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Calix Martinez

Customer Assistance Representative at 20V0 Student of Energy and Sustainability at the University of Michigan-Flint

20/20 Energy Savings Vision My ideas to help Enterprise achieve its 20/20 vision encompass the individual branches use of electricity, natural gas, and water. Energy savings opportunities are listed below.

Electricity Lighting 

Use compact fluorescent lamps where an incandescent bulb would be used. These bulbs used 75% less energy than an incandescent bulb and can last ten times longer. (United States Environmental Protection Agency, 2007) Don’t use a T12 fluorescent lighting system. Use energy-efficient fluorescent lighting systems. Use T8 and T5 lamps, which are more efficient, provide a high intensity, and have a longer life. Always use electronic ballasts and not magnetic ballasts, electronic ballasts are 30% more efficient. (United States Environmental Protection Agency, 2007) Make use of lighting controls. A flexible lighting system will increase efficiency of your lighting system by letting you control which lights and the intensity of the light being used. Why light an unused area? Common controls are dimmers, occupancy sensors, and daylight sensors. An estimated 20-25% energy savings on lighting can be attained through this (United States Environmental Protection Agency, 2007) Day lighting is a great technique which requires no additional technology. By using sunlight you can dim/adjust lighting in the facility throughout the day to save on electric costs. Methods include; making sure windows aren’t blocked, uses of skylights, and daytime dimming systems. Research has shown that daylighting saves money and increase employee productivity and sales. (United States Environmental Protection Agency, 2007)

Appliances 

Only use Energy Star appliances on any new purchases of equipment. o Energy Star Refrigerators use 15% less energy than non-certified models. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) Refrigerators are a major appliance and use a lot of energy. Two easy ways to increase its efficiency are too make there there’s an inch or two of space between

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Calix Martinez

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Customer Assistance Representative at 20V0 Student of Energy and Sustainability at the University of Michigan-Flint

the appliance and the wall and avoid putting it in the sun or next to a heat source. Energy Star computer monitors use 25% less energy than noncertified models. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) Energy Star computers use 30-65% less energy than non-certified models. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) Energy Star copy machines use 40-55% less energy than non-certified models. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) Energy Star central air conditioners are over 15% more efficient than non-certified models. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency)

Natural Gas Garage 

Garage doors to the car wash open and close many times a day. To reduce the load put on the heating and cooling system install automatic sensors to ensure the doors close after a vehicle or person exits. Ensure the seals on the door are not hardened or cracked. o Educate employees on the energy efficiency value of keeping the doors sealed. o For new garage door installations, specify a thermal break of R-10 or greater.

Building Buildings account for 41% of annual energy use in the U.S., with space heating and cooling accounting for the top two uses in the building. (Air Movement and Control Association Internation, INC., 2010) 

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Due to the large amounts of foot traffic we get coming in and out of our buildings the doors are opened and closed a lot. This results in cool air coming in or hot air being lost outside. To help alleviate this installation of air curtains or vestibule doors will reduce the amount of cooling and heating that is lost. Many commercial buildings feature vestibules, which are small areas separated by two sets of doors. Vestibules use a small air space to improve

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Calix Martinez

Customer Assistance Representative at 20V0 Student of Energy and Sustainability at the University of Michigan-Flint

occupant comfort and reduce drafts by separating the outside from the inside of the building. They also save energy. For new construction or major renovations, vestibules are a good idea and should be considered for existing buildings as part of major renovation of the façade. (Published by the National Automobile Dealers Association, 2016) Use a programmable thermostat to reduce the amount of heating/cooling used when the building is unoccupied. “By turning your thermostat back 10° to 15° for 8 hours, you can save 5% to 15% a year on your heating bill -- a savings of as much as 1% for each degree if the setback period is eight hours long. In the summer, you can follow the same strategy with central air conditioning by keeping your house building warmer than normal when you are away, and lowering the thermostat setting to 78°F (26°C) only when you are in the building and need cooling.” (U.S. Department of Energy, 2013) Window orientation is important to a buildings energy budget. Minimize north facing window area and maximize south facing windows to help reduce heating costs in the cooler months. Shades and over hangs will help reduce the solar inputs from these windows in the warmer months. Use Energy Star qualified windows with a U-Factor of 0.35 or less o U-Factor measures the rate of heat transfer and tells you how well the window insulates. U-factor values generally range from 0.25 to 1.25 and are measured in Btu/h·ft²·°F. The lower the U-factor, the better the window insulates. (Energy Star) Install weather stripping on doors and windows to reduce any air leaks. It’s an easy and cost-effective way to save on heating and cooling costs. Also ensure existing weather stripping isn’t hardened or cracked. (U.S. Department of Energy, 2012)

Water Restrooms 

Toilets on average use about 1.6 gallons per flush, while urinals on average use about 1.0 gallons per flush. Having a urinal available could save a moderate amount of water. (U.S. Department of Energy, 2016)

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Calix Martinez

Customer Assistance Representative at 20V0 Student of Energy and Sustainability at the University of Michigan-Flint

Install WaterSense labeled faucets and fixtures which can use up to 20 percent less water than standard models. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2012)

Carwash  

Choose hand-held spray wands and foamy brushes that use 3.5 gallons per minute or less. Make sure each spray wand, foamy brush, or similar system has a positive shutoff valve so that the water will not run while the system is not being used. Replace spray nozzles regularly and check for leaks. o Repair the leaks promptly as they occur. Leaks can account for up to 10% of water use. (California Urban Water Conservation Council, 2000)

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Calix Martinez

Customer Assistance Representative at 20V0 Student of Energy and Sustainability at the University of Michigan-Flint

Works Cited California Urban Water Conservation Council. (2000, March). Retrieved January 12, 2014, from Resource Center: http://www.cuwcc.org/docDetail.aspx?id=1590 Published by the National Automobile Dealers Association. (2016). Retrieved January 12, 2014, from Energy Star: http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/small_business/BM31jan22.pdf Air Movement and Control Association Internation, INC. (2010). Investigation of the Impact of Building Entrance Air Curtain on Whole Building Energy Use. Retrieved January 12, 2014, from AMCA International: https://www.amca.org/UserFiles/file/Energy%20Initiative%20Web%20Pages/Air%20Cu rtain%20Study%281%29.pdf Energy Star. (n.d.). Energy Star. Retrieved January 12, 2014, from Windows, Doors, and Skylights.: http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=windows_doors.search_windows_submi t U.S. Department of Energy. (2012, May 7). U.S. Department of Energy. Retrieved January 12, 2014, from Weatherstripping: http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/weatherstripping U.S. Department of Energy. (2013, November 26). Thermostats. Retrieved January 12, 2014, from U.S. Department of Energy: http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/thermostats U.S. Department of Energy. (2016, August 26). U.S. Department of Energy. Retrieved January 12, 2014, from Best Management Practice: Toilets and Urinals: https://www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/program/waterefficiency_bmp6.html U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (2012, November). U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Retrieved January 12, 2014, from Saving Water in Office Buildings: http://www.epa.gov/watersense/commercial/docs/factsheets/offices_fact_sheet_508.pdf U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (n.d.). Air Conditioning, Central for Consumers. Retrieved January 9, 2014, from Energy Star: http://www.energystar.gov/certifiedproducts/detail/air_conditioning_central U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (n.d.). Computers for Consumers. Retrieved January 9, 2014, from Energy Star: http://www.energystar.gov/certified-products/detail/computers U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (n.d.). Displays for Consumers. Retrieved January 9, 2015, from Energy Star: http://www.energystar.gov/certified-products/detail/displays U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (n.d.). Imaging Equipment for Consumers. Retrieved January 9, 2014, from Energy Star: http://www.energystar.gov/certifiedproducts/detail/imaging_equipment

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Calix Martinez

Customer Assistance Representative at 20V0 Student of Energy and Sustainability at the University of Michigan-Flint

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (n.d.). Refrigerators for Consumers. Retrieved January 9, 2014, from Energy Star: http://www.energystar.gov/certifiedproducts/detail/refrigerators United States Environmental Protection Agency. (2007, September). Putting Energy Into Profits: Energy Star Guide for Small Business. Retrieved January 9, 2014, from Energy Star: http://www.energystar.gov/buildings/tools-and-resources/putting-energy-profits-smallbusiness-guide

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Enterprise Rent a Car 20/20 Energy Savings Vision