__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

CALIFORNIA WOMEN LAWYERS N E W S L E T T E R JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2018 1

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


CWL

NEWSLETTER JANUARY - FEBRUARY #7 2017-18 CWL Board Officers CWL President Renée Galente CWL President-Elect Amee Mikacich Immediate Past President Chris Chambers Goodman First Vice-President Jessica L. Rowe Second Vice-President Naomi Dewey Secretary Michelle Ialeggio Treasurer Summer Selleck Editors Amelia Burroughs - Janssen Malloy LLP Jodi Cleesattle - California Department of Justice Assistant Editor Vanessa Gonzales Editorial Designer David Blue Garrison Additional Photography Pexels, Pixabay and Stocksnap CWL was chartered in 1974. It was organized “to advance women in the profession of law; to improve the administration of justice; to better the position of women in society; to eliminate all inequities based on sex; and to provide an organization for collective action and expression germane to the aforesaid purposes.” The purposes are limited to purposes meeting the requirements for exemption provided in Section 2370le of the Revenue and Taxation Code and Section 501(c)(6) of the Internal Revenue Code as the statutes may be amended from time to time. Thank you to all the authors in this issue for sharing with us their time and expertise. If you have an idea for a future article, please contact Vanessa Gonzales at the CWL office at newsletter@cwl.org Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in these articles are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of CWL. For more information on CWL or this newsletter, please contact the CWL office at 916.930.9020 or visit the website at www.cwl.org.


LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT Renée Galente

O

prah Winfrey’s “A New Day is on the Horizon” speech at the Golden Globes. The #TimesUp Legal Defense Fund and movement. The #MeToo movement. The Women’s March. Off the Sidelines. It’s On Us. The NoMore campaign. The Silence Breakers. #RuntoWin. #SheShouldRun. According to CNN, 2018 will be the year of the woman. For CWL, every year is the year of the woman and has been since 1974 when we began our work directed towards achieving gender equity and diversity in the legal profession and in the judiciary, and advocating for women, children and LGBT in California. 2018 will be no different for us as we continue our efforts. We will continue until we no longer need movements, campaigns, or hash tags; we will continue until gender equity is the norm. CWL applauds the work of these women’s movements, some which have existed for years without recognition until recently, and we thank all the strong women and men who fight for women’s rights. We at CWL are proud to be a long-standing part of those efforts. We truly stand on the shoulders of those that came before us, including sheroes like Past President Carol Copsey. Join us. Renew your membership for the New Year if you haven’t already. Take your support to the next level and become active on a committee. Don’t have the time to be on a committee? Fund our work as a sponsor and help us remain a vibrant and robust organization. The prevalence of all these women’s movements highlights just how much work there is to do and how righteous and timely the work we do is. Don’t miss being a part of it. CWL starts off 2018 raising awareness of a topic near and dear to our heart. Since 2009, CWL has been a strong advocate against human trafficking and January is Human Trafficking Awareness month. We are fortunate to have two of the strongest advocates for victims of human trafficking in the State involved with CWL: District Attorneys Nancy O’Malley of Alameda County and Summer Stephan of San Diego County. In this issue, they share statistics on human trafficking in California, what is being done to combat human trafficking, and, more importantly, how you can help fight human trafficking.

We also take time to highlight the strong black women leaders in the California legal profession in honor of Black History Month this coming February 2018. Would you be surprised to learn that the first black woman judge was not appointed until 1961? That the first black woman Attorney General was elected in 2010? Or that the first black woman District Attorney of Los Angeles was elected in 2012? CWL honors these pioneers for their work leading the way for the future generations and breaking down barriers. Breaking down barriers is what CWL strives to do. For instance, our national award-winning program So, You Want to be a Judge? ™ focuses on breaking down barriers by diversifying the judiciary. This year, the program will take place in two parts; Part One was an intimate brown-bag lunch and conversation with Sr. Appointment Advisor to Gov. Brown Josh Groban and Incoming JNE Committee Chair David Fermino. Timing is now critical: If you want the opportunity to be considered for appointment under Gov. Brown, you must get your packet in now! Mr. Groban provided insight on getting those applications in, as well as what you might want to consider in supplementing your existing application. Part Two will take place at the State Capitol on March 9 and will feature state and federal judges discussing pathways to the bench. Please take advantage of these programs! We need a bench that reflects the diverse community it serves. If you would like CWL to evaluate you as a judicial candidate to supplement your nomination packet, please reach out soon. The process is thorough and does take time. These two programs are just the beginning of what CWL will bring to you this year. You can view our full calendar of events here. We look forward to spending time with you this year, working together towards a common goal and advocating with the loudest voice possible for the women of California.

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


CWL N E W S L E T T E R


Editor’s Note By Amelia Burroughs Join us at CWL in welcoming in 2018. It’s empowering to begin every year by celebrating the life and work of Martin Luther King, Jr. It’s an inspiring beginning for those of us working for change. His memory lifts us up; his words compel us forward in our work for equality. The names of those who blazed the way still resonate. In this issue, in honor of Black History Month, we highlight a number of firsts, including Annie Coker, the first female African American lawyer in California. Also in our thoughts are Emma Ping Lum, the first Chinese American woman to practice law in California, Chiyoko Sakamoto, the first female Japanese American attorney in California and again after her imprisonment in an internment camp, Maria V. Orozco, the first Latina to pass the California Bar, and Abby Abinanti, who is the first Native American female attorney to practice law in California and who serves as the Chief Judge of the Yurok Tribal Court today. Change sometimes comes from the top down. The California Legislature recently created a committee to address sexual harassment in the Capitol, which is expected to hold its first meeting this month. CWL looks forward to seeing transparent, credible leadership on the issue from our Capitol. The abolishment of human trafficking remains at the forefront of our work. We include an article by those at work in this regard. Thank you to District Attorney Nancy O’Malley for your tireless efforts on behalf of human trafficking victims. Finally, I am thrilled to introduce my co-editor, Jodi Cleesattle. As the former newsletter editor for the Lawyers Club of San Diego, she brings a wealth of talent and experience. I expect you’ll hear a great deal from her in our future editions. Welcome, Jodi!

Jodi Cleesattle 5

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


Re-framing Failure To Succeed In Business Development By Liz Stone This article addresses how lawyers perceive and respond to failure, and how it’s necessary to reframe this view to succeed in business development. The skills that make us good lawyers don’t necessarily make us good business generators, and in fact can be counterproductive to business development. In order to succeed in building a book of business, lawyers often need to use an entirely different skill set and attitude than what made them good lawyers in the first place. Lawyers tend to test high for skepticism, urgency, and impatience, and typically try to be “efficient” in relationships. (Dr. Larry Richard, Herding Cats: The Lawyer Personality Revealed, LawyerBrain LLC, http://www.lawyerbrain.com/sites/default/files/caliper_ herding_cats.pdf). In addition to this personality profile, lawyers are trained not to put anything out into the world that isn’t perfect and to generally embrace a risk-averse approach at work. For lawyers, anything less than perfection is a failure. Too often, good lawyers bring this risk-averse approach attitude to business development and delay sowing the seeds for new business. They don’t put themselves out there as much as they should, whether it’s publishing articles, speaking at conferences, and - most importantly - asking clients for business. Many lawyers shy away from requesting introductions, making cold calls, or pitching business on a regular basis. Instead, they keep their head down in their work, staying squarely in their comfort zone. The direct result is developing less business than they otherwise could. There are many anecdotes at law firms about how the biggest rainmaker isn’t the “best” or most “detail oriented” lawyer - which makes sense when you break down the skill set and personality traits necessary for business development. In contrast to practicing law, business development requires: • A long game approach, usually with no immediate results (a challenge for people who test high on the “urgency” scale) • Confidence putting yourself out in the world (often lacking in those who are worried about failure) • Being comfortable with unpredictable results (lawyers like certainty) • Optimism (lawyers are born pessimists) • Last but certainly not least: resilience. Bouncing back from rejection, not getting discouraged from a “failure”, and turning a bad experience into a business development opportunity. So much of business development involves an element of luck - being the right attorney in the right place at the right time. However, this luck only strikes if you put yourself out there on a regular basis - often feeling like you’re spinning your wheels in the process. Too many lawyers stop after a few pitches or calls because they don’t want to feel uncomfortable or rejected. Others tell themselves they’ll pitch more when they are a bit more experienced, established in their field, or have a few more big wins under their belt. This is an easy way to avoid stepping out of your comfort zone. continues on next page

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


7

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


Lawyer

Business Person

Less than 100% is not a success

100% is not the right goal Business is the goal 1 hit out of 100 is a success

Don’t put anything out into the world until it’s perfect One failure will follow you for the rest of your career Practicing law requires immediate wins Risk assessment for attorneys - “Risk tree” - usually leads to a risk averse course of action Job requires pessimism

The earlier you get used to putting yourself out there, the better Responding to (perceived) failure the right way can lead to business Biz Dev is long term relationship building 1 in a million...so you’re telling me there’s a chance! Biz Dev requires optimism

So, how do you change your mind-frame? 1. Understand Your Current Approach First, acknowledge your mind-frame as a lawyer and recognize how it might be slowing down your business development efforts. Do you pass on opportunities to write or speak? Do you ask your contacts for business? Where are you holding back, and why? Being honest with yourself can help open you to a new approach. 2. Plan to Fail Next, break your business development plan into small tasks and goals, focused on the process rather than the final result. In addition to standard items, such as doing people favors, connecting with former classmates and coworkers, and staying active in organizations, create a checklist that includes rejection as tasks to accomplish. This list should include making pitches that don’t get the business, writing articles that don’t yield calls from clients, and speaking at events that turn up no work. Why would you include failures on your to-do list? Because business development is not about batting 1000, and there are no rainmakers who haven’t faced rejection along the way. Rejection may be painful, but it is a necessary step to success. I’m reminded of a professional stand-up comic who kept a running count on a poster of every time he bombed, because he heard he couldn’t be a good comic until he bombed at least 1000 times. He turned demoralizing bad performances into small wins every time he got to add to his chart. If rainmakers in your practice area tend to get one matter in the door for every 15 pitches, list out 14 unsuccessful pitches on your to-do list. This process also helps you become more resilient because the physical act of checking a rejection as an item off your to-do list helps you embrace the process and see that you are getting closer to your long term goal. This helps you put your self-judgment on the shelf, respond more positively, and bounce back quicker. REMEMBER: resilience in the face of rejection and responding positively can pay off. There are countless examples of attorneys who didn’t get a job the first time around but - because they remained resilient and positive - they got the offer when a 2nd position opened up. So too with business development - just because you aren’t the right person for the matter at hand doesn’t mean the client won’t call you for their next issue. Stay positive, accept the bad news gracefully, and continue building a positive relationship with potential clients. 3. Practice Makes Perfect In addition to your business development checklist, practice stepping out of your comfort zone more often. Do something outside of work that scares you a little bit - toastmasters, a singing class, improv - where you can fail without consequences. The act of failing publicly and realizing it’s okay will help you get outside your normal work/risk averse mentality. In sum, try to re-frame your views of “failure” with respect to business development and remember that no rainmakers have a 100% success rate, or anything close to it. Even if changing your mind-frame seems impossible, open up your business plan, check off “failure”, and look at how it’s getting you one step closer to success!

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


About the Author Liz Stone is the Founder and Principal of Stone Legal Search, a premiere attorney search firm based in California. Currently the Chair of the ABA Legal Career Central Board of Directors, Liz also speaks regularly at legal conferences and on career panels, and she serves as an Expert Advisor for the Bay Area legal market for Harvard Law School. Prior to becoming a recruiter, Liz litigated with Pillsbury Winthrop, Goodwin Procter, and Buchalter Nemer. She holds a J.D. from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law and a B.A. from the University of Virginia. Liz is also a standup comedian who performs throughout the country. She can be reached at estone@stonelegalsearch.com. Š2018. Published in Law Practice Today, December 2017, by the American Bar Association. Reproduced with permission. All rights reserved. This information or any portion thereof may not be copied or disseminated in any form or by any means or stored in an electronic database or retrieval system without the express written consent of the American Bar Association or the copyright holder.

9

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


Recognizing Black History Month Black History Month, or National African American History Month, is an annual celebration of achievements by black Americans and a time for recognizing the central role of African Americans in U.S. history. The event grew out of “Negro History Week,” the brainchild of noted historian Carter G. Woodson and other prominent African Americans. President Gerald R. Ford officially recognized Black History Month in 1976, calling upon the public to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” Since 1976, every U.S. president has officially designated the month of February as Black History Month. CWL would like to take this opportunity to recognize some of the amazing black women pioneers in the California legal profession. In 1929 Annie Coker became the first black woman to become a lawyer in California. Annie Coker was born in Oakland in 1903. She graduated from Boalt School of Law at UC Berkeley in 1929. At the time she was the second woman to receive a law degree from the school and the first black woman to do so. She took the California State Bar the same year. She practiced in the State Office of Legislative Counsel for 27 years. She died in 1986 at the age of 83. In 1930 Zephyr M. Ramsey was the second black woman admitted to the Bar in California. She practiced in Los Angeles and Pasadena, California. She graduated from Howard Law School in 1922. Hon. Vaino Spencer became the third black woman admitted to the California State Bar in 1952. She was the first black woman in California appointed to a judgeship when she was appointed as a municipal court judge in Los Angeles in 1961. In 1976 she became a Los Angeles Superior Court Judge. She was appointed to the California Court of Appeal in 1980, the second black woman appointed to that court. That same year, she was named Presiding Judge of the California Court of Appeal, Second Appellate District, Division One. She retired in 2007 as one of the longest-serving judges in California history. Spencer also co-founded the National Association of Women Judges with Hon. Joan Dempsey Klein in 1979, and was a founding member of Black Women Lawyers of Los Angeles in 1975. She died in 2016 at age 96. Hon. Arleigh Maddox Woods, a labor lawyer admitted to the California State Bar in 1953, was the first black woman to become a senior partner in a major law firm. She was appointed to the Los Angeles Superior Court bench in 1976. In 1978, she was the first woman selected by her peers to serve as the Supervising Judge of the North Central District of Los Angeles. Woods was the

CWL N E W S L E T T E R

first black woman in the United States to hold office as a Justice on a State Court of Appeal when she was appointed to the California Court of Appeal, Second Appellate District, Division Four, in 1980. In 1982, she became the Presiding Justice of Division Four, and in 1984, she was selected by the Chief Justice to serve as the Administrative Presiding Justice of the Appellate Court. She retired in 1996 and currently serves as a mediator. Yvonne Brathwaite Burke, an attorney, was elected to the California Assembly in 1966, and in 1972 was the first woman in 20 years, and the first black woman in California’s history, to be elected to Congress. In 1979, she was appointed to fill a vacancy on the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, the first woman and the first black person to serve on the board. She later was elected to the Board of Supervisors in 1992 and served until 2008. Hon. Consuelo B. Marshall was the first woman to be hired as a Los Angeles Deputy City Attorney in 1962. She served as a Juvenile Court Referee, a Superior Court Commissioner, and in 1976 she was the first woman appointed to the Inglewood Municipal Court. In 1977, she was elevated to the Los Angeles Superior Court. In 1980, she was appointed to the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California in Los Angeles, where she still serves. Hon. Irma Brown was the second president of Black Women Lawyers and the only president to serve two terms. She was appointed as a Commissioner to the Compton Municipal Court in 1982, then as a Judge of the Compton Municipal Court in 1986. She was elevated to the Los Angeles Superior Court in 2000, where she still serves as the Supervising Judge of the Juvenile Delinquency Court in Inglewood. Hon. Elizabeth Riggs was the first black woman judge in San Diego. She was appointed to the El Cajon Municipal Court in 1979 where she was elected Assistant Presiding Judge and created the Domestic Violence Court in 1997. She became a superior court judge in 1998. She was the only black woman judge in San Diego until 2001. She was a founding member of the Association of Black Attorneys of San Diego County, which later changed its name to the Earl B. Gilliam Bar Association. She died in 2017 at age 75. continues on next page:

Hon


11 n. Vaino Spencer

Annie Coker

Hon. Arleigh Maddox Woods

Elizabeth Riggs

Past CWL Presidents Chris Chambers Goodman

Hon. Consuelo B. Marshall

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


Hon. Alice Lytle was the first black woman appointed to the Sacramento County Municipal Court in 1982 and served as presiding judge of that court from 1988 to 1989. She served as Presiding Judge at the Juvenile Court in Sacramento County Superior Court from 1995 to 1996 and was elevated to the Sacramento County Superior Court in 1998. While on the bench, she established what is believed to be the first Children’s Waiting Room in the nation. She retired from the bench in 2002. Hon. LaDoris Cordell, a former assistant Dean at Stanford Law School, was the first black woman judge in Northern California when she was appointed to the Santa Clara County Municipal Court in 1982. In 1988, she was elected the first black person to the Santa Clara County Superior Court. In 2004, she was elected to the Palo Alto City Council and served until 2008. From 2010 to 2015, she served as the Independent Police Auditor for the City of San Jose. Hon. Candace Cooper is the second woman, and first black woman, to serve as president of the California Judges Association, which she headed from 1988 to 1989. She was appointed to the Los Angeles Municipal Court in 1980 and the Los Angeles Superior Court in 1987. From 1997 to 1998, she was the Supervising Judge of the West District/Los Angeles Superior Court and the Presiding Judge of the Santa Monica Municipal Court, pursuant to a voluntary unification arrangement. In 1999, she was appointed to the California Court of Appeal, Second District, Division Two. From 2001 to 2008, she was the Presiding Justice of Division Eight. Hon. Erithe A. Smith is the first black woman appointed to the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in the Ninth Circuit. She was appointed in 1994 to the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Central District of California and reappointed in 2008. She served on the Ninth Circuit Bankruptcy Appellate Panel from 2004 to 2007. Hon. Diana Becton was sworn in in September 2017 as the first woman and first African American to be appointed District Attorney in the history of Contra Costa County. She previously served 22 years on the bench, first appointed to the Contra Costa County Superior Court in 1995. She was elected Presiding Judge of the court in 2011, and was elected president of the National Association of Women Judges in 2016. Karen Nobumoto was elected President of The State Bar of California in 2001, the second woman, the first black woman and the third black person, to be elected President. She is a Deputy District Attorney at the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office, where she has worked since 1989. Hon. Kamala Harris was elected in 2016 to the U.S. Senate, only the second black woman elected to the Senate. From 2010 to 2016, she served as the first woman and first black woman Attorney General of California. She previously served as San Francisco District Attorney from 2004 to 2010, serving as the first woman, first black woman, and first South Asian-American woman to hold that office. Hon. Jackie Lacey is the first woman, and first black woman, to serve as Los Angeles District Attorney since the office was created in 1850. She was elected in 2012 after serving in the District Attorney’s Office since 1986. Hon. Teri Jackson was appointed to the San Francisco bench in 2002. She became the first elected black woman Presiding Judge in San Francisco in 2016.

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


Hon. Kamala Harris

Hon. Marguerite Downing

CWL has a special place in our hearts for our own black women leaders and thanks Past Presidents Chris Chambers Goodman (’16-’17), Angela J. Davis (’06-’07), and Hon. Marguerite Downing (’04-’05), the first black woman President of CWL, for their time and efforts furthering the organization. We also want to thank our Affiliate Black Women Lawyers of Los Angeles, especially BWL President & CWL Judicial Evaluation Co-Chair Demetria Graves and BWL Treasurer & CWL Affiliate Governor Michelle Kazadi, whose participation strengthens CWL. CWL honors the accomplishments of these strong black women leaders, lawyers and judges this Black History Month 2018 and always. *Thank you to Ms. Shirley Henderson for her time, effort, and valuable contributions to this article.

13

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


CWL N E W S L E T T E R


California Women Lawyers Seat at the Table vol. 4 with Louise Renne Hosted by Summer C. Selleck and Ariel B. Lee CWL’s podcast “A Seat at the Table” recently posted its fourth volume. It is an interview with the indomitable Louise Renne. Ms. Renne is a lawyer, former Supervisor, and one-time City Attorney for the City and County of San Francisco, California. She is a graduate of both Michigan State University and Columbia Law School (1961). She was appointed Supervisor by Mayor Dianne Feinstein in 1978, and she acted as member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors for 8 years from 1978 to 1986, where she was chair of the Finance Committee. Ms. Renne was then appointed by Feinstein as City Attorney in 1986, and she became the first female City Attorney in San Francisco history. She served in the position until 2001. In this role, she argued on behalf of the state before the California and United States Supreme Courts. Ms. Renne had her own private practice for two years, and she was a staff attorney in the General Counsel’s office at the Federal Communications Commission for another three years. Ms. Renne served as General Counsel for the San Francisco Unified School District, where she led the effort to combat corruption existing at the time and establish a legal department. She also served as City Attorney for the City of Richmond. Ms. Renne currently practices at Renne Sloan Holtzman & Sakai LLP, in San Francisco, which is a public practice law firm. She was a founder and former California Women Lawyers President from 1977-1978. Listen to the interview here: https://cwlseatatthetable.blogspot.com/2017/12/volume-4-featuring-louiserenne-civil.html

15

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


So, You Want to be a Judge PT. 1: A Conversation with Josh Groban and David Fermino Recapped! This year, our national award-winning program So, You Want to Be a Judge? ™ was split into two parts. The first part, A Conversation with Josh Groban and David Fermino, took place on January 23, 2018 in the beautiful Skyroom at UC Hastings and was supported by local group AABA and affiliate Queen’s Bench Bar Association. Josh Groban is the Senior Advisor for Appointments to Governor Brown and David Fermino is the incoming Chair of the Judicial Nominee Evaluation Committee of the State Bar of California, more commonly known as “JNE” which assists the governor in the judicial selection process by providing independent, comprehensive, accurate and fair evaluations of candidates for judicial appointment and nomination. With almost 2,000 nomination packets submitted state-wide, one of the biggest take-away from the event was that anyone seeking review under the current administration must get their packets in within the next 4-6 weeks. Other topics discussed included candid feedback on which questions Messrs. Groban and Fermino gave the most weight, the proper amount and substance of letters of reference, the appropriate times and substance of updates, and the depth and breadth of what experience makes an applicant an ideal candidate for appointment. CWL was pleased to hear Mr. Groban say again that both he and JNE give CWL judicial evaluations serious consideration and that the evaluations are wellrespected, as they are both fully aware of how thorough the CWL process is and that substantive vetting occurring. Board member, moderator and event co-chair Gina Boer raised to the two speakers a concern that was raised in response to this event’s marketing - namely, “Why are there two men on this panel telling women how to run?” Mr. Fermino responded, “I think its sheer happenstance that I’m here as a man as incoming chair of JNE. The last two Chairs were woman. The Chair after me will be a woman. The Commission is diverse and about equally split between men and women.” Both Messrs. Groban and Fermino talked at length about their constant work through training, as individuals and in the Commission, to overcome implicit (or even explicit) bias which occurs in the review process, as well as the detailed follow-up in which they engage to make sure that candidates are not derailed because of their gender or ethnicity. Their goal is to strive for inclusion. The conversation continues with So, You Want to be a Judge? Pt. 2: Pathways to the Bench on March 9, 2018 at the State Capitol. Panels from both State and Federal Courts will be presented as well as time for workshops. You can register here. Opportunities to sponsor are available here. We hope to see you there!

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


17

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


News from the California Legislature This month, Legislative leaders announced a bicameral committee on the prevention of sexual harassment. The joint committee’s mission is to create reform to address how the Legislature addresses sexual harassment and protections for those who report harassment. The Joint Committee on Sexual Harassment Prevention and Response, a subcommittee of the Joint Rules Committee, will have its first hearing this month. Committee members include: Assemblymember Laura Friedman (D-Glendale), chair Senator Holly Mitchell (D-Los Angeles), vice chair Senate Republican Leader Pat Bates (R-Laguna Niguel) Assembly Republican Leader Brian Dahle (R-Bieber) Senator Jean Fuller (R-Bakersfield) Senator Connie Leyva (D-Chino) Assemblymember Eloise Gómez Reyes (D-San Bernardino) Assemblymember Marie Waldron (R-Escondido)

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


19

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


CWL N E W S L E T T E R


Fighting Human Trafficking: A Call To Action January is Human Trafficking Awareness Month, but for Alameda County District Attorney Nancy O’Malley and San Diego County District Attorney Summer Stephan, the goal is more than awareness. The time is now to act to end human trafficking and to recover the dignity and liberty of exploited children, women and men. From Northern California to Southern California, these DAs are calling on the powerhouse California Women Lawyers (CWL) to join them in this noble fight. In 2009, Alameda County District Attorney Nancy O’Malley introduced the issue of human trafficking to CWL when she became CWL President. Since that time, combatting human trafficking through advocacy and activism has been a priority focus for CWL. As we enter January 2018, CWL demands an end to this egregious human rights violation that treats children, women and men as chattel that can be bought and sold without regard for the mental, physical or psychological impact of the crime. What you need to know about human trafficking. Slavery and involuntary servitude were abolished by Abraham Lincoln in 1865. However, here we are in 2018, and there are thousands of individuals in California that are still victims of human trafficking. Our state is one of the top four destination for this vile crime, and three of California’s regions are on the top 13 FBI list for High Intensity Human Trafficking and Exploitation of children. We know that human trafficking continues around the world and in every state in the U.S., and that it is driven by monetary profit and thrives in the exploitation of the victim’s vulnerability, whether mental, social or economic. The sale of human beings is prevalent with organized crime and gangs because a human being can be sold for sex or labor repeatedly but a drug or gun can only be sold one time. Many myths exist that help perpetuate the crime of human trafficking, such as that human trafficking victims are foreign-born or that victims consent to being sold or prostituted. Myth-buster: Most sex trafficking victims are American-born, and you can’t consent to being a victim in this civilized country of laws. The statistics are important, as they inform us about the truth and destroy the myths. A 2016 groundbreaking study of sex trafficking in San Diego County affirms what we know to be true: trafficking of human beings is the second largest criminal industry, estimated at $810 million annually in San Diego County alone, and 85 percent of the sex trafficking industry is run by gangs. Ninety percent of 20 high schools studied in San Diego County had cases of sex trafficking. We must also be aware of and report labor trafficking, with the most common fields for such trafficking being hospitality, domestic servitude, construction, agriculture, and massage parlors. Statistically, girls, especially girls of color, are identified in higher numbers than boys and reflect a disproportionately high percentage of children who are trafficked. Sadly, the average age of entry into sex trafficking, with its most popular form of being sold for prostitution, varies from 13 years old and 90 percent American-born in Alameda County to 16 years old and 80 percent domestic U.S. girls. In both Alameda and San Diego, as is the case across California, the most common recruitment tactic is not to physically kidnap a victim but to “psychologically kidnap” by a trafficker posing as a “Romeo” older boyfriend or “daddy.” The newest danger zone for children being lured into a sex trafficking situation is through the use of the internet and social media.

21

continues on next page

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


What our District Attorneys are doing about human trafficking. Investing in and relying on intelligence driven data in order to effectively combat human trafficking has been a hallmark for DA O’Malley and DA Stephan. In Alameda County, “SafetyNet,” a program created by O’Malley in 2011, revealed common demographics of those being trafficked. A study of more than 800 commercially sexually exploited children (CSEC) in Alameda County documented that a high percentage of these children have run away from a home they deem not safe; have prior victimization, such as molestation and being sold for drugs; have school attendance issues; and have mental health challenges. More than 40 percent of the identified children were from places other than Alameda County. O’Malley built prevention efforts to address the key identified factors. O’Malley is a national leader in bringing awareness to and combating human exploitation and trafficking. She created the first human trafficking vertical prosecution unit in the country in 2005 and was part of the successful effort to enact the crime of human trafficking in 2006. O’Malley’s office has prosecuted more than 550 cases with an 82 percent conviction rate. In 2009, O’Malley created Human Exploitation and Trafficking Watch (H.E.A.T. Watch) (LINK to www.HEATWatch. org), a blueprint for communities to build their own initiatives to combat all forms of trafficking. H.E.A.T. Watch has been adopted across America as more and more communities accept the reality that human trafficking is real, and it is in their community, In 2015, O’Malley created the H.E.A.T. Institute, a California-based research Institute with a Blue Ribbon Commission of statewide leaders, to study human trafficking in California with the goal of improving outcomes for trafficked individuals and creating initiatives to prevent the crime in the first place. More than 1,200 community members, professionals and trafficking survivors/thrivers participated in seven statewide summits, beginning in San Diego where District Attorney Stephan worked closely with O’Malley to bring awareness and listen to San Diego’s response to human trafficking. Stephan pioneered a Sex Crimes and Human Trafficking division in San Diego County, with prosecutors, advocates and investigators that can handle these cases with special victims with trauma-informed and expert care. Stephan recognized that prosecution alone will not be enough to bring an end to human trafficking, so she invested in building collaborations and partnerships in a large advisory group with nine committees that includes a strong survivor component and a formidable community component in addition to law enforcement, prosecution, child welfare, education, victim services, and research and data. Stephan also lead the development of a Human Trafficking Task Force that received the 2016 award for human and civil rights work by a multiagency. The Task Force works to recover and support victims of human trafficking as well as support the prosecution of offenders. Stephan, through her leadership and the blood, sweat and tears of many, has brought San Diego County to the forefront of responding to and fighting against human trafficking, with great success. Stephan spearheaded the award-winning www.TheUglyTruthSD.org campaign that debunked the myths and informed San Diegans about the ugly truth when it comes to human trafficking. Both O’Malley and Stephan agree that community awareness is the first step to prevention, identification, intervention, and restoration of victims to thrivers. The two District Attorneys co-chair the Human Trafficking Committee for the California District Attorneys Association and are active in Sacramento, enacting legislation to improve outcomes for trafficked individuals. January is Human Trafficking Awareness Month but “awareness” is not enough for CWL and its members. O’Malley and Stephan advocate for awareness with determination and action to stop the worst violation of human rights.

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


What CWL members can do to fight human trafficking. Learn more. There are many resources available so that you can learn more about human trafficking. An easy step is to input and share the National Human Trafficking hotline 888-3737-888 or text INFO to BeFree (233733) to receive helpful links to information about human trafficking. Join us to ensure businesses are following the law. Civil Code Section 56.2 requires certain types of businesses to post a sign explaining human trafficking and containing the national hotline number. The poster is for those who are being trafficked to seek help or for the community to be educated about what human trafficking is. If you are in a place that serves alcohol, a massage parlor, a bus station, an emergency room, or other designated industries (hotels and motels, which are the number one location for sex trafficking, will have to post beginning January 2019), and there is not a poster conspicuously located, let the District Attorney’s Office know. They will bring posters to the location. Failure to post the sign under California law is a $500 fine for the first offense, and $1000 fine for every day following. O’Malley created an easy web-based app “Map1193” that can help you report businesses that have not complied. Make sure your county has Map1193. Be an advocate! Help with vacatures. In 2016, the legislature passed a new law that allows victims of human trafficking to vacate their non-violent criminal records that they obtained as a result of being victims of human trafficking such as prostitution, theft or drugs as ordered by their trafficker. Penal Code Section 236.14 allows survivors to file a petition to get a clean slate and be able to work as free people. Work with your local District Attorney’s Office to assist with these petitions. Support survivors personally and professionally. When victims of human trafficking are recovered, their life has to be put back together from years of trauma and victimization, and they may need family law, civil law, and other legal services. Just being a mentor and healthy role model is something that every victim needs as they are not used to having anyone want to do something for them without extracting something in return. As an attorney, you can help a specialized, non-profit obtain licensing to house or provide services for victims. Continue the messaging. Social media has allowed access to children, allowing exploitation of the most vulnerable. O’Malley and Stephan call for CWL and its members to turn that paradigm around by using social media as our message point, as our community dialogue, and our action base to end human trafficking. Be active in the community. Search for coalitions, churches, advisory groups, or task forces in your area that you can join. Help us fight for systematic prevention education in our schools to build resiliency in our kids so they understand that “Stranger Danger” is more likely a stranger posing as a “friend” coming through social media. We must educate our children, parents and teachers so they can recognize human trafficking when they see it.

Nancy O’Malley is the Alameda County District Attorney and Summer Stephan is the San Diego County District Attorney. They serve as Co-Chairs of the Human Trafficking Committee of the California District Attorneys Association. DAs O’Malley and Stephan have prioritized the combat of human trafficking and have supported, pioneered and implemented laws and innovations to prevent, protect, prosecute and partner in order to combat human trafficking and abolish slavery.

23

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


CWL Announces 2018 Award Honorees Judith Soley Lawyer As Citizen

Pearl Gondrella Mann Ms. Mann will be honored at our Annual Conference.

Joan Dempsey Klein Distinguished Jurist Award

Hon. Beverly Reid O’Connell Judge O’Connell will be honored at our Southern California Judicial Reception.

Rose Bird Memorial Award

Hon. Claudia Wilken Judge Wilken will be honored at our Northern California Judicial Reception.

Fay Stender Award

Sandra Muñoz Ms. Muñoz will be honored at our Annual Dinner.

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


25

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


“Carol was a fearless feminist. Both as president of CWL and before that the San Francisco Women Lawyers Alliance, Carol fought for increased access to childcare, more women judges, reproductive freedom, and many other issues that are important to women and women lawyers. She leaves an inspiring legacy of volunteerism and activism. We miss her so much.” - Gay Grunfeld, CWL member

“Carol was a wonderful person, lawyer and citizen.” - Pearl Gondrella Mann, CWL Past President

CWL N E W S L E T T E R

“Carol was a br creative spirit who i touched many p

- Hon. Charlene Kiesselba


Carol Copsey (1954-2017)

Celebrating the Life of Carol Copsey CWL Past President 2000-2001

right and inspired and people.”

Padovani ach

Carol Copsey loved CWL. During her term as president, she met with the California Governor’s staff to press for the appointment of more women judges, she awarded CWL’s first Justice Rose Bird Memorial Award to California Supreme Court Justice Joyce Kennard, she launched the CWL website, and she was instrumental in creating our “Lessons From our Mothers” Video highlighting the history of CWL. Carol died of ovarian cancer on December 3, 2017, at the age of 63. Carol was gifted with a very sharp mind and commitment to fairness and justice. She applied these toward the law, becoming an employment attorney and advocate for women’s rights. Carol attended the University of the Pacific, first earning a B.A. in Liberal Arts in 1979 and then a J.D. from McGeorge School of Law in 1983. An early career choice took her to a position at Ms. Magazine and a brief stint with feminist leader, Gloria Steinem. Choosing to return to California, Carol accepted a position as an attorney at Pillsbury, Winthrop, Shaw and Pittman and later became partner at Berman, Berkley & Lasky and then at Gordon & Rees LLP. Carol had a profound enjoyment and appreciation for the fine arts and performances, especially supporting dance. She loved to travel, including recent trips to Italy, Mexico, and Hawaii. She was a member of a 30-year book reading group with close friends she had cultivated as a young lawyer in San Francisco. She was an avid hiker with her beloved dogs, an aficionado of fashion and a good party, and most of all she enjoyed spending time with her extensive community of friends. A committed practitioner of yoga and follower of Buddhist principles, Carol was a “Dedicated Volunteer” at Spirit Rock Meditation Center in West Marin. It was Spirit Rock that gave Carol what she called “a new feeling – that I am included and recognized at Spirit Rock – and I notice that helps me send more loving, kind compassion toward myself.” You can read more from the beautiful interview regarding her volunteer work here. Carol was also a devoted lover of food always seeking the newest and best cuisine California restaurants and the farmer’s markets had to offer. She knew how to laugh and play, often holding well-catered birthday parties for her American Eskimo dogs at a favorite location, Crissy Field. She was proud of her contribution to The Dog Lover’s Companion to California: The Inside Scoop on Where to Take Your Dog and the introduction of her most frequented restaurant, Rose’s Café, as a wonderful place to dine with one’s dogs and friends (and order pancakes for the table to share). CWL sends its deepest condolences to Carol’s family and friends and all those who loved her. She will be missed.

27

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


California Women Lawyers & the Litigation Section of California Lawyers Association Present

SO, YOU WANT TO BE A JUDGE? ™

Part 2

Pathways To The Bench

Friday, March 9, 2018 California State Capitol Building, 1315 10th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 11:00 a.m. – Registration and Lunch 12:00 p.m. – Opening Session 2:00 p.m. – Breakout Sessions 4:00 p.m. – Networking Reception CWL or CLA Litigation Member - early bird (by Februar y 2): $100.00 Non-member - early bird (by Februar y 2): $125.00 CWL or CLA Litigation Member - regular: $125.00 Non-member - regular: $150.00 Government: $75.00

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER BY MARCH 2 ND ! Panelists Currently Include: Judge Barbara Dickinson, Alameda County Superior Court (Appt’d 2017) Judge Laurie Earl, Sacramento County Superior Court (Appt’d 2005) Judge Leslie Landau, Contra Costa County Superior Court (Appt’d 2003) Judge Benjamin Reyes, Contra Costa County Superior Court (Appt’d 2017) Judge Tara Desautels, Alameda County Superior Court (Appt’d 2010) ...more panelists to be added.

CLICK HERE FOR SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES!

CWL N E W S L E T T E R

(916) 930-9020 • email info@cwl.org


California Women Lawyers 2018 Signature Events SAVE THE DATE! March 9

April TBD May 4

June 7

June 22 July 13

July 26 August 17 August 23 September 18 September TBD

October 5-6

29

So You Want To Be A Judge™ PT. II: Pathways to the Bench

(Sacramento)

Whiskey & Bites

(Los Angeles)

Annual Conference

(Hyatt Regency, San Francisco)

CWL’s award winning program that offers insight and advices about the judicial appointment process in California and helps to increase the number of women and diverse candidates who see to obtain appointment to the bench. CWL claims a traditionally male drinking experience and pairs it tasty morsels in this In House Counsel Community Building event.

CWL’s Annual MCLE Conference features inspirational speakers and multiple panels of top lawyers and judges addressing timely issues, a full-day two-track offering of MCLE participatory credit. Recent keynote speakers include Michele Coleman Mayes (Chair, ABA Commission on Women in the Profession), Hon. Nancy Pelosi, Hon. Kamala Harris, Patricia Gillette, and Catherine Lacavera (Google, Inc.)

In House Counsel Puzzle Program Session I

(Mountain View)

Elect to Run ™

(San Diego)

Judicial Reception

TBD*

In House Counsel Puzzle Program Session II Judicial Reception In House Counsel Puzzle Program Session III In House Counsel Puzzle Program Session IV Annual Dinner

(Redwood City) TBD* (San Francisco) (Southern Cal) (San Diego)

In House Counsel Puzzle Program Retreat

(Napa/Sonoma)

The four-part Puzzle Program builds relationships in teams of in-house counsel women covering sensitive issues, shared experiences and common goals in a confidential intimate setting.

CWL’s award winning non-partisan program that seeks to educate and encourage women to run for public office. CWL hosts both a Northern and Southern Judicial Reception honoring a judge selected for their excellence as a jurist from each area. These judicial receptions are held in the town of the Honoree, who will be selected at the January 2018 board meeting.

CWL’s Annual Dinner celebrates each step made towards gender equity during the year, honors women in the legal profession, and highlights the achievements of CWL and its members. Past speakers include Sen. Wendy Davis and Janet Napolitano. Mingle with friends and colleagues at the CWL Foundation Silent Auction preceding the Dinner to help fund the Nancy E. O’Malley Scholarship which recognizes a deserving California law student whose prior and current activities, and future plans demonstrate a commitment to issues affecting women and/or children in the community. CWL’s Puzzle Piece Program culmination, this Retreat is invitation only.

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


The Women’s March

Black Women Lawyers of LA Womens March

Black Women Lawyers of LA Womens March

Lawyers Club of SD Womens March

Lawyers Club of SD Womens March

Santa Barbara Women Lawyers Womens March

Women Lawyers of Sacramento Womens March

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


Renew Your CWL Membership For 2018 CWL is the only statewide bar association dedicated to the advancement of women in law and in society. Join CWL and make a difference - for yourself and the community. What you can expect with your membership: • CWL statewide network • Leadership training and opportunities • Annual (MCLE) Conference • Legislative advocacy for the advancement of women in law and society • Judicial evaluations • Lifelong friendships • One-of-a-kind award winning programs including So, You Want to be a Judge?, Elect to Run and the In-House Counsel Puzzle Program • Amicus activity

BE A PART OF SOMETHING BIGGER

31

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


CWL N E W S L E T T E R


CWL In Action Amicus Committee The advancement of a women’s rights agenda depends heavily on court decisions for its success. Since its inception, CWL has devoted significant energy to an active amicus committee in which CWL prepares or joins others in presenting amicus briefs in cases relevant to CWL’s core issues. This year, CWL has signed onto the following amicus briefs: CASE

OUTCOME

Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission CASE To prohibit business owners from disregarding non-discrimination protections in the name of religion and free speech. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania v. Donald J. Trump CASE To immediately block the Trump administration rules that broadly exempt employers and universities from complying with the ACA’s contraceptive coverage requirement.

pending

injunction granted injunction

State of California et al v. Eric D. Hargan et al CASE

granted

(Sister brief to Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, supra) Janus v. American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, Council 31 CASE

To decide whether employees who enjoy union benefits -including antidiscrimination protections and greater pay equity- should be required to contribute to the cost of securing them. At stake is the decades-old Supreme Court precedent, Abood v. Detroit Board of Education, which held that public sector collective bargaining agreements may include these “fair share” provisions.

Legislative Committee CWL also sent a Letter of Opposition to Senators Feinstein and Harris regarding the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act. This act seeks to make obtaining an abortion illegal after 20 weeks with very few exceptions. Those “exceptions” are invasive and demeaning. CWL is committed to ensuring and maintaining a woman’s right to choose the reproductive option most suitable for her, regardless of her age, wealth, race, marital status or sexual preference. CWL opposes all efforts to restrict, impede, encroach or infringe upon a woman’s sole right to decide if, when and how she will bear a child. CWL supports universal and unrestricted access to information about reproductive options, contraception and proper medical care. (CWL Position Statement, 12/15/17).

33

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


AFFILIATE EVENTS

Contra Costa County Bar Association – Women’s Section Women’s Power Lunch March 13, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm Tender Greens 1352 Locust St Walnut Creek, California For info: Ariel@BrownellLegal.com Lawyers Club of San Diego Leadership: A Dialogue Featuring City Attorney Mara Elliot and Hon. Lynn Schenk February 8, 2018, 12-1:15 pm Westin San Diego 400 W Broadway San Diego, California For info: Allison@lawyersclubsandiego.com Lawyers Club of San Diego Red, White & Brew March 1, 2018, 5:30 - 8:30 PM 57 Degrees 1735 Hancock St. San Diego, California For info: Allison@lawyersclubsandiego.com Orange County Women Lawyers February 13, 2018, 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM Orange Coast Winery 869 W 16th Street Newport Beach, California 92663 Register at: https://www.ocwla.org/event-2781519

Women Lawyers Association of Los Angeles Downtown Mentoring Circle Dinner February 15, 2018 Pez Cantina 401 S. Grand Ave. Los Angeles, California Info at: info@wlala.org WLALA Networking Event February 18, 2018, 12:30 pm Il Fornaio 301 N. Beverly Dr. Beverly Hills, California For info: hamar@pacbell.net WLALA Litigator’s Forum March 1, 2018 Save the date, place TBD For info: http://www.wlala.org Women Lawyers of Sacramento February Luncheon: United States District Court Judge Troy Nunley February 22, 2018, 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm For info: Administrative@womenlawyers-sacramento.org


ADVERTISE IN THE CWL NEWSLETTER!

Each digital issue of the California Women Lawyer’s newsletter is shared with over 4,000 people across the U.S. This digital publication connects industry experts to relative legislation news, valuable events for networking and professional development as well as opinion editorials from CWL leaders and members. Space is limited, ad space is determined first come, first serve. All ads subject to approval by CWL.

Full Page Ad $500

• 8.5”W x 11”H • Full Color • Interactive Links To Your Website, FB, etc.

Quarter Page $250

• 4.25”W x 5.5”H (Must Be Vertical) • Full Color • Interactive Links To Your Website, FB, etc.

Half Page Ad $375

• 4.25”W x 11”H (Must Be Vertical) • Full Color • Interactive Links To Your Website, FB, etc.

6 issue bulk rate available” ($2000, 1500, 1000)” CWL Affiliates receive a 15% discount on any advertisement.

GENERAL AD & LOGO SPECIFICATIONS PDF/300dpi Art Only Full-page display (vertical) 8.5”W x 11”H - full dimensions 8.375”W x 10.875” - *active space Half-page display (vertical) 4.25”W x 11”H - full dimensions 4.125”W x 10.875” - *active space Quarter page display (vertical) 4.25”W x 5.5”H - full dimensions 4.375”W x 5.375” - *active space Business card (horizontal) 3.5”W x 2”H - full dimensions 3.375”W x 1.875”H - *active space Logos must be sent in an eps or vector file format.

CWL N E W S L E T T E R


CALIFORNIA WOMEN LAWYERS N E W S L E T T E R JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2018

Thank You to our 2018 Southern California Title Sponsor:

Thank You to our Annual Newsletter Sponsor:

Learn about all of our Annual CWL Sponsorship Opportunities HERE

www.cwl.org

CWL N E W S L E T T E R

Profile for California Women Lawyers

CWL Newsletter January-February 2018  

California Women Lawyers promotes the advancement of women in the legal profession and is an active advocate for the concerns of women in so...

CWL Newsletter January-February 2018  

California Women Lawyers promotes the advancement of women in the legal profession and is an active advocate for the concerns of women in so...

Advertisement