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Caldwell

Caldwell County, North Carolina

Volume 4, Issue 6 www.CaldwellJournal.com Free Thursday, November 16, 2017

Veterans Honored in Dudley Shoals in amazing fashion DUDLEY SHOALS, NC (November 13, 2017)...Veteran Dude Starnes, former owner/operator of the dry cleaners in Granite Falls, decided he wanted to pay tribute to all veterans. He decorated the graves of veterans with either an American or Confederate Flag at Dudley Shoals Baptist Church. He purchased and put together over 125 flags and poles. It is an amazing site to see!

Yokefellow Observes Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week...page 3 Mayor Gibbons proclaims #GivingTuesday...page 8 ACA Individual Health Insurance Forecast for 2018...page 8 “Movies with Mike�...page 16


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Caldwell Journal Info

“Published each Thursday by the Caldwell Journal” Established October 2, 2014 Volume 4, Issue 6

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Caldwell Journal Weather Partly sunny. High 62 Low 30 Precipitation: 0.00 in. High 59 Low 37 Precipitation: 0.00 in. High 62 Low 36 Precipitation: 0.22 in. Turning sunny, breezy, cooler High 49 Low 25 Precipitation: 0.00 in. High 53 Low 26 Precipitation: 0.00 in. Mostly sunny. High 57 Low 33 Precipitation: 0.00 in. High 58 Low 39 Precipitation: 0.00 in.

Devotional by Pastor Scott Frady You know what we get to do today?

The baseball movie The Rookie is classic Disney . . . a lot of sweet sentimentality wrapped in a heroic story about beating the odds. Somehow, the folks at Disney are so good at telling their “based on a true story” stories that we are still gripped by them even though we know the outcome before the opening credits even roll. One of the best storytelling moments in The Rookie comes when Jim Morris (played by Dennis Quaid) is at his lowest point. Morris was a 38 year-old high school baseball coach who had been a major league prospect in his youth before injuring his pitching arm. While throwing batting practice to his high school team, Morris realizes that he throws harder as a 38 year-old than he threw when he was a prospect. Morris’ team recognizes his gift and makes a deal with him that if they make the state playoffs Morris has to try out with a major league team. They do and he does and of course he is offered a chance to make it in the big leagues with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. Morris has to begin in the minors, where he is befriended by a young, budding superstar named Brooks. But Morris misses home. He is struggling on the mound. He is just about ready to give it up and go back to Texas. But then heading back to his hotel one night, he happens to spot a little league game. He stands at the outfield fence and takes in the pleasure the young players have in the game. Watching these boys running around the field changes Morris’ perspective. He realizes he loves baseball and the opportunity to play is a gift. The next day, when Morris enters the locker room he finds Brooks and says enthusiastically, “You know what we get to do today? We get to play baseball.” I have often reflected on how this perspective was a turning point for Morris. When baseball became a duty, a goal to be achieved, a paycheck to cash, there was little motivation, low performance and emotional darkness. But when Morris got caught up in the joy of what he is doing, his life soared. Now here’s the reason I am writing about all this. Every Sunday morning many Christians out there feel about church the way Morris felt about baseball when he was toiling away in the minors. They are burned out, tired, attracted by the prospects of just staying home. Church seems like a burden rather than a blessing. So I want to say to you this week . . . “You know what we get to do Sunday? Continued on page 3...


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You know what we get to do today? Continued from page 2…

We get to gather to worship God with our brothers and sisters in Christ! Church is not what we HAVE to do, it is what we GET to do. It is a joy and privilege to worship with fellow believers: to sing, to pray, to talk, to listen.” Maybe somebody made you mad and you are embittered. Maybe you have questions about God that you just can’t seem to answer. Maybe you are just in a dry spell in your life. Whatever the case, I pray that you would recapture the joy of worship with God’s people. Pastor Scott Frady of West Hickory Baptist Church 40 12th Street NW, Hickory, NC

Yokefellow Observes National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week LENOIR, NC (November 9, 2017)…National Hunger & Homelessness Awareness Week (HHAW) is held each year the week before Thanksgiving. Caldwell County Yokefellow invites all county residents to take this time to think about what we are thankful for, a perfect time to share our compassion with our neighbors who are experiencing homelessness, and work toward a world where no one has to experience hunger or homelessness. To increase the understanding and awareness of Hunger and Homelessness in Caldwell County, Yokefellow is sponsoring two Open House events Sunday, November 19th, 2:00-4:00pm at LEOS (Lenoir Emergency Outreach Shelter) located at 1129 West Avenue in downtown Lenoir AND at Caldwell County Yokefellow located at 1602 Harper Avenue. Both buildings will be open for visitors to tour, see the operations of both locations up close, and have meaningful conversations with agency staff and volunteers available that afternoon. Yokefellow firmly believes all citizens have real political power to add to the struggle to end homelessness and the power to educate your community members and area politicians. Together, we can help to change the conversation about stereotypes, improve policy, help service providers, and so much more. Please join us Sunday afternoon, November 19th for a tour or LEOS, Caldwell County’s emergency shelter, and then drive down Harper Avenue to Yokefellow for a full building tour there. For additional information contact Sharon Osborne at Yokefellow, 754-7088.

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Roasted Possum (try at your own risk!) To roast opossum parboil, season with salt and pepper, chop the liver fine, to which add bread crumbs, 1 onion minced, a little parsley; moisten with water and use as forcemeat. While roasting pour a little hot water in with the drippings and baste frequently. Serve with spiced cherries and a gravy made by thinning the liquor in the pan with boiling water, if necessary, and thickening with browned flour. Some prefer apple sauce to serve with opossum, and it may be garnished with fried apples in circular slices, or served whole with a roast apple in the mouth, if so liked.

Stuffed Cauliflower Pick over a fine cauliflower, and plunge it for a moment in boiling water. Look over it well again and remove any grit or insects. Put it head downwards in a pan when you have already placed a good slice of fat bacon at the bottom and sides. In the holes between the pan and the vegetable put a stuffing of minced meat, with breadcrumbs, yolks of eggs, mushrooms, seasoning of the usual kinds, in fact, a good forcemeat. Press this well in, and pour over it a thin gravy. Let it cook gently, and when the gravy on the top has disappeared put a dish on the top of the saucepan, turn it upside down and slip the cauliflower out. Serve very hot.


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Just Roll With It (Food, Wine & Beer)

107 Fairway Ave Hudson, NC 28638 (828) 572-5588 www.facebook.com/justrollwithithudson

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Shop in downtown Hudson & support local!!!


Thursday, November 16, 2017

LP Frans stadium improvements announced HICKORY, NC (November 14, 2017)‌The Hickory Crawdads and Texas Rangers today announced plans for a series of improvements to be made at LP Frans Stadium, the home of the South Atlantic League club, for the 2018 season. The announcement was made at a public event on Tuesday at LP Frans Stadium that was attended by officials from the Rangers, Crawdads, and City of Hickory. On October 12, the Rangers announced that the organization had purchased the Crawdads franchise from the ownership group led by majority owner Don Beaver, who had owned and operated the team since 1993. The Rangers and City of Hickory have signed a new LP Frans Stadium lease that extends through 2022 and includes an option through 2027. "The Texas Rangers are proud and honored to have acquired a franchise that thrived under the stewardship of Don Beaver and his ownership for the last quarter century," said Neil Leibman, Chairman of the Texas Rangers Ownership Committee and the new President of the Crawdads. "We are so pleased to be able to announce a series of improvements to one of the South Atlantic League's finest parks that will allow fans and players to have an even better experience at LP Frans Stadium." Improvements to LP Frans Stadium, which was originally built in 1993, will include the following: --A new stadium video board in right center field that is expected to measure 16 feet high and 54 feet in length. The current board at LP Frans Stadium is 12 feet high and 20 feet in length.

--An entirely new playing surface, including new infield and outfield sod, new dirt in the infield and on the warning track, and a new irrigation system. --New protective netting behind home plate and down the right field that will eliminate many of the current large structure poles that have caused problems with sightlines. --A totally rebuilt outfield wall with new padding that will run from foul pole to foul pole. The height of the outfield wall will remain at eight feet. Continued on page 7...

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Thursday, November 16, 2017

LP Frans stadium improvements announced Continued from page 5‌

--Renovated first and third base dugouts to include new flooring, steps, and benches as well as rebuilt bat and helmet racks. The Rangers will provide the initial funding of approximately one million dollars for the 2018 stadium improvements with the City of Hickory reimbursing the club that amount over the next two years. The Rangers also announced that the team plans to make future improvements to LP Frans Stadium in areas such as food service and maintenance equipment that will be fully funded by the Texas organization. For information on tickets for 2018 Hickory Crawdads home games, fans can call 828-322-3000 or go to crawdad@hickorycrawdads.com

Granite Falls Historical Association unveils its new logo GRANITE FALLS, NC (November 13, 2017)‌The Granite Falls Historical Association, Inc. is pleased to unveil its new logo courtesy of Paragon Design Group in Hudson. The logo incorporates the blue and gold colors of the former Granite Falls High School and has a vintage appearance reminiscent

of historical markers, antique car tags, and old fashion nameplates. Paragon provided the service pro bono as part of CreateAthon, a program developed by participating marketing agencies to benefit community based nonprofit organizations. For more information about Paragon Design Group, check out their website at paragondesign.com. Information about the Granite Falls Historical Association may be found on the website of the Granite Falls History and Transportation Museum (www.granitefallshistorymuseum.org).

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ACA Individual Health Insurance Forecast for 2018 by Laura Sedlacek LENOIR, NC (November 12, 2017)…Open enrollment for Individual Health insurance has cranked up and is underway. If you’re planning to sign up for an Affordable Care Act plan, you’re probably a little bit anxious, maybe confused. Recent efforts to repeal or replace the ACA failed. Currently the Tax Reform efforts may fold in another attempt to repeal the health care law’s individual mandate – the mandate that requires you to carry health insurance or pay a fine unless you qualify for a hardship exemption.

Mayor Gibbons proclaims #GivingTuesday LENOIR, NC (November 15, 2017)…Mayor Joe Gibbons declared Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2017, to be #GivingTuesday in the City of Lenoir. Gibbons made the proclamation Tuesday night, Nov. 14, during City Council’s regular meeting. #GivingTuesday is an idea brought to the Mayor by Ms. Kenvian Moravec with Teacher Treasures A Resource Center. Moravec said #GivingTuesday is a day “when charities, families, businesses, community centers, students, and retailers and more will all come together” and give back to various groups and causes across the city and county. Last year, millions of people in 98 countries came together to give back and support causes they believe in, Moravec said. More than $177 million was raised online to support many organizations. “There are so many places we can give as a community, as individuals, as corporations to help our town,” Moravec said. “Go in your closets, get coats, get blankets and give them to [people in need].” For more information, visit givingtuesday.org.

Even with less advertising and grants cut in half for ACA “Navigators,” health insurance plans and other coverage options are still available for 2018. In North Carolina, every county has at least one option for individual health plans. Under ACA law, insurers must offer at least one Silver and Gold plan and many also offer options from the other two metal tiers: Bronze and Platinum. Metal categories differ with Bronze and Silver plans offering the lowers monthly premiums. You should carefully consider your choices. Even though Navigator funding was cut back you can still get help by searching by City and State or by Zip Code on the Marketplace website, or check your local papers or phone book for insurance agents in your area. The subsidies are still on the exchange and many still do get subsidies to reduce premiums. Those who choose a Silver option may get additional help to cover other out of pocket costs like a reduced doctor copay or deductible. Those are called Cost Sharing Reductions (CSRs) and that’s what the current Administration cut, not the subsidies aka Advanced Premium Tax Credits. Companies must keep offering these Silver plans with CSRs, but they won’t receive cost sharing payments from the government. Under the ACA, the penalty for not buying insurance still exists. People must sign up for health insurance or pay a penalty. The mandate will still be enforced. Continued on page 9...


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ACA Individual Health Insurance Forecast for 2018 by Laura Sedlacek Continued from page 8...

To be realistic, the Marketplace still has issues with some people being ineligible for a premium subsidy or Advanced Tax Credit, some people being unable to qualify for Medicaid, and some being unable to keep their original plan they had before the ACA. Many grandfathered individual health plans are being discontinued in this state at the end of the year. Still there are choices for comprehensive health for individuals who lack job-based health insurance options, who don’t qualify for Medicare, Medicaid or VA benefits, or who are losing their grandfathered individual health plans.

It’s important to keep in mind that the enrollment period has been shortened: November 1st – December 15th. There are circumstances for Special Enrollments (moving, marriage, divorce, loss of health coverage from a job, loss of COBRA, loss of Medicaid, etc.) where enrollment can be made outside of the Annual Enrollment Period. It’s important to also keep in mind that the Marketplace and coverage options, however, still exist. The time is now for you to see what your coverage choices are for 2018. ~Laura Sedlacek is an Individual Health insurance Agent with Bush and Associates in Lenoir, NC. She has been offering ACA individual health plans since they began in 2013. Contact Laura at (828) 754-2601, quotes@bushandassociates.net, or by logging onto: https://www.healthsherpa.com/? _agent_id=laura-bushsedlacek or http:// www.mynchealthplan.com

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Book Signing for “Aria” at Cornerstone Nov. 18 with Local Author Penny Lea BOONE, NC (November 13, 2017)…Local author Penny Lea Muller, who has traveled the country for decades now ministering to hurting people, will host a book signing for her latest title, “Aria,” at Cornerstone Bookstore in Boone from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 18. “Aria” is the latest fruit of her obedience to God’s mission in her life through Penny Lea Ministries, giving a glimpse into her heart for pro-life ministry, the heartache that abortion causes in families everywhere, the forgiving spirit of Jesus and the healing promises of Heaven. “God supernaturally called me to be a voice for the unborn on June 7, 1982 as I walked through a small church cemetery just outside of Nashville,” she said. “He allowed me to hear the screams of countless children that I would later come to know as ‘the broken ones.’ That day changed my destiny.” Since that day, Muller has committed her life to waking a sleeping nation from its tragic choices and to sharing God’s redemptive promises with the mothers, fathers, grandparents, siblings, relatives, loved ones, friends and all people affected by abortion’s ripple of darkness. “In early 2016, God used my friend, Sid Roth, to inspire me to seek God about writing a book that would stop a couple from choosing abortion, and also to bring healing to those who carry the guild and regret of this tragic choice,” said Muller. “I spent much time alone with the Lord, and one day I sat down and started writing ‘Aria.’ It was totally God. It was released in February of this year, and I truly believe this little book was totally Godbreathed into my spirit. It seemed as though the Lord has opened the veil between Heaven and earth and allowed me to see a glimpse of His glorious kingdom.” “Aria” is available at Cornerstone Bookstore or online through Amazon or Barnes & Noble. Get your copy to read the message that God is sending us through Muller’s voice. Books are available for just $10. Consider donating the cost of a book to help bring healing through Christ to someone in need. “The book also deals with the pain of miscarriage, a subject too often ignored. We who have lost children will see them in God’s garden,” she said. “For anyone who has lost a loved one, this will ring much joy and comfort. Heaven is an amazingly beautiful place. It’s promised to those who love Jesus.” Stop by Cornerstone Books on Nov. 18 to meet the author and pick up a copy for you or someone who needs its healing message. Cornerstone Books is located at 1894 Blowing Rock Road in Boone, NC, 28607. Continued on page 11...


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Book Signing for “Aria” at Cornerstone Nov. 18 with Local Author Penny Lea Continued from page 10…

Author Bio from Penny Lea “June 7, 1982 is a day that will be forever engraved in my heart. While walking through a little church cemetery just outside of Nashville, TN, I heard the cries of children. Those cries surrounded me. I fell to my knees and cried out to God, "Where are these tortured children?" I ran from that place, but I couldn't escape the screams. Weeks later, through a supernatural chain of events, God spoke to me. I had found the children. They were not in a distant land; they were here in the USA. They were the broken ones. They were millions of aborted children. “I have traveled relentlessly throughout the USA and Canada as a voice for the voiceless. I was a guest at the Reagan White House, and I shared the platform in Ottawa, Canada with Mother Teresa. Thirty-two thousand people stood in the pouring rain as we spoke. It was as though heaven was weeping. “After thirty-four years of travel, it is now time to write my heartbreaking stories. My hope is to awaken those who continue to sleep through a war on children, to offer help and healing to the mothers and families who live in pain and regret, and to introduce the way to our redeemer who died in our place that we would one day see that beautiful city. “My first book is titled, Aria. It's a novella that I pray will touch the hearts of all who read it. It was written as fiction, but it's reality. I wept as I wrote that little book, and I believe it is God's cry to America. Thank you for visiting my page.” — Penny Lea

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GF Women's Enrichment Association invites prospective members to its Christmas party GRANITE FALLS, NC (November 10, 2017)‌The Granite Falls Women's Enrichment Association invites interested persons to attend its Christmas party on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 beginning at 6:30 p. m. in the Civic Club House on the campus of the William B. Shuford Recreation on Pinewood Road in Granite Falls. While membership in the Association is open to all persons who support its objectives, the group extends a special invitation to retirees and persons planning to retire soon. GFWEA provides opportunities for women to enrich their lives beyond the workplace. Work relationships often change or end after retirement, and members of the Association make social connections in a learning environment. Monthly programs center around presentations and round table discussions about a variety of topics, and members enjoy socializing, mentoring, and networking. Annual dues of $24.00 are now prorated for new members. To make reservations for the party, please call (828) 396-1066. There is no charge, but the group needs a headcount for the meal. For more information, check out the group's website at www.granitefallsweassociation.org.

Caldwell Arts Council Seeks Artists for 2019 Exhibitions

Granite Drug Center 828.212.1066

LENOIR, NC (November 9, 2017)‌The Caldwell Arts Council will accept portfolios from local and regional artists for possible exhibitions in 2019 at either our Caldwell Arts Council gallery (four exhibit opportunities ranging from 5 to 8 weeks) or at the Art-in-Healing Gallery (three 3-month long exhibit opportunities at Caldwell Memorial Hospital. Other exhibition sites may be available in 2019 as well. All details for submitting your portfolio are available on our website at http:// www.caldwellarts.com/157-guidelines/ and portfolios will be accepted through January 31, 2018.


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Twelfth Annual Festival on the Square Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony in Granite Falls set GRANITE FALLS, NC (November 13, 2017)...The Twelfth Annual Festival on the Square Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony will be held Monday, November 20, 2017 in downtown Granite Falls. The Festival begins at 6:15 p.m. but we encourage everyone to come early to see the 25 Christmas trees decorated by local school groups and civic organizations as part of the “Light Up Granite Falls” event. Festival attendees can enjoy beautiful live Christmas music from local school choruses and bands and the community choir. Several downtown businesses and faith based organizations will have booths providing free refreshments and there will be a special appearance by Santa Claus. This event has always provided great fun for the entire family. Due to limited seating, we encourage you to bring a comfortable lawn chair and enjoy the beginning of the holiday season in historic downtown Granite Falls. We hope to see you there for the first snowfall of the season! This project was supported by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

Blue Ridge Energy Propane and Fuels Donates over $2,000 to The Wig Bank LENOIR, NC (November 8, 2017)…Blue Ridge Energy Propane and Fuels recently donated $2,184 to The Wig Bank of Caldwell County. Pictured: Caldwell Propane and Fuels Manager Ray Mull, front right, presents the check to Wig Bank board members Angie Rash, front, second row: Becky Gibbons and Susan Gray, back row: Rebecca Hites and Michael James. The donation represents a penny for every gallon of propane delivered in Caldwell County during the past year in the company’s pink “Fueling the Fight” propane delivery truck to increase breast cancer awareness. Employees say they’re honored to drive the trucks in the spirit of honoring family and friends who have been touched by cancer. Since beginning the program in 2013, Blue Ridge Energy Propane and Fuels has donated over $60,000 to local breast cancer related organizations across its service area in Caldwell, Watauga, Ashe, and Alleghany counties in North Carolina and Grayson County, Virginia.


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“Movies with Mike� Collaborators or Adversaries? by Mike Holsclaw (November 3rd, 2017) Saturday, October 21st, was the occasion of our ninth annual Halloween Double Feature. It was one of the best attended of all our "Movies with Mike" Halloween events and I believe that everyone truly enjoyed themselves, although I have to confess that I may not have been at the top of my form this year as I was somewhat distracted by thoughts of my father. Still and all, I was deeply touched by this tremendous show of support on the part of all the "usual suspects", both old and new, and this was just what I needed to lift my spirits during a difficult time. Thanks, guys, you really went above and beyond! After the program, several of us adjourned to the Village Inn to celebrate its success. During the course of our meal, Shawn and I revisited, in a good-natured way, a disagreement we have tossed around for many years; I believe that before you spend the money on a theater ticket (which, these days, can be anywhere between ten and fifteen dollars), you should consult the opinions of several film critics whose taste you trust to form some kind of consensus as to the quality of the film in question and then act accordingly; I admit, if the reviews are uniformly bad across the board, I will think long and hard about whether I will see the film or not. Shawn, on the other hand, thinks that, if the subject of the film is something you are already interested in, you should limit the amount of criticism you consume before seeing the film because the critics may adversely affect your appreciation of something you might otherwise truly have liked. That is, they may poison the well before you ever have the chance to drink. We're not exactly doctrinaire in our positions on this issue; I know that, despite his fear of contamination, he has occasionally read a review of a film he's really excited about before he actually saw the film and, as he pointed out, if a movie really intrigues me, I will still see it even if all the reviews are negative ( for instance, I don't think I read a single favorable comment about the movie "Colombiana", yet I thought it was a deft, stylish revenge thriller; I'll admit, however, that my opinion may have been slightly swayed by the fact that Zoe Saldana was the film's lead) . Still, for the most part, these are our general attitudes. What I find interesting is the underlying philosophical stances that inform these two disparate points-of-view. I hesitate to assume the deep sources of someone else's opinions but, I think I know Shawn well enough at this point that I might hazard some guesses as to why he feels the way he does; if I'm mistaken, I promise I will correct the record at a later date! I believe that, like many of his fellow Americans, he has an intuitive distrust of the self-appointed authority who presumes to tell the rest of us what we should think or feel in response to a work of art, popular or otherwise. There is a reflexive, (small "d") democratic impulse to think that all of us are just as qualified as the arriviste poetaster who arbitrarily stands in judgment of books, music, or films. As a matter of fact, we might even possibly know more than they do on any given objet d'art, depending on what that particular objet is! I think that Shawn's wariness in regard to critical opinion is due, in part, to an ambiguous sense that the critical community is, to no small degree, the audience's adversary; he suspects that, deep down, they take delight in spoiling our simple entertainments. Ironically, my appreciation for and sense of spiritual communion with the critical community is also rooted in a democratic impulse; long ago, in my first blog post, as a matter of fact, I made the argument that when we passionately discuss our reactions to television, film, or music, we are participating in a grand discourse that began long before we existed and that will continue long after we are gone. Without being too grandiose, such discussions are, to me, the leading edge of contemporary Western culture. Continued on page 17...


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Collaborators or Adversaries? by Mike Holsclaw (November 3rd, 2017) Continued from page 16‌

When we read the comments of a film critic or music reviewer, for example, we are receiving the distilled essence of one person's point- of- view; I don't see these individuals as authorities, per se, but rather as colleagues who are as intellectually engaged by the cultural artifacts of our modern world as I am. I view what takes place between the expression of their opinion and my reflecting on what they said as two halves of a conversation; I don't think they are superior to me in any way and I don't feel they are trying to dominate my thinking on any given subject - rather, I think two equals are both considering the same object, sometimes agreeing and sometimes diverging, but both responding in their own respective ways. Now obviously, I can't reach through the page or computer monitor and interact directly with my critical comrade but, I can take their ideas into my mind and play point/counterpoint. When I do so, it sometimes really does feel like I'm conversing with another person, especially if the writer has an above average insight or if they possess a sensibility sufficiently refined to make their opinions unfurl into something a little more complex than just a simple "thumbs up" or "thumbs down". Still, I know that Shawn (and many others) are still unpersuaded; they think that the critic's role is largely a negative one and that his role in society is, in many ways, scurrilous. I can only respond by recounting one of my favorite anecdotes about critics; in 1978, when John Carpenter's "Halloween" was first released in theaters, the reaction of many reviewers writing for small town newspapers was tepid at best. Many of them thought it was a crude, exploitation horror flick and that it would soon, deservedly, sink beneath the waves of mediocrity. Two critics writing for metropolitan papers, however, Bob Allen and Roger Ebert, recognized just what a singular accomplishment the film really was and they sang its praises at length in the columns they wrote about it. Both realized that it was a worthy successor to Hitchcock's "Psycho" and Ebert, in particular, saw that it would become a classic in its own right in years to come. Before they championed the film, it had been hobbling along anemically in theaters and was on the verge of being pulled from distribution. After they began giving it the attention it deserved, though, its fortunes reversed and it went on to earn more than 50 million dollars in revenues. Today, most film historians believe that Allen and Ebert essentially saved one of the best horror films of all time from an unworthy fate. If not for their efforts, "Halloween" might have retreated into obscurity and John Carpenter's career might have died before it really began. Not too bad for a couple of dirty rotten critics, eh? One last thing; shortly after the Weinstein scandal broke, one of my favorite critics, Stephanie Zacharek, wrote something in "Time" magazine that struck me as eminently sensible - she said that several of her young female friends were feeling angst as to whether they could continue to love some of the films Weinstein had produced, "Shakespeare in Love" for example, and she pointed out to them that films are the product of collaborative effort and that it was unfair to all the people both in front of and behind the camera, guilty of nothing, who had worked on Weinstein productions, to condemn everything he had ever been involved in as no longer worthy of appreciation. This dispassionate sense of proportion in the face of an understandable impulse to overreact seemed just what was needed in the moment and I appreciated the fact that someone was defending the integrity of the scores of good, talented people who were just unfortunate enough to have been employed by a moral monster. Again, it reminded me of the good work a critic can do, contrary to the negative stereotype in which they are commonly perceived. Find a good critic today and read something they wrote; you may discover you've made a valuable friend and not struck up an acquaintance with someone in the devil's camp. Try it, you'll like it! Learn more about classic films and enjoy the magic of movies at Movies with Mike. Held the 1st Thursday of each month at 6:00pm downstairs at the Lenoir Library. This program is free and popcorn is provided! For more information, please call 828-728-4207. Caldwell County Public Library website: http://ccpl.libguides.com/main


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Lenoir / Caldwell County Crime Stoppers need your assistance LENOIR, NC (November 9, 2017)‌The Lenoir / Caldwell County Crime Stoppers need your assistance in solving the following crime: On 10/30/2017 a report for damage to real property was filed with the Lenoir Police Department. An unknown offender(s) caused damage to glass windows in a building located in the 300-block of Elizabeth St. The value of the damage was $325.00. On 11/08/2017 a report for breaking and entering to auto with larceny was filed the Lenoir Police Dept. An unknown offender(s) entered an unsecured vehicle while it was parked in the 1000-block of Taylorsville Rd. The total taken was valued at $25.00. On 10/28/2017 a report for breaking and entering was filed with the Lenoir Police Department. An unknown offender(s) entered a residence located in the 900-block of Southview Pl. Nothing was reported taken from inside. No damage was reported Anyone who has any information regarding this crime or any other crimes is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 758-8300. A cash reward will be paid to anyone with information leading to the arrest of criminals or the recovery of property or illegal narcotics. You do not have to reveal your name. CRIME STOPPERS is a community program operated by citizens of Caldwell County which involves the public in the fight against crime. The CRIME STOPPERS phone line is operated 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Good Christian Learning At Affordable Prices Ages 6 weeks to 12 years

828-212-0900

Mount Zion Baptist Church is looking for a part-time custodian. Please send resumes to Mount Zion Baptist Church, % Personnel Committee, 1787 Cajah Mountain Road, Hudson, NC 28638. Clover Baptist Church is seeking a gifted Christian who is committed to Jesus Christ and the Word of God to fill their Interim/Permanent parttime Worship Music Leader position. The hours needed to fulfill this position will be determined and discussed during the interview and will include Sunday morning, Sunday evening, Wednesday evening, and special services. Experience preferred. Send resumes to Clover Baptist Church, c/o Pastor, 100 Pinewood Rd, Granite Falls, NC 28630.

First Baptist Church 8 Crestview St, Granite Falls

Open Monday - Friday - 7:00 A.M. - 10:00 A.M. Serving Coffee and Coffee House Beverages Begin the day with a hot or cold beverage and a Word from the Master


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Thursday, November 16, 2017

Caldwell Journal 11 16 2017  
Caldwell Journal 11 16 2017  
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