Page 102

Swift

println(descending) println(ascending) When we run the above program using playground, we get the following result: [75, 20, 10, 5, -6] [-6, 5, 10, 20, 75] The statement itself clearly defines that when string1 is greater than string 2 return true otherwise false hence return statement is omitted here.

Known Type Closures Consider the addition of two numbers. We know that addition will return the integer datatype. Hence known type closures are declared as let sub = {(no1: Int, no2: Int) -> Int in return no1 - no2 } let digits = sub(10, 20) println(digits) When we run the above program using playground, we get the following result: -10

Declaring Shorthand Argument Names as Closures Swift automatically provides shorthand argument names to inline closures, which can be used to refer to the values of the closure's arguments by the names $0, $1, $2, and so on. var shorthand: (String, String) -> String shorthand = { $1 } println(shorthand("100", "200")) Here, $0 and $1 refer to the closure's first and second String arguments. When we run above program using playground, we get following result 200 Swift facilitates the user to represent Inline closures as shorthand argument names by representing $0, $1, $2 --- $n. Closures argument list is omitted in definition section when we represent shorthand argument names inside closure expressions. Based on the function type the shorthand 90

​Fast is really a strong and intuitive coding language for macOS, iOS, watchOS and tvOS....  

Quick is a effective and instinctive programming language for macOS, iOS, watchOS and tvOS....

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you