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The User In order to have a successful ‘space and place‘, it is highly essential to assess the not only the site, but also the potential user and social context in which the venue is placed.

An Era of Change

It is important to understand the social context of the society in order to propose the right use for the designed venue, as our desire is for our solution to be embraced by the community not only at an aesthetic level but also for its function and role. Therefore, the topic ‘An Era of Change’ frames the scene of Greenland’s modern society and the presents the struggles they are facing. Sejersen’s [2015] book on Rethinking Greenland and the Arctic in the Era of Climate Change outlines a profound understanding of Greenlandic traditions and contemporary needs. After a historical legacy of colonialism that linked Greenland to Denmark since 1721 [from being a colony to being endowed as an integrated part of the Danish realm], in 2009 Greenlanders have changed the face of the country’s home rule to self government, offering themselves the recognition as peoples with right to independence from Denmark. Greenland is however still depending on Denmark through the block grant of 3.6 billion DKK for areas such as education, health, fisheries, and environment. [Sejersen, 2015, p.28] Awareness in terms of societal and environmental changes that Greenland is facing, has led to the desire of diversification and strengthening of the

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THE USER

nation’s economy. This has been achieved by facilitating access to mega-industries such as the placement of aluminum smelters in three of the country’s most developed cities. The initiative represents an active way of adapting to natural changes, creating opportunities for future generations. This adaptation entails however, a ‘total transformation of society’ [Sejersen, 2015, p.126]. Nonetheless, the environmental change and the desire of furnishing a new society is also addressed by the ambition of turning the melting ice problematic into a water resource. Therefore today, after being deeply entangled in colonial and post-colonial projects, the people of Greenland are on their way into modernity. However, the people have become marginal, this marginality being linked in respect to one’s own culture, to the environment and to modern culture. Moreover, comprehending ‘the local point of view’ is not an exercise in representing one’s understanding of place or of a diversity of views, but a question of appreciating how place-awareness can be multidimensional and can be intertwined in dynamic spatial and temporal scalemaking, while simultaneously being deeply embedded in everyday life and prevailing problems.

Geopolitical Context The concept of ‘Indigenous Peoples’ has undergone intensive lobbying in terms of embracing these cultures as stakeholders in the international context. The people’s ambition of self-determination and, concomitantly, the rights to continue practicing a specific way of life are being pursued in political institutions on different scales [Sejersen, 2015, p.18]. Moreover, the initiative stressed upon the importance of the collective right to determine a personalized future development. Adequate examples of this phenomena are Greenland or the Nunavut region in Canada, places that have managed to detach and express their own beliefs, taking the form of selfgovernment in Greenland and regional government of Nunavut in Canada. Climate change In an era subjected to continuous climate change, challenges such as melting sea ice, receding glaciers, the thawing of permafrost or changes in biodiversity and resource presence, have placed Arctic societies in a tense situation. Now, difficult societal choices have to be made and expectations have to be reconsidered. Sejersen [2015] argues that the speed of environmental change that challenges indigenous peoples’ capacity for adaptability is linked with the discourse of

Master's Thesis  

Architecture and Design Master's Thesis Proposal

Master's Thesis  

Architecture and Design Master's Thesis Proposal

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