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Legends CARS AND THEY HISTORY 80s- 90s


FO ELBAT

CONTENTS

3

HISTORY

4

NISSAN

5

HONDA

6

BMW

7

VOLKSWAGEN


MAY 2018 • VOLUME 1

MOTORS The history of the engines and the most emblematic

History The first internal combustion engine in 1860; consumed lighting gas and only took 3% of the energy produced by combustion. A few years later, in 1876, the German Nikolaus Otto improved significantly, being this the first to work with the cycle of four times. On the other hand, the first satisfactory motor with two-stroke cycle

ONE OF THE ENGINES THAT CHANGED THE WORLD FORD V8 FLAT HEAD (1932) WANKEL (1929) TURBO ENGINEÂ ( 60S)

appeared, in 1878, of the hand of the Scot Dugald Clerk.

HEMI-BIG BLOCK (1951)

There was also another variant of motorization, this

VVT (1987)

time introduced in 1892 by another German, Rudolf

TDI (1989)

Diesel. Unlike the gasoline engine, the diesel was larger and slower, while at the same time given its complex construction entailed high production costs. It was not until 1923 that a diesel engine, with these already improved characteristics, was introduced in a truck.The first 8.8-liter six-cylinder in-line engine was called Spyker 60 HP, built by Jacobus and Hendrik-Jan Spijker in 1903, although it had not been introduced in series at the time. In the middle of this decade, in 1957 again a German named Felix Wankel manufactured the first rotary piston engine. Nowadays, internal combustion engines prove to be more efficient and demonstrate every time to provide more strength and better performance Toyota 2JZ-GTE 1991-2002


MAY 2018 • VOLUME 1

NISSAN Nissan 240Z from 1969 to 1978.

One of the iconic cars of the manufacturer NISSAN Also known as Nissan Fairlady Z or Datson 240Z, the Nissan 240Z is the first two-seat Z series car produced by the brand between 1969 and 1978. It was equipped with a 2.4-liter inline six-cylinder engine that delivered a power of 150 HP and 198 Nm of torque. It was associated, on the other hand, with a four-speed manual gearbox (later than five) and a three-speed automatic. It is one of the most sought-after sports cars in the United States, as well as the first in the Z series that is still marketed with the Nissan 370Z.


MAY 2018 • VOLUME 1

HONDA Honda NSX from 1990 to 2005

The famous Honda NSX The origins of the NSX trace back to 1984, with the HPX (Honda Pininfarina eXperimental) concept, which was a mid-engined 3.0 L V6 engined rear wheel drive sports car. Honda committed to the project, with the intention of meeting or exceeding the performance of the then V8 engined Ferrari range, while offering reliability and a lower price point. The concept thus evolved and had its name changed to NS-X, which stood for "New", "Sportscar" "eXperimental", although the production model was launched as the NSX.

THE NSX WAS DESIGNED BY A TEAM LED BY CHIEF DESIGNER, MASAHITO NAKANO, AND EXECUTIVE CHIEF ENGINEER, SHIGERU UEHARA.


MAY 2018 • VOLUME 1

BMW BMW M3 e30 from 1992 to 1994

The most known as M3 The BMW M3 made experts and car buffs wax lyrical right from the very beginning, before the car even made its official appearance. For it was back in summer that 1985 car magazines all over Germany published their first reports on an “over-the-top 3 Seriesâ€

based

on the E30 model series and boasting exceptional performance data: 200 horsepower, a top speed in excess of 230 km/h or 143 mph, and acceleration to 100 km/h in 6.7 seconds. Obviously, the connoisseur immediately realised that the fastest BMW 3 Series the world had ever seen was about to make its appearance. In reality, however, well over a year was still to pass before the first car testers and customers were able to take their seat in a BMW M3.

M3 (S14Z): 4 CILINDROS EN LÍNEA, 2.3 LITROS, 16V, 195 CV, 143 KW, 230 NM (1986 - 1989)


MAY 2018 • VOLUME 1

VOLKSWAGEN Volkswagen Golf Mk1 1975-1983

The little known golf The Volkswagen Golf Mk1 is the first generation of a front-engine, front wheel drive, water-cooled small family car manufactured and marketed by Volkswagen currently in its seventh generation. As the successor to Volkswagen's historic Beetle, the first generation Golf was marketed in 3-door and 5-door hatchback (1974–1983), two-door convertible (Cabriolet, 1979-1993), two-door sport model (GTI, 1975-1983) as well as open-bed mini-truck (Pickup, Caddy, 1979–1996) models, with one intermediate facelift (1980). Having debuted in May 1974 with styling by Giorgetto Giugiaro's ItalDesign and water-cooled, front-wheel drive technology from VW's newly acquired Auto Union subdivision the Golf Mk1 was marketed globally, prominently as the Rabbit in North America, as the Caribe in Mexico, and as the Citi Golf in South Africa (1984-2009).


TALKING ABOUT_ CARS

TALKING ABOUT CARS

Legends  

cars history

Legends  

cars history

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