rainbowâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women in Love,â&#x20AC;? Odysseus in Three Versions (Homer, Sophocles, Euripides), Charles Darwinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Descent of Man,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tragedy Ancient and Modern (Sophocles and August Wilson).â&#x20AC;? Write to: Summer Classics, St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College, P.O. Box 2800, Annapolis, MD 21404. I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t emphasize enough my own conviction that a week at St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in summer, joining other adults in a discussion of great books, is one of the important vacation activities â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a superb opportunity for a different type of recreational interlude that proves tremendously rewarding, in my experience.

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CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

A great many publications have failed to note that President Barack Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget for ďŹ scal year 2013 contains the first appropriation of a ďŹ ve-year plan to allocate between $35 and $50 billion for the development of high-speed rail in the United States. At last, our nation would take decisive steps to fund a high-speed rail corridor between Los Angeles and San Francisco, another along the west coast of Florida, one in Michigan and in other important and heavily populated areas. That kind of economic stimulus would not only create hundreds of thousands of new jobs but would set us on the path toward becoming a modern, efficient and prosperous nation in the ďŹ eld of transportation. It should be noted that this is not a partisan issue. A great many Republicans, including the one Republican cabinet member in the administration, Secretary of Transportation Ray La Hood, enthusiastically support this national initiative. This week, Ray La Hood is in California, urging that legislators of both parties there stay ďŹ rm in their insistence on the creation of a high-speed rail corridor along the coast of California. So we are at a turning point. Are we to remain a horse-and-buggy nation, mired for hours on end in traffic jams, condemned to waste valuable time at crowded airports with planes stacked up in the skies, or are we to become a modern, efficient, economically prosperous nation of sensible transportation? This, to me, should

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C A L L E R -T I M E S

Inside Society/Celebrations Anniversaries

MR. & MRS. GARCIA

50TH ANNIVERSARY

Manuel and Carmela Garcia celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary. The couple were married Feb. 25, 1962, at San Jose Mission, Palito Blanco. They have six children, eight grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

MR. & MRS. WILSON

50TH ANNIVERSARY

This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s honorees are Sally Garcia (from left), Sandra Alvarez, Rosie Colin, Lee Gwozdz and Col. Bill Ibarra. In the background is Master of Ceremonies Tony Bonilla.

United Married Couples honor community service The United Married Couples Club celebrated its 54th Annual Presentation Ball on Feb. 18. Outstanding individuals are honored annually at the event for their contributions to the community, state and country. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s honorees were Sally Garcia, Sandra Alvarez, Rosie Colin, Lee Gwozdz and Col. Bill Ibarra. Tony Bonilla served as

Best-sellers

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

HARDCOVER FICTION 1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Private Gamesâ&#x20AC;? by

master of ceremonies. Those in attendance enjoyed an evening of dancing to the sounds of the Rey Ramos 12-piece orchestra. Approximately 200 people attended the event and were treated to a complimentary breakfast after the dance. Staff reports

Eudell and Jewel Bonner Wilson celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary with dinner at their favorite eating spot. The couple were married Feb. 17, 1962. They have four children.

James Patterson & Mark Sullivan (Little, Brown) 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kill Shotâ&#x20AC;? by Vince Flynn (Atria) 3. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Wolf Giftâ&#x20AC;? by Anne Rice (Knopf) 4. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Defending Jacobâ&#x20AC;? by William Landay (Delacorte)

5. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve Got Your Numberâ&#x20AC;? by Sophie Kinsella (Dial Press)

HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;American Sniper: The autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military Historyâ&#x20AC;? by Chris Kyle, Jim

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Alvarez

DeFelice and Scott McEwen (Morrow)

2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ameritopia: The Unmaking of Americaâ&#x20AC;? by Mark R. Levin (Threshold Editions)

3. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Start-Up of Youâ&#x20AC;? by Reid Hoffman & Ben Casnocha (Crown)

4. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Killing Lincoln: The Shocking Assassination that Changed America Foreverâ&#x20AC;? by Bill Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilly and Martin Dugard (Henry Holt and Co.) 5. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The End of Illnessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; by David Agus (Free Press)

MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS 1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Against All Enemiesâ&#x20AC;? by Tom Clancy with Peter Telep (Berkley)

2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Girl Who Played with Fireâ&#x20AC;? by Stieg Larsson (Vintage)

3. â&#x20AC;&#x153;44 Charles Streetâ&#x20AC;? by Danielle Steel (Dell)

4. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cold Vengeanceâ&#x20AC;? by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child (Grand Central) 5. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bonnieâ&#x20AC;? by Iris Johansen (St. Martinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) TRADE PAPERBACKS 1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Helpâ&#x20AC;? by Kathryn Stockett (Putnam Adult)

2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Vowâ&#x20AC;? by Kim & Krickitt Carpenter with Dana Wilkerson (B&H)

3. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Extremely Loud and Incredibly Closeâ&#x20AC;? by Jonathan Safran Foer (Mariner)

4. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heaven is for Real: A Little Boyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Astounding Story of His Trip to Heaven and Backâ&#x20AC;? by Todd Burpo, Sonja Burpo, Colton Burpo and Lynn Vincent (Thomas Nelson)

5. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Tigerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wife: A Novelâ&#x20AC;? by Tea Obreht (Random House) Publishers Weekly

Mr. and Mrs. Tony Diaz o: Â&#x2014;t :yTWÂ

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Club President Chris Jahnke (left) and Vice President and Master of Ceremonies Tony Bonilla introduce the honorees.


C A L L E R -T I M E S

« Sunday, March 4, 2012 « 5G

Puzzles Dear Abby: I am a 64year-old healthy widow with no children. I retired a year ago after a successful 42-year career. I am financially sound. I couldn’t wait to retire because my job was demanding, and toward the end it had become extremely stressful. About two months into retirement — and after taking a few trips — I began feeling worthless and guilty for being nonproductive. I tried a part-time job, but it wasn’t my thing. I’m now considering another part-time job, volunteering or returning to school. I have always wanted to further my education and get a graduate degree, but I don’t know if I’m too old to meet the demands. I feel like I lost my identity when I stopped working. I know it had to end one

day, but I still have a lot of energy and want to engage in some activity that will revive my self-worth. At this point, I don’t know what that will be. Your thoughts and guidance would be greatly appreciated. — Searching for “Me” in Texas

Dear Searching: If you think a graduate degree would be challenging and would help you in a new career, then by all means, go for it. When people tell me they are thinking of retiring, I always ask, “And what will you be retiring TO?” because I am convinced that retiring to “nothing” is neither physically nor emotionally healthy for individuals who are used to being active.

DEAR ABBY Dear Abby: I bought my aunt, uncle and two teenage cousins gift cards from an online retailer a year and a half ago. I checked with them in advance to see if this might be something they’d use. Six months ago, I noticed in my order history that only one of the cards had been redeemed. I hate to see the money go to waste. Should I call my relatives? If I do, what do I say? It’s possible they just haven’t gotten around to using the cards. Should I reprint the cards and send them with a reminder note? Should I

send my relatives a check and use the cards myself? Chalk it up to a loss? I suppose if I hadn’t seen the order history, I would never have known whether the cards had been used. What do you think I should do?

Jumble Unscramble these six Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form six ordinary words.

The 800/900 nos. have been DISCONTINUED.

— Conflicted in Connecticut

Dear Conflicted: Use the direct approach. Contact your relatives and tell them that while reviewing your account history, you noticed that three of the four gift cards you sent have not been used. Ask if they would like to have them printed out again, if by chance they were lost — or if they would prefer you send them a check for the value of the cards. To contact them isn’t rude.

Sudoku

Horoscopes PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) — The bigger your

dreams, the bigger the reward when you turn those dreams into reality — both materially and emotionally. ARIES (March 21-April 19) — You may want to buck a current trend today, and do something in a way that is not considered current by those in the know. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Mistakes you make today are not likely to stay with you for long. There is more to think about, and more to do, than dwell on the past. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — You’ll need something more at home than your routine provides. Once you identify it clearly, you can welcome it into your life right away. CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You may find yourself in an uncomfortable position today as a result of putting too much pressure on the new guy. It’s time to lighten up! LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Everyone will benefit by making your needs known as clearly as possible. A conservative approach is not for you today. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — You are ready to move on to something more challenging — and, ultimately, more rewarding. You may want to take a friend along with you. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — It may be time for you to consider switching from one team to another today. Yours isn’t getting the results you had hoped. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — You may have to do something today that bends, if not breaks, a few rules you take very seriously. Pay attention to profit margins. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — You’ll receive a few timely hints today that allow you to move closer to a permanent solution than to a personal dilemma. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — You must make decisions today in a new way, or be passed up by those who are learning how to get things done faster. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — You may have lost sight of the key issue at hand — but today your encounter with someone in the trenches sets you straight once more. IF YOU WERE BORN TODAY: You are comparatively simple and direct in your approach to other people and to situations that may arise in your daily life, and some may even consider you unnecessarily blunt at times, and rather cold and distant. The truth, of course, is that you are uncommonly hot-blooded, and your seeming lack of tact is a direct result of this.

Saturday’s

Word Scrimmage

HOW TO PLAY: Sudoku High Fives consists of five regular Sudoku grids, sharing one set of 3-by-3 boxes. Each row, column and set of 3-by-3 boxes must contain the numbers one through nine without repetition. The numbers in any shared set of 3-by-3 boxes apply to each of the individual Sudokus. Answer to previous puzzle

© Puzzles by Pappocom. Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com.

Crossword 1 6 12 20 21 22 23 25 26 27 29 30 32 34 35 40 42 46 47 48 50 51

ACROSS Bulb holders Part of the name of many a Spanish restaurant Confabs Stern taking a bow (in two senses) Demands (from) Eternally Aide for a V.I.P. customer Multiple Grammy winner who was a contestant on “Dancing With the Stars” Paper nautilus, e.g. Words mouthed to a TV camera Like the pen or pencil you might reach for P.T.A. interest One of two options at a fast food restaurant Sample Prozac, for one W.C. “Oh baby!” Eve’s opposite Work assignment Gore in fiction Dirty Kind of switch

3/4/12

53 54 56 57 59 62 63 64 65 67 69 72 73 75 76 78 82 85 86 87 89 90 92 93 95 96 98

YESTERDAY’SSOLUTIONBYJUDD

Special ___ It may be popped for fun Metro area X X X lover? Freudian concept Lie about The “L” of S.L.R. Trample Inverness native Funeral stands Run out “Tell ___ lies” Jimmie Rodgers or Tex Owens, musically Bun contents Make ___ dash Mountains, rivers, plains, etc. More sinister Blackjack decision “The Magnificent Seven” co-star Suffix with human Actor Hill of “Moneyball” Mind Spanish winds Distilled vis-à-vis tap Gospel singer Winans Like the “ng” sound “___ who?!”

SATURDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

99 Fancy salad ingredient 101Org. making grants to museums 103Big faucet maker 105University in North Carolina 106Rear 110Genealogical study 112Articles aren’t found in it 117London transportation 119Marlon Brando film 121Set free 122“Cheers” bartender Sam 123Movie droid 124Fastener patented in 1939 125Pivoted 126___-Japanese DOWN 1 Alternative to dieting, informally 2 “Just ___!” 3 Bartering locale 4 ___ Robles, Calif. 5 Checked (out) 6 Antecede 7 ___ Rose 8 Bills, e.g. 9 Most 17-Down 10 Plant pores 11 “You missed ___” 12 Grok 13 Sir Anthony Eden, 1st Earl of ___ 14 Pulitzer winner for “John Brown’s Body” 15 Brother’s place 16 Early life forms? 17 See 9-Down 18 Refrain syllables 19 Send some pixxx? 24 Network connections 28 Environs 31 Incapacitate 33 Subject of the documentary “An Unreasonable Man” 35 Helter-skelter 36 Bar ___ 37 Cavemen 38 Blows up 39 Eve who wrote “The Vagina Monologues” 41 Has parked

Puzzle by Daniel A. Finan / Edited by Will Shortz BACK TO THE START / SUNDAY’S PUZZLE

43 South Dakota memorial site 44 Modern December birthstone 45 White elephant, e.g. 48 TiVo precursor 49 “Eavesdrop” from across the room, say 52 It’s felt on the head 54 “Time ___ …” 55 Poetic preposition 58 Only Hitchcock film to win Best Picture 60 Minnesota twins? 61 Song that starts “A winter’s day in a deep and dark December” 65 Draw (off): Var. 66 Premium Cuban cigar brand 68 Nationals whose flag declares “God is great”

69 70 71 74 75 77 79 80 81 83 84 88 91 93 94 97

What echoes do Clear the atmosphere of Sod house locale Min. or max. Sweets Capt.’s superior Drew in Old-timer Some M.I.T. grads Per Korea’s Syngman ___ Like some housecats “Gone With the Wind” bad guys Yammer First TV show to debut at #1 in the Nielsen ratings Eye up and down

99 Discordant 100General Motors subsidiary 102Feeling pervading Brat Pack movies 104Towers 106Reynolds of “Boogie Nights” 107From the top 108Mid fifth-century year 109Hofbräuhaus crowd? 111Place after place 113Home of the Norte Chico civilization 114Part of 101-Across 115Corp. money types 116Switch attachment? 118Metered praise 120Charlotte-to-Raleigh dir.


6G » Sunday, March 4, 2012 »

C A L L E R -T I M E S

Fashion rite My favo color to wear is:

pink

Ah

edicure ot pink p

ma ke s th

e se h

hi sho e ot pink S

s look ult

ra chic .

BY PHOTOS Y CLOW/ N N E D RACHEL ER-TIMES CALL TOS RE PHO M O M E E O S LER.C ON CAL

Closet

SNOOP I wouldn’t be caught dead wearing:

socks with sandals. The most I have ever paid in the name of fashion: $2,500 on a handbag. My big fashion influences are: Au-

drey Hepburn and Coco Chanel.

Fashion advice I’d give my best friend: Don’t wear anything that you

don’t feel fabulous in, no matter how great everyone else might say it is. My favorite shopping haunt: Four Chicks in the Park. Most memorable shopping experience: was shopping in Paris. I spice up my wardrobe with: brightly

colored skinny jeans.

My favorite piece of jewelry: is my wedding ring. It’s a family heirloom that’s dear to my heart. I have an impressive collection of:

shoes.

When I shop for clothes: I try on whatever catches my eye. You never know what might look great on you! My favorite designers include: Burb-

Pink is always a hit, and hot pink is the color of the season for spring. Brittney Wells wears a Kensie dress from Four Chicks in the Park paired with Shi shoes.

A peasant top and white pants scream “It’s spring!” Wells pairs a pink Goosefeathers peasant top over a Michael Stars tank top with Juicy Couture pants and Steve Madden pumps. Bag is from Four Chicks in the Park.

erry, Christian Louboutin, Chelsea & Violet and Juicy Couture. Three words to describe my wardrobe: feminine, vintage and timeless. The best way to organize your closet is: by occasion, then by outfit. My biggest fashion pet peeve: when

someone wears clothes that are too small for him or her.

The only thing I dislike about shopping is: absolutely nothing! The most comfortable item in my closet: my Uggs. I save lots of money on fashion by:

shopping for basic tanks and tees at Forever 21. One of my best accessories: my pearl earrings. A must have fashion staple: a little black dress. I can never own too many: bracelets. To nominate someone for the Closet Snoop, contact Sarah Tindall at srjtindall@gmail.com

A tunic and tights look sleek with a modern gray and black color scheme. Wells is wearing a Michael Stars tunic over black tights and Gianni Bini pumps. A silver gray DKNY handbag completes the look.

Winter looks get a little less wintry ■ Mild weather

affects Milan fashion designs By Daniela Petroff and Colleen Barry Associated Press

MILAN — Designers are filling their collections with looks once reserved for warmer weather, and February was springlike during Milan Fashion Week . Even functional daytime dresses can be sleeveless. Shorts are having their winter incarnation. Shoes are open toed, or even variations of

sandals. Bare legs are perfectly acceptable. If temperatures turn, there also are plenty of layering options — from capes to long vests.

DOLCE&GABBANA Black velvet, lace, chiffon and more gold than Midas are the basic ingredients of the dramatic Dolce&Gabbana winter collection. Front row guest, British actress Helen Mirren, described the clothes as both “decadent and opulent” and loved the show. MISSONI Missoni’s look is urban ASSOCIATED PRESS

British actress Helen Mirren attends the Dolce & Gabbana women’s fall-winter 2012-13 collection show during fashion week in Milan, Italy, on Feb. 26 .

nymph (woodland fairy). The silhouette is slim. Tightly-fitting knit pants, figure-hugging dresses and back-buttoned wraps let the Missoni heroine to nimbly navigate the concrete jungle.

FERRAGAMO Always hovering in the background during this round of Milan collections is a romance between an officer and a damsel. This is particularly evident at Ferragamo, whose winter collection includes gold-buttoned doublebreasted military coats and romantic evening gowns. MARNI Marni is getting decorative. Big brooches, beads and sequins were featured in the womenswear col-

lection — accents that are cropping up all over the current runways. “Jewelry becomes an integral element of the garment,” the fashion house noted.

AQUILANO AND RIMONDI The Baroque hall replete with gilded accents hinted at the richness to come. Bejeweled and regal, Tommaso Aquilano and Roberto Rimondi womenswear recalled the royal courts of centuries past. The pair stayed close to their architectural style, building their dresses and tops out of panels in a sort of triptych — back, front and sides — that allowed them to mix textiles and colors. The tops often resembled bustiers, and finished in short bubble skirts.

General Excellence - March 4, 2012  

Caller-Times March 4, 2012 issue for the general excellence category