Issuu on Google+

Caldecote Parish Plan

2010 - 2015 Collated from questionnaires distributed in July 2009


Foreword We hope that you find this document informative and thought provoking – it contains a wealth of information about what residents think about the Parish of Caldecote and what improvements they would like to see. The recommendations will help the Parish, District and County Councils, as well as other agencies, to plan the services that we, the residents, think are important both now and in the years to come. Ensuring that the proposed actions are followed through and the plan is kept fresh will need the dedication and support of us all, but especially those on the Parish Council. This plan would not have seen the light of day were it not for the dedication, hard work and stamina of the various members of the Steering Committee and many others who gave up their time to distribute questionnaires, enter data and generally support the effort. In particular, we should all thank Neale Whyatt, Sharon Newton, Gill Read, Sue Day, Alan Levett, John Newby, Vitor Pinheiro, Hazel Pinheiro, Lisa Hazel, Sarah Whyatt, Robin Martlew, Jack Lang, John Barker, Tumi Hawkins, Clive Gilchrist, Sue Tasker and everyone else who has helped along the way. We thank May Kember for providing the historical photographs of Caldecote taken by her late husband Owen. We should also thank the Parish Council for their support and Melanie Baker, Nancy Davies and Sarah Johnston from Cambridgeshire ACRE (Action with Communities in Rural England) for their guidance and encouragement. In these times of financial belt-tightening, we all need to contribute whatever we can to help shape the community we want. Several actions call for volunteers to get involved – if you are able to help, please contact the appropriate group or a member of the Parish Council (http://www.caldecote.gov.uk).

The Parish Plan Steering Committee June 2011

2


Contents Foreword ......................................................................................................................... 2 Contents .......................................................................................................................... 3 1. Introduction ................................................................................................................. 4 Developing Caldecote’s Parish Plan .................................................................................................. 4

2. About the Parish ........................................................................................................... 5 A short history .................................................................................................................................. 7 Snapshot of the community ............................................................................................................. 9

3. Traffic and transport ................................................................................................... 13 Traffic .............................................................................................................................................. 13 Bus services..................................................................................................................................... 16 Cycling ............................................................................................................................................. 17 Community transport ..................................................................................................................... 18

4. Community and environment ..................................................................................... 19 Housing ........................................................................................................................................... 19 Policing and security ....................................................................................................................... 20 Environmental services, social and cultural amenities ................................................................... 21 Local government ........................................................................................................................... 22 Local environment .......................................................................................................................... 23

5. Sport, recreation and facilities for young people ......................................................... 24 6. Youth Questionnaire................................................................................................... 27 Survey results.................................................................................................................................. 27

7. Action Plan ................................................................................................................. 28

3


1. Introduction The idea of Parish Plans was first mooted in the Government’s Rural White Paper ‘Our Countryside, the Future’ (2000) in which it proposed that all rural communities should develop ‘Town, Village and Parish Plans’ to identify their key facilities and services, to establish what needs to be preserved, and to set out the problems that need to be tackled. The onus is on the Parish to decide what should be included in the Plan and the actions required to improve the quality of life of its residents. For this reason, a key action in the development of a Parish Plan is the canvassing of residents’ views, typically in the form of a questionnaire. Parish Plans are recognised by local government departments, service providers, fund-holding groups and commercial organisations. Having a Parish Plan to support the community’s position will help both the Parish Council and local groups to access funding and assistance from local government and other agencies. Any future proposals will also carry greater weight if they can be supported by the Parish Plan.

Developing Caldecote’s Parish Plan Caldecote Parish Council first decided to support the development of a “Parish Plan” back in 2007. A volunteer steering committee was formed, supported by Cambridgeshire ACRE1 (Action with Communities in Rural England). We held an open meeting in the Village Hall, consulted with local groups and, after a lot of hard work, developed and distributed a village-wide questionnaire designed to capture people’s view on both general and specific issues. Collecting and analysing the questionnaire response data has been an involved and time-consuming task. It is therefore with a real sense of achievement (and some relief) that we are now able to present the key findings and – more importantly – a plan of action that seeks to address the key aspirations and concerns of the community.

641 Questionnaires delivered 295 Adult responses 118 Youth responses

Around 46% of the village responded to the questionnaires and this is sufficient to provide data which will be accepted as representing the views of the village as a whole. In total there were 295 main questionnaires returned from 641 delivered. The Youth section within the questionnaire was completed by 118 young people.

1

Cambridgeshire ACRE is contracted by the District Councils in East Cambridgeshire, South Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire to support rural communities through the community planning process.

4


2. About the Parish The Parish of Caldecote is located south of the A428, approximately six miles west of Cambridge and three miles east of Cambourne. It consists of the older village of Caldecote to the south and the newer development of Highfields Caldecote in the north. Nearby settlements are Hardwick and Toft to the east, Bourn to the west, Childerley to the north and Kingston to the south. Bourn Airfield lies on the north-west edge of the village. “Caldecote: a place-name meaning ‘cold or inhospitable cottages’, or shelters for travellers” (Oxford Dictionary of Place-Names) The older village of Caldecote is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086. The Parish church, St. Michael and All Angels, parts of which date to the 14th Century, is located in this part of the village. Bourn Brook, just south of the church, forms the southern boundary between the Parishes of Kingston and Caldecote. Highfields Caldecote, north of the old village, has grown significantly in recent years and is now much larger than the old village of Caldecote. There is a social club, primary school, village shop, hairdressing salon and a village hall. A petrol station is located just outside Highfields Caldecote on the former A428 road at Childerley Gate. The A428 was converted to a dual carriageway and was opened on 24 May 2007, easing driving to and from the village. By skilful negotiation, villagers were able to achieve a number of benefits in exchange for the new developments in Highfields: (1) a roundabout at the junction of the A428 and Highfields road which dramatically improved the queues to leave the village for commuters; (2) a contribution towards the expansion of the school; (3) a recreation ground; (4) a contribution towards a new village hall. The original village hall, constructed in 1931, was located immediately south of the Social Club, crucially at the entrance to Caldecote Phase 2 (now Clare Drive). The old village hall was Queue of traffic leaving Highfields demolished in 1997, and the new village hall was built in 1998. Caldecote to join the A428 prior to the roundabout

In 2001/2002 the site known as “Caldecote Phase 1” (the area west of Highfields Road including the shops and the village hall) was developed by Wilcon, and “Caldecote Phase 2” (the area east of Highfields Road, now Clare Drive) was developed by Wilcon and Bloor. The land was originally farmland used for grazing cattle, and owned by John Harrup and the Taylor Brothers from Bourn Grange. Before the building work could be started, an archaeological dig was performed. This showed that there were several round houses in the area in both the Bronze Age (c. 2500 B.C.) and the Iron Age (c. 750 B.C.). A number of interesting artefacts were also discovered, which today give their names 5


to some of the roads (for example, a milling stone was found near Mill Quern and a mint condition roman coin was found near Roman Way).

Blythe Way was developed in 2001 by Banner Homes. Two smaller developments, Grafton Drive and The Willows, were started by Ashwells in 2004 and 2006 respectively, on land previously owned by the Grafton Pig Farmers.

The changing landscape of Highfields Caldecote over the last 65 years. Images on this page: ©2011 Google, ©2011 TheGeoinformation Group, ©2011 TeleAtlas, ©2011 Infoterra Ltd & Bluesky, ©2011 Getmapping plc

6


A short history The history of Caldecote is, in many ways, unremarkable. Set among the fields of agricultural Cambridgeshire, the Parish of Caldecote is a rural outpost some seven miles to the west of the city of Cambridge. But scratching beneath the surface, we find a village that has, over the centuries, been very much part of local, national and world events. In one of the earliest accounts of Caldecote, in the Domesday Book of 1086, 17 people are counted as resident in the village. Those listed would have been heads of households so we can speculate that the population at that time was possibly 80 to 90, taking into account family members and others living and working in the households. The villagers mentioned in the Domesday Book would have lived upon and farmed the land towards the southern boundary of Caldecote, where the church of St Michael and All Angels now stands and where the land slopes gently downhill to Bourn Brook. Although the church itself was not founded until much later, we can speculate with reasonable confidence that there would have been a place of worship on the site at the time to serve the spiritual needs of the villagers. However, the people listed in the Domesday Book were not the first to occupy the village. Archaeological excavations in advance of the new developments to the east and west of Highfields Road at the end of the 20th and beginning of the 21st centuries have revealed that a thousand years before William the Conqueror undertook his survey, ancient Britons and Romans had made their homes in what has now become Highfields Caldecote. They, too, worked the land, grew crops, harvested and milled cereals and raised animals. Evidence of Iron Age enclosures and Roman farmsteads has been found hidden beneath the earth. This evidence now lies under the new roads and cul-de-sacs of the village, which bear names such as Roman Drift, Mill Quern and Samian Close (named after a type of Roman pottery) in acknowledgement of their ancient past. In the centuries that followed, farming continued to be the predominant activity in and around Caldecote. Remains of medieval field patterns have been identified throughout Bourn Valley, still traceable in the modern landscape. In many cases farming tenancies remained in the same families for generations, although the land may have been owned by the Church, the University of Cambridge or even wealthy individuals who lived many miles away and who may never have visited the village or the land that was cultivated on their behalf. Throughout the centuries, too, Caldecote, along with other rural communities, shared the privations of the nation in times of hardship. At times the population became sparse and villagers moved away to look for work elsewhere; in 1554 only nine householders remained in the village although the population later recovered. Although the location of the farms and the pattern of the fields within the landscape did not change very much across the centuries, the ownership of the land changed hands many times. The Enclosure Act of 1854 also had an impact on the village. Over the years the material wants of the community were served by travelling salesmen, bearing their wares on horse-drawn wagons; occasionally small shops would open, and then close. There was even a pub, The Fox, now a private house. Spiritual needs were served by the church of St Michael and All Angels; although unfortunately for the congregation absentee vicars rendered pastoral care occasionally haphazard. The villagers were called upon to pay their share of taxes to 7


the State and it is recorded that during the reign of King John the village church, and its parishioners, were required to contribute to the cost of the Crusades. Later the village was to send its young men far away to other wars; some of them were destined not to return. Memorials to those villagers who gave their lives for their country in both the World Wars may be seen in the church of St Michael and All Angels and its surrounding churchyard and also in Ely Cathedral. Towards the end of the nineteenth century one of a succession of land-owners had the idea of dividing the land on what is now Highfields Road into strips 100 feet long by 20 feet wide. Later, after the end of the First World War, demand for homes increased and on these strips of land disused railway carriages and corrugated iron sheds were set up by people coming to settle here for the first time. The make-shift nature of these structures caused Caldecote to become known locally as Tintown. Despite the influx of new residents, Caldecote was slow to gain from the advantages of the twentieth century; for example, mains water was not introduced to the village until 1945, and only then after a vigorous campaign by one local resident. During the Second World War, Caldecote found itself on the fringes of Bourn Airfield, which played a significant part in the air defence of Great Britain. The local school was then situated on the edge of the airfield, but the building had to be demolished as it became a hazard to the aircraft taking off and landing there. The school was relocated to vacant land near Childerley Gate before moving to its present location in the 1960s. Some current residents of the village attended the school at Childerley Gate and remember it well. Since 1990, much in the Parish of Caldecote has changed, to the extent that the part of the village lying to the north has been renamed and is now called officially Highfields Caldecote. The old main road between Cambridge and Bedford, that at one time skirted the village, has been rebuilt as a dual-carriageway and now passes us by. We have new houses and a growing population, and the school is expanding with new buildings to accommodate a new generation of children. We even have traffic-calming, in the form of mini-roundabouts and those infamous “speed-humps�. What would the ancient Britons, the Romans, the medieval farmers, even the villagers and settlers of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, have made of Caldecote as we see it now? We cannot know, of course. But what we do know is that the land on which the villages of Caldecote and Highfields Caldecote now stand has a long history of occupation.

8


Caldecote Local History Group Caldecote Local History Group was formed to recover and preserve the history of Caldecote and to pass it on to future generations. A book, being written by the people of Caldecote, is in preparation that will tell the story of the village in far more detail than it has been possible to do here. Everyone is welcome to contribute.

Snapshot of the community The results of the Parish Plan Questionnaire provide a valuable overview of the general make-up of the Parish in 2009.

Housing 90% of respondents are owner-occupiers (Figure 1) and over half the houses of those who responded are detached (Figure 2). Whilst the original housing stock included many bungalows, the new developments built since the year 2000 are probably responsible for the dominance of detached houses. Many of the original bungalows have also now been converted into houses. housing association part of employment privately rented owner-occupied shared ownership 0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

Figure 1: Home Ownership

terraced house semi/link-detached house semi-detached bungalow mobile home/caravan detached house detached bungalow 0%

10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60%

Figure 2: Home type

9


The growth in housing really started in the 1960’s. A more dramatic increase then occurred from 2000 onwards with the new developments in Highfields Caldecote. House numbers extrapolated from the questionnaire responses are shown in Figure 3.

Figure 3: Housing growth

Age-distribution and employment Figure 4 shows that there is a reasonable spread of ages in the community, with a large number of adults under 45.

Figure 4: Age distribution of village residents

10


Figure 5 shows that the majority of respondents are in full-time or part-time employment. We are fortunate to have very little unemployment in the community. Most employment is outside of the village; as a rural community local employment is limited, examples being the school, shops, farming, small businesses run from home and the Burr Elm business units.

Figure 5: Employment status

When asked what sort of employment should be encouraged in the village, greatest support was for farming/smallholdings and small business development (Figure 6). It is clear that people value the rural nature of the village. “The village is a place to live. It is not a small town, industrial area, employment opportunity or tourist attraction.� (A resident)

Figure 6: Support for local employment

11


Transport We asked about the type and number of vehicles per household. Not surprisingly, the car is the predominant form of transport, with 280 respondents having at least one car; 176 have 2 cars and 21 have three. 93 respondents have at least one bicycle, 9 have a motorcycle. The majority of people who responded make one or two return journeys per day. Of those people travelling to work, 374 do so by car, 26 by bus and 21 by bicycle. 55% of people in the village travel more than 10 miles to work.

Quality of life Figure 7 shows people’s opinions on how the quality of life in the village has changed over the last ten years. 36% of respondents feel that life has improved, whilst 19% feel it has worsened. We can only hope that the issues identified and the actions proposed in the Parish Plan will lead to an improvement in quality of life for all.

Figure 7: Change in the quality of life

When asked to rate the importance of different aspects of village life, the environment was rated as very important by 89% of respondents, facilities by 68% and the community by 48%.

The old and the new village halls

12


3. Traffic and transport Traffic The Parish of Caldecote is characterised by an almost straight road running from the A428 at the north, to the B1046 in the south. In Highfields Caldecote there are a number of roads branching off, but the main road (called Highfields Rd in Highfields Caldecote, and Main Street in the old village of Caldecote) is the only route in and out of the village. Although Highfields Caldecote has a 30 mph speed restriction, and Caldecote a 40 mph speed restriction, the largely straight nature of the road means that speeding is a potential problem. One of the preconditions that went with the new housing developments in Highfields Caldecote was that appropriate traffic calming measures be installed along Highfields Road. The speed humps/thumps and mini-roundabouts, which are now the cause of so much debate within the village, were thus installed by the developers. Apart from the 40 mph speed restriction between the bridge over Bourn Brook and Clare Farm, there are currently no traffic calming measures in the old village of Caldecote. In contrast to the relatively straight road in Highfields Caldecote, the road in the old village has a couple of difficult bends and narrows at one point to almost a single lane with steep banks to either side. The ‘sunken’ nature of the road is an important historic characteristic and this part of the road falls within a Conservation Area. Unfortunately, traffic is gradually eroding the banks and there are no provisions for pedestrians. The road is frequently used by walkers, joggers, cyclists and horse riders of all ages as well as by cars, buses and farm vehicles. Traffic calming There is very little publicly available data on traffic, including accidents, for our Parish. Consequently, it is difficult to assess whether the village actually needs traffic calming measures and what their impact is on the number of accidents. According to the Department for Transport2 a reduction in traffic speed leads to fewer and less severe accidents. Traffic calming measures involving “horizontal or vertical displacements” such as chicanes and bumps are more effective at reducing the number of accidents than coloured tarmac and traffic islands.

2

http://www.dft.gov.uk/adobepdf/165240/244921/244924/1100_Village_traffic_calmin1.pdf

13


Traffic calming in Highfields Favoured traffic calming measures: Speed-sensitive signs, followed by chicanes and coloured tarmac, were the most favoured traffic calming measures. Speed-sensitive signs 59% of respondents felt that the current speed Chicanes humps/thumps are not an effective means of traffic Coloured tarmac calming. Raised tables 87% of respondents wanted the speed humps/thumps replaced with an alternative system. 89% of respondents felt that the current speed humps/thumps could cause damage to vehicles driven within the speed limit. 80% of respondents felt that the present humps/thumps could reduce the ability of emergency services to operate effectively. The most commonly listed danger spots were the mini-roundabouts. Poor visibility of approaching drivers (in some cases due to high hedges) and disregard of the Highway Code were the most common complaints. Areas around the school, particularly during drop-off and pick-up times, were also highlighted as being potentially dangerous.

As expected, the speed humps/thumps proved a controversial issue. Only 2% of respondents did not have a view on their effectiveness as a traffic calming measure. Although a majority (59%) thought they were ineffective, a sizeable fraction (38%) considered them an effective measure. Interestingly, nearly two thirds (67%) of those who thought the humps/thumps effective still wanted them removed. Overall, there seems to be clear evidence that our current speed bumps are unacceptable. Given that even those respondents who felt the speed humps/thumps to be effective want them removed and that one of the preferred traffic calming measures was raised tables, a possible interpretation is that residents are not against “vertical displacements” per se. But they are against its current implementation. With respect to the traffic danger spots highlighted in the village, the Highway Code3 is clear regarding roundabouts and mini-roundabouts (rules 184 through 190). These rules are usually summarised as “give way to your right – even if the next right entrance into the roundabout is in front of you”. The Highway Code is clear regarding parking near school areas, parking near junctions and bends (rule 243), simply summarised as “don’t”. Action points: Replace speed humps/thumps with more suitable traffic calming measures in Highfields Caldecote. Determine the best strategy to tackle danger spots. Consult with the police and the County Council to identify the best strategies to tackle speeding, driving and parking offences in the village. Improve visibility at mini-roundabouts through hedge cutting and encourage home owners to keep hedges low at critical points.

3

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/TravelAndTransport/Highwaycode/index.htm

14


Road safety near the school Road safety near the school is a hot issue with many respondents raising it as a key problem/danger spot. A common comment was that there should be double yellow lines outside the school to prevent parking and to improve visibility and make it safer for people crossing the road. This measure might also encourage more parents and their children to walk to school. The majority of respondents agreed that: parking and turning near the school causes safety problems (77%) the school needs a pedestrian crossing (60%) road safety near the school needs to be improved (66%)

Action points: Address road safety issues near the school – investigate the possibility of a school crossing. Investigate use of double yellow lines or similar parking restrictions outside the school.

Traffic calming in Caldecote Over half (54%) of the respondents felt that there was a speeding problem through the old village (along Main Street). 62% of respondents would like to see a lower speed limit in the short stretch of road between Highfields Caldecote and Caldecote (currently 60 miles per hour). 72% would like to see the speed limit through Caldecote lowered from 40 to 30 mph. 54% would like to see the speed limit in the narrow section of the road (between Bourn Brook and Mill Farm) reduced further to 20 mph. Nearly three quarters (77%) support the introduction of traffic calming measures appropriate to the rural/conservation area along Main Street. The main danger spot was highlighted as being the narrow section between Bourn Brook and Mill Farm. It seems that at least part of the problem is due to the road condition (potholes) and steep verges forcing drivers to the middle of the road. Another common concern was the lack of provision for pedestrians.

It is possible to report potholes and other road hazards online at www.fillthathole.org.uk4 or in the Cambridgeshire County Council website5. Road defects can also be reported to Cambridgeshire Highways on 0345 045 5212. Action points: Campaign to lower the speed limit in Caldecote. Liaise with the District Council to ensure that the road surfaces are maintained to a good standard. Identify and introduce suitable traffic calming measures in Caldecote.

4

“Fill that hole” is an online initiative run by CTC, the UK National Cyclists’ Organization, to report potholes and other road hazards to local Councils throughout the UK. 5 http://www.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/transport/roads/potholes/

15


Bus services There are a number of bus services available from the bus stop at the Caldecote Turn (near the entrance of the Bourn Airfield at the north end of the village): 6

Go Whippet hourly services (Services 01 and 03) to Cambridge city centre and towards Huntingdon (via Cambourne) on weekdays and Saturdays from 7:00am to 6:00pm. 7 Stagecoach hourly service (Citi4) everyday from 7:00am to 11:00pm to Cambridge city centre and St. Neots (via Cambourne). More frequent (every 20 min) Stagecoach service (also shown as Citi4) linking Cambourne and Cambridge during weekdays and Saturdays from 7:00am to 8:00pm.

There is also a single weekday-only bus service through the village (Stagecoach 14), going into Cambridge city centre in the morning (about 7:00am) and returning via the village (about 7:00pm).

Survey results The bus services through and around the village are important to just over half (52%) of the respondents. If the bus services were more frequent, nearly three quarters (70%) of the respondents to whom the bus service is important would use it more – just over 100 respondents. Figure 8: Preferred bus destinations The main preferred destination by bus from our village is Cambridge. St. Neots 7% 10% Just over half of the respondents felt that the Cambourne 9% bus stops were clearly marked (51%). 6% Bar Hill 170 respondents (58%) would make regular 21% Cambridge use of a circular shuttle bus from Hardwick Highfields/Caldecote to the Madingley Park 38% 9% and Ride, if such a service were available. Comberton Bourn

Action points: Liaise with Stagecoach, Whippet and the County Council to determine the best way to address the current unmet needs of bus users. Look at the feasibility of setting up a circular bus route from the village to the Madingley Park and Ride, given the estimated demand. Ensure bus stops are clearly marked and visible.

6 7

http://www.go-whippet.co.uk/ http://www.stagecoachbus.com/cambridge/timetables.php?service=167

16


Cycling The Parish of Caldecote and surrounding area is good cycling country: the land is relatively flat and there are a number of cycle routes. Cambridge was awarded National Cycling Town status in 2008 and over seven million pounds are being spent in improving cycling conditions in Cambridge and surrounding villages8. One possibility, the Parish Council wanted to explore, was the introduction of a secure bicycle rack at the north end of the village near the bus stop on the A428 to encourage bus use.

Survey results Over half of the residents (55%) agreed that if cycling routes were safer, they would cycle more. Just over half of the respondents (51%) thought that a secure cycle rack near the bus stop on the A428 would encourage them to use the bus more. 73% (112 respondents) of those who stated that they would cycle more if it were safer, also thought that a secure cycle rack near the bus stop on the A428 was a good idea.

With safety being an issue for cyclists, it is worth noting that there are a number of organisations available for cyclists that provide advice, routes and training: CTC (the UK National Cyclists’ Organization)9, Sustrans (a sustainable transport charity)10 and Cambridge Cycling Campaign11. The Cambridgeshire County Council also has extensive resources for cyclists online12. An interesting initiative available is CamShare13, a car sharing scheme in Cambridgeshire that also provides a cycle route sharing scheme: cyclists can choose to share a route with more experienced cyclists to gain confidence and experience. Guidance on better provision for cyclists and on traffic calming measures that do not increase accident rates for vulnerable road users are available from the Department of Transport14 and from the Scottish Government “Cycle by Design” initiative15. Action points: Liaise with the District Council and assess viability of introducing safer cycle paths along with the proposed traffic calming measures. Determine the feasibility of introducing a secure cycle rack at the north end of the village, including location, level of security required and size.

8

http://www.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/transport/around/cycling/ http://www.ctc.org.uk/ 10 http://www.sustrans.org.uk/ 11 http://www.camcycle.org.uk/ 12 http://www.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/transport/around/cycling/ 13 http://www.camshare.co.uk/ 14 http://www.dft.gov.uk/cyclingengland/engineering-planning/infrastructure-for-cyclists/ 15 http://www.cyclingscotland.org/transportministerlaunchescyclingbydesignat.aspx 9

17


Community transport With the poor provision of bus services through Highfields and Caldecote, it has been suggested that various forms of Community Transport could be beneficial. A Doctor’s Run scheme already exists.

Survey results 74% of respondents were aware of the Doctor’s Run scheme Of the 289 residents who responded, 26% felt that some form of community transport would be beneficial to them. A small army of households (at least 48 people) declared themselves prepared to assist with a community transport scheme. The sort of trips people would benefit from are summarised in the figure. Trips to the Doctor and Shopping were most cited. Other suggestions included transport to St Neots or Cambridge railway stations, the library and the hospital.

Figure 9: Community transport destinations

Action points: Encourage volunteers to make contact with each other with a view to forming a community transport scheme (currently offered through the Hardwick and Caldecote Community Car Scheme).

18


4. Community and environment Housing The most dramatic increase in the number of homes in Highfields Caldecote has occurred since the development of substantial areas of land in Highfields. Development began in 2000 and has involved a number of different developers and different areas of the village, see overview in the History of the Parish.

Survey results 56% of respondents felt that no further homes were required in the village. Of the respondents who felt more houses were needed (30%), there was no consensus as to what type of housing was required (family homes [large and small], homes for single people and sheltered housing accounted for the majority of opinions (73%). 46% of respondents objected in principle to further housing developments in Highfields Caldecote. For respondents who didn’t object to further development, the preference was for the Figure 10: Does the village need more construction of small groups of dwellings (10 homes? No further or fewer) or single dwellings (in controlled 2% homes locations), or redevelopment of single No opinion dwellings (or conversion of redundant 30% buildings). Further homes 56%

The majority of residents that feel no more homes are required and object in principle to further housing development.

12%

Abstained

“The village is big enough, thank you�. (A Resident)

Action points: Ensure that when reviewing planning applications the Parish Council and South Cambridgeshire District Council bear in mind the fact that the majority of residents do not want any more houses built in the village and object in principle to further housing development. (Note: this information has already been presented to the Parish Council).

19


Policing and security 79 crimes were reported in the 12 month period of Top village concerns: July 2009 to June 2010 in the area covered by Caldecote, Toft, Kingston and the surrounding Vandalism countryside. This is average compared to the rate of Fast or aggressive driving reported crimes in Cambridgeshire in the same Theft/Burglaries 16 Drug and alcohol abuse period . A Neighbourhood Watch Scheme is in Behaviour of young people operation in the village and there is a Police Community Support Officer (PCSO). PCSOs are employed to support the police and work within the local community to tackle anti-social behaviour. Anyone witnessing anti-social behaviour should report it to the police control room (Tel: 0345 456 4564). PCSOs have the power to issue Fixed Penalty Notices for specific offences as well as certain Penalty Notices for Disorder to people over the age of 16. Each PCSO should carry a card summarising his/her powers. The Cambridge Constabulary also runs an e-mail newsletter, E-cops, that is meant to keep us informed of local crime information and policing activities. E-cops also provides direct access to our Neighbourhood Policing Team. More information is available from https://www.cambspolice.co.uk/myneighbourhood/ecops/.

Survey results While the majority view the village as safe, 81% Preferred measures to improve safety: of respondents said that they were concerned about anti-social and crime-related behaviour More activities for young people in the village Greater police presence Nearly a third of respondents take precautions More frequent public consultation by such as avoiding going out in the dark, going police out accompanied or avoiding certain areas of Extended neighbourhood watch our village (namely where groups of youths More/better street lighting tend to congregate such as bus shelters, playground, recreation ground). 31% of respondents were not aware that the village has a Police Community Support Officer. 24% were not aware of the Neighbourhood Watch Scheme and only 12% currently participate in the Scheme. 34% of respondents would be willing to join the Neighbourhood Watch Scheme. The most popular measures for improving safety in the village were ‘more activities for young people’ and a ‘greater police presence’.

“Come on, this is Caldecote, not New York!” (A Resident)

16

Information on local crime rates can be obtained from the local police on: https://www.cambs-

police.co.uk/myneighbourhood/crimemapping.asp

20


Action points: All information gathered on safety and security for the Parish Plan will be shared with the village’s PCSO and Neighbourhood Watch coordinators. This will include not only the village major concerns but also detailed information such as areas in the village which are avoided. Encourage PCSOs and our Neighbourhood Watch to run more public engagement events and publicise these events throughout the village. Extend the Neighbourhood Watch scheme.

Environmental services, social and cultural amenities As in surrounding villages, refuse collection and kerbside recycling occurs on a fortnightly basis – with non-recyclable rubbish (black bins) collected one week and recyclable rubbish collected the next week (green and blue bins). Normal utilities are available throughout the Parish with the exception of gas which is only available in Highfields Caldecote. Information about events taking place in the Parish comes from three key sources: the Caldecote Journal, the notice boards in the village and the advertising journal. Together, these sources are expected to reach 96% of the residents. An email list has been considered as a further way to advertise local events and could, together with the three main aforementioned sources, reach virtually all residents (99%).

Survey results Most of the environmental services (e.g. water, gas and electricity supplies, kerbside recycling and refuse collection) in the village were considered at least reasonable. The services more commonly deemed poor included winter weather service (e.g. snow clearance and pavement gritting), roads and broadband services. 75% of respondents were critical of the current levels of winter weather services in the village provided by Cambridgeshire County Council. At the moment, no roads or pavements are cleared or gritted during winter throughout the village. 17 Over a third of respondents (35%) felt that social facilities for young people in the village were poor . The vast majority of residents (93%) read every issue of the Caldecote Journal and would like to see 18 more items about local events, leisure and sports events . 32% of respondents said that they would like to receive information on village events by email.

17

35% of respondents thought the facilities were poor. If “no opinion” and abstained are excluded, the 102 responses suggesting the facilities are poor, account for 70% of the respondents. 18 These 3 categories represent 80% of the total suggestions for further articles in the Caldecote Journal.

21


Action points: Liaise with County Council to improve winter weather service and road repair in the village. Investigate recruiting volunteers from the community to help with snow clearing and gritting. Investigate options available to improve the village’s broadband connection speed. (Faster speed is expected in part of the village following the upgrade of the Madingley Exchange to fibre broadband by early 2012). Focus on improving social facilities for young people (also highlighted as a measure to improve safety). Encourage more residents to contribute to the Caldecote Journal. Consider compiling an e-mail distribution list for the advertising of local events in addition to the Journals and notice boards. Residents’ data protection and list management concerns must first be addressed.

Local government Caldecote is subject to three levels of local government: the Cambridgeshire County Council19, the South Cambridgeshire District Council20 and the Caldecote Parish Council21. Different councils have different remits and are responsible for different services. Further information on the structure of local government, including information on what services are provided by each council, can be found at: http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Governmentcitizensandrights/UKgovernment/Localgovernment/ The annual Parish Meeting of the Parish Council is open to the public. Residents are welcome to attend other meetings of the Parish Council but any items for the agenda must be communicated to the Parish Clerk in advance. (see http://www.caldecote.gov.uk for contact details).

Figure 11: How satisfied are you with the way the planning system is implemented in the village? 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Not familiar, Dissatisfied Reasonably no opinion satisfied or abstained

Very satisfied

Totally satisfied

Survey results 31% of respondents had attended at least one of the Parish Council meetings. Other local government meetings were rarely attended. 55% of respondents felt that the Parish Council publicises its decisions and activities well. 60% of respondents didn’t think the Parish Council publicises planning applications sufficiently. 38% of respondents were not familiar with the planning system.

19

http://www.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/ http://www.scambs.gov.uk/default.htm 21 http://www.caldecote.gov.uk 20

22


Of the people who were familiar with the planning system, over half were at least reasonably satisfied with the way it has been implemented to date.

Action points: Encourage residents to take interest and engage in local politics, for example by offering more informal opportunities for residents to speak with members of the Parish Council, and giving more publicity to the Parish Council meetings. Find and implement alternative ways to publicise planning applications in a timely manner. Improve communication between residents and Parish Council. Determine the feasibility of creating a village “Welcome pack”, covering basic information about the village and the structure of its local government. Liaise with County Council to improve the availability and quality of public transport links to neighbouring towns.

Local environment With the exception of the north-western boundary which borders Bourn Airfield, the Parish of Caldecote is largely surrounded by farmland. Footpaths head west to connect with Bourn and East to Hardwick and Toft via the Wimpole Way. It is ideal walking country with meadows and woodland areas as well as large tracts of arable land. Conversion of the old A428 to a dual carriageway in 2007 has helped to reduce the traffic on local roads and ease driving to and from the village.

Most valued elements of countryside around the village:

the

Tranquillity Footpaths Small woods Meadows and green fields Bridle paths Hedges

The rural nature of the Parish is further enhanced by the presence of a number of Conservation Areas, the largest being in the old village of Caldecote in the area around the church.

Survey results 95% of respondents said that the quality of the Rating of initiatives to improve the local countryside around the village is either important or very important to them environment: The most valued elements of the countryside Improved public transport were its tranquillity, footpaths, small woods, Greater number of allotments meadows, green fields and bridle paths. More recycling 82% felt that particular landscape features, most notably woods, hedgerows, and verges (including the sunken lane in the old village of Caldecote) should be protected. ‘Improved public transport’, followed by ‘Allotments’ were the most popular of the measures suggested to help protect and enhance the local environment. (Note that a small number of Allotments (located south of Carrera Farm) are managed by Sitwells Charity and Townlands. The Parish Council is trying to secure additional land nearer to Highfields Caldecote)

23


It is clear that the village’s current bucolic and tranquil nature is very important to its current residents.

Figure 12: How important is the quality of the countryside around the village? 5% 0%

10%

No opinion and abstained Not important Important

85%

Very important

Action points: Support the maintenance of the village’s rural nature Liaise with County Council to improve the availability and quality of public transport links to neighbouring towns. Attempt to secure land nearer to Highfields Caldecote for additional Allotments.

5. Sport, recreation and facilities for young people A prerequisite for the new developments in Highfields Caldecote was the provision of sports fields and a children’s play area. The sports facilities are accessible from Furlong Way and Strympole Way. They include playing fields, football pitch, tennis courts and a basketball court. The village has an active sports association with football, cricket and croquet clubs (the latter only in the summer) and these are all publicised in the Caldecote Journal. Many additional clubs and activities also take place in the village. These include a Tuesday Club (for over 50s), Women’s Institute, Tiny Talk Baby Classes, Children’s Dancing Classes, Aerobics, Colourstrings Music Kindergarten, Youth Club, Rainbows, Brownies, Guides, Dog training, Playgroup, Baby and Toddler Group, and a Local History Group. Again, these are all publicised in the Caldecote Journal.

24


Although the village does not have a pub, it does have an active Social Club which always welcomes new members.

Survey results Only 17% of respondents regularly took part in sports, clubs and leisure activities in the village; 23% took part occasionally and 60% not at all. Nearly 30% of those not taking part in any leisure activities in the village, take part in activities outside the village; 21% said they did not want to take part in any of the activities and around 15% were not aware of what was available. 9 respondents said they would be prepared to help run an activity in the village and 60 said they might possibly be prepared to help. 57% of respondents felt that the sports and recreation facilities already available were adequate for the size of the village. Badminton and yoga were the most popular of potential new sports clubs or facilities mentioned, and a swimming pool was top of the list of additional suggestions. Other popular activities suggested include ballroom/salsa dancing and gardening, rambling and photography clubs. 33% of respondents use the social club at least occasionally. 44% of respondents thought that the children’s playground provided good facilities, and 24% thought them adequate. An activity course and a skate park topped the list of other activities for young people that residents would like to see. With regard to one big project that residents would like the community to embark upon, responses included getting the sports pavilion built (12 responses), a pub (10 responses), swimming pool (21 responses), sports hall (18 responses), skate park (6 responses), extending the village hall (4 responses) and improved cycle facilities (2 responses). “We have sufficient facilities; it would be good to get more activities going using the facilities that already exist.” (A Resident) “Something to engage teenagers – projects combining arts/sports.” (A Resident) “Improve cycle facilities so children can cycle to school.” (A Resident)

Badminton Yoga Cycling Bowls Golf Table tennis Tennis Squash Snooker or Pool Other (please specify below) Volleyball Darts Billiards

0

20

40

60

Figure 13: Interest in new sports clubs as number of responses

25

80

100


Dancing classes (e.g. ballroom or salsa) Gardening Club Rambling Club Photography Club Book Club Art Club Choir Other (please specify below) Luncheon Club Drama Club Whist drive Music Society Band

0

20

40

60

80

100

Figure 14: Interest in new activities as number of responses

An activity course (zip wires, rope bridges, etc.) Skate Park Internet Cafe BMX track After-school homework club Other (please specify below) More play or football space

0

20

40

60

80

100

Figure 15: Activities of interest to young people as percentage of respondents

Action points: Work to encourage more widespread use of sports and recreational facilities already available in the village (with more prominent advertising). Follow up with those who have indicated an interest in helping with activities/starting up new activities. Investigate the possibility/costs of creating an activity course for young people and a skate park. Ensure young people are heavily involved in deciding choice and location of new activities. Investigate the possibility/costs of embarking on a “big project�.

26


6. Youth Questionnaire The Parish Plan Committee felt it to be very important that the young people in Caldecote had a say in the development of the Parish Plan and an opportunity to voice their concerns over Youth facilities, hence the development of a separate Youth Questionnaire. We received 118 responses.

Survey results Transport (33%) appeared to be the main concern for young people. Other issues raised included bullying, anti-social behaviour/intimidation, boredom and drugs.

Transport Traffic Stress Other Environmental issues 0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

35%

Figure 16: Main concerns of Caldecote youth

“Not enough to do”

“Nothing for my age group”

“Older kids dominating basketball court for football or just hanging out”

“Teenagers from outside the village hanging around Caldecote”

68% of respondents use the sports facilities in the village. In terms of further facilities, 44% of respondents indicated that they would like an Activity Course (e.g. zip wires/ropes etc) and 24% said they would like a Skate Park. 95 adults responding to the questionnaire also thought that an Activity Course would be an advantage. Suggestions for changing one thing in the village included: making it tidier, having a pub, cycle path, BMX track, swimming pool and a cafe. Getting rid of the speed humps was also a popular response.

Action points: Keep sport active in the village. Investigate the possibility of providing more activities for young people, such as an activity course and skate park. Ensure young people are heavily involved in deciding choice and location of new activities. Address antisocial behaviour.

27


  

7. Action Plan

High priority (1-2 years) Medium priority (3-6 years) Low priority (6-10 years)

Traffic in Highfields: Liaise with County Council and developers to replace speed humps/thumps with more suitable traffic calming measures in Highfields Caldecote. Consult with the police to determine the best strategy to tackle danger spots. Consult with the police and the County Council to identify the best strategies to tackle speeding, driving and parking offences in the village. Improve visibility at mini-roundabouts through hedge cutting and encourage home owners to keep hedges low at critical points.

Traffic in Caldecote: Campaign to lower the speed limit in Caldecote. Liaise with the District Council to ensure that the road surfaces are maintained to a good standard. Identify and introduce suitable traffic calming measures in Caldecote.

Road safety near school: Address road safety issues near the school – investigate the possibility of a school crossing. Investigate use of double yellow lines or similar parking restrictions outside the school.

Bus service: Liaise with Stagecoach, Whippet and the County Council to determine the best way to address the current unmet needs of bus users. Look at the feasibility of setting up a circular bus route from the village to the Madingley Park and Ride, given the estimated demand. Ensure bus stops are clearly marked and visible.

Cycling: Liaise with the District Council and assess viability of introducing safer cycle paths along with the proposed traffic calming measures. Determine the feasibility of introducing a secure cycle rack at the north end of the village, including location, level of security required and size.

Community transport: Encourage volunteers to make contact with each other with a view to forming a community transport scheme (currently offered through the Hardwick and Caldecote Community Car Scheme).

Housing: Ensure that when reviewing planning applications the Parish Council and South Cambridgeshire District Council bear in mind the fact that the majority of residents do not want any more houses built

28


in the village and object in principle to further housing development. (Note: this information has already been presented to the Parish Council).

Policing and security: All information gathered on safety and security for the Parish Plan will be shared with the village’s PCSO and Neighbourhood Watch coordinators. This will include not only the village major concerns but also detailed information such as areas in the village which are avoided. Encourage PCSOs and our Neighbourhood Watch to run more public engagement events and publicise these events throughout the village. Extend the Neighbourhood Watch scheme.

Environmental services, social and cultural amenities: Liaise with County Council to improve winter weather service and road repair in the village. Investigate recruiting volunteers from the community to help with snow clearing and gritting. Investigate options available to improve the village’s broadband connection speed. (Faster speed is expected in part of the village following the upgrade of the Madingley Exchange to fibre broadband by early 2012). Focus on improving social facilities for young people (also highlighted as a measure to improve safety). Encourage more residents to contribute to the Caldecote Journal. Consider compiling an e-mail distribution list for the advertising of local events in addition to the Journals and notice boards. Residents’ data protection and list management concerns must first be addressed.

Local government: Encourage residents to take interest and engage in local politics, for example by offering more informal opportunities for residents to speak with members of the Parish Council, and giving more publicity to the Parish Council meetings. Find and implement alternative ways to publicise planning applications in a timely manner. Improve communication between residents and Parish Council. Determine the feasibility of creating a village “Welcome pack”, covering basic information about the village and the structure of its local government. Liaise with County Council to improve the availability and quality of public transport links to neighbouring towns.

Local environment: Support the maintenance of the village’s rural nature Attempt to secure land nearer to Highfields Caldecote for additional Allotments.

Sport and recreation: Work to encourage more widespread use of sports and recreational facilities already available in the village (with more prominent advertising). Follow up with those who have indicated an interest in helping with activities/starting up new activities. Investigate the possibility/costs of embarking on a “big project”.

29


Youth: Keep sport active in the village. Investigate the possibility of providing more activities for young people, such as an activity course and skate park. Ensure young people are heavily involved in deciding choice and location of new activities. Address antisocial behaviour.

30


Caldecote Parish Plan