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CALIFORNIA WOMEN LAWYERS N E W S L E T T E R JANUARY 2017

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NEWSLETTER JANUARY 2017 #2 2016-17 CWL Board Officers President Chris Chambers Goodman - Pepperdine University School of Law President-Elect Renee Galente - Galente Law, APC First Vice President Amee Mikacich - Sedgwick LLP Second Vice President Jessica Lynn Rowe - Aaron, Riechert, Carpol & Riffle Secretary Naomi Dewey - Buynak, Fauver, Archbald & Spray Treasurer Connie L. Chen - Jackson Lewis P.C. Editor Amelia Burroughs - Janssen Malloy LLP Assistant Editor Kristen Calderon Editorial Designer David Blue Garrison Additional Photography Pexels, Pixabay and Stocksnap CWL was chartered in 1974. It was organized “to advance women in the profession of law; to improve the administration of justice; to better the position of women in society; to eliminate all inequities based on sex; and to provide an organization for collective action and expression germane to the aforesaid purposes.� The purposes are limited to purposes meeting the requirements for exemption provided in Section 2370le of the Revenue and Taxation Code and Section 501(c)(6) of the Internal Revenue Code as the statutes may be amended from time to time. Thank you to all the authors in this issue for sharing with us their time and expertise. If you have an idea for a future article, please contact Kristen Calderon at the CWL office at kcalderon@cwl.org Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in these articles are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of CWL. For more information on CWL or this newsletter, please contact the CWL office at 916.930.9020 or visit the website at www.cwl.org.


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

As a law student, I heard many stories about Clara Shortridge Foltz from Professor Barbara Babcock, who was meticulously researching for a biography of this first California Woman Lawyer. I recently had the pleasure of talking with Professor Babcock about the impact of her work, and you can read Professor Babcock’s article in this newsletter. Now, we celebrate the 138th anniversary of her admission as the first female attorney of the California State Bar (California State Bar number 2596). As Professor Babcock shared these snapshots of Clara Shortridge Foltz’s early struggles to become and then practice as a “lady lawyer,” we were inspired by her life in service to the law. The walls that Clara Shortridge Foltz and others broke through expanded opportunities for everyone. These stories informed all of us how much, as well as how little, has changed in our profession. Clara Shortridge Foltz and others turned their efforts to securing the vote for women—to share responsibility for selecting and electing our political leaders. Many of us exercised that right a few months ago, and there were winners and losers. As a profession, we rank low in resilience, in the ability to bounce back, to move on in the face of unanticipated adversity or defeat, and many are struggling. Ringing in 2017, we are faced with changes. Many attorneys resist change. For some, it means unbearable uncertainty, and for others, outright fear. Some welcome and embrace change, and some look forward to exploring a new direction. But whether we love change or hate change, we all experience it. Change happens to us, with us, without us, over us, under us, and all around us. We may experience it gracefully, with poise, and with dignity, or with hostility and resentment. It’s our choice. This month, I visited our San Francisco affiliate Queen’s Bench to participate in their Girls’ Juvenile Hall art program. I interacted with our members at the Women’s March in Los Angeles and joined our board the following day for a meeting in Sacramento. We were inspired to hear the stories of those who marched all around the state, and have some photos to share on the pages that follow. We have a heartening schedule of affiliate events for the upcoming months, and I hope to see you at some of them. Thank you for your support in word and deed, and for participating in our continuing outreach and advocacy efforts as stewards of the legacy of the first California Women Lawyer.

Chris Chambers Goodman CWL President


EDITOR’S LETTER WOMEN AT WORK AMELIA BURROUGHS California Women Lawyers is thrilled to bring you the January 2017 edition of our newsletter. Equal pay is heavy on our minds and in our sights. Given that January marks the anniversary of legislation intended to drive out disparities in pay based on sex, CWL brings you reflections on California’s Fair Pay Act by its author Senator Jackson and an interview with Lori Andrus, of Andrus Anderson LLP, a powerhouse in equal pay class litigation. The Equal Pay Act of 1963 (“EPA”), at 29 U.S.C. §206(d), has been federal law for over 50 years. Despite this, the data continues to reflect a grim, immobile disparity in pay between women and men in the workplace. The EPA amended the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, and it is enforced by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The EPA prohibits discrimination in wages between women and men who work for the same employer and who perform jobs with substantially equal skill, responsibilities, and efforts. In enacting the EPA, Congress determined that wage differentials based on sex depress wages and living standards necessary for employees’ health and efficiency, prevent the maximum utilization of the available labor resources, burden and obstruct the free flow of commerce, and constitute an unfair method of competition. This month also marks the anniversary of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009, which overturned the Supreme Court’s time-restrictive decision in Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Inc., 550 U.S. 618 (2007). The National Women’s Law Center has an excellent resource on the causes of the wage gap and suggestions for addressing same: LINK Here in California, the California Fair Pay Act, carried by Senator Jackson and signed by Governor Brown in 2015, was intended to supplement California’s own Equal Pay Act. It is currently the strongest equal pay law in the nation, and it requires equal pay for equal work and includes protections against retaliation for fair pay advocacy in the workplace. The text of the Act, in effect since January 1, 2016, can be found here: LINK These laws, though powerful, are but a few in the equal pay litigation toolkit. And, of course, this month marks the anniversary of the Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113 (1973), a necessary step in the quest for sex-equality and personal autonomy. We’re also bringing you pictures from Women’s Marches throughout California. So many of us on the Board of CWL went right from a march and got straight to work to bring you great programming events and networking opportunities. Finally, as we look toward the future of women at work, it pays to remember those who climbed up and reached back a hand for us. In this newsletter, Barbara Babcock, Crown Professor of Law, Emerita, Stanford Law School reflects on the life of California’s first woman lawyer, Clara Shortridge Foltz. Professor Babcock’s own book on Ms. Foltz, “Woman Lawyer: The Trials of Clara Foltz”, can be found here: LINK Join us at CWL as we celebrate those who advocate for women in the world and educate ourselves and our allies on how to litigate on behalf of women in the workplace.


CWL Board Meeting held in Sacramento

Please join

Women Lawyers of Long Beach for a presentation on

Relationships in the Workplace When: Time: Place: Cost: Entree:

(For 1 Hour of MCLE Ethics Credit)

Monday, February 13, 2017 5:30 p.m. Long Beach Marriot, Garden Terrace Cafe and Patio (4700 Airport Plaza Drive, Long Beach, CA 90815) $35 - CWL & WLLB Members and Students / $40 - Non-Members Herbed Salmon / Roasted Chicken / Spaghetti Puttanesca (vegetarian) -- Please RSVP with your choice

Please RSVP no later than February 6, 2017. Send your RSVP to Margo Bergkvist at margo@lawbbc.com and mail checks payable to: WLLB P.O. Box 21457 Long Beach, CA 90801

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CLARA FOLTZ: FIRST WOMAN Barbara Babcock In the long struggle for equal rights, women turned early to the law, both to join the profession and to change it. Myra Bradwell of Illinois argued in the U.S. Supreme Court that the recently minted fourteenth Amendment established the right for all citizens (including women) to pursue any honest vocation or occupation. Bradwell v. Illinois, 83 U.S. 130 (1873) Bradwell lost, which meant that the admission of women to the Bar would be a state by state campaign. In some places, it was rather easily achieved, and women practiced in the local, unspectacular way of most attorneys. But in California five years after Bradwell, Clara Foltz fought a terrific court and press battle to change the statute which provided that only “white men” of good character might be lawyers. When she started on her journey to lasting fame, Clara Foltz was an obscure housewife in San Jose, recently deserted by her husband, with five young children in her care. At her death in Los Angeles in 1934, she was the famous “First Woman of California:” first to be a lawyer; first to attend the first law school (Hastings); first to practice in San Jose, San Francisco, and San Diego, first to hold statewide office (on the Board of Trustees of the Normal School) and first to serve on the Board of Charities and Corrections. She was the first person to promote the idea of a public defender, and the first woman to be a deputy district attorney in Los Angeles. Though she was very famous in her day, Foltz had been largely forgotten in modern times. That is, until California women lawyers took up her case, starting with a successful campaign to re-name the central criminal courts of Los Angeles. Now the huge important building is known as the Clara Shortridge Foltz Criminal Justice Cente . Equal Rights for women and constitutional rights for the criminally accused were her two great causes—and in her person and her thinking the movements were joined. Like countless other suffragists, Foltz spent most of her adult life petitioning, lobbying, leafleting, speaking, rallying, writing, pleading and importuning for suffrage. Luckier than most of the pioneers, she lived to cast a legal ballot. She also saw the initial success of her other great cause; the first public defender office in the nation was established in Los Angeles in 1913. It was created by a new city charter passed with women’s support at the polls in the first general election where they voted. In the last years of her life, Foltz received some of the recognition she longed for. She liked being called the “lady lawyer.” It was a “pretty soubriquet” she said, one that helped her “maintain a dainty manner as I browbeat my way through the marshes of prejudice and ignorance.” She also received such other soubriquets as: “sister of men, mother of women lawyers, dean of suffragists, Knight Errantress of Equal Rights, and the Great Pioneer.” In addition to the triumphs were many disappointments and frustrated ambitions. No woman could be counsel to large corporate interests, hold high elective office, or even be a trusted legal advisor to those who did, though Foltz tried hard to do all these. She longed to be a judge, but by the time a few women were elected or appointed to judicial office, she was well past her prime and was not considered. The first female federal judge took office four years after Foltz died. If she had been born a man, would she have won the lasting fame and large fortune she sought? She certainly thought so but the answer is complicated. A lot of the publicity and attention Foltz received was on account of her sex as much as her brilliance and originality. Being an underdog and outsider sharpened her best gifts and enhanced her sympathies, as well as helped her to formulate her unique contribution, the idea of the public defender. In the women’s movement, moreover, Foltz found companionship in her struggles and a cause that ennobled her efforts. Barbara Babcock, Crown Professor of Law, Emerita, Stanford Law School Author of Woman Lawyer: The Trials of Clara Foltz (Stanford University Press 2011). Also see chapter fourteen of Babcock, Fish Raincoats: A Woman Lawyer’s Life (Quid Pro Books, 2016) describing “Writing a Life.”

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Clara Shortridge Foltz

Los Angeles County Courthouse

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EQUAL PAY CHAMPION IN THE COURTS Lori E. Andrus is a founding partner of Andrus Anderson LLP, based in San Francisco, California. Ms. Andrus specializes in class actions and complex litigation, encompassing a wide range of subject matter including mass torts, consumer fraud, product defects, and wage and hour claims. In recent years, Ms. Andrus has focused her practice on equal pay cases, recently settling a wage discrimination case on behalf of a nationwide class of female attorneys at Farmers Insurance Group. In Coates v. Farmers Insurance Group, et al., Case No. 5:15-cv-01913 (Northern District of California), Ms. Andrus and her co-counsel Lori J. Costanzo, of the Costanzo Law Firm, brought Equal Pay Act and Title VII claims on behalf of a nationwide class, as well as California class claims for violations of the California Fair Employment in Housing Act, the California Equal Pay Act, California’s Unfair Competition Law, and the California Private Attorneys General Act of 2004. A graduate with honors from Duke University School of Law, Ms. Andrus was named by The National Law Journal as one of the nation’s 75 “Outstanding Women Lawyers.” CWL caught up with Ms. Andrus to talk about her work, wage discrimination cases generally, and the future of women’s bar associations.

“...the younger

generation is better at transitioning to equity and inclusion, particularly around parenting and workplace hours that work for everybody.”

The Coates case came to Ms. Andrus through word of mouth after she gave an ethics CLE presentation. She immediately saw the potential of the case, and she describes Lynn Coate’s story as a 100% forthright, strong equal pay case. With settlement, Ms. Andrus achieved a substantial victory for the class. She is most proud of the benchmark provisions, which she describes as “not quotas, but aspirational goals for increasing representation by women at all levels of the organization.” Under the terms of the settlement, Farmers will, for a three-year period, appoint a compliance monitor, conduct statistical analyses to confirm that its compensation policies do not negatively impact female attorney employees, make salary range information available to attorney employees, and use its best efforts to increase the representation of women in certain salary grades to agreed-upon benchmarks. Ms. Andrus credits Farmers and its counsel, Nancy L. Abell of Paul Hastings (“a tough litigator”), as genuinely interested in and willing to transform any organizational pay disparity.

As Ms. Andrus expected from the outset, the Coates case garnered significant media attention. She prepared with polished pleadings. She describes the investigation into the claims of pay discrimination as incredibly important (and legally obligated), and the complaint must demonstrate that even though small, her firm is a contender on the nationwide stage. Ms. Andrus describes having a class of lawyers as clients as anxiety-producing but enjoyable. “These women were Super Women—accomplished, responsive, helpful, brave, and principled.”

Continues On Next Page PHOTO CREDIT TO PAMELA PALMA PHOTOGRAPHY

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EQUAL PAY CHAMPION IN THE COURTS Continued Ms. Andrus’ own role models include Elizabeth Cabraser (“a hard-working, magical lawyer”) and her father, Vance Andrus, a successful trial lawyer who started his own firm from the ground up. He remains a tremendous resource for her, and he was largely her inspiration for leaving Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein, LLP and striking out on her own with her law partner Jennifer Lee Anderson. At the time, Ms. Andrus was looking for a more intimate professional partnership, and the transition felt “scary yet attainable.” For other lawyers considering the transition, Ms. Andrus offers the mantra “Fear Less.” On the future of equal pay, Ms. Andrus sees the movement gaining ground in state legislatures. She believes real work can be done locally, for example, to prohibit pay secrecy and protect those who discuss pay in the workplace. She sees the federal Equal Pay Act as entrenched, but she would like to see the catch-all defense, which permits employers to maintain pay differentials for any gender neutral but business-related reason, deleted. “I’d like to see a more strict liability standard—the same work should be paid the same. The catch-all provision allows for flimsy excuses to be considered total defenses.” As for the future of feminism, “women transitioning has been the history of the movement. I feel like the younger generation is better at transitioning to equity and inclusion, particularly around parenting and workplace hours that work for everybody.” Ms. Andrus believes women’s bar associations remain relevant—and she’s chaired more than her share. But she encourages us to do less talking to ourselves, to get on the main stage of legal events and MCLEs, and to write for the all-inclusive publications and not just the “women’s” newsletters. Ms. Andrus gets particularly fired up when she talks about the need for women lawyers to be politically active. She considers women lawyers as natural candidates, and she’d like to see CWL profile women lawyers who are politically active. For Ms. Andrus, these are the ways we’ll actively engage male counterparts in the demands for equity.

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CWL MEMBERS MARCHED On Saturday, January 21, 2017, CWL members and CWL Affiliates throughout California took to the streets in support of fair pay, women’s reproductive health, and diverse communities. Here are some pictures from the events in Oakland, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Palm Springs, Sacramento, San Diego, Fresno, and Eureka.

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Photo by Meghan Leeman at the Sacramento March

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Join us for the

2017 Annual Conference IN SAN DIEGO

Offering a full day of MCLE credits, inspiration and networking in a world-class vacation destination!

April 7, 2017

8:30 am to 5:00 pm Cocktail Reception Following with Presentation of the Judith Soley Lawyer as Citizen Award to Tracy Skaddan, General Counsel for Planned Parenthood of the Pacific Southwest 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm


Sponsor and Exhibitor Opportunities available. For more information and registration

Hotel Accomodations: Book your room by March 9, 2017 for

special discounted room rates of $269/nt plus tax and fees for single or double rooms. Reservations may be made online HERE or by calling: Toll Free 1-877-622-3056 See what San Diego has to offer. Please be sure to reference that you are with California Women Lawyers to receive the special pricing.


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THE FUTURE OF FAIR PAY California Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson Last year, California’s accomplishments on pay equity marked an historic turning point in the battle for equal rights for women. When my SB 358, the California Fair Pay Act, was enacted into law a year ago, California became the nationwide leader in addressing pay inequity and its impacts on women, families and our economy. Since the enactment of the Fair Pay Act, women are now able to challenge pay discrimination based on wages paid to other workers at the same or different worksites for the same employer for doing substantially similar work, and employees no longer risk retaliation for doing so. Employers, not employees, are now required to show that a difference in wages is based on a specific factor that is legitimate, serves a business purpose, and is not based on or derived from a gender bias. These important changes were achieved by bringing together employee and employer representatives to work collaboratively on an issue that is important to all of us.

“Ensuring that

women are paid equally for doing the same work as their male counterparts is not only right, it is critically important to a woman’s economic future.”

When my bill was introduced in 2015, pay equity took center stage as a nationwide issue and many companies, including Salesforce, Gap Inc., and Intel, took proactive steps to ensure fair pay in their organizations. Yet our work is not complete. In addition to working together to pass stronger protections, California has also taken the lead on implementation efforts, most notably, the convening of the California Commission on the Status of Women and Girls’ Pay Equity Task Force. As a Commissioner and a member of the Task Force, I am enthusiastic about the work we are doing to ensure meaningful implementation of the Fair Pay Act throughout the entire business sector, including our efforts to support all employers in complying with the law. With the leadership of the law’s enforcer, Labor Commissioner Julie Su, and management-side employment law attorney, Commissioner Lauri Damrell, the Task Force has brought together stakeholders representing diverse interests in compensation, employees’ rights, human resources, and policy. This effort represents the spirit of collaboration which was so vital to the law’s success.

Ensuring that women are paid equally for doing the same work as their male counterparts is not only right, it is critically important to a woman’s economic future. When a woman is paid less than a man for the same job, this disparity impacts her lifetime earnings, her highest wage and ultimately her retirement security. When women suffer economically, families suffer, our economy is weakened, and our society undervalues the hard work of half its population. I am committed to continuing my work to ensure women are paid fairly, recognizing that our successes today are possible because of the work that has gone on before us. Together we are building a foundation for a future of economic opportunity and prosperity that our daughters, sons, granddaughters and grandsons will be able to benefit from equally. This foundation will assure economic growth. Together we will continue to provide a model to the rest of the nation that economic equity is not only morally right but an economic imperative.

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MEET A CWL MEMBER Rachael Lamkin of Lamkin IP Defense Tell us about your practice. I’ve just started my own firm, Lamkin IP Defense. My practice is focused on white hat IP litigation—IP litigation that supports creators against mere monetizers. I do predominantly anti-patent troll work but also some anti-counterfeit and scope of field work for artists concerned about exploring the appropriation landscape. As far as I know, it’s the first law firm that is focused on anti-patent troll work. After the firm’s first year, I would like to build or compile a team of other litigators doing white hat litigation, such as anti-trafficking, anti-revenge porn, and antifraud. In brief, I have practiced patent litigation since graduating from law school in 2006. I have always loved it, the complexity, the challenge, having to deep dive into technology after technology, from biochemistry to software to mechanical engineering. About four years ago, I went in-house as a Senior Associate General Counsel for a company I had represented as lead trial counsel previously (OtterBox). I was then and remain now incredibly honored to have been responsible for advising and protecting OtterBox, its people, its assets, and its place in the world. I oversaw and participated in litigation in nearly every litigation forum, from federal court, to the International Trade Commission, to Customs, to federal appellate courts. But the litigations I was most passionate about were the ones against patent trolls. That is, companies who don’t make, create, or innovate anything but simply buy patents that are then used to extort people and companies who do actually make, create, and innovate. Thus, when it came time to resign my position at OtterBox and form my own firm, I knew I would start with anti-troll work. What do you find is the best part of the practice of law?

“...as for big law in particular, once you’ve been there for a few years, don’t let the ego and money hold you hostage. There is important, rewarding work to be done.”

The best part of practicing law is helping people who feel afraid and powerless see that they are neither. And, I really like to bring karma to extortionists.

What advice would you give to other lawyers contemplating a transition like the ones you’ve made? If you’re at a big law firm, take advantage and learn as much as you can before you leave the excellent training ground of big law. I was incredibly fortunate to learn from the lawyers at Day Casebeer Madrid and Batchelder, arguably one of the best patent litigation boutiques in the world. But I probably learned the most from a firm we call “TurBo,” a litigation boutique formed by two amazing patent litigators, Julie Turner and Karen Boyd. Turner Boyd is a woman-lead patent litigation boutique that is garnering rave reviews in Silicon Valley (although I think they have let men in now). It’s such an important example for lawyers and the legal community, and I am grateful to have fought and learned alongside them. I highly recommend that all lawyers seek mentors, but female litigators in particular should seek female mentors. And as for big law in particular, once you’ve been there for a few years, don’t let the ego and money hold you hostage. There is important, rewarding work to be done. What do you do when you’re not lawyering? Trail running, cycling, working on a non-fiction book about the Beastie Boys’ IP philosophy, and spending time with my incredible wife. Are women’s bar organizations still relevant today? And why? Women’s organizations of all kinds are incredibly important right now. And especially bar associations. We need to draw from each other’s strength, courage, connections, skill-sets, and resolve. Now more than ever. And see note above re: female mentors for litigators. How do you hope to benefit from your CWL regarding membership? I would like to meet other women who are fighting the good fights.

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Santa Barbara

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CWL AFFILIATE SANTA BARBARA WOMEN LAWYERS HONORS WOMAN LAWYER OF THE YEAR On December 12, 2016, CWL Affiliate Santa Barbara Women Lawyers hosted a reception and annual dinner. SBWL awarded Denise Motter, Commissioner of the County of Santa Barbara, with its Deborah M. Talmage Attorney of the Year award. Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson was recognized for her tireless work on behalf of women. SBWL and SBWL Foundation Boards were sworn in by the Hon. Jean Dandona of the Santa Barbara County Superior Court. Congratulations to SBWL Director and CWL Governor Danielle De Smeth, CWL Affiliate Governor Kate McGuinness, and everyone at SBWL!

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QUEEN’S BENCH JUVENILE HALL PROJECT The Juvenile Hall Project is a community outreach program that has been serving teenage girls held at the San Francisco Juvenile Detention Center for over forty years. Twice a month, members of CWL-affiliate Queen’s Bench spend time with the girls who are serving time at the facility. Many of the girls have unstable home lives and few chances to develop the skills needed as adults. The Juvenile Hall Project hopes to impact these girls’ lives by providing positive role models. While making crafts, the girls and volunteers share stories and get to know each other On the evening of January 4, CWL president Chris Goodman and I volunteered with the Project. That evening’s selected craft was centered around mapping out a goal that each participant wanted to accomplish in the next five years. We were asked to write down the steps that we needed to reach it and then design an artistic rendering of our journey towards the goal. As we festooned our drawings with gold and blue glitter, the two girls at the table where I was seated and I exchanged our goals and discussed the short and long-term steps required to reach them. Both girls knew that education was important to their success but seemed confused about how to continue their educations. After I left Juvenile Hall, I continued to think about how the girls might achieve their goals and hoped my advice might help to guide their choices. It is such nonjudgmental mentoring that builds connections between the women from Queen’s Bench and the girls at Juvenile Hall and explains the ongoing success of the Juvenile Hall Project.

“The aim of

the Juvenile Hall Project is to provide mentoring through building these nonjudgmental connections between the young girls and Queen’s Bench volunteers...”

The aim of the Juvenile Hall Project is to provide mentoring through building these nonjudgmental connections between the young girls and Queen’s Bench volunteers, and the rewards flow to the mentors. It is this connection between these young women and those Queen’s Bench volunteers that, I believe, explains the ongoing success of the Juvenile Hall Project.

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Queen’s Bench Juvenile Hall Project participants Clarissa Kang, Christine MacDonald, Christine Goodman, Rebecca Hooley, Lisa Villasenor, and Tiffany Hufford

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Klinedinst shareholder Heather L. Rosing (right) is pictured with Shunya Wade (left), the 2015 recipient of the Klinedinst PC Scholarship from the California Bar Foundation. Ms. Rosing was elected President of the California Bar Foundation for the 2017-2018 term, and will help lead the charge to build a more diverse and accessible legal profession. Photo and copy from the klinedinstlaw website.

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MEMBER NEWS CWL member Heather Rosing, shareholder and CFO of Klinedinst PC, was elected President of the California Bar Foundation. CBF is the center of philanthropy for California’s legal community, and it is the state’s largest scholarship resource for diverse law students. Ms. Rosing is a tireless advocate for promoting diversity and serving the underrepresented. At Klinedinst, Ms. Rosing serves as Chairperson of the Professional Liability Group, working in the defense of professionals such as lawyers and accountants. Learn more about her achievement HERE CWL congratulates Ms. Rosing and CBF!

Continues On Next Page PHOTO CREDIT TO PAMELA PALMA PHOTOGRAPHY

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UPCOMING EVENTS - March 2 Northern California Judicial Reception and Rose Bird Memorial Award Presentation to Judge Carol S. Bosnahan, Alameda County Superior Court (watch for email announcements coming soon with more details and registration) - April 7 The Future is Feminine – Inspire, Illuminate, and Inform CWL’s 2017 Annual Conference Marriott Marquis San Diego 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM Cocktail Reception to follow from 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM Register HERE Please join us for this full day conference offering inspiration, networking, and MCLE credits. Book your room by March 9, 2017 for special discounted rates of $269/night plus tax and fees for single or double rooms. Reservations may be made online HERE or by calling: Toll Free: 1-877-622-3056 Reservations Local Phone: 619-234-1500 Be sure to reference that you are with California Women Lawyers to receive special pricing. - May 19 Southern California Judicial Reception and Jaon Dempsey Klein Distinguished Jurist Award Presentation to Judge Marguerite D. Downing, Los Angeles Superior Court - October 5 CWL 43rd Annual Dinner and Silent – Grand Hyatt San Francisco

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FINAL THOUGHTS

2017 Induction Ceremony and Champagne Reception Queen’s Bench Bar Association Associate Justice Kathryn M. Werdegar, California Supreme Court, will conduct the induction ceremony in honor of incoming officers and directors of Queen’s Bench Bar Association and to welcome new admittees to the California State Bar. Thursday, February 9, 2017 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Civic Center Courthouse, Fourth Floor Rotunda, 400 McAllister Street, San Francisco Champagne and hors d’oeuvres will be served. Judges and New Admittees to the California Bar are guests of Queen’s Bench. Queen’s Bench Members and General Public tickets are $25 each and can be purchased HERE


Thank You to Our 2017 Statewide Bronze Sponsor

Learn about all of our Annual CWL Sponsorship Opportunities HERE

CALIFORNIA WOMEN LAWYERS N E W S L E T T E R DECEMBER 2016

CWL N E W S L E T T E R

www.cwl.org

CWL Newsletter January 2017  
CWL Newsletter January 2017  

California Women Lawyers promotes the advancement of women in the legal profession and is an active advocate for the concerns of women in so...