Page 11

>>Continue on McCullars Lake, >>Turn left on 144 >>Turn right on Harts Ferry Road >>Turn left onto Spring Road >>Turn right onto Janney Road. Janney Furnace 145 Janney Road Janney Furnace was built by Alfred A. Janney in 1863 and 1864 to produce pig iron during the Civil War for the Confederate States of America. Janney Furnace Park is home to the largest lack granite Confederate Memorial in the World. The Confederate and Native American Museum houses more than 150 War Between the States and more than 500 Native American artifacts from the surrounding area. The Museum is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday through Thursday and Saturday from 12 to 5 p.m. Admission is free. >>Return to 144 >>Turn left then right onto 431 Return to Anniston, follow 21/431 South to Oxford >>turn left toward Choccolocco Street Oxford About the time the Creek Indians were departing from this area in 1832-1833, Sylvanus Simmons and Dudley Snow homesteaded lands in the newly created Benton County. The settlement was called “Lickskillet.� The state legislature first incorporated the town with the name Oxford in 1852. By 1860 Oxford was linked to the outer world via the Alabama and Tennessee Rivers Railroad. Oxford became active as cotton and trading center on the eve of the Civil War. The presence of charcoal iron furnace attracted federal troops to the area in 1865 when they destroyed the furnace and much of the town. Despite the setbacks of the war, Oxford rebuilt, grew and prospered. Many of the structures on the tour are reminiscent of the postwar, Victorian years. Oxford Performing Arts Center- c. 1921 100 Choccolocco Street In 1920, the parents and leaders of Oxford decided to take action in establishing a Mill Tax to raise the funds. It was later determined that a Mill Tax would take twenty years to raise the appropriate money. In place of the Mill Tax was the organization of a Loyal Loan School League. On April 5, 1921, the first privately owned, public school opened in Oxford, housing first through sixth grades. The location of the school was chosen at 100 Choccolocco Street, the previous site of a cotton warehouse. The total cost of the building was $40,000. In 1951, the City of Oxford purchased the building, it was totally renovated for the new Oxford City Hall. Male and female jail cells were added in the basement, and the main floor was made into offices for the mayor, city clerk, fire and police chief, while the second floor was portioned off for council chambers and a court room. In May 2011, construction began on the $11 million renovation and expansions for the new state-of-the-art Performing Arts Center.

Profile for Calhoun Chamber

Historic Driving Tour 2017  

This historic driving tour of Calhoun County, Alabama is always growing, as more and more homes and stories are shared.

Historic Driving Tour 2017  

This historic driving tour of Calhoun County, Alabama is always growing, as more and more homes and stories are shared.

Advertisement