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SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT 16

Annual Report 2010

AU G U S T 2 0 1 0

S E R V I N G B R E N T W O O D , E A S T K I N G S TO N , E X E T E R , K E N S I N G TO N , N E W F I E L D S & S T R AT H A M


Michael A. Morgan Superintendent

Paul Flynn Associate Superintendent

Laura H. Nelson, JD Assistant Superintendents

Esther Askell Director of Curriculum and Assessment (K-8)

Nathan Lunney Chief Financial Officer

Tuck Learning Campus 30 Linden Street Exeter, NH 03833 603.775.8400 www.sau16.org

Member Schools

Swasey Central School Brentwood, NH

East Kingston Elementary School East Kingston, NH

Lincoln Street School Exeter, NH

Main Street School Exeter, NH

Kensington Elementary School Kensington, NH

Newfields Elementary School Newfields, NH

Stratham Memorial School Stratham, NH

Cooperative Middle School Stratham, NH

eLearning Charter School Tuck Learning Campus Exeter, NH

Seacoast School of Technology Tuck Learning Campus Exeter, NH

Exeter High School Exeter, NH

Exeter Adult Education Tuck Learning Campus Exeter, NH

02 •

SAU 16 ANNUAL R EPORT

The School Boards of SAU 16 Exeter School Board Patrick O’Day - Chair Kathy McNeill - Vice Chair John Maxwell Kate Miller Jean Tucker Brentwood School Board Charlie Gargaly - Chair Pete Reed - Vice Chair Liz Bryan Dianne Vosgien Linda Garey East Kingston School Board Stacy Penna - Chair Robert Nigrello Christina Cassano Pelletier Kensington School Board Dana Donovan - Chair Cheryl Camacho Alice Mower Newfields School Board Carolyn Bellisio - Chair James McIlroy Mike Price Stratham School Board Travis Thompson - Chair Wendy Poutre - Vice Chair Gary Giarrusso Claire Ellis Luke Pickett Exeter Region Cooperative School Board Townley Chisholm - Chair (Exeter) Dave Miller - Vice Chair (East Kingston) Elizabeth “Liz” Faria (Brentwood) Kate Miller (Exeter) Kate Segal (Exeter) Joni Reynolds (Kensington) Mike Grant (Newfields) Patricia Lovejoy (Stratham) Jennifer Maher (Stratham) SST Board of Directors Barbara Munsey (Epping) Susan Kimball (Epping) Michael Morgan (Exeter) Patricia Lovejoy (Exeter) Dr. Hames Hayes (Newmarket) Chet Jablonski (Newmarket) Dr. Jean Richards (Raymond) John Stewart (Raymond) Dr. Brian Blake (Sanborn) Janet Hart (Sanborn) Dr. Robert Sullivan (Winnacunnet) Dick Goodman (Winnacunnet) Margaret Callahan (Ex Officio) Sam Bruno (Ex Officio) Great Bay eLearning School Board of Trustees Roy Morrisette - Chair Lucy Cushman - Vice Chair Kim Casey Kent Chamberlin Dr. Arthur Hanson Ben Hillyard Chester “Chet” Jablonski Patty Lovejoy Kim Martin Bill Perkins

Compiled by Chris Allen and Jack Tisdall

Central Office


index SAU 16 Annual Report 04 06 08 10 11 12 13 14 16 17 18 20 22

Superintendent’s Report Swasey Central School Report Kensington Elementary School Report Newfields Elementary School Report Stratham Memorial School Main Street School Report East Kingston Elementary School Report Lincoln Street School Report Cooperative Middle School Report Exeter Adult Education Report Exeter High School Report Great Bay eLearning Charter School Report Seacoast School of Technology Report

03


Superintendent’s Report The Year in Review by MICHAEL A. MORGAN

The 2009-2010 school year concluded many student and Tradeport when troops have returned to or departed staff recognitions that are indicative and symbolic of the from the states. The “Kids Who Care” program at CMS, outstanding educational opportunities that are afforded in partnership with Buxton Oil Company provides fuel asto families within the SAU 16 communities. This included sistance for needy families. Five members of the EHS Nateacher and student awards, athletic and sportsmanship tional Honor Society joined Coach Jim Tufts for the annuaccomplishments, and academic achievements on many al Penguin Plunge at Hampton Beach recently. This event levels. supports NH Special Olympics. Student organizations at   Perhaps the most important success of the 11 schools EHS sponsored two blood drives for the American Red that comprise the third largest school administrative unit Cross. As one of its many projects, Stratham Memorial in New Hampshire, however, is the significant involvement School collected food for the local SPCA. of so many individuals in community service. In an eco  Space limits the full listing of the many community sernomic climate that has brought a severe burden to many vice initiatives, but it is important to stress that the confamilies, the outpouring of service projects by students sideration of others is a constant theme within each of of all ages speaks volumes about the “head, hearts, and the programs and schools of SAU 16. The idea of “giving hands” of the caring and commitment to helping others. back” to a community that is so supportive of its schools   The “Do Good Denim Project” collected over 2500 pairs is essential for the transmission of the ideals and pracof slightly used jeans and distributed them to northern tices of good citizenship—at all ages. New Hampshire schools and communities that were se  From an academic perspective, the 424 Exeter High verely impacted by the closSchool graduates in the Class ing of mills and the resulting of 2010 achieved awards and In an economic climate that has loss of hundreds of jobs. The scholarships totaling in the brought a severe burden to many Cooperative Middle School hundreds of thousands of dolfamilies, the outpouring of service “Outreach Program” and lars. College acceptances in projects by students of all ages “Builders’ Club” joined forces at least 26 states, the District speaks volumes about the “head, to amass funds and food to of Columbia, and one foreign hearts, and hands” of the caring distribute to over 100 families and commitment to helping others. country show the wide range during two different holiday of influence that SAU 16 stuperiods. From every elemendents will have beyond our lotary school to the Exeter Adult Education program and cal communities. Seventy-one percent (71%) of the class from the Seacoast School of Technology Wright Start was accepted at four-year colleges; 12% was accepted at Pre-School to the SAU Offices, money and food were coltwo-year colleges; 10 students will join the military. lected in a wide variety of ways to stock the shelves of   In addition to the EHS graduation, it is important to local food pantries. In the fall, the fifth graders and teachrecognize the accomplishments of the students in the ers at Swasey Central School in Brentwood collected 38 Great Bay eLearning Charter School, the Exeter Adult boxes of food that were donated to the Pilgrim Church in Education program, and the Seacoast School of Technoltheir community. ogy. Each of these provides amazing opportunities for   Some fourth graders at East Kingston Elementary students of all ages because they are focused on meetSchool sent personal letters, cards and hundreds of ing the learning styles and interests of students from a pounds of candy to US troops overseas this year. Some wide geographical area. Having hosted three high school of the students have also served as greeters at the Pease graduations beginning with the Class of 2008, GBeCS 04 •

SAU 16 ANNUAL REPORT


now boasts of having 82 graduates. SAU 16 is fully commorial School. Mr. Dobe will be replaced by Ms. Helen Rist mitted to doing its best to meet the various academic who has been the Principal of Newington Public School and social needs of its students and it does so with its for the past several years. extensive offerings of programs and services.   The SAU is most grateful to both Mr. Baldasaro and Mr.   The Cooperative Middle School students achieved sigDobe for their dedicated leadership and welcomes Ms. nificant recognition for their outstanding test scores in the Asbell and Ms. Rist to their new positions. New England Common Assessment Program. In addition   Throughout this past year over 60 students, commuto making “Adequate Yearly Progress” in both reading nity representatives, and staff members have been diliand math this year, 92% of the eighth graders and 91% gently involved in a Strategic Planning process that will of the seventh graders scored “proficient or better” on lead to some major initiatives and action plans over the the reading component of the test. (State averages were next five years. Focus Area committees have worked on 76% and 77% respectively.) On the math portion of the issues related to governance, special education, curricutest, 86% of the eighth graders and 85% of the seventh lum and assessment, communications, lifestyle, design graders scored at the “proficient or better” level. (State and philosophy, and community involvement. A final reaverages were 66% in each of those grades in math.) port is schedule to be released in the fall of 2010.   Exeter High School was awarded the Class L Sports  During 2010 voters approved all of the proposed opmanship Award for the fourth erating budgets and teacher conconsecutive year, making that tracts in East Kingston, Kensington, The quality of the educational the 8th time in the last 11 years and Newfields, a paraprofessional programs and services within that EHS earned this distinctive contract in Exeter, and an adminthe district is made possible recognition. istrator contract in the Exeter Reby the 1,200 employees who   All of this hard work and the gion Cooperative. The proposed collaborate and cooperate accolades that are bestowed teacher contract for the Exeter Re“to provide a rigorous and upon the students of the differgion Cooperative School District comprehensive education ent schools are made possible (Coop) was defeated for the first that will prepare our students by the dedication, hard work, time since the Coop began in 1997. for diverse post-secondary effort, and commitment that   National, regional, and local fieducational opportunities, a are displayed regularly by the nancial difficulties that have incompetitive workplace, and staff, parents, and volunteers cluded high unemployment, many active civic participation,” as within our six communities. home mortgage foreclosures, balstated in the new SAU Vision So many individuals regularly looning health insurance costs, Statement. and consistently labor behind and unprecedented federal debt the scenes to help our system have prompted state and local murun smoothly, Certainly think nicipalities and school districts to of the teachers, paraprofessionals, therapists, and adscrutinize revenues and expenses more carefully because ministrators but do not lose sight of the custodial and of the property burdens faced by many residents. SAU maintenance crews, the food and nutrition workers, the officials, Board Members, and Budget Committees take administrative assistants, and business office staff. Their this work very seriously. Our collective goal is to work in professionalism and their collaboration are essential for the best interests of our 6,000 students while remaining the daily function of an $85 million operation. vigilant about the need to do this in the most cost effec  After serving in various capacities throughout the Cotive manner. operative School District and the SAU for 13 years, As  This Annual Report provides an overview of the many sistant Superintendent Tony Baldasaro resigned his curaccomplishments and educational programs and services rent position to accept a leadership role with the Virtual available to students in SAU 16. The quality of these opLearning Academy Charter School (VLACS) as of July 1, portunities is made possible by the 1,200 employees who 2010. Ms. Esther Asbell, most recently Assistant Supercollaborate and cooperate “to provide a rigorous and intendent of SAU 56 in Somersworth and Rollinsford, will comprehensive education that will prepare our students replace Mr. Baldasaro in the role of Director of Curriculum for diverse post-secondary educational opportunities, a and Assessment for Grades K-8. competitive workplace, and active civic participation,” as   Principal Dennis Dobe of Newfields Elementary School stated in the new SAU Vision Statement. The employees for the past seven and a half years resigned his position of SAU 16 are the ones who bring the words in this report to accept another principal position in Laconia as of July to life. I am grateful to them and to the residents of our six 1, 2010. Prior to his dedicated service to Newfields, Mr. communities who have joined their resources to make the Dobe had worked as Assistant Principal at Stratham Meschools in SAU 16 among the best in the state. 05


Swasey Central School Brentwood

by Principal Joan Ostrowski There is much to be proud of and celebrated regarding Classroom® program, and identifying ways to reduce Swasey Central School. Joan Ostrowski has been recogelectrical and paper consumption to ‘green’ the school. nized as New Hampshire’s Elementary School Principal   The curriculum at Swasey Central School focuses on of the year! For the past ten years, Mrs. Ostrowski has the education of the whole child with high standards helped each student to reach his or her potential. She in academic, emotional and physical growth. Academic has supported staff members as they explored best pracareas are supported by Everyday Mathematics, the 4 tices and adopted new approaches to instruction. She Blocks Literacy Model, inquiry based science, and experihas guided the staff ence based social studto fulfill its mission to ies programs. TechnoloJoan Ostrowski, the principal of Swasey provide children with gy has been embedded Central School in Brentwood, has been a solid foundation for across all curriculum arrecognized as New Hampshire’s Elementary future learning, an uneas helping the students School Principal of the year. derstanding of the become active particiconnection between pants in the 21st Century education and life exLearning Community. As periences, an eagerness to challenge themselves acaa part of the Healthy Schools initiative, various opportudemically, and the emotional strength to succeed as lifenities for physical activity are provided. Students parlong learners and productive citizens. The building goals ticipate in two 40-minute periods of physical education a include identifying essential standards for curriculum at week. Before and afterschool programs are coordinated each grade level, enhancing the instructional program by Swasey staff and include cross country, jump rope to meet each child’s needs, embracing The Responsive club, and yoga. Our school has a strong, positive environ06 •

SAU 16 ANNUAL REPORT


Budget Trends (in millions) $6

$5

$4

$3

$2 01-02

02-03 03-04 04-05 05-06 06-07 07-08 08-09 09-10 10-11

Enrollment Trends 500

400

300

200 2001

89 ment based on the Responsive Classroom and Second Step social education programs.   Swasey students continue to perform well on the state standardized assessment, the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP). This year, 87% of students scored proficient or above in the area of Reading and 87% of students scored proficient or above in the area of Mathematics. Our professional staff continues to review the NECAP results along with classroom assessments to identify and remediate any areas of concern while reinforcing those skills in which we already excel. With the help of everyone in our learning community, we will continue our work toward excellence for all.   Our school community is very excited about the new walking trails and outdoor classroom areas that resulted from the Timberland Serv-a-Palooza volunteer day. A former Swasey and current Great Bay eLearning Charter School student, Jennifer Poggi, took on this project last spring. Timberland volunteers, in coordination with Swasey and GBeCS students, cleaned and marked trails, created outdoor classrooms, and added new flower and

2002

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2009

BY THE NUMBERS The percent of staff members at Swasey Central School that have a Masters degree or higher (26 of 32).

vegetable beds to Swasey’s beautiful courtyard. A solar powered weather station was provided by the ParentFaculty Group and is used by the students to learn about weather and support the science curriculum. These outdoor learning environments are utilized and enjoyed by every grade level and across curriculum areas.   Serving the community has been an ongoing theme at Swasey Central School. Each classroom or grade level identifies a community service project as their focus for the school year. As a result, coat, food, and pet supply collections were organized to meet identified needs of the community. The Brentwood Teachers’ Association sponsored a Red Cross Blood drive and the Swasey staff supported the Brentwood Fire Department’s annual holiday drive for needy families. Second graders caroled for the Rockingham Nursing Home residents and Brentwood senior citizens. Fourth graders sponsored a school-wide recycling program and can be seen cleaning the scuff marks off of the floors. By students and staff supporting community service projects, our students have made strengthened connections with the building and town. 07


Kensington Elementary School Kensington

by Principal Barbara Switzer

Kensington Elementary School is one of the seven elementary schools in SAU #16. It began the 2009-2010 school year with 200 students in grades K-5. Our Mission Statement is: At Kensington Elementary School, we work together with families and community members to provide a safe learning environment that fosters academic, emotional, social and physical growth for all students.   The 2009-2010 school year was a very exciting and busy one for the whole community. Once again, the PTO and Enrichment Committee put together a calendar of events/activities for staff, students and families. For our fifteenth year, KES received the Blue Ribbon Award for the outstanding volunteer program that we have at our school. We would not be able to accomplish all that we do without the help of our parent and community volunteers. We worked with the Kensington Youth Athletic Association, the Kensington Recreation Department and the Kensington Public Library to sponsor events at KES that benefited the entire Kensington community.   The KES Vision Statement is “It is the vision of the KES families, staff and community that our students are prepared to be contributing members of the ever-changing es in their academic futures. The KES professional and world by becoming independent lifelong learners.” We support staffs participate in ongoing professional develbelieve: in high academic standards; all students can opment initiatives within the building, within the SAU and learn; children learn best in a safe and nurturing environ- by attending outside offerings of workshops and/or colment; learning is best when students and teachers are lege courses. Professional Development is important bepassionate about education; learning can be fun; that a cause it helps us to stay current on best practices, keeps partnership among community, family and school is nec- us fresh and energized and keeps reinforcing the need essary for learning; in respect, for us to be lifelong learnresponsibility and citizenship; ers. Through professional For its fifteenth year, Kensington in educating the whole child; development and our ProElementary School has received the in fostering the creativity in fessional Learning ComBlue Ribbon Award, which recognizes each child; in teaching chilmunity (PLC), we are able schools with an outstanding dren to understand themto successfully achieve volunteer program. selves as learners; in fosterour annual school goals. ing a strong sense of self; in For the 2009-2010 school promoting a healthy child; in year the KES school goals making students of Kensington aware of their place in the included: continuing to use best practices while impleworld; that good communication skills are necessary to menting all the SAU Curriculum areas and NH State Stansucceed; in fostering social skills among children; a suc- dards and this year we focused on Literacy; improving cessful student will possess good study habits; and that our individual technology skills and integrating technolall KES students will leave prepared to meet the challeng- ogy into our grade level curriculum; and reviewing the 08 •

SAU 16 ANNUAL REPORT


Budget Trends (in millions) $3

$2.5

$2

results of student learning from various assessments to improve our instruction with children. Kensington Elementary School is the best place to work and visit! The building is filled with smiling, happy students who really care about one another and who are ready to learn about anything at any time. The staff is friendly, dedicated, creative, and knowledgeable and they all love children. At the end of the day, you can see staff standing in the hallways telling stories from the day and laughing with, or seeking support from, each other. The parents spend countless hours working along side us in the classrooms, sponsoring school-wide activities that allow us to enjoy each other in a playful way, assisting us by performing the routine tasks that must get done and cooperating with the staff to support their children with their daily school work. The Kensington School Board and the Kensington community continue to support all of our efforts and they truly value the importance of education for all children in Kensington. Once again, thanks to everyone mentioned above, we had a very productive and successful 2009-2010 school year at KES.

$1.5

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Enrollment Trends 250

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Newfields Elementary School Newfields by Principal Dennis Dobe (2003-2010) The 102 year-old front entrance provides an old-fashion one-room schoolhouse feel to Newfields Elementary School (NES) and although it has had four major renovations since 1907, the staff and community of NES certainly continue to portray that feeling today.   Fourteen classroom and special education teachers, seven part-time specialists, and twelve part-time educational assistants work hard to fulfill the school’s mission to their 170 pre-k through fifth grade students. That mission is: To encourage academic excellence in a nurturing environment where all individuals are valued intellectually, emotionally, artistically, socially and physically and are empowered to develop to their maximum potential so they can make contributions to the global community.   Newfields Elementary School, just like its home town, is proud of its heritage. Initially a part of Exeter, modern day Newfields, along with Newmarket, broke away from Exeter in 1727 and became South Newmarket. With the Parish of Newmarket’s decision to become it’s own town in 1949, the village of Newfields remained, although it did not get its current name until 1895 when Dr. John Brodhead left funds for a new town library with the stipulation that the town change it’s name to its now familiar Newfields. With its location on the Squamscott River and its roots in the early Great Bay manufacturing and shipping community, Newfields has now grown into an 1,800 resident strong bedroom community with many of its residents now commuting to Massachusetts. 10 •

SAU 16 ANNUAL REPORT

Budget Trends (in millions) $2.5

$2

$1.5

$1 01-02

02-03 03-04 04-05 05-06 06-07 07-08 08-09 09-10 10-11

Enrollment Trends 200

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Stratham Memorial School Stratham

12.8 BY THE NUMBERS Percent growth of Stratham’s population since 2000. Currently, the town has 7,206 residents. by Principal Tom Fosher In 1716 when members of the small seacoast community first petitioned for a town charter, one of their key desires was for a school. Education in the town started even before a school was built, when a teacher was hired to teach in private homes. Seventeen years after the town acquired a charter, two schoolhouses were built. The new buildings were built with minimal luxuries and amenities for about $100.00. Seating within the school was comprised of benches without backs or writing tables. There was not even a record of having a chalkboard in the building. They did have one writing table where students learned to write with a goose quill pen. All of the furnishings and supplies totaled about 10 dollars. Twentyeight years later, two more schools were built dividing the town into four districts within walking distance for every Stratham resident.   Today, there still exist some similarities and beliefs that travel back to its earlier foundations. Education is the essence of growth and the root for prosperity. The focus of developing the whole child - socially, emotionally, and

scholastically - are incorporated into their everyday learning. All of the students, preschool through fifth grade, are challenged in many capacities on a daily basis. The level of excellence Stratham Memorial School seeks to achieve has greatly influenced the core curriculum in the development of a 21st century learner. Where chalkboards, slates, quills and benches once stood, now finds students using ipods, ipads, and writing with wikis or blogs from the many integrated technological advances.   Sprawling across 37 acres along the northwest corner of Stratham, the school building holds 640 students in 37 classrooms. Recipient of the Blue Ribbon Award for the past fourteen years, the school and community prides itself on a well-developed partnership. The 59 members of the professional staff has averaged thirteen plus years as experienced educators for students. Enhancing their craft, 52 of the group has attained their Master’s Degree or better. The well-maintained campus provides students with an abundance of opportunities for physical, social, emotional and academic development and well-being.

Enrollment Trends

Budget Trends (in millions)

650

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600 2001

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Main Street School Exeter

by Principal Steve Adler Located within walking distance of Exeter’s historic and safe learning environment that will lead to intellecdowntown and a neighbor to the prestigious Phillips Extual, physical, social, and emotional growth and the deeter Academy, the Main Street School services families velopment of positive self-esteem. It is the responsibility of pre-kindergarten through second grade. As a historic of the staff, administrators, parents and community to building, Main Street School provides the foster this environment. foundations from which Exeter students We are committed to meeting the Main Street’s can grow and reach the high quality of needs of all children. We recognize mission is to education the community values and exand respect individual differences and provide a positive, pects. want to help each child develop his/ safe learning Well known for its commitment to enher potential. We strive to develop the environment that sure that all students begin their experiwhole child through a well-rounded fosters a life-long ence in a facility where the entire staff program, which includes challenging love of learning for values and respects each learner, the and varied activities built upon the all with respect for Main Street School is proud of its affiliacurriculum. individual strengths tion with the Exeter Developmental Pre  We wish to promote a life-long love and needs. school which helps provide quality eduof learning by encouraging curioscation services for those who qualify. ity, problem-solving, cooperation, and Main Street’s mission is to provide a positive, safe learnindividual responsibility. Maintaining a strong working ing environment that fosters a life-long love of learning partnership with the parents and guardians of our stufor all with respect for individual strengths and needs. dents is essential to achieving all of our goals at the Main The community strives to create and maintain a positive Street School. 12 •

SAU 16 ANNUAL REPORT


East Kington Elementary School East Kingston

by Principal Jim Eaves “Learning Empowers All People” is the mission statement of the East Kingston Elementary School (EKES), a K-5 public school nestled in picturesque East Kingston, NH. With a population of only 200+ students, EKES is proud of its reputation as a student-centered community of learners.   We build on this concept daily as we come to know each of our student’s learning style, interests and personal needs. As educators and community members working in the best interest of our students, we all share in the understanding that what we value, both individually and as a community is demonstrated through our programs, practices and affliations.   Community and a strong sense of belonging is at the heart of our daily work; we hold regular school-wide meetings where we greet one another, share messages and celebrations, salute the flag, and sing songs. Students and teachers alike are continually giving back to the broader community. For example, last year the fifth grade raised over $2000 to support the Pennies for Peace

Program that builds schools in Pakistan and Afghanistan.   To further establish a sense of community, EKES has an annual theme that brings commonality to our experiences and learning, This year’s theme is, “Our Big Back yard.” Throughout the year we will be visited by authors, illustrators, musicians, artists and a wide variety of experts who will strengthen our understanding of our community, state and country.   As a collaborative partner for the past seven years, EKES is a host site for UNH graduate level education interns. The internship program allows us to support preservice teachers while fostering ongoing professional development opportunities for our teachers. This year we are hosting eight interns at our school.   EKES is continually seeking new ways to save money and reduce our carbon footprint, and was recently awarded a $300,000 federal grant to install a solar power array large enough to generate over 60% of our school’s electrical needs. The monies will also be used to update the heating system.

Enrollment Trends

Budget Trends (in millions)

200

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13


by Principal Dick Keays   Further, the 2009-10 school year has allowed for sevWith an enrollment of 505 students in grades three eral significant celebrations. In February, we joined with through five, Lincoln Street School has had a most prothe town of Exeter to commemorate the 150th anniverductive and successful 2009-10 school year. Our award sary of Abraham Lincoln’s historic visit to Exeter. Addiwinning Volunteer Program, winners of the State Blue tionally, through a grant from the NH Council on the Arts Ribbon Achievement Award for more than 20 consecuand PTO support, our grade 5 students participated in tive years, continues to provide exceptional support to a most enriching experience through their our academic and extra-curricular prowork with visiting poet, Rick Agran. This grams. Our extremely helpful Parent Lincoln Street special program resulted in each grade Teacher Organization has consistently School has 5 student combining a digital photosupported our school by sponsoring enjoyed a most graph with a poem he/she had created, outstanding cultural programs for our successful 2009-10 culminating in a wonderful student book students, as well as assisting with the school year with of poetry entitled, “Echoes”. Also, as the funding of fieldtrips and the cost of our continued Grade 5 Class Gift, our fifth graders creatteacher-bought classroom materials. efforts to promote ed some beautiful posters of their digital   Additionally, our very active Student educational photography which will be permanently Council has worked diligently to supexcellence displayed throughout our school. Other port several community-based service and student major celebratory events included two projects this year. This included a Noresponsibility. drama productions, Grade 4, “Willy Wonvember Food Drive to help stock our ka” and Grade 5, “Aladdin”; several Music local food banks and a “Holiday Card” concerts during March, “Music in our Schools” month; and project to provide greeting cards to seniors through the our culminating celebration of the Arts on “Integrated Meals on Wheels Program and to our service men and Arts Night” in May. women through the Pease Greeters Program. The Council   To conclude, Lincoln Street School has enjoyed a most also sponsored fundraisers, raising several thousand dolsuccessful 2009-10 school year with our continued eflars for the Chamber of Commerce Children’s Fund and forts to promote educational excellence and student rethe Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Efforts to collect food sponsibility. Our school has been very fortunate to enjoy items for the Stratham SPCA, as well as our involvement a terrific partnership between staff, parents and the overwith a local Sneaker Recycling Program were also noteall Exeter community. worthy Student Council projects. 14 •

SAU 16 ANNUAL REPORT


Lincoln Street School Exeter

Budget Trends (in millions) for LSS & MSS $15

$12

$9 01-02

02-03 03-04 04-05 05-06 06-07 07-08 08-09 09-10 10-11

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BY THE NUMBERS Destination Imagination, Team Eternity, placed 22nd of 67 teams at the Global Finals in Knoxville, Tennessee in May 2010.

Enrollment Trends for LSS & MSS 1200

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800 2001

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D I D YO U K N OW ?

Robinson Female Seminary Memorial Nature Trail (behind Lincoln Street School) has been certified as a “Wildlife Habitat” (one of 10 in NH) by the National Wildlife Association.

2009

SPOTLIGHT

Volunteerism A desire to volunteer is a developing trend among students in SAU 16. The number of volunteer focused groups and clubs has grown tremendously in the last decade and will continue to expand in the coming school year with the implementation of new programs such as Link Crew at Exeter High School. If you ask advisors Mrs. Supple, Mrs. Roether or Mr. Forbes how valuable they think Link Crew will be to students, they’ll tell you its one of the best things to happen at Exeter High School. Based on the unprecedented number of applicants the program received, it seems students agree. Link Crew is an experimental program in which students of all grades attend team building events to develop their sense of fellowship at EHS. “Link Crew allows freshmen and upperclassmen to develop relationships that make the overall transition from middle school to high school much easier for freshmen,” said senior Molly Chesterton, who will take part in Link Crew this fall.   Special Olympics is a volunteer program at EHS that takes place each spring. During the events, special athletes are teamed with student volunteers. The competition allows kids to get to know each other and often leads to a personal connection. “I joined Special Olympics because I wanted to make a difference in these kids’ lives. I’ve made a ton of friends and these connections have had an influence in my life and theirs,” said senior Kerin Toothaker. Peer Outreach, which focuses on the well-being of the student population, is a long running student to student volunteer club. For many freshmen, Peer Outreach helps them have a recognizable face to look up to during their first few months at Exeter High School. Other groups that focus on the needs of communities all over the world include Schools for Schools and STAND. Schools for Schools is an international program whose branch at EHS was started by students and focuses on the re-building of schools in the war ridden nation of northern Uganda. Students help to plan fund raisers and each year they attend an annual rally event in Boston that supports this cause. STAND, which sends money and aid to support the fight against genocide in Darfur, has become one of the most vivacious volunteer groups at EHS. The group finds creative ways to volunteer their time to insure that they are capable of sending aid over to remote villages in the African country of Darfur. Last year, students dressed up in cow costumes and paraded around the cafeteria in hopes of raising funds to send a cow to a village in Darfur for food and milk. Volunteer work within the SAU 16 community is easy to find and hard to ignore. The doors are wide open for student participation and these opportunities give students a chance to use their creative energy for the good of the community. 15


Cooperative Middle School Stratham

by Principal Tom O’Malley The Cooperative Middle School students and staff continue to embody its mission statement “to provide a challenging, safe, and healthy learning environment designed to meet the social, emotional, and intellectual needs of all students.”   Significant to this effort is the achievement of Adequate Yearly Progress as part of the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP). During this past year, CMS students in Grades 6, 7, and 8 scored significantly above the NH state average in Reading and Math.   Three CMS teachers were recognized for outstanding educational practices. Language Arts teacher Janet Prior received the English Teacher of the Year Award. Library Media Specialist Deidre Whall received the Outstanding Library Specialist Award. Language Arts teacher Sarah Cook was selected as a finalist for the 2011 Teacher of the Year award. Social Studies teacher, Bob Schur, was also honored as the well-deserved recipient of the prestigious Eustis Award for service to SAU 16 at the beginning of the 2009-2010 school year.   Community Service continues to be a focus as evidenced by the student, family, and staff support of programs such as the Kids Who Care initiative, Do Good Denim project, assistance for local food pantries, and the Community Outreach program.   In an effort to better prepare students for a high school education, CMS and the Seacoast School of Technology (SST) began a student mentor program that encourages 16 •

SAU 16 ANNUAL REPORT

interested middle school students to explore learning options at SST. Through this program, students are able to explore their interests and select intriguing high school courses.   CMS is also constantly striving to integrate technology in the learning environment. Teachers at CMS received professional development to learn how to use Apple’s iTouch technology as a 21st Century teaching/learning tool. CMS was well represented in a year-long SAU-wide initiative, Powerful Learning Practices. This involved over twenty-five local educators who worked in small groups to explore and create online, connected, technologybased instructional practices that could be shared with students.

Enrollment Trends 1500

1200 2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009


Adult Education Exeter

by Director Leslie Haslam Exeter Adult Education serves a wide range of people, needs, and geographic areas. Located in the Tuck Learning Campus (former Exeter High School building) on Linden Street in Exeter, individuals ranging in age from 16-89 attend either academic or enrichment classes at the TLC or work individually in the community through the Adult Learner Services Program. Classes and GED® (General Education Development) testing are also available for inmates in the Rockingham County House of Correction in Brentwood.   There are numerous academic programs provided each year. Adult Basic Education classes are offered both mornings and evenings for adults to learn or improve their basic reading, writing, and math skills. GED preparation classes are also offered mornings and evenings for students who did not complete high school and who want to earn a credential to qualify them for college or employment opportunities. Instruction focuses on grammar, essay writing, reading comprehension and math problem solving (including algebra and geometry).   Earning a GED certificate involves passing five timed tests: Language Arts Writing, Science, Social Studies, Language Arts Reading and Mathematics. Exeter Adult Education is an official New Hampshire GED testing site. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes meet mornings and evenings. Students take a placement test to determine their class level: beginner, intermediate or advanced.   Adult Basic Education and ESOL classes are free. These classes have open enrollment throughout the school year,

and a small summer program is offered for continuing students. Funding is through state and federal grants, enabling students from any NH town to attend.   Adult High School Diploma Program offers tuitionbased high school credit courses in the evening, including English, social studies, science, math, and computers. Students may earn an Exeter Adult High School diploma or take courses for college prerequisites or high school credit recovery. The diploma program has two 15-week semesters/year, a stringent attendance requirement and small class size. Many adult diploma students work full time and attend evening classes.   The Adult Learner Services Program of Rockingham County offers adult learners free, confidential, one-toone or small group instruction in basic reading, writing, math, English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL), and preparation for the GED.   Volunteer tutors receive training, instructional materials, and on-going support as they work in partnership with their students to achieve individual goals. Instructional time and location are individually arranged for each tutor/student pairing, with most meeting in community locations like the public library.   The Enrichment Program offers evening classes for community members to learn a new skill, meet people, and have fun! Course offerings include computers, money matters, health & wellness, home & crafts, and personal & professional development. Class may be a one-night workshop or an eight-week course.   New offerings and standard class schedules are available in program brochures or at www.sau16.org/adult. htm or call the Exeter Adult Education office at 775-8457. 17


Exeter High School Exeter

by Principal Vic Sokul school during the school day. In all content areas Exeter When Exeter High School moved from its 93 year-old High School students are taught by staff members who home in downtown Exeter to its current location on the believe in the school’s mission: The Exeter High School outskirts of town, it brought its tradition of excellence community strives to provide a rigorous and comprehenwith it. With its challenging academic program, its many sive education that inspires and challenges all students to co-curricular offerings, and its all-state athletic program, become engaged and successful adults. Exeter High School offers the Exeter Cooperative Region   Beyond the classroom, Exeter High School provides a comprehensive high school able to meet the needs of a opportunities for stuvariety of students. dents to participate in   With a full complement of The Exeter High School community many co-curricular activicourses in 12 departments, strives to provide a rigorous and ties. Athletic support at Exeter High School has a comprehensive education that inspires EHS is evidenced by the wide variety of offerings and challenges all students to become many individual student for its students. Whether a engaged and successful adults. and team state champistudent is studying an inonships awarded to the troductory course, or one school along with being of Exeter High School’s adthe recipient of the New Hampshire Interscholastic Athvanced placement courses, students are able to find a letic Association (NHIAA) Class L Sportsmanship Award course that not only challenges them academically, but for four of the last six years. With its tradition of excelalso provides the opportunity to explore areas of interest. lence, its state-of-the-art facility, and its commitment Exeter High School is affiliated with the community colto the families of the Exeter Cooperative Region, Exeter lege system of New Hampshire through which students High School is truly a cornerstone to our community. can enroll in specified college courses taken at the high 18 •

SAU 16 ANNUAL REPORT


Budget Trends (in millions) for EHS & CMS

Staff Awards & Recognitions

$50

The following staff members of SAU 16 received awards this past year: Angela Lennox, Exeter High School

$40

2010 Excellent Teacher Award NH Society of Professional Engineers

Susan Argyros, Exeter High School Runner-Up for 2010 English Teacher of the Year

$30

Amy Vandersall, Exeter High School 2010 Social Studies Teacher of the Year NH Association of Social Studies Teachers

$20

01-02 02-03 03-04 04-05 05-06 06-07 07-08 08-09 09-10 10-11

Joan Ostrowski, Swasey Central School 2010 Elementary Principal of the Year

Sarah Cook, CMS Finalist for 2011 Teacher of the Year

Enrollment Trends

Janet Prior, CMS 2010 English Teacher of the Year NH Association of English Teachers

1700

Deidre Whall, CMS 2010 Outstanding Library Specialist NH Educational Media Association

Laurie Eldridge, SST Administrative Assistant 2010 Running Start Advocate Award Community College System of NH

Anne DeMarco, SST Connor Award (2010 Teacher and Advisor of the Year for Future Farmers of America)

Paul Flynn, SAU 1500 2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010 Outstanding Community Service Award NH School Administrators Association

SPOTLIGHT

Blue Hawk Athletics   A number of factors contribute to the success of Exeter Blue Hawks athletics. Fantastic coaching, led by Athletic Director William Ball, has a positive influence on player development. With great athletic programs at the middle school level, athletes are ready for high school sports once they are freshmen. The freshmen and Junior-Varsity teams assist players to reach the competitive and successful varsity levels. The values of teamwork, enthusiasm, and dedication are effectively ingrained into Blue Hawk players’ minds throughout their years.   Exeter High School’s first-class athletic facilities are representative of how seriously the school takes its sport. The William D. Ball Stadium at Eustis Field combines state-of-the-art lighting, audio technology, and a grass-turf field to make for a truly professional feel when one steps foot in the stadium. The stadium has capacity for 3,200 fans, and there is plenty of extra standing room. The field itself is made of turf known as FieldTurf,

which is also used in Nashua’s Stellos Stadium and on the Phillips Exeter Academy field.   Sportsmanship is highly valued at Exeter High School. The gymnasium holds the Sportsmanship Awards that Exeter has won. Over the past eleven years, Exeter has won eight NHIAA class L Sportsmanship Awards.   It is no surprise that Exeter High School’s phenomenal athletic program produces many seniors who advance to play their sport for a college team. This past year, Exeter graduated 29 seniors who will continue to play sports at the collegiate level. Of those 29 seniors, 6 will play for a Division I college or university.   With such an extensive array of athletic talents, resources, and values, the Exeter High School name will always be associated with sports. Given the success of the Blue Hawks in the past year, coupled with great coaching, exceptional playing facilities, and the values of teamwork and sportsmanship, the Blue Hawks will continue to fly high. 19


Great Bay eLearning Charter School Exeter

by Co-Principals Peter Stackhouse and Cheryl McDonough

Located at The Tuck Learning Campus at 30 Linden Street in Exeter, the Great Bay eLearning Charter School (GBeCS) serves students in grades eight through twelve. As one of eleven approved publicly chartered schools operating in New Hampshire in 2009-2010, GBeCS provides students with a project-based education based upon the assessment of curriculum competencies in a flexible classroom environment. Educational technology is a part of our program, but our success is due to the strong relationships that exist between and among our students, staff, and parents.   GBeCS was chartered in 2004 by the New Hampshire Board of Education, as a result of its application by the Exeter Region Cooperative School District. It is overseen by a separate Board of Trustees, but actively engages with both SAU 16 and the Exeter Cooperative School District in its operation.   The mission of GBeCS is to provide alternative ways to serve those students who are “underserved” in some way by the traditional educational system. Not all students learn the same way and at the same pace and some simply need a smaller learning environment. The school opened in January, 2005 with 35 students in grade nine and has evolved to include grades eight through twelve 20 •

SAU 16 ANNUAL REPORT

and approximately 150 students.   As a chartered public school receiving the majority of its funding directly from the State of New Hampshire, GBeCS is required to accept qualified students from any NH town or city, but our student body has consistently included 67-70% of students from SAU 16 communities. Five districts, including the Exeter Region Cooperative School District, provide additional financial support to GBeCS allowing us to maintain a per pupil cost of approximately $8,000 for 2009-2010. The school also supports its programs through fund-raising activities by its dedicated parents group and staff.   GBeCS rents program space at the Tuck Learning Campus and contracts with SAU 16 for administrative, business, and technology services. Our school cost-shares with Seacoast School of Technology and Exeter High School’s Alternative Education Program for health services on campus and our classrooms, equipment and educational technology have been made available in support of the Exeter Adult Education program which utilizes them at night for their classes throughout the school year.   As of June, 2010, three graduating classes totaling 83 students have earned diplomas from the school. As a requirement of our program, all 83 students have applied and been accepted to attend at least one post-secondary school or program after high school.


SPOTLIGHT

Technology and the Classroom

INSIDE LOOK

A Progressive Education In 2008 GBeCS was awarded recognition as “A School of Promise” by the New Hampshire EDies Committee. 100% of GBeCS graduates since the first graduating class (2008) have been accepted to at least one post-secondary program. GBeCS teachers work with students in two teams—lower school (grades 8 and 9) and upper school (grades 10-12) Each GBeCS student has a faculty advisor with daily meeting/check-in opportunities built in to our schedule. The cost per pupil at GBeCS for 2010-2011 is anticipated to be approximately $8,100. Students with identified educational disabilities make up approximately 34% of our enrollment. GBeCS implements all Individualized Education Plans and works with students’ resident district for any required services support.

Enrollment Trends 150

120

90

60 2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

SAU 16 continues to integrate technology into the curriculum to provide a modern learning environment that prepares students for today’s technology-infused workplace. The regular use of digital tools promotes creative thinking and allows students to work with up-to-date software to produce high quality projects and presentations.   Moreover, technology facilitates communication between students, teachers and parents. School-to-home communication websites such as Homeworknow.com and Moodle are utilized by teachers to enhance some aspects of the learning process. Students can be better organized by checking their teacher’s page for the week’s assignments. They have instant access to class resources such as websites and class notes. Other uses include online quizzes, a blog, and submitting assignments electronically.   Parents also have access to student information including progress reports, attendance and grades history through PowerSchool. This system was used to provide electronic scheduling for students at Exeter High School for the 2010-2011 academic year. Beyond this, Powerschool gives parents access to their child’s attendence, grades, and the status of assignments. Besides being uses by teachers for state reporting and grading, Powerschool links the schools of the SAU, enabling instant communication of information such as medical alerts.   Students with disabilities are directly benefited by specialized software programs that enable total learning. Skills Tutor guides students through multiple levels of practice on skills and concepts from across the curriculum and is used to measure student progress for various assessments. Last year, CMS deployed two mini mobile computer labs for targeted use by students with special needs.   The ever-growing Web 2.0 lexicon, which includes all interactive Internet applications such as blogs and Facebook, means students are increasingly engaging in the web as they create content and publish their thoughts. Both in school and at home, students practice their 21st Century Skills. Within the context of rigorous academics, according to research commissioned by the North Central Regional Educational Laboratory, this skill set includes digital-age literacy, inventive thinking, high productivity and effective communication. The SAU fosters the growth of these skills and supports students in becoming a part of the Web 2.0 community.   As technologies grow and improve every year, the skills and knowledge needed to fully utilize those technologies change. SAU 16 remains committed to preparing students to fully participate, develop, communicate and collaborate with the 21st century world. 21


Seacoast School of Technology Exeter

by Principal Margaret E. Callahan Located in Exeter and a member of SAU 16, the Seacoast School of Technology provides a unique, focused career and technical education program for students who attend Epping, Exeter, Newmarket, Raymond, Sanborn Regional and Winnacunnet High Schools. By combining a Seacoast School of Technology program with an appropriate sequence of courses at their sending high schools, students prepare themselves for a variety of college and career options after graduation.   All sending school students who are in grades 11 and 12 are eligible to attend all Seacoast School of Technology programs. Students in grades 10-12 are eligible to enroll in Biotechnology. Students in grades 9-12 are eligible to enroll in Pre-Engineering. Students who have completed one year of high school are eligible to enroll in Technology Careers. Applications are available at sending high school guidance offices in January or from the Seacoast School of Technology Student Services Office. Initial program assignments are in March and students will be notified by mail of their acceptance to a program or position 22 •

SAU 16 ANNUAL REPORT

on a waiting list in high-demand programs. Every effort is made to place students in their first-choice program. After the initial round of program placements, all further course assignments are made on a first-come, first-serve basis.   Students attend classes at the Seacoast School of Technology for 90 minutes per day. The remainder of the day is spent at their sending high school taking required and other courses for graduation. The cost of a Seacoast School of Technology program is paid by the student’s school district, which also provides transportation.   All programs and classes are open to both females and males. The staff encourages all students to pursue nontraditional careers. More and more people are discovering non-traditional careers to be rewarding, fulfilling and challenging. All students should select their Seacoast School of Technology program based on their interests, skills and personal goals regardless of gender.   For more information, please call 603-775-8461 or visit our website at www.seacoasttech.com.


NECAP Proficiency Report

Champions for Children

Grades 3-8 & 11 in the SAU 16 District

The following individuals have distinguished themselves by demonstrating significant involvement in programs and/or services that directly benefit the students and families of SAU 16:

Percentage of students scoring proficient or better Columns in italics indicate the state average. READING

2007

2008

2009

Grade 3

88.0

77.0

86.0

78.0

91.3

80.0

District

Name

Grade 4

83.0

74.0

87.0

75.0

82.2

75.0

Grade 5

88.0

71.0

88.0

76.0

90.1

79.0

Grade 6

83.0

73.0

86.0

74.0

82.4

76.0

Grade 7

85.0

75.0

88.0

77.0

91.0

77.0

Grade 8

83.0

67.0

91.0

71.0

92.0

76.0

Grade 11

67.0

67.0

70.0

72.0

74.2

73.0

Brentwood Brentwood Brentwood CMS/Coop CMS/Coop East Kingston East Kingston EHS/Coop EHS/Coop Exeter Exeter Exeter Kensington Kensington Newfields SST/Coop SST/Coop SST/Coop SST/Coop SST/Coop SST/Coop SST/Coop Stratham Stratham Stratham Stratham Stratham

Kathy St. Hilaire Wayne St. Hilaire Sheila Lane Martha LaPerle Ed Pease Laurel Blackett Andrea Perella Reverend Michael Pike Kathy Bean Arthur Baillargeon Janet Guen Sue Bendroth Bette Cox Lili Spinosa Laura Gowling Donna Buxton Paul Marcoux Stephen Baum Kathleen Totten Denise Landis Dr. Philip Hatcher Susan Moynahan Marlo Ryan Susan Bessemer Jordan Ambargis Nathan Merrill Bruce Scamman

MATH

2007

2008

2009

Grade 3

90.0

73.0

86.0

72.0

91.2

76.0

Grade 4

82.0

68.0

89.0

73.0

83.5

75.0

Grade 5

90.0

69.0

86.0

73.0

90.2

75.0

Grade 6

89.0

68.0

85.0

69.0

83.4

72.0

Grade 7

76.0

63.0

81.0

66.0

85.0

66.0

Grade 8

76.0

58.0

79.0

65.0

86.0

66.0

Grade 11

27.0

28.0

43.0

32.0

46.8

33.0

WRITING

2007

2008

2009

Grade 5

71.0

52.0

79.0

60.0

NA

NA

Grade 8

64.0

43.0

78.0

51.0

NA

NA

Grade 11

34.0

33.0

54.0

39.0

46.0

50.0

24

BY THE NUMBERS Number of college-level courses that are offered at SST through the Running Start program.

Enrollment Trends 700

600

500

400 2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009


SAU 16 Tuck Learning Campus 30 Linden Street Exeter NH 03833


SAU 16 Annual Report