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Other Sites: Historic Choccolocco Named by the Creek Indians, Choccolocco means “wide shallow stream with big shoals” which is an excellent description of the Choccolocco Creek. After the Federal Survey of Indian Lands was completed, Choccolocco Valley was opened in 1834. The William Mallory family was one of the first to come to this valley. The land was still Indian Territory. Mallory first set up a trading post near White Plains and according to folklore acquired several hundred acres of land on the creek directly from the Indians. In the 1830’s there was a crude road through Choccolocco Valley through a gap in the mountains and ran south to Oxford. The mail came by horseback and stage coach to White Plains where there was a post office as early as 1842. When the Georgia Pacific Railroad laid track through the valley the depot was placed at a spot convenient for the loading of ore. At about the same time three brickyards were built. The current population totals about one thousand individuals in 350 households. White Oak Vineyards 1484 Dry Hollow Road, Anniston, 256-231-7998 White Oak Vineyards is a small farm winery that grows the fruit used to produce wines for their trademark label, Southern Oak Wines. Their tasting room hours are on Fridays from 1-6 P.M. and Saturdays from 10 A.M. to 6 P.M. For more information, visit www.southernoakwines.com. Mountain Longleaf National Wildlife Refuge Bain Gap Road, Anniston, 256-848-7085 With more than 6,000 acres of former military base, this area was designated as a National Wildlife Refuge to protect a unique and endangered ecosystem, the mountain longleaf pine forest. About 400 years ago, it is believed more than 60 million acres of the southeast were longleaf pines; whereas, today, only 3 million acres remain off Highway 21. This land is also home to the Bains Gap Waterfall and trails. Each year, the City of Anniston’s Woodland Century Challenge invites cyclists to grind up this steep climb, through the forest as they finish their ride. Weaver Weaver is a very good example of small town life at its best. The City of Weaver is a growing community, with The Chief Ladiga Trail running through the city alongside Elwell Park and on throughout the county, north, towards Jacksonville. There is an Easter Egg Hunt in the spring, a Christmas Parade in December, and the annual Weaver Station Heritage Day Celebration held in the Fall. Come to Weaver and see for yourself that there is a jewel lying at the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, and you too will fall in love with the little town that’s a big city at heart. For more information, visit www.weaver-alabama.org. Hobson City Fewer than 1,000 people inhabit this small historic town, but its name is larger than life. Hobson City, located directly across from Oxford, was incorporated in 1899 by a small neighborhood of black citizens when the new mayor of Oxford gerrymandered the residents' homes out of the larger city. The displaced citizens refused to leave the area and simply created a city of their own.

Profile for Calhoun Chamber

Historic Driving Tour 2017  

This historic driving tour of Calhoun County, Alabama is always growing, as more and more homes and stories are shared.

Historic Driving Tour 2017  

This historic driving tour of Calhoun County, Alabama is always growing, as more and more homes and stories are shared.

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