Page 1

October 2014

Turlock Livestock Auction Yard

Serving Ranchers from the Sierras to the sea New in this issue... California Brokers Water Deal CCA Works On Public Lands Issues Analysis of CCA Member survey October 2014 California Cattleman 1


r o f s u n i Jo oming c p u e thes Events! M V W INTERNET VIDEO SALES, LIVE FROM COTTONWOOD

Friday

OCTOBER 3

Friday

NOVEMBER 7

FROM THE SILVER LEGACY RESORT & CASINO, RENO

Tuesday

DECEMBER 2 bid online at www.wvmcattle.com

MARKET YOUR CATTLE WITH THE PROFESSIONALS!


Teixeira Cattle Co.

20th Annual

October 10 • 4 p.m. OUTSTANDING BULLS • BRED COMMERCIAL COWS • OPEN & BRED HEIFERS • STEERS Tex 9Q13 1310 VA

Tex 9Q13 1304 VA BW

1.6

BW

WW

64

WW

65

YW

112

YW

112

MK

28

MK

24

RE

1.39

RE

.92

MB 1.50 MB RITO 9Q13 OF RITA5F56 GHM X RITO REVENUE 5M2 OF 2536 PRE RITO 9G31 OF RITA 6EMK 6F71 X GAR-EGL PROTEGE

.60

DOB 2/12/13

DOB 1/18/13

Tex Capstone 3048

1

Tex Adam 3131

BW

2.3

BW

1.9

WW

52

WW

62

YW

93

YW

116

MK

24

MK

26

RE

.54

RE

.27

MB

.76

MB

.54

DOB 1/2/13

DOB 3/9/13

B/R-TEX CAPSTONE 111 X B/R NEW FRONTIER 095 ANKONIAN ADAM 8288 X BALDRIDGE KABOOM K243 KCF J/V Angus Bill Traylor, (530) 304-2811

Veenendaal Angus Eddie Veenendaal, (559) 259-5631

Allan & Cecilia Teixeira • (805) 595-1404 John & HeatherTeixeira

WATCH AND BID ONLINE! SALE MANAGED BY:

(805) 595-1416 • (805) 448-3859

855 Thousand Hills Rd., Pismo Beach, CA 93449 www.teixeiracattleco.com cattle@thousandhillsranch.com Psalms 50:10

LARRY COTTON (517) 294-0777 RYAN COTTON (706) 206-8361


CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION OFFICERS PRESIDENT Tim Koopmann, Sunol

FIRST VICE PRESIDENT Billy Flournoy, Likely SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS Fred Chamberlin, Los Olivos David Daley, Ph.D., Oroville Rich Ross, Lincoln TREASURER Jack Hanson, Susanville

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Billy Gatlin VICE PRESIDENT GOVERNMENT RELATIONS Justin Oldfield DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT RELATIONS Kirk Wilbur DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Lisa Pherigo DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Stevie Ipsen ASSOCIATE DIR. OF COMMUNICATIONS Malorie Bankhead OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Katie Almand

PUBLICATION SERVICES

OFFICE & CIRCULATION Office: (916) 444-0845 • Fax: (916) 444-2194 MANAGING EDITOR Stevie Ipsen stevie@calcattlemen.org ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES Matt Macfarlane (916) 803-3113 mmacfarlane@wildblue.net BILLING SERVICES Lisa Pherigo lisa@calcattlemen.org

REPRESENTING EACH OF YOU by CCA Second Vice President Rich Ross In years past, CCA had a couple of instances where local members worried that CCA was unsupportive of local concerns. In response, CCA staff and officers focused on ensuring that any action effecting local associations needed to be vetted by the affected local associations. At the Midyear Meeting this summer I received an e-mail related to a proposed resolution which concluded that the resolution was “probably as good as we can expect from CCA.” The best anyone can expect in a resolution from CCA is the best they can compose and get their fellow members to adopt at convention. This is a membership organization and the rules and policy positions are written by those who show up and participate. If anyone disagrees with a policy or direction of CCA, they can simply have their local association propose a resolution at convention and take up the issue with their fellow members. CCA provides ample opportunity for all to be heard. The purpose of CCA is to advocate for its members, and those members are all local someplace. Many individual ranchers and local associations are adept at dealing with local issues, but occasionally the opposition is intimidating and all too often the local problem involves state or federal agencies. Since the beginnings of civilization people have aligned with clans, tribes and other associations of same-minded people. In 1917, a group of cattlemen associated themselves together for the common good. That was the start of the CCA. The goal was then, and is now, to advance the goals and objectives of our members and with our collective power and expertise to stand up for the individual stockman or local association. With the passage of time and continued urbanization of our state, agriculture is less and less understood. Perhaps the least understood and most stereotyped sector is animal agriculture. Our presumed effects on air, water, flora, fauna and antibiotic efficacy are exacerbated by public concerns for animal welfare. As policy bodies and staffers have increasingly urban backgrounds and diminishing understanding of how their rules effect the operations of our members, it is increasingly important that we have staff and members explaining the realities of our businesses, our lifestyles and our benefits to the state. CCA has a diverse membership. Some are

involved in marketing organic, natural, grass fed, antibiotic free, breed specific, locally born and raised; and some are disinterested in pursuing those markets. Some are interested in conservation issues and easements and environmental stewardship while others view their operations as providing those benefits already and they are reluctant to participate in programs which could lessen their operational prerogatives. Our members are seed stock operators, cow-calf folks, stockers and feeders; we have members in the deserts, the mountains, on the coast and inland valleys. But we are all in the same business. I am reminded of Benjamin Franklin’s famous remark that “We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately.” Whenever a local member or local association needs help, you must feel confident that you can reach out to CCA and we will be there. On Sept., 17, Kirk Wilbur and I drove to Marin County to meet with the chair of the California Coastal Commission and the president of the Marin County Board of Supervisors relative to revisions of the Marin local plan which implements the Coastal Act. We were joined by local members and Andy Mills, chair of the CCA Coastal Subcommittee. Kirk and I have appeared before the Coastal Commission more than once, participated in workshops, and on behalf of CCA I recently appeared as amicus in an appellate court case dealing with the Coastal Act’s effects on ranchers. Coastal issues may not interest inland land owners. Wolves may not interest members outside of mountain areas. Regional water quality control board issues are specific to their regions, yet CCA is the one organization that local cattlemen can call for assistance. Other organizations like the California Farm Bureau are wonderful allies, but their constituency bases are not as focused on cattle. CCA has been in the forefront of representing cattlemen on issues related to wolves, the coastal act, water quality, drought, pharmaceuticals and a host of other issues. Remember, CCA is here to help the membership whether the issues seem local or statewide, seem focused on a particular part of the industry, or only tangentially important to the cattle industry. We represent all members, all the time. And we represent a lot of non-members.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

4 California Cattleman October 2014


ON THE COVER

OCTOBER 2014 Volume 97, Issue 9

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN Optimism is essential in ranching

4

BUNKHOUSE Finding your voice

8

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 10 CCA working in all arenas VET VIEWS 20 Copper supplementation in your herd PROGESSIVE PRODUCER 26 Cattlemen’s College: Meat from cattle fed feed with GMOs

SPECIAL FEATURES

California Governor signs water bond measures 16 UC Davis conducts survey of CCA membership 28 Are your prepared in case disaster strikes? 31 th The 98 annual CCA/CCW Convention 32 Californians attend annual PLC Meeting 34 UC Davis unraveling longtime mystery 40 Cattlemen receive Grand National honors 42

READER SERVICES

California bull sales off to record start Buyers’ Guide Obituaries and New Arrivals Advertisers Index

44 46 52 54

This month’s cover features Turlock Livestock Auction Yard (TLAY), a longtime family-owned and operated marketing venue that provides second-to-none service to California ranchers “from the Sierras to the sea.” As the choice market yard for many California beef producers, the employees and management at TLAY work tirelessly to ensure that all parties – both buyer and seller – are happy with the marketing process. An NHTC-Certified auction yard, TLAY markets more than 100,000 head of cattle each year and prides itself on carrying on the personal service of which its foundation was built upon. The team at TLAY takes great pride in assisting with your livestock merchandising needs, where you can always be assured that they are big enough to compete, yet small enough to care. With record-setting prices this summer, the TLAY family offers a special “thank you” to all of the cattle producers and buyers who helped make the 2014 spring and summer a tremendous success. For more information on upcoming events and fall specials, see the ad on page 6. TLAY representatives also represent customers through the Western Video Market, based in Cottonwood. For more information about consignments or upcoming specials, feel free to contact the stockyard office at (209) 634-4326 or any of the below representatives.

Col. Max Olvera....... (209) 277-2063 Col. Steve Faria........ (209) 988-7180 Col. Eddie Nunes ���� (209) 604-6848 Col. Chuck Cozzi..... (209) 652-4480

Bud Cozzi................ (209) 652-4480 John Luiz ���������������� (209) 480-5101 Brandon Baba �������� (209) 480-1267 Jake Bettencourt......(209) 262-4019

October 2014 California Cattleman 5 ©THD


The Central California Livestock Marketing Center

UPCOMING SUMMER AND FALL EVENTS SATURDAY, OCT. 11

CALIFORNIA ANGUS & CHAROLAIS BULL SALE & FALL REPLACEMENT SALE

FEATURING 300 TOP QUALITY PAIRS, BRED AND OPEN FEMALES FROM REPUTATION RANCHES, INCLUDING: •70 fancy first calf Angus heifer pairs from Iron House Cattle Co. Calves are sired by outstanding Angus bulls with excellent EPDs & qualify for NHTC. •50 Angus & BWF pairs from Jim Thomas. Cows are 3 to 5 years old. Calves are sired by Rancho Casino/Dal Porto Angus bulls. •40 Top quality Angus pairs from Matheson Ranches.

TUESDAY, OCT. 14

8TH ANNUAL

FALL SPECIAL FEEDERS SALE

SPECIAL FEEDER CALF SALE

FEATURING OVER 300 HEAD OF NHTC CATTLE!

TUESDAY, NOV. 4 SPECIAL FEEDER CALF SALE

Tuesday:

TUESDAY, NOV. 18 TUESDAY, DEC. 9

8TH ANNIVERSARY

REGULAR WEEKLY SALE SCHEDULE 9 a.m.

Feeder Cattle Followed by Pairs & Bred Heifers 3 p.m. Cull Cows & Bulls Wednesday 11 a.m. Cull Cows & Bulls Friday 2 p.m. Cull Cows & Bulls Tuesdays feature large runs of calves & yearlings!

SPECIAL FEEDER SALE & CUSTOMER APPRECIATION DAY

CALL US TO LEARN MORE ABOUT CONSIGNING CATTLE TO UPCOMING VIDEO SALES!

FROM THE SIERRAS TO THE SEA, OUR TEAM IS ALWAYS HERE TO ASSIST YOU IN MEETING YOUR BUYING AND SELLING NEEDS! TLAY REPRESENTATIVES

MAX OLVERA.......................... 209 277-2063 STEVE FARIA .......................... 209 988-7180 EDDIE NUNES......................... 209 604-6848 CHUCK COZZI ........................ 209 652-4479 BUD COZZI .............................. 209 652-4480 JOHN LUIZ ............................... 209 480-5101 BRANDON BABA................... 209 480-1267 JAKE BETTENCOURT ........... 209 262-4019 REED WELCH - HONORARY FIELDMAN AND FRIEND

6 California Cattleman October 2014

TURLOCK LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD OFFICE: 209 634-4326 209 667-0811

10430 Lander Ave., Turlock, CA P.O. Box 3030, Turlock, CA 95381 www.turlocklivestock.com


THE

NEXT GENERATION BULL SALE

OCTOBER 18, 2014

KUNDE RANCH • KENWOOD, CA SELLING 60 PERFORMANCE-ORIENTED, MOUNTAIN-RAISED POLLED AND HORNED HEREFORD BULLS HORNED

2082

2067

WW +50

YW +81

MILK +22

RE +..27

MARB +.19

2095

SIRE: T YANKEE 09 MGS: CJH L1 DOMINO 552

SIRE: T YANKEE 09 MGS:/S LADY MOM 7745 BW +4.3

$CHB +$24

BW +3.9

WW +46

YW +70

MILK +17

RE -.11

MARB +.02

$CHB +$16

SIRE: THR THOR 4029 MGS: C LR DIESEL 2030 ET

WW +61

YW +81

MILK +23

RE +.64

MARB +.18

$CHB +$25

WW +46

YW +72

MILK +22

RE +.08

BW +3.6

MARB +.27

$CHB +$25

POLLED

75A

9A

31A

BW +2.6

SIRE: T YANKEE 09 MGS: KB L1 DOMINO 233

POLLED

POLLED

BW +2.0

HORNED

HORNED

SIRE: DAKITCH 112T TUNDRA 85X MGS: SB 122L PRIDE LINE 32N ET WW +53

YW +82

MILK +21

RE +.37

MARB -.02

$CHB +$24

SIRE: SB LR 61N DONE RIGHT 31X ET MGS: SB 122L PRIDE LINE 32N ET

BW +6.0

WW +65

YW +111

MILK +24

Jim, Marcia & Jamie Mickelson • Bobby & Heidi Mickelson

Steve Lambert and Family

JMMick@sonic.net • sonomamountainherefords.com 5174 Sonoma Mountain Rd. • Santa Rosa, CA 95404

slambert@digitalpath.net • LambertRanch.com 2938 Nelson Ave. • Oroville, CA 95965

(707) 527-5948 • (707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdsman (707) 396-7364

RE +.67

MARB -.06

$CHB +$32

(530) 624-5256

October 2014 California Cattleman 7


BUNKHOUSE The transition Period

by CCA Associate Director of Communications Malorie Bankhead October is the ultimate transition month. October is made up of the hustle and bustle that is back-to-school, fall calving, the start of football season and bull sales, and it prepares you for changing leaves and holiday chaos. October also allows you to reflect on your summer months as you launch feet first into the last months of the year, wondering how all 12 of them went by already. This summer I had several opportunities to grow during my transitional period at CCA, as it is fast-approaching one year since I first began working on behalf of you, California cattle ranchers, and this great organization. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Young Cattlemen’s Tour was a phenomenal experience that helped me continue to grow my professional network in the beef community while also learning more about all of the various segments that you are a part of in the beef industry. Venturing from pastureto-plate and beyond to things like legislation and regulation that impact your operations helped me continue to gain new knowledge in the beef industry. I also got to embark on the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association (CBCIA) tour in the beautiful Fall River area to spend several days with CCA and CBCIA members. Now the fall will be filled with Beef Quality Assurance trainings, local tour meetings, YCC meetings, convention preparation and more. There are a lot of ways we can all exhibit the “October” in our lives year round, especially with communication. As cattle ranchers you have the unique ability to serve as the bridge for a lot of people, consumers and legislators alike. And that’s why we are here for you; your CCA staff has your back. No longer will agriculturists be famous for hiding on their home ranches, clinging tight to their pitchforks, just “doing what I was meant to do.” With your help, we can give the beef community a boost in its communication efforts and continue to give it a powerful voice. Lately I’ve heard that agriculture doesn’t do a good job of telling its story; however, I disagree whole heartedly in the fact that agriculture isn’t an “it.” Agriculture is filled with real people, caring for real animals, tending to real crops and feeding real families. Herein lies your role: be yourself, and you will naturally share your story; you already may be doing so without even knowing it. You are the voice of reason for many consumers and legislative staff before a message from anti-animal agriculture groups reaches them. Sometimes you are inserted after the damage has already been done, but there are several ways you can strengthen the credibility of the beef industry personally. If you see a negative article about the beef or cattle, you can write a letter to the editor. If you know you want to write on a topic you feel passionately about, write and submit an opinion editorial. Or, if you’d like to be a voice for California cattle ranchers in another way, I can connect you with television, radio, and newspaper reporters who are looking for a cattle rancher’s perspective on a certain issue. 8 California Cattleman October 2014

Fortify your communication skills with educational opportunities at the upcoming annual convention, the midyear meeting, CCA leadership events or just a phone call to the CCA office. As always, please reach out to me if you’d like assistance creating MALORIE BANKHEAD responses to the stories you feel warrant a response from a cattle rancher. Your eyes and ears will help us counter the negative messages that are spread too often. If you know you’d like to work with the reporters who call the office let me know that too, so I can put you in touch with them. There are plenty of opportunities to share your story and share it well. It’s ok to step out of your comfort zone. Ranchers who stand up for themselves stand up for their product, and in the end building consumer confidence and trust is not just the name of your game—it’s your valueadded lifestyle. Consumers will never stop asking questions and seeking more information from this point forward. They key is for the beef community to speak the same language and educate each other and consumers about all sectors in the beef industry, because each and every one of them impacts the consumers’ dinner plate in some way. There are many opportunities to help provide a voice for the beef cattle industry and its impact on the environment and issues X, Y and Z. If you ever come across something that just doesn’t sit right with you, you can correct the misinformation. If you ever need assistance formulating a response, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me via e-mail at malorie@ calcattlemen.org or by phone at (916) 4440845. With the 98th annual CCA/CCW Annual Convention right around the corner, I look forward to seeing you in Sparks, Nev., so that together we can all help each other serve as the transition for those in and beyond the beef community as we all “think outside the fence.”


SHASTA

LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD

Cottonwood, California Friday, October 3

SHASTA COUNTY CATTLEMEN’S SPECIAL Immediately following the Western Video Market Internet Sale

Friday, October 24

LASSEN COUNTY & FALL RIVER-BIG VALLEY CATTLEMEN’S SPECIAL

Tuesday, November 4

49TH ANNUAL SHASTA BULL SALE

Friday, November 7 LAKE COUNTY (OREGON) CATTLEMEN’S SPECIAL Immediately following the Western Video Market Internet Sale

Sale Information (530) 347-3793 www.shastalivestock.com • shastals@shasta.com October 2014 California Cattleman 9


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK CCA Working for Ranchers on Local, State & Federal Level CCA Works To Improve drought monitor accuracy CCA has been working to improve the accuracy of the U.S. Drought Monitor that designates the severity of a drought in California and throughout the United States. CCA approved policy at the 2014 Midyear Meeting in Sacramento directing the association to work with the staff of the National Drought Mitigation Center located at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln (UNL) to ensure that local information provided by farm advisors, county agricultural commissioners and others is appropriately reviewed and incorporated in the drought designations that are made weekly in the publication of a drought designation map. The accuracy and timely recognition of a more severe drought designation for those areas meeting the drought standard impact total disaster payments made to ranchers under the Livestock Forage Program authorized under the 2014 Farm Bill. An inaccurate designation may also negatively impact a producer’s ability to defer federal capital gains taxes associated with the sale or liquidation of livestock due to drought. CCA was successful in also bringing this policy forward for adoption by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA). Like CCA, NCBA is now also directed to work with the National Drought Mitigation Center and UNL to improve the accuracy of the U.S. Drought Monitor.

CCA recently had a meeting with officials from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) which is an agency within the U.S. Department of Commerce and a major funder of the National Drought Mitigation Center at UNL. As a result of the meeting, NOAA officials committed to help CCA address our concerns that weekly drought designations made by the National Drought Mitigation Center are not always reflective of the conditions on the ground. CCA will continue to work with officials from NOAA, staff at the U.S. Drought Mitigation Center and UNL, NCBA and other local stakeholders to improve the accuracy of the National Drought Monitor. CCA would like to specifically thank Glenn Nader, Ph.D., of the University of California Cooperative Extension for his work in assisting CCA and our members in providing on-the-ground data directly to the authors of the National Drought Monitor to improve its accuracy in the interim. New Legislative Session Means More Opportunity

While CCA always seeks to protect your livelihood against legislation that is harmful to California’s ranchers, the best defense is always a good offense. For this reason, CCA seeks to be proactive in sponsoring bills that benefit the cattle industry. In recent years, for instance, CCA has had tremendous success sponsoring two livestock theft bills, AB 924 and AB 1722, both authored by Assemblymember Frank Bigelow (R-O’Neals), which increased penalties for livestock theft and redirected funds from fines associated with livestock ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

10 California Cattleman October 2014


“My three GREATEST LOVES are my family, THE LIVESTOCK and the land.” —Tom Talbot, UC Davis ’75, Talbot Ranch, Bishop

When cattle rancher and veterinarian Tom Talbot returned to his hometown after graduating from UC Davis, he found joy in working with animals in the place he knew best. “This work is so much more than a job,” Tom says. “We love where we live and the people we serve. I couldn’t have asked for more than the life I have.” UC Davis understands that kind of dedication. We’ve partnered with experts like Tom to pioneer animal health, veterinary medicine and disease surveillance for more than a century, protecting animals and land in the state we love. Find out more at OneCalifornia.ucdavis.edu.

Our College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and School of Veterinary Medicine are educating leaders in agriculture, health and sustainability.

October 2014 California Cattleman 11


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 theft to benefit the Bureau of Livestock Identification. With the 2013-2014 legislative sessions at a close and a new legislative session on the horizon after November’s election, now is the time to start considering bills CCA may want to sponsor for the 2015-2016 legislative session. Your input is invaluable as we set out CCA’s priorities for the upcoming legislative session. If you have any ideas for new legislation to improve the legal landscape facing California’s cattle ranchers, please let us know at the CCA office. In suggesting your ideas, remember that the best legislative proposals for CCA to champion will be those that are feasible given the realities of California’s political climate. CCA Advocates for Ranchers in Local Areas Though CCA’s efforts at the state and federal level often receive a great deal of attention, it is important to remember that CCA also exists to protect your interests at the local level, where local governments have the ability to impose harsh regulations impacting your livelihood as a rancher. CCA is currently involved in a wide range of local issues, primarily before various county boards of supervisors. For instance, CCA has encouraged the boards of supervisors for Santa Clara, Stanislaus, San Joaquin and Alameda counties to dedicate funding to ensure that the Sweetwater Fire Station in the San Antone Valley can remain open year round, providing important emergency medical service and fire protection for residents and tourists in the winter and spring months, when the station is currently closed. CCA has also worked to oppose strict riparian guidelines proposed by the Sonoma County Permit and Resource Management Department which would impose overbroad and arbitrary restrictions on vegetation removal and grazing. CCA will continue to advocate on behalf of Sonoma County ranchers as those proposed guidelines move up to the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors. Additionally, CCA is currently engaging the Marin County Board of Supervisors on proposed amendments to Marin County’s Land Use Plan Amendments, and is focusing on the troublesome issues presented by mountain lions in San Mateo County and elsewhere in the state. If you’re facing an issue from your local government that impacts your ranch or livelihood, never hesitate to contact CCA staff to go to bat for you at the local level. Additionally, CCA staff and officers are currently in the midst of local Fall tour meetings, and these local meetings are an excellent opportunity for you to discuss your local issues with CCA representatives.

12 California Cattleman October 2014

COMPETETIVE LIVESTOCK MARKETING FOR OVER 30 YEARS! Sales every Monday, Wednesday and Friday plus small animal and poultry every Friday

JOIN US FOR OUR SPECIAL FEEDER SALES...

OCT. 27 • NOV. 3 • NOV. 10 AT 1 P.M.

Pay us a visit...We’re 2 miles north of Escalon VISIT US ONLINE AT: ESCALONLIVESTOCKMARKET.COM MIGUEL A. MACHADO, PRESIDENT

OFFICE (209) 838-7011 • MOBILE (209) 595-2014

FIELD REPRESENTATIVES JOE VIERA................. (209) 531-4156 THOMAS BERT .......... (209) 605-3866 TONY LUIS ................ (209) 609-6455 DUDLEY MEYER ......... (209) 768-8568

25525 LONE TREE RD. • P.O. BOX 26 • ESCALON, CA 95320 OFFICE (209) 838-7011 • FAX (209) 838-1535


Offering 125 Top Quality Bulls at the 49th Annual

Shasta Bull Sale Tuesday, November 4 • Noon

SHASTA LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD, COTTONWOOD, CALIF.

BULLS WILL BE GRADED AND SIFTED ON MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3 Hereford • Angus • Red Angus • Gelbvieh • Charolais • Composites

2014 Western Her itage Night g Featurin HOSTED BAR & STEAK DINNER

Monday, November 3

Cottonwood Community Center, Cottonwood

2014 Consignors:

Avila Cattle Co. Bagley Cattle Co. Bar-N-Bar Angus CB Ranch DeForest Livestock Genoa Livestock Kaaekrest Angus Kodiak Ranch Kohl Creek Angus Ranch Morrell Ranches Oak Knoll Herefords P & M Waltz Ranches Peets Rancho Capay Gelbvieh Sammis Ranch Scott Valley Angus Siskiyou Angus Spencer Cattle Co. Sale Book Request & Spencer Ranch Western Heritage Night Reservations Steve Smith Angus GREG OR MAUREEN THOMAS, SALE MANAGERS Sunbright Angus Ranch (541) 545-3417 OR YCROSS@CENTURYLINK.NET October 2014 California Cattleman 13


Central Oregon

Cattlemen’s Fall Cl assic

Saturday, October 18, 2014 I 1pm Donor

Donor

LARSON TAMARA 545-556 • 2/13/2005

RAISLAND BELLA 001-429 • 1/09/2010

CED -2 BW -0.8 WW 62 YW 92 MILK 26 TM 57 ME 6 HPG 11 CEM 1 STAY 10

CED -1 BW -1.3 WW 68 YW 112 MILK 16 TM 50 ME 5 HPG 11 CEM 10 STAY 10

Sire: LCC Major League A502M • Dam: Larson TAM 556-170

Sire: Red Fine Line Mulberry 26P • Dam: Raisland Rebella 429-502

Donor

Right to Flush

BIEBER DAKEL 136X • 3/08/2010

ECHO FRANCES 2519 • 2/16/2005

CED 10 BW -5.5 WW 58 YW 97 MILK 17 TM 46 ME 0 HPG 15 CEM 9 STAY 15

CED 5 BW -2.4 WW 47 YW 66 MILK 12 TM 36 ME 2 HPG 6 CEM 5 STAY 9

Sire: MESSMER Packer S008 • Dam: BASIN Dakel 7466

Sire: Beckton Lancer F442 T • Dam: Echo Ramon 2519

1 PROVEN HERD SIRE & 130 head of bred heifers and cows VF Red Angus

Jack Vollstedt I (818) 535-4034 Everett Flikkema I (406) 580-2186 Terrebonne, Oregon I eflikk@gmail.com www.vfredangus.com


Proven Herd Sire Sells

VF TAMARA A239-721 • 3/01/2013

Bred to Prospect

Sire: Leland Odyssey Y290 • Dam: Larson Tamara 721-920

CED 6 BW -3.2 WW 65 YW 109 MILK 22 TM 54 ME 12 HPG 12 CEM 10 STAY 11

REDHILL B571 JULIAN 1W • 1/02/2009 Sire: Beckton Julian GG B571 • Dam: 1BWJ Barmaid 54P

CED 16 BW -4.9 WW 59 YW 89 MILK 22 TM 52 ME 1 HPG 14 CEM 2 STAY 19

Dam Sells as Lot 1

Bred Heifer Service Sires include LSF PROSPECT 2035Z & RIGHT KIND 315, & more!

DUNN REBELLA A310 • 1/13/2013

Bella Cow Family

Sire: LSF JBOB Expectation 6034S • Dam: RAISLAND Rebella 921-606 CED 1 BW -2.6 WW 58 YW 88 MILK 19 TM 48 ME 0 HPG 9 CEM 3 STAY 11

VF TAMARA A196-545 • 2/10/2013

Sire: Larson Masterpiece 009 • Dam: Larson Tamara 545-556

CED 5 BW -1.9 WW 63 YW 94 MILK 22 TM 54 ME 3 HPG 11 CEM 5 STAY 13

Top 1%: WW & YW

Bred to Prospect

PCHFRK CHERRY SEQUOYA 1342 • 2/11/2013

Sire: PCHFRK Sequoya Mission 1853 • Dam: PITCHFORK Cherokee Noequal CED 8 BW -3.2 WW 56 YW 82 MILK 17 TM 45 ME 6 HPG 13 CEM -1 STAY 14

You Pick ‘Em!

VF PRINCESS ANN A236-054 • 3/01/2013

Sire: LJC Mission Statement P27 • Dam: Larson Princess Ann 054-409 Calving Ease Specialist

CED 1 BW 0.1 WW 84 YW 141 MILK 13 TM 55 ME 10 HPG 14 CEM 1 STAY 13

Mary Ropp (406) 581-7835 Garrett Thomas (936) 714-4591 Clint Berry (417) 844-1009 www.alliedgeneticresources.com Choice of

Alliance daughters

DUNN MS REVELATION A318 • 1/29/2013 Sire: Brown Alliance X7795 • Dam: LSF RAB Ms Revelation

VF ANNA MARIE A144-854 • 1/31/2013

Sire: Larson Masterpiece 009 • Dam: Larson Anna Marie 854-375

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October 2014 California Cattleman 15


California is no longer the only state in the West to not regulate the extraction of groundwater. What does this mean for you? by CCA Vice President of Government Relations Justin Oldfield Of the various high profile pieces of legislation that reached the Governor’s desk this year includes a series of landmark water bills that for the first time in California’s history will mandate local agencies manage groundwater basins throughout the state except for those that have been previously adjudicated. AB 1739 authored by Assemblymember Roger Dickinson (D-Sacramento) and SB 1168 and SB 1319 authored by Sen. Fran Pavley (D-Augora Hills) will require local newly formed or previously identified local groundwater sustainability agencies to manage groundwater extraction for all groundwater basins determined appropriate by the Department of Water Resources (DWR). This currently includes 127 groundwater basins that have been designated as “high” or “medium” priority published in the updated version of Bulletin 118 by DWR (See Map). While the bills appear to be founded on local control, the state has an extensive review process and may significantly influence the outcome and implementation of a local plan, especially if state agencies find a local plan to be “insufficient”. The California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) remained adamantly opposed to the entire package because not all the concerns expressed by the agricultural community were fully addressed by the bills’ authors. This issue is too important to rush and it was not appropriate to try and push the adoption of the bill package through during the last week of session which proved to be chaotic. Traveling the state and hearing from many CCA members, it is clear that ranchers throughout California are split on what to do about groundwater. Many have argued regulating groundwater extraction is not only necessary but the right thing to do because many have been impacted by increased pumping rates by their neighbors due to a reduction in surface water deliveries and the expansion of intensive agricultural into areas

16 California Cattleman October 2014

of the state that were once predominantly rangeland. Even those that argue that something must be done have a clear level of concern that government, whether state or local, will add to the problem and not provide the solutions that are necessary. To be clear, not all of California’s groundwater basins are currently “unmanaged.” Legislation passed many years ago, most notably AB 3030 and SB 1938, provide the authority for local districts to be formed to gather information and identify a comprehensive strategy that ensures that a groundwater basin does not enter a longterm trend of chronic overdraft. Many special districts have also been created by the legislature and with the consent of their constituents have been formed to regulate groundwater extraction. That said, most of these areas do not include regions of the Central Valley or other high profile groundwater basins that have been the target of the press in highlighting the impacts the ongoing drought has had on agricultural and the overall use of water by all Californians. Like any legislation involving water regulation, the devil is most certainly in the details. I want to take the time now to further outline the specific provisions of this legislation, what is required in the future and what uncertainties the bills create that will require further attention. THE FACTS The legislation requires the formation of Groundwater Sustainability Agencies (GSA) and for them to draft and implement Groundwater Sustainability Plans (GSP) for each high and medium groundwater basin identified by DWR by Jan. 31, 2020 determined to be in critical overdraft. For high and medium priority basins that are not considered to be in critical overdraft a GSP must be developed and implemented by


Jan. 31, 2022. Many groundwater agencies that already exist were recognized as their groundwater basin’s GSA by the legislation. For groundwater basins without a recognized GSA, counties or other locally formed jurisdictions may elect to serve as the GSA assuming their jurisdictional boundaries are congruent with the boundaries of a basin or sub-basin. The GSP must ensure long-term “sustainability” of a groundwater basin or sub-basin within 20 years of implementation. The GSPs must avoid undesirable results which include: • Chronic lowering of groundwater levels, but excluding overdraft during a drought if it is otherwise managed; • Significant and unreasonable reductions in groundwater storage; • Significant and unreasonable seawater intrusion; • Significant and unreasonable degradation of water quality; • Significant and unreasonable land subsidence; and • Surface water depletions that have significant and unreasonable adverse impacts on beneficial uses. Under the legislation, GSAs have been provided broad fee, compliance and enforcement authorities. GSAs are authorized to collect information on all extraction facilities pumping groundwater with a yield of more than 2 acre feet annually, institute moratoriums on new well drilling, assess fees to develop and implement GSPs and monitor groundwater pumping and aquifer levels to avoid undesirable results. In addition to fee authority, GSAs have also been given the authority to allow for the voluntary fallowing of agricultural land in addition to developing regulations for the spacing of wells. GSAs, in accordance with a recognized GSP, may control extraction by issuing allocations to landowners which may include a carryover of water from year to year if the full allocation was not used the previous year. The legislation provides clear enforcement authorities for GSAs. This includes the ability for a GSA to levy fines for those found in violation of pumping in excess of what is allowed up to $500 per acre foot. A GSA may also impose a fine of $1,000 plus $100 per day for each day an action occurred in violation of GSA bylaws or an ordinance. The State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), in consultation with DWR, will be given the authority to label a groundwater basin as “probationary” and effectively take over as the GSA if a GSA has not been formed by July 1, 2017, a GSP has not been developed for an entire groundwater basin by Jan. 31, 2020 or Jan. 31, 2022, depending on what’s required, or the SWRCB determines a GSP is insufficient or does not comply with state regulations

dictating the scope and content of a GSP. The SWRCB will continue to manage groundwater within a basin or sub basin that is deemed probationary until such time a locally formed GSA can take over groundwater management in accordance with the laws and regulations prescribed by DWR and the SWRCB. THE GOOD While not a lot can ever be spoken in favor of additional regulations, several amendments were made to both bills in the final hours of negotiations that made them better, but again, certainly not in a form that were ready for the governor’s approval. These amendments would not have happened though without the strong opposition put forward by CCA and other agricultural organizations. Specifically, the amendments sought to clarify that both bills will not impede historical surface water rights and groundwater extraction allocated to landowners by local agencies will not constitute an established water right. The bills make it clear that this power remains with a court in a formal adjudication proceeding. Other amendments were made that will not penalize a GSA formed to manage a specific sub basin if other sub basins within the entire groundwater basin are found to be probationary by the SWRCB. This is important especially for the Central Valley where various sub basins compromise one large groundwater basin. THE BAD First and foremost, the bills mandate a process that will result in the assessment of fees for most farmers and ranchers throughout California who depend on the use of groundwater. Some may already be paying these fees based on a county ordinance or some level of management by an existing groundwater authority, but most are not. A more significant issue is how the courts will shape the implementation of both bills moving forward. It was made clear to both authors and the governor on numerous occasions that the bills professed language and terms that have not already been defined by statute or case law. As such, these bills present new terms that will ultimately be defined by the courts which could result in a greater impact on California agriculture. Of the terms included in the legislation, the most remarkable error is the use of “sustainable yield” rather than the term “safe yield”. Safe yield is defined simply as the extraction of one water molecule followed by the replenishment of the aquifer by another water molecule. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

October 2014 California Cattleman 17


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17 Litigation will almost certainly follow the implementation of AB 1739, SB 1168 and SB 1319 in the future. If a party challenges that a GSP does not properly provide a “sustainable yield,” what additional actions might a court impost on a GSA to achieve “sustainable yield?” Will this include a reduction in groundwater pumping for “environmental” purposes? It is also unknown at what level a court might find groundwater pumping to be impacting surface water flows and what must be done by a GSA to mitigate the problem. These questions remained the center of the opposition for many organizations arguing that the rushed process to pass hastily drafted laws in 2014 could have significant consequences for groundwater users in the future. WHAT’S NEXT In addition to the race that will occur to form GSAs across the state, it is likely that the legislature next year will follow up this year’s bill package with additional legislation that may establish an expedited adjudication process. Most farmers and ranchers recognize that adjudications are costly and time consuming; however, adjudications provide the proper due process afforded to all landowners to protect their water rights. Rather than groundwater allocations being established by an elected or appointed GSA through the implementation of a GSP, common law adjudications will establish water rights based on historical use, need and ultimately the presentation of factual evidence to support a claim before a judge. An individual may find their water rights will be more securely protected through an adjudication proceeding. The governor and legislature have hinted that they may be open to exploring legislation next year that would further streamline common law groundwater adjudications while at the same time ensuring due process is protected. CCA will continue to argue that not only should past adjudications be exempt from the requirements established under AB 1739, SB 1168 and SB 1319, but future adjudications should also be exempt. This will not only provide landowners protection against the implementation of a GSP that may greatly affect their ability to grow crops and raise livestock, but also serve as an offramp to avoid a takeover by the SWRCB and prevent state intervention in groundwater management should a basin be labeled as probationary in the future. The authors of the legislation have professed they have brought certainty to groundwater use which is a benefit to farmers, ranchers and all Californians. The strength of a bill can only be determined by the minutia of its details. In this case, we can expect a long road ahead to ultimately determine the impact these bills will have on our industry and what the years of litigation that will likely commence with their implementation will mean for us all. 18 California Cattleman October 2014

HIGH PRIORITY MEDIUM PRIORITY LOW PRIORITY VERY LOW PRIORITY Source: Department of Water Resources Groundwater Information Center

KEY DEFINITIONS SURROUNDING NEW GROUNDWATER LEGISLATION SUSTAINABLE GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT: The management and use of groundwater in a manner that can be maintained during the planning and implementation horizon without causing undesirable results. SUSTAINABLE YIELD: The maximum quantity of water, calculated over a base period representative of long-term conditions in the basin and including any temporary surplus, that can be withdrawn annually from a groundwater supply without causing an undesirable result. UNDESIRABLE RESULT: One or more of the following effects caused by groundwater conditions occurring throughout the basin: ·

· · · · ·

Chronic lowering of groundwater levels indicating a significant and unreasonable depletion of supply if continued over the planning and implementation horizon. Overdraft during a period of drought is not sufficient to establish a chronic lowering of groundwater levels if extractions and recharge are managed as necessary to ensure that reductions in groundwater levels or storage during a period of drought are offset by increases in groundwater levels or storage during other periods. Significant and unreasonable reduction of groundwater storage. Significant and unreasonable seawater intrusion. Significant and unreasonable degraded water quality, including the migration of contaminant plumes that impair water supplies. Significant and unreasonable land subsidence that substantially interferes with surface land uses. Surface water depletions that have significant and unreasonable adverse impacts on beneficial uses of the surface water.

WATER YEAR: The period from Oct. 1 through the following Sept. 30, inclusive.


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October 2014 California Cattleman 19


VET VIEWS CRACKING DOWN ON COPPER DEFICIENCY by Anita Varga, DVM, DACVIM, Gold Coast Veterinary Service and Consulting; and John Maas, DVM, DACVN, DACVIM, Emeritis Extension Veterinarian Copper deficiency is recognized as one of the most common health problems in California and it causes significant economic losses where it occurs. Copper deficiency is a complicated disease and this article will help to answer the most common questions cattle producers ask. WHY IS COPPER IMPORTANT FOR CATTLE? Copper is a trace mineral which is required by all livestock and that has multiple functions. It plays a role in the proper function of the nervous system, fetal development and bone development, skin and claw health as well as hair coat color. Furthermore copper helps the immune system fight diseases in combination with other minerals such as zinc, magnesium and selenium. HOW DOES MY HERD BECOME COPPER DEFICIENT? There are two main mechanisms by which cattle will become copper deficient. Primary copper deficiency is produced by a low copper content in the soil and diet. Secondary copper deficiency occurs more commonly and is caused by dietary (including water) excess of other trace elements especially of molybdenum and sulfur. These inhibit the absorption or metabolism of copper in the animal. While molybdenum and sulfates are the most common interfering substances in cattle diets, other situations can drastically interfere with copper uptake. These can include soil ingestion due to overgrazing, excess cadmium, excess zinc and excess calcium, particularly as limestone. WHAT ARE THE CLINICAL SIGNS OF COPPER DEFICIENCY IN BEEF CATTLE? Copper deficiency can lead to a wide range of symptoms in cattle, which can lead to significant production losses in your herd. Often the production occurs long before symptoms of clinical copper deficiency are seen. Clinical signs of copper deficiency are usually seen in young animals and are listed below. The most visible sign is discoloration of the hair coat. Copper deficiency leads to a grey/brown coat in black cattle or rust color in red cattle, especially around the eyes. Defective development of the hair can lead to formation of thin, dry, sparse hair coat, not to be confused with the normal shedding of the winter coat. Cattle can develop lameness due to widening of the growth plates of the long bones of the legs. Copper deficiency can also lead to spontaneous fractures in some animals. Profuse diarrhea and poor weight gain or weight loss can be seen in copper deficient calves. However watery diarrhea can also be seen in cattle after turnout onto pastures with high molybdenum concentrations. Furthermore signs of diarrhea are not specific for copper deficiency and can be caused by other diseases and conditions such as 20 California Cattleman October 2014

parasites, selenium deficiency, viral infections and many other conditions. Copper deficiency can also alter the iron metabolism leading to anemia (decreased number of red blood cells) and can play a role in causing infertility. Furthermore due to its impact on immune function, cattle with copper deficiency are more susceptible to disease and less responsive to vaccines. This will become more apparent when the animal is stressed, for instance, at weaning or when sent to the feedlot. In both scenarios there is much more illness and death losses then normal. Depending on the herd the symptoms will vary, and it is not predictable how copper deficiency will manifest in any particular herd. WHY IS IT IMPORTANT TO TREAT COPPER DEFICIENT CATTLE? If copper deficiency has been diagnosed in your herd, it is important to prevent further losses in production due to decreased weight gain, weight loss and decreased immunefunction. Copper deficient cattle have poor health, decreased animal well-being, and subsequently your profit margin is decreased. HOW MUCH COPPER SHOULD BE IN THE DIET OF CATTLE? If the copper concentration of forages is <7 ppm on a dry weight basis or if the total rations are <10ppm on a dry weight basis, the forage is copper deficient, causing a primary copper deficiency. However if excessive amounts of molybdenum or sulfur are present in the plants or water, this can interfere with the copper utilization and metabolism and a secondary copper deficiency can develop. Cattle will usually perform normally when the copper to molybdenum ratio is from 5:1 to 10:1 in the diet. When the copper to molybdenum ratio falls to 2:1 or less, one can expect severe interference with copper utilization and a resulting copper deficiency to occur. It is easy to see that copper nutrition in cattle can be complicated by a number of factors. HOW CAN IS COPPER DEFICIENCY DIAGNOSED IN CATTLE? It is possible to test feed, soil and water for all the various minerals previously mentioned in this article, however it is much more practical to test the cattle to determine their copper status and make any necessary changes based on those findings. The California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory (CAHFS) reports that copper deficiency is one of the second most frequent mineral deficiency identified in their lab. Your veterinarian can help you test your cattle. One way is to take blood samples and to measure the copper


concentration in the serum or plasma. If the serum copper concentration is < 0.5 ppm in your cattle, this is diagnostic of a copper deficiency. During severe deficiency the copper level can be between 0.1-0.3 ppm. Screening the herd with serum copper analysis is quick and inexpensive; however, it is primarily of value to identify advanced deficiency situations. Copper metabolism is complicated by the fact that most of the copper in the body is stored in the liver, and it is the liver copper level that gives the true reflection of the copper status of the animal. The serum copper concentration begins to drop only after the liver copper reaches very low levels. That is why serum copper is a good screening tool; however, is not a good measurement for marginal deficiencies or for monitoring the cowherd after supplementation with copper begins. On a practical level this means that liver samples from a few cows (4 to 7) for copper analysis is necessary for monitoring the effectiveness of copper supplementation. This is important for two reasons: to be sure that the copper supplementation method(s) is solving the deficiency, and secondly because excess copper is extremely toxic to cattle and to be sure that excess copper supplementation is not occurring. Liver samples from cattle can be obtained by harvesting of a small piece (1 to 2 ounces) from normal animals that are slaughtered. Another method is your veterinarian takes a liver biopsy from live cattle (usually 4 to 7 animals are sufficient). Liver biopsy can place the animals at increased risk of Redwater disease, and your veterinarian will administer penicillin after the liver biopsy procedure to prevent death due to Redwater. ARE THERE ANY SIDE EFFECTS OF TREATING CATTLE WITH COPPER PRODUCTS? Producers need to carefully balance the amount of copper administered to cattle and need to be sure that

supplementation is required, since too much copper can lead to copper toxicity and possible death of animals. The sudden ingestion or over administration of copper may cause acute toxicity. The symptoms after ingestion are abdominal pain, diarrhea and sometimes death. Following the toxic injection of copper preparations, animals may become weak and show yellow discoloration of the mucous membranes or may be found dead. Death usually occurs within a few days in calves. Chronic copper toxicity is more common then the acute from and does occur more often in sheep than in cattle. Continued ingestion of copper in excess of the requirements leads to accumulation of copper in tissues especially in the liver for weeks or even months. Once the liver is saturated, a liberation of a high proportion of the liver copper into the blood stream can occur, resulting in extensive hemolysis (destruction of red blood cells) characterized by yellow eyes (icterus) and jaundice. Animals can die in a few hours once the red blood cells lyse. Clinical signs before death are lethargy, soft feces, and anorexia, exhibits an excessive thirst, and excrete dark urine. Also, in cattle over supplemented the animals may die acutely with no signs of illness prior to death. Treatment of copper toxicity is costly and invariably unsuccessful. DOES THE DROUGHT HAVE ANY IMPACT ON COPPER CONCENTRATIONS IN THE FEED? Drought conditions often lead to the producer to feed poor quality forages and this can certainly affect not only the animalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nutrition as well as the risk of either intoxications or deficiencies. With the use of poor quality feeds a copper deficiency can become exacerbated. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 22

A typical sympton of copper deficiency may include a rough, discolored hair coat. The calf at the left displays a healthy hair coat while the calf aboive does not. October 2014 California Cattleman 21


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21 HOW CAN I PREVENT AND TREAT COPPER DEFICIENCY IN CATTLE?

administration of soluble capsules containing cupric oxide needles (fragments of oxidized copper wire), which are retained within the stomach. Copper is slowly released from these supplements over an extended period of time. One of these products is the copper oxide bolus (Copasure®), which is given orally and usually provides supplementation for 1012 months. This product works very well; however, it has the disadvantage of having to be given via a balling gun and the capsule is water soluble, it will melt if rained on. It is important to point out that often more than one of these methods is needed to solve a severe copper deficiency problem. This is where working with your veterinarian is an essential part of this solution. You may need to monitor the copper status of the cattle with liver samples every 1-2 years to be sure the supplementation is enough but not too much to cause toxicity or death which can easily kill large numbers of cattle. Working with your veterinarian, prevention of both copper deficiency and the possibility of copper toxicity are relatively straightforward even though the metabolism of copper in cattle can be very complicated.

You can add copper salts such as copper sulfate to either a concentrate or a complete feed mixture. However, this method is most practical when the cattle are penned or in a dry lot. Salt blocks can also contain copper in varying amounts. However, the availability of copper and other trace minerals in salt blocks are often very low and do not provide adequate supplementation. For grazing animals the most satisfactory method is providing them a loose salt-based mineral supplement containing 0.1 to 0.2 percent copper. This can provide the animal with enough copper to maintain adequate and safe copper levels when consumed at 1 ounce per head per day. Injectable copper glycinate has been used successfully to treat and prevent copper deficiency in cattle. Most of the copper accumulates directly in the liver and gives protection for around 4 to 6 months or more. This product is available only through your veterinarian who must diagnose copper deficiency in your herd, write a prescription for copper glycinate and send it to a compounding pharmacy where the injectable product is manufactured. Occasionally, copper glycinate injections can cause acute death in calves or cows and must be given carefully. If you do not have experience giving copper glycinate injections be sure to consult with your veterinarian prior to injecting the cattle. Another commercially available product that contains an injectable form of copper is MultiREGISTRATION BW Min®. Multi-Min® contains much less copper than 17363945 I +2.3 the copper glycinate. The Multi-Min® product does 17363943 I +.9 17363942 I +3.3 have selenium which should last for about 30 days, 17351386 I +.5 based on the scientific literature. 17349918 I +1.6 A recently published study has shown that when 17348488 I +.8 this product is given at three time points to beef 17348484 I +2.0 calves (birth, 100 and 200 days of age) increased 17348483 I +1.7 liver copper concentrations were measured when 17348480 I +3.6 compared to age controlled calves. Another 17877429 I +.1 study has demonstrated increased liver copper concentrations 15 days after the administration of Multi-Min® to steers. However, injections every 15 days would be best for short-term strategic supplementation versus long-term herd supplementation. Another approach involves the oral 22 California Cattleman October 2014

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October 2014 California Cattleman 23


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PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER EATING MEAT FROM CATTLE FED GMOS: HOW NATURAL IS THAT? By Alison Van Eenennaam, Ph.D., Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis There has been a lot of talk recently about the labeling of food derived from genetically modified (GM) crops such as corn and soybeans. I am sure we all remember Proposition 37, the initiative to require a label on GE foods in California which was not supported by the majority of the voters in the November 2012 election. One relatively new proposal in this discussion around mandatory GM labeling is to require the labeling of milk, meat and eggs from animals that have consumed GM feed. Although animal products were exempt in Proposition 37, in March 2013 Whole Foods came out with a pledge to place a label on all products in their stores to indicate whether they contain genetically modified organisms (GMOs) by 2018. Since that time several states have included language that would include milk, meat and eggs from animals fed GM feed in their proposed mandatory GM labeling legislation. No study has revealed any differences in the nutritional profile of animal products derived from GM-fed animals. Because DNA and protein are normal components of the diet that are digested, there are no detectable or reliably quantifiable traces of GM components in milk, meat and eggs following consumption of GM feed. Said another way, there is no way to tell whether meat has been derived from an animal that has eaten GM feed. Such labeling would require supply-chain segregation and traceability. It would be quite an expensive proposition to consider keeping track of whether a beef animal consumed GM feed as some point in its life, especially given the structure and complexity of the beef industry! In 2013, GM varieties were planted on more than 95 percent of sugar beets, 93 percent of soy and 90 percent of all cotton and corn acres

26 California Cattleman October 2014

in the United States. Hundreds of independent studies have shown the compositional equivalence of the current generation of GM crops. Similarly, numerous experimental studies have consistently revealed that the performance and health of GM-fed animals are comparable with those fed isogenic non-GM crop lines. GM feed is an important topic to livestock producers because global livestock populations constitute the largest consumers of GM crops, eating 70 to 90 percent of GM crop biomass. Almost all animal products in the United States are derived from animals that have consumed GM feed. This is true for livestock populations in other countries as well. For example, the European Union livestock industries are heavily reliant on GM soybean meal imported from the United States, Argentina and Brazil. Likewise China is the largest importer of soybeans in the world, and more than 90 percent of global trade comes from countries growing GM soybeans. At the current time no country requires the labeling of milk, meat and eggs from animals that have consumed GM feed. The reason such labeling is now being proposed in the United States is that, according to some, GM feed has deleterious effects on underlying animal health. Special interest groups have touted some anecdotal evidence and a handful of small, poorly-designed feeding studies to suggest dire animal health outcomes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ranging from tumors to infertility â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as a result of GM feed consumption. In considering the basis for these claims I have explored both the scientific evidence and field experience of feeding GM feed to livestock. The United States feeds literally billions of animals on diets comprised of GM feedstuffs each year. on a very large number of animals that have


that can be brought to the quality of feedstuffs using GM been fed GM feed for multiple generations. It would be technology. reasonable to expect that if animal feed derived from GM crops had deleterious effects on these billions of animals that have been fed on diets containing predominately The author’s reviewed paper entitled “Prevalence and Impacts of GM feed, then animal performance and health attributes Genetically Engineered Feedstuffs on Livestock Populations” was in these large commercial populations would have been recently published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Animal Science. negatively impacted. To examine this question, Van Eenennaam will present The author will be addressing this topic at the 98th Annual CCA/ data on livestock productivity and health (somatic cell CCW Convention during the Zoetis Cattlemen’s College Session, at count, percent mortality, percent post-mortem carcass condemnation) from publicly-available data sources for two 4 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 21 at John Ascuaga’s Nugget in Sparks, Nev. time periods: 1983-1994 before the introduction of GM crops in 1996 and 2000-2011, a period featuring high levels of GM varieties in livestock rations based on high rates of U.S. adoption and international trade in GM crops. These data on broilers, dairy and beef cattle and swine revealed continuously improving productivity and animal health trends. Productivity Fall Female & Bull Sale trends in all livestock species continued in the positive direction they were trending prior to the introduction of GE feed, and health parameters • 11 A.M. • Baker City, slightly improved over time. Available Bull sale at 11 a.m. (Pacific). Females will sell immediately after the bulls about 2 p.m. mortality and carcass condemnation Thomas Waylon 3768 data suggest that these rates actually decreased during the 2000-2011 time Lot 617 period when livestock feed would be expected to contain high levels of GM crops. These field data sets representing billions of observations do not Thomas Ester 3031 reveal disturbing trends in the US livestock health and productivity data. Such data are in agreement with the many peer-reviewed, well-designed, controlled animal feeding studies that have reported no biologically-relevant Lot 1 difference between the nutritional attributes and safety of feed from GM plants as compared to feed derived from conventional crop varieties. GM crops are likely to be 250 Bulls - 150 Fall Bulls, 100 Spring Bull Calves increasingly important to animal 500 Females - 40 Fall Bred Heifers, 60 Fall Bred Cows, agriculture in the future. Feedstuffs 40 Spring Bred Heifers, 60 Spring Heifers Calves are a major contributor to life cycle assessments in the production of and 300 Females selling in Groups meat, milk, and eggs on a national Please contact and global scale. Plant breeding can Thomas Angus or the increase the efficiency of livestock sale managers for a production at two levels: by raising sale book 517-546-6374 the number of calories produced www.cotton-associates.com per area of land (i.e. yield), and by improving the conversion of vegetable calories into animal calories. There are numerous GM crops enhanced 42734 Old Trail Rd. • Baker City, OR 97814 for animal nutrition in the research Rob & Lori Thomas - Home: (541) 523-7958 • Office: (541) 524-9322 and development pipeline (e.g. lowRob’s Cell: (541) 403-0562 • Lori’s Cell: (541) 403-0561 lignin alfalfa). This reflects both the www.thomasangusranch.com • thomasangus@thomasangusranch.com importance of GM feed markets and the potential nutritional improvements

Thomas Angus Ranch October 16, 2014

Selling

October 2014 California Cattleman 27


SURVEY SAYS...

BELIEFS, ATTITUDES AND DEMOGRAPHICS OF CCA MEMBERSHIP by Tracy Schohr, University of California, Davis Since 1917, one organization has focused its attention on improving the businesses of California’s ranchers and beef producers. For nearly 100 years, the state’s ranchers have looked to the California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) leadership and staff to create a more favorable business environment so they can prosper in an everchanging regulatory climate. The more than 1,700 producer members of CCA were asked to participate in a survey focused on their individual management practices, business strategies, along with attitudes and beliefs. There were 507 surveys from across the state returned to the University California (UC), Davis for analysis, resulting in a 33 percent response rate. The survey respondents represented 11 million acres, approximately 33 percent of California’s grazed rangeland (CAL FIRE-FRAP 2010). The collaborative survey between CCA, University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE), California Farm Bureau Federation, Natural Resources Conservation Service, California Rangeland Conservation Coalition and UC Davis was designed to gain insight into the social, economic and ecological factors driving ranch management

28 California Cattleman October 2014

decision making. Intact rangelands are important for the long-term sustainability of livestock production enterprises and are also considered a community-asset. Working rangelands maintain open spaces, provide important flood protection, reduce the threat of catastrophic fires and offer habitat for a diversity of plant and wildlife species. The survey results suggest policy recommendations and outreach strategies to improve ranching businesses in California and conserve grazed rangelands. The first goal of the survey was to understand the socio-economic and structural characteristics of California’s ranching operations. Similar to previous agricultural surveys, most respondents were male, college educated or had formal vocational training, and were on average 62 years old. The surveyed operations were largely multigenerational businesses, with 71 percent of respondents being third generation or longer. Only 10 percent identified themselves as second-generation ranchers and 19 perent of respondents were first generation ranchers. This survey also highlights the structural diversity of California’s working ranches. Total rangelands acres used by an operation varied widely—ranging from one to nearly five million acres, with a median operation size of approximately 2,400 acres. Approximately one-half of the operations are reliant on two or more types of land ownership (i.e., privately owned, privately leased, publicly leased, or hired to


graze). Although less than 20 percent of operations included publicly leased lands (e.g., federal, state and local government administered lands), public land area comprised the majority of reported land resources utilized across all operations. Previous UC research has also demonstrated a strong dependence of Western ranching operations on public lands for economically viable livestock production enterprises. Cattle ranchers in California are primarily cow-calf based, with a median herd size of 145 cows. Nearly twothirds of operations grazed only cow-calf pairs, one-third grazed both cow-calf pairs and stocker cattle and less than 5 percent grazed only stocker cattle. Incorporating both cow-calf and stocker cattle can increase management flexibility, providing a mechanism to adaptively adjust stocking rates in response to forage availability (e.g. drought) and markets, while maintaining base cow-calf herd core genetics. The majority of respondents reported diversified income sources. Almost one-third of respondents reported other agricultural production activities (e.g., timber, vineyards, row crops) within their operation. More than three-quarters of survey respondents (79 percent) reported some level of off-ranch employment, and 56 percent of these respondents relied on off-ranch employment for more than half of their total household income. Nevertheless, nearly two-thirds of ranchers still identified ranching as a critical source of income. Agricultural production (e.g. livestock production and forage production) was the highest ranked goal by survey respondents. The primary key practices identified included matching calving to the environment, livestock water development, consulting a veterinarian on heard health plan, cross fencing, supplemental feeding and matching cattle genetics to environment. These practices are clearly linked to ranchers’ primary goals of livestock and forage production. Mid-level priority goals of ranchers encompassed supporting natural resources goals such as weed management, water quality, soil health, riparian health and wildlife. Lowest priority goals included recreation and carbon sequestration.

“Given the importance of ranch income, it is not surprising that livestock and forage production are critical goals for ranching families,” says Ken Tate, Ph.D., UCCE. “We also found that ranchers do value natural resource goals such as healthy soils and clean water and see these as supporting livestock and forage goals.” If confronted with a situation in which there were conflicts between economic viability and environmental protection, 68 percent of respondents agreed that it would be more important to protect economic viability. However, 97 percent of survey respondents agreed with the statement, “I try to conserve natural resources whenever possible.” Ranchers and farmers face a delicate situation balancing economics and the intrinsically linked environmental resources. There is a preference for economics amongst ranchers, but a majority of ranchers also agree the ranching lifestyle, a quality of life goal, is more important than economic returns. “The participation by ranchers in this survey provides valuable insight into our organization’s membership,” states Sunol rancher and CCA President Tim Koopmann. “The statistical data produced from the University California, Davis, will assist CCA staff in advocating for policies that meet the needs of ranchers, based on data not anecdotal information we have used in the past.” The survey also identified ranchers’ major concerns for sustaining working rangelands. Three major concern themes emerged from rancher responses: 1) government regulations and environmental policies (50 percent); 2) economic viability (43 percent), specifically, 25 percent of these respondents mentioned concerns with the loss of Williamson Act funding; and 3) succession planning (21 percent), with 49 percent of these respondents specifically noting estate taxes as a challenge. Additionally, 21 percent of respondents identified water supply concerns related to both weather and policyrelated issues as a concern. Respondents also

...CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

October 2014 California Cattleman 29


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 29 specifically expressed concerns for the future of water resources: 44 percent of ranchers stated that drought will be more influential in their management plans in the next 10 years than it has been in the past 10 years. For 51 percent of respondents, the last drought (prior to spring 2011) that affected their operation had occurred within the

previous two water years (2009-2010 and 20102011). “Our team is continuing to bridge the gap between science, policy and management. As a next step, we’ve conducted 100 on-ranch interviews to dig into the on-the-ground challenges facing California’s ranchers, and demonstrate win-wins for agricultural and natural resource goals,” states Leslie Roche, Ph.D. UC Davis. “This fall, we’ll be following up with rangeland health and productivity monitoring with participating ranchers.” Information from the survey demonstrates the demographic diversity of ranchers from across the state along with a variation in attitudes and beliefs. One common theme from the survey was the support for CCA and the important role the organization plays for the state’s beef producers in legislative oversight. The vast majority of CCA members looked to the association for action on lobbying and advocacy on policies and government regulations. The membership also looks to the organization for providing public outreach and producer education. UC Davis is constantly working with local cooperative extension advisors and CCA to develop and adapt producer education and diversify outreach efforts based on ranchers’ information needs. The key findings from this survey are being incorporated into a series of scientific and popular press articles that focus on the importance of decision making by ranchers to sustain California’s’ working rangelands economic contribution to the state and the community assets they provide (e.g. open space, clean water, wildlife habitat). At the 2014 CCA/CCW Convention in Sparks, Nev., a presentation is scheduled for a more in-depth look at the survey results and subsequent rancher interviews that are taking place throughout the state. In the meantime, more information on the survey and next steps is available at http://rangelandwatersheds.ucdavis. edu/. A sincere thank you to all the ranchers who took the time to complete the survey; your responses are valuable and greatly appreciated. 30 California Cattleman October 2014

Oak Knoll

CHARLES FULLER

CARGILL BEEF FRESNO, CA

COWBOY COMEDY

“be careful where you step ... My Dad says there is a lot of blood, sweat and tears in this ranch.”


Are You Prepared? THE ESSENTIALS OF EMERGENCY PLANNING by Ridley Block Operations Animal Nutritionist Jackie Nix As beef producers know all too well, disasters come in many forms – hurricane, flood, tornado, fire, blizzard or ice storm, just to name a few. You will likely have to deal with one or more of these situations at some point. No matter where you live or what kind of livestock you raise, everyone can benefit from having a well-prepared disaster plan. As they say – failing to plan is the same as planning to fail. Here are a few tips on what you can do to plan ahead. Familiarize yourself with possible disasters for your location, including manmade situations like chemical spills near highways. Develop a written plan of action for each scenario. Include a list of resources (livestock haulers, veterinarians, American Red Cross, county cooperative extension agent, etc.) along with their contact numbers. These action plans should be kept with your disaster kit in a secure but easily accessible place. Photograph/video all structures and/or equipment and keep this in your disaster kit. It might also be useful to keep a list of VIN or serial numbers of equipment in your disaster kit along with your insurance information. Review insurance coverage and make sure you have adequate coverage, especially if you have made improvements or additions since the last review.

ITEMS TO CONSIDER WHEN FORMING YOUR ACTION PLANS • Do your livestock have permanent identification? Do you have a written inventory of all tag/tattoo numbers? This will help recovery if they escape or are lost in the disaster. Another good idea is to photograph and inventory your animals, especially those of highest value. In the event that only a portion of the animals can be saved, make sure that these are identified as high priority in your Disaster Plan. • Do you require electricity to feed or water your livestock? If yes, do you have a back-up generator capable running of all necessary equipment? • Have you identified off-site locations for possible evacuation? Identify these in advance, and

familiarize yourself with their rules and procedures. Possibilities include: fairgrounds, stockyards, boarding stables, veterinary facilities and other farms. • Do you own trailers/trucks capable of hauling all of your livestock to another location? If not, locate suitable transportation well in advance of an emergency. • If evacuation isn’t possible, where is the best location(s) on your property for animal confinement? Make sure that you have enough feed and water for a minimum of 48 hours at this location(s). • Do you have temporary fencing materials that don’t require electricity at the ready? These are but a few tips and suggestions. Each potential disaster will have its own unique challenges. Disasters are an inevitable fact of life; however, with a little planning you can make sure that you are properly prepared to deal with them and provide the best care possible for your livestock.

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October 2014 California Cattleman 31


Join us at the 98th Annual CCA/CCW Convention

November 20-22, John Ascuaga’s Nugget, Sparks, Nev.

Larry Gran Zoetis

Musician Chad Bushnell

Richard Linhart, DVM Zoetis Alison Van Eenennaam, Ph.D.

UC Davis

Duane Lenz Cattle-Fax

Event Registration REGISTRATION IS AVAILABLE ONLINE OR VIA MAIL. VISIT WWW.CALCATTLEMEN.ORG TO REGISTER ONLINE OR FILL OUT THE FORM AT RIGHT AND MAIL TO THE CCA OFFICE: 1221 H STREET, SACRAMENTO, CA 95814. REGISTRATION PRICES INCREASE AFTER NOV. 5.

Event Accomodations RESERVE YOUR ROOM TODAY! ROOM RESERVATIONS ARE DUE BY OCT. 29 West Tower Deluxe Rooms = $74 per night East Tower Premier Rooms = $80 per night Call: 800-648-1177 • Mention Group Code: GCCA14 for discounted rate

Questions? FOR REGISTRATION QUESTIONS, CONTACT THE CCA OFFICE AT (916) 444-0845. FOR TRADE SHOW INQUIRIES, CONTACT KARISSA HASSER VIA E-MAIL: KJ@EXPOINTEL.COM OR (530) 520-6933. 32 California Cattleman October 2014


Thursday, November 20, 2014 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. 12 – 5 p.m. 12 – 5 p.m. 1 – 4 p.m. 1 – 4 p.m. 1 – 2 p.m. 2 – 5 p.m. 4 – 5 p.m. 4 – 7 p.m. 7 – 9 p.m.

UC Davis Working Group CCA Scholarship Interviews Registration Opens California Rangeland Trust Board Meeting YCC Officer Interviews Media Training CBCIA Finance Meeting CBCIA Board Meeting CCW Executive Committee CCA Officers Meeting CCA Local President’s Reception

6 a.m. – 6 p.m. 7 a.m. – 3 p.m. 6:30 – 7:30 a.m. 7:30 – 9 a.m. 7:30 – 9:30 a.m. 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. 9:45 –10:30 a.m. 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. 12 – 1 p.m. 1 – 4 p.m. 1 – 4 p.m. 1:30 - 3:30 p.m. 4– 5 p.m.

Registration Exhibitor Move-In Prayer Gathering CCA Finance Mtg (followed by Convention Cmte) CCW Presidents’ Breakfast CCA Cattle Health & Well Being/BQA CCA Cattle Marketing & International Trade CCA Federal Lands CCW Heritage Mtg California CowBelle of the Year Lunch Beef Promotion Lunch CCA Property Rights & Environmental Mgmt CCA Agriculture & Food Policy/Tax & Credit CCW Edcuation Workshop Cattlemen’s College Session #1 Sponsored by CBCIA: Eating Meat From Cattle Fed GMOs CCA Membership Committee CCA General Resolutions Meeting Cattle-PAC Reception YCC Meeting CCW President’s Reception Allied Industry Council Wine & Cheese Reception CCA Dinner Cocktail Reception & Entertainment By the California Rangeland Trust

Friday, November 21

4 – 5 p.m. 4 – 6 p.m. 5 – 6 p.m. 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. 6 – 7 p.m. 7 – 9 p.m. 9 – 11 p.m.

Saturday, November 22

6 a.m. – 6 p.m. Registration 6:30 - 7:30 a.m. CCA Nominating Committee 7 – 9 a.m. CCW Awards Breakfast 7 a.m. – 2 p.m. Allied Industry Council Trade Show Wake Up! Coffee Break 7 – 8 a.m. Bloody Mary Bar 7 – 10 a.m. 8 – 9 a.m. Cattle-Fax Breakfast with Duane Lenz 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. LMRF Meeting 9:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. CCW Board Meeting 9:15 – 10:15 a.m. Cattlemen’s College Session # 2 Sponsored by Zoetis : Genemax Advantage 10:15 – 11:15 a.m. Cattle-PAC Meeting 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. POSSEE Mtg 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Cattlemen’s College Session # 3 Sponsored by Zoetis: Latest Vaccine Technologies 12 – 1:30 p.m. Lunch in the Trade Show 12:30 – 1 p.m. Weather Outlook by Meteorologist Brian Bledsoe 1 – 4 p.m. CCA Board & Membership Meeting 5 – 6 p.m. CCA President’s Reception 7 – 10 p.m. CCA/CCW Awards Banquet

ALL INCLUSIVE REGISTRATION

$275

# TICKETS TOTAL

Save $25! Includes full registration, Cattlemen’s College, meals. *denotes inclusion

FULL REGISTRATION

$85

Includes access to meetings, tradeshow, wine and cheese reception, happy hour, Wake Up! Coffee Break and lunch on Saturday.

YOUNG CATTLEMEN’S REGISTRATION $25 Full registration for young members only.

FULL REGISTRATION REQUIRED FOR BADGE AND ACCESS TO MEETINGS AND TRADE SHOW

Friday, November 21

*CATTLEMEN’S CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP $5 juice and coffee will be served

CCW PRESIDENT’S BREAKFAST

$10

Coffee and pastries will be served

CCW COWBELLE OF THE YEAR LUNCH $25 *CCA BEEF PROMOTION LUNCH

$25

*CATTLEMEN’S COLLEGE SESSION 1

$10

*CCA DINNER

$55

*CRT COCKTAIL RECEPTION

$25

Eating Meat From Cattle Fed GMOs

Entertainment by Chad Bushnell; includes 2 drink tickets

Saturday, November 22 CCW AWARDS BREAKFAST

$25

*CCA CATTLE-FAX BREAKFAST

$25

*CATTLEMEN’S COLLEGE SESSION 2

$10

*CATTLEMEN’S COLLEGE SESSION 3

$10

* CCA/CCW AWARDS BANQUET

$50

Market Update with Duane Lenz Genemax Advantage

Latest Vaccine Technologies

2014-2015 CATTLE-PAC MEMBERSHIP $200 Please write separate check to Cattle-PAC

PRE-REGISTRATION PRICES REFLECTED HERE WILL INCREASE AFTER NOV. 5

TOTAL

NAME(S) ATTENDING___________________________ ______________________________________ PAYMENT METHOD

CHECK

CARD #_________ _________ __________ _________ EXP. DATE: ______/______ CARDHOLDER’S NAME_________________________ CARDHOLDER’S PHONE________________________ October 2014 California Cattleman 33


DEFENDING PUBLIC LANDS RANCHING Annual PLC Meeting held in colorful Colorado

public Lands Council Meeting

by CCA Director of Government Relations Kirk Wilbur

P ublic Lands Council members and affiliates throughout the West convened at the Sky Ute Resort in Ignacio, Colo., from Sept. 3 to Sept. 6 to discuss pressing issues facing public lands permittees. Among those in attendance were CCA staff and public lands permittees Mike Byrne, Tulelake, and Billy Flournoy, Likely, representing the California delegation at this year’s meeting. The event began on Wednesday evening with a welcome barbecue at the Gosney family ranch in Ignacio, where PLC members from Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington and Wyoming had a chance to mingle and catch up with one another over brisket and lamb. The next morning, the business of the annual meeting began in earnest. Though the meeting addressed a wide range of topics impacting public lands permittees, two issues emerged as clear standouts, coming up time and again: the potential listing of the sage grouse under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) and the failure of the federal government to properly manage wild horses. Sage grouse took center stage early during the first session of the meeting, as Scott Horngren of the Western Resources Legal Center (WRLC) provided a presentation on potential responses to combat the possible ESA listing of the sage grouse. Horngren examined the possibility of a legal challenge in the event that the species does become federally listed as endangered—a possibility which looks likely. Specifically, Horngren drew attention to the possibility of challenging the critical habitat designation for sage grouse, pointing out that past challenges to critical habitat designations have been successful in narrowing the habitat designated as critical for species such as the spotted owl and the willow flycatcher. Because of the importance of the critical habitat designation, Horngren also encouraged ranchers and ranching advocates to provide comments to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Marine Fisheries 34 California Cattleman October 2014

Service regarding their proposed changes to critical habitat designation regulations, which would include a redefinition of what constitutes “adverse modification” of such critical habitat. Comments on the topic, which CCA is engaged in, are due on Oct. 9. Wild horses commanded attention throughout the three-day meeting. Wild horses on public lands and adjacent private lands have greatly reduced available forage for cattle in many parts of the West. In California’s Modoc National Forest, wild horses have presented a significant problem for CCA members Byrne and Flournoy and many others, and the PLC meeting presented an excellent opportunity to discuss the issue with others in the Western United States. The PLC meeting also provided CCA staff and members an opportunity to work with the WRLC on the case American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign v. Vilsack. CCA is intervening in the case to defend the U.S. Forest Service’s (USFS) wild horse management plan, which, if upheld, will allow USFS to better manage the horses and reduce their impacts upon ranching. PLC members from a number of other western states, including Utah, Nevada and Wyoming, shared their frustrations about mismanagement of wild horses, and PLC Executive Director Dustin Van Liew, Washington, D.C., discussed discussions with Rep. Rob Bishop (R-UT) to get the House of Representatives’ Subcommittee on Public Lands and Environmental Regulation to address the issue. Caroline Lobdell of WRLC addressed both sage grouse and wild horses during her update on PLC litigation. WRLC is in the process of preparing an amicus curiae brief for wild horse litigation in Utah, and is working on another amicus curiae brief for the wild horse litigation currently underway in Nevada (though not on behalf of PLC). Additionally, WRLC is engaged in wild horse litigation on behalf of PLC and CCA regarding wild horse management on the Modoc National ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 36


CLASSIC HEREFORD

SALE & SHOW

Sale Date: Show: Date

Saturday, November 15 Sunday, November 16 12:00 Noon

All age appropriate cattle sold on Saturday and purchased by a junior are eligible to show on Sunday. CJLA Sanctioned Breed Show (Heifers Only).

Location:

Placer County Fairgrounds — Roseville, California

Great progressive Hereford sires!

Golden oak outcross 18u

ML Ms Investor Gal A5 This heifer was the 2013 Reserve Champion Sale Heifer in last year's sale. Consigned by Macfarlane Livestock (Cottonwood, CA) and purchased by Allyson Spears (Brentwood, CA). She was Division Champion at the 2014 National Western Nugget Junior Show.

These are reference sires — there will be progeny of these two sires.

For info, contact: B.J. Macfarlane (530) 518-1024 e mail: bjherefords@yahoo.com or Shelley Truelock (209) 694-5111 e-mail: dstruelock@comcast.net

nJW 98s r117 rIBeYe 88X et

Featuring Show heiFerS and Bred heiFerS From Some oF the top BreederS on the weSt CoaSt. SireS and

donorS will Be repreSented From Some oF the top hereFord genetiCS in the Country.

in addition, there will Be a FanCy Set oF Show SteerS, aS well aS emBryoS.

October 2014 California Cattleman 35


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 34 “roasted” by current and former staff and officers, as well Forest as discussed above. Though WRLC is not as his daughter Lisa Pederson. Lee was also presented with a currently engaged in the sage grouse issue, Lobdell belt buckle in appreciation of his service as president and his acknowledged that they will likely become involved in many years of dedication to PLC. litigation once a final regulation on endangered species The next morning, roughly 30 attendees turned out designation is announced—either challenging a listing for a range tour on Lee’s nearby ranch, sponsored by Dow decision or intervening to support a decision not to list the AgroSciences. During the tour, Lee discussed his efforts in species. collaboration with Dow AgroSciences to treat sage brush Another significant topic addressed at the meeting and increase forage on his rangeland. was the proposed regulation by the U.S. Army Corps of Overall, the Annual PLC Meeting was a great success, Engineers (Corps) and the U.S. Environmental Protection and provided excellent direction for ranchers and advocacy Agency (EPA) to amend the definition of “Waters of the United States” (WOTUS), a proposal that would significantly groups on how best to address important issues like the sage grouse and wild horse management over the coming year. expand the jurisdiction of the federal government and which would thus burden ranchers with additional  Certified Organic permitting requirements for routine ranching activities.  Conventional Ashley McDonald, Environmental Counsel for the National Cattlemen’s Premium Livestock Feeds CATTLE MINERALS Beef Association (NCBA), provided an overview of the proposed rule and encouraged ranchers to submit comments to the EPA and Corps opposing the rule, and to encourage their local and state officials to engage on the issue, as well. CCA encourages you to submit comments on the proposed regulation, and NCBA has provided sample comments (which you can edit to tell your own story) and a simple portal for submitting comments at www. beefusa.org. Comments are due by Oct. 20, and CCA will also be submitting detailed comments. We offer mineral During the Annual Meeting, PLC supplements for every adopted a resolution directing PLC feeding program! officers and staff to submit a proposal to the Public Lands Endowment Trust to  Conventional expend no less than $200,000 on a public  Organic GrassGrass-Fed* relations campaign to bring awareness to the many benefits of utilizing public * - All ingredients are either lands for grazing. “We hope this longcertified organic or OMRI listed! term project will help bridge the gap between our producers and consumers across the country,” Van Liew said. The meeting also saw the election of PLC’s new slate of officers. Brenda Richards of Idaho, who operates a Sales - Wade McIntosh cow-calf operation in Owyhee County,  Three Sources of Vegetable 530-200-0054 began her two-year term as president. Proteins www.baraleinc.com Utah rancher Dave Eliason, former  Intellibond® Trace Minerals facebook.com/baraleinc PLC secretary/treasurer, took over Richards’ post as vice president, and  Selenium Yeast Oregon rancher Bob Skinner was elected Also Available:  Intake Limiter  Availa®4 from Zinpro® as the new secretary/treasurer of the  Best Value on the Market  Rumensin® organization.  Delivers Consistent Results!  …. Much More! Outgoing president Brice Lee of Colorado was honored at the President’s P.O. Box 699, 1011 5th Street, Williams, CA. 95987 • (888) 258-7333 Banquet Friday evening, where he was 36 California Cattleman October 2014


October 2014 California Cattleman 37


IBBA LAUNCHES BRANGUS BUILT to Assist Commerical Producers The International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA) launched the Brangus Built commercial program designed to help producers identify and garner the added value associated with the Brangus influence of their commercial replacements. “The Brangus Built program will give producers who use Brangus genetics an opportunity to highlight those cattle so they can be easily identified,” said Jason Bates, IBBA Director of Field Services and Commercial Marketing. “Most importantly it will help commercial producers looking to purchase Brangus influenced replacements identify those cattle and rest assured they are not just a black or red cow with a little ear.” Brangus Built cattle are commercial cattle that are identified as having high valued Brangus influence. The eligible cattle will be assigned ear tags that have the Brangus Built logo along with an individual ID number as well as plenty of room for the producer to add any identification that fits into their program (example: herd ID, dam and/or sire ID, lot number). These tags can stay with that female indefinitely. For more than 65 years, the Brangus breed has been

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38 California Cattleman October 2014

known to excel in maternal traits. Brangus cattle have the built-in heterosis from the combination of Angus and Brahman genetics the allows them to transcend other breeds in terms of longevity, fertility, udder soundness, early breed back and other important maternal traits while still maintaining outstanding performance and carcass characteristics. The current lows in the nation’s cow inventory and price of feeder cattle has caused a surge in the price of replacement females because so many producers are sending the heifers to the feedlots. The Brangus Built program will help producers maximize their return because a buyer will be willing to spend more knowing those cattle have been identified as having Brangus influence. In the future, as commercial replacement female prices level off, it will be vital for producers to have an avenue that identifies the added value of their product. The Brangus Built program was designed with that in mind. Contact Jason Bates at (210) 696-8231 to find out about using Brangus genetics and how you can get enrolled for your FREE tags for a limited time, or visit us at www. gobrangus.com for more information.


ASA RELEASES NEW North American Shorthorn Genetic Evaluation In September, the American Shorthorn Association (ASA), based in Omaha, Neb., announced that the “New” North American Shorthorn Genetic Evaluation is finally complete, representing over a year of diligence and effort by the ASA Board and staff. These expected progeny differences (EPDs) were calculated by the American Simmental Association, Bozeman, Mont., as part of their multi-breed genetic evaluation. The first thing producers will notice is that the EPD breed averages are far different in some columns, not much in others. The entire set of EPDs are now on the same “base” as Simmental, Red Angus, Gelbvieh and a growing number of other breeds. As a result, these EPD numbers are comparable with those breeds within the columns that are identical (BW vs.

We Believe... ...our goal is to be more than just a semen supplier, but a genetics partner that creates pregnancies that are designed to meet your desired outcome. Low birth weights, high grid values and female replacements that improve your bottomline.

Calving ease. Carcass. Cows.

BW, Marbling vs. Marbling). Even still, Shorthorn calculates a $CEZ, Simmental does not; Simmental calculates Stayability EPD, Shorthorn does not. All said, you will still find differences breed to breed in what is presented. Another major change involves the $Indexes. These are complex math equations aimed at helping breeders and buyers select for multiple traits at the same time, avoiding the pitfalls of single-trait selection. Though the relative economic differences between the traits remain constant in the formulas, the breed base is now far different. Consequently, the $ Values have changed significantly, but their percentile rank within an index and even each EPD should be relatively similar. In other words, if a bull was in the top 10 percent for YW and $Feedlot in the previous evaluation,

the bull should still be at or near the top 10 percent in this evaluation. The power of this data still lies in the hands of the breeders. ShorthornPlus cattle will have better EPD predictions, but ONLY if the non-Shorthorn side of the pedigree is built in the registry system. Remember, Angus, Chianina, Maine-Anjou, club calf bulls and many other composite sires are represented in this evaluation in addition to Shorthorn, Gelbvieh, Red Angus and Simmental. In the end, bull and female buyers can search for genetics from multiple breeds and compare the performance profiles against one another. Within the Shorthorn breed, we have known our strengths and weaknesses versus our competitors. Now we get to gauge our genetic progress moving forward.

We Believe... ...our goal is to be more than just a semen supplier, but a genetics partner that creates pregnancies that are designed to meet your desired outcome. Low birth weights, high grid values and female replacements that improve your bottomline.

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1-800-278-8254 www.selectsiresbeef.com contact@allwestselectsires.com

October 2014 California Cattleman 39


SOLVING THE PUZZLE: UC DAVIS UNRAVELS BLUETONGUE MYSTERY The bluetongue virus, which causes a serious disease that costs the cattle and sheep industries in the United States an estimated $125 million annually, manages to survive the winter by reproducing in the insect that transmits it, report veterinary scientists at the University of California, Davis. The findings solve a century-old mystery and are particularly significant as global climate change brings more moderate winter temperatures around the world. The new study appears Sept. 12 in the journal PLOS ONE. “By conducting this epidemiological study on a commercial dairy farm in Northern California, we were able to demonstrate that the virus overwinters in female midges that had fed on an infected animal during the previous season,” said lead author Christie Mayo, a veterinarian and postdoctoral researcher in the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. “This discovery has important ramifications for predicting the occurrence of bluetongue in livestock and, we hope, for eventually developing controls for the disease,” said coauthor James MacLachlan, a UC Davis veterinary professor and viral disease expert.

Western Hemisphere in the early 1950s at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.

A SEASONAL MYSTERY

In California, bluetongue is most prevalent when midges are abundant in late summer and fall, but there has been speculation over how the virus survives through the winter. When temperatures turn cold and the biting-midge populations plummet, transmission appears to cease for more than six months, but the virus reappears when temperatures warm the following season.

FINDINGS FROM CALIFORNIA DAIRY

The researchers monitored cows and midges on a Northern California dairy farm for more than a year. They documented, for the first time, the presence of genetic material for the bluetongue virus in female midges that were collected during two consecutive winter seasons. The bluetongue virus was widespread in both the dairy cows and the midges from August to November. Surprisingly, however, the researchers

ABOUT BLUETONGUE

Bluetongue disease, first identified during the 1800s in southern Africa, is transmitted by the Culicoides biting midge, a tiny gnat sometimes referred to as a “no-seeum.” The disease mostly sickens sheep but also infects cattle and goats, as well as deer and other wild ruminants. In the U.S., the virus’ greatest economic impact is in the cattle industry, because it is bigger than the domestic sheep industry and most adversely impacted by international trade barriers related to bluetongue. The disease does not pose a threat to human health. The name bluetongue derives from the swollen lips and tongue of affected sheep, which may turn blue in the late stages of the disease. The virus that causes bluetongue was first isolated and identified in the 40 California Cattleman October 2014

discovered that the virus was also present in female midges captured in February of both 2013 and 2014. There was no sign of infection in the dairy cattle being studied. The researchers concluded that those long-lived female midges had been infected with the bluetongue virus during the previous warm-weather season. They were carrying the virus through the winter months and would later in the season once again transmit it to cows on the dairy. The research team notes that the bluetongue virus may also have additional, yet-to-be discovered, modes of overwintering in temperate regions. Other members of the research team were William K. Reisen and Cameron J. Osborne, both of UC Davis; E. Paul J. Gibbs of the University of Florida, Gainesville; Bradley A. Mullens of UC Riverside; and Ian A. Gardner of Atlantic Veterinary College, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada. Funding for the study was provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture and the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine’s Center for Food Animal Health.

ANGUS MEANS BUSINESS. A reliable business partner is difficult to come by. At the American Angus Association®, a team of skilled Regional Managers can guide your operation toward success. Contact Terry Cotton to locate Angus genetics, select marketing options tailored to your needs, and to access Association programs and services. Put the business breed to work for you. To subscribe to the Angus Journal, call 816.383.5200. Watch The Angus Report on RFD-TV Monday mornings at 7:30 CST. © 2013-2014 American Angus Association

Terry Cotton, Regional Manager 3201 Frederick Avenue St. Joseph, MO 64506 816.390.3227 tcotton@angusjournal.com Arizona California Nevada Utah

3201 Frederick Ave. • St. Joseph, MO 64506 816.383.5100 • www.ANGUS.org


2014 CATTLE-PAC FUNDRAISER Case IH Scout Utility Vehicle $100 per ticket or 3 Tickets for $250 Raffle drawing will be held on Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014 at the 98th Annual CCA/CCW Convention in Reno, NV.

CONTACT THE CCA OFFICE TODAY TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN GET TICKETS!

Contributions to Cattle-PAC (FPPC #760980) are limited to $6,800 per calendar year per contributor. The limit includes both monetary contributions and donated items (at fair market value). Funds will be used to make political contributions to state candidates, and for other political purposes. Contributions shall be voluntary and are non-tax deductible.

MSRP $12,000 October 2014 California Cattleman 41


VIETHEER TO RECIEVE MEMORIAL AWARD AT COW PALACE Cattlemen and women with a love for the showring often exhibit traits that are hard to find in the world today. These kinds of individuals wake up early, go to bed late and can usually be found with a smile on their faces in the hours in between. This year at the Grand National Stock Show will mark the third time the Darrel Chapman Stockman Award will be presented in memory of a man who exemplified leadership, friendship, hardwork and loyalty to the agriculture way of life. Darrel Chapman, was a long time manager of the Grand National Rodeo, Horse and Stock Show at the Cow Palace in San Francisco, where he himself had been an exhibitor since the age of 10. He is remembered as a man of strong convictions. Those who knew him best say Chapman could be counted on to be decisive, quick witted and genuinely interested in the lives of others. He made friends wherever he went, and never passed up an opportunity to strike up a conversation or share a few words of wisdom. Born in Merced and raised in LaGrange, Chapman spent his early years working the family cattle ranch with his dad and brother. Darrel and his brother Jack were peerless in their careers as young cattlemen, often winning competitions against men twice their age. They traveled the country showing cattle, and Darrel later took on the added challenge of judging cattle at national shows. In 1971, with his wife Shelley, he accepted the position of manager of the Grand National Rodeo, Horse and Stock Show where he was known for his dedication to the stock show and California cattlemen. It seems only fitting that the this year’s recipient of the Darrel Chapman Stockman Award be presented to an individual similar to Chapman in so many ways. Few cattlemen have as many friends as this year’s recipient, Jim Vietheer – better known simply as “Big Jim,” – and those closest to him best say he is just as genuine as he seems. Mel Hansen, one of Vietheer’s longest-time friends, mentors and confidants says Big Jim is known for all

the things every true cattlemen wants to be known for. He knows cattle like the back of his hand and folks nation wide know him as someone who would give the shirt off his back to help anyone in need. Raised in Petaluma, Vietheer got his start in 4-H where he began showing Herefords. He graduated from Rancho Cotate High School in 1971 and attended Santa Rosa Junior College. For 28 years, he worked for the City of Sacramento, retiring in 2008. Vietheer started Big Jim’s Cattle Service in 1989 and is also a representative for WW Livestock Equipment and Paul Scales. Since 1994, Vietheer and the Hansen family have been partners in the HAVE Angus enterprise in which the team has exhibited cattle throughout the nation and raises Angus bulls for commercial cattlemen. According to Vietheer, who was a close acquaintance of Chapman, the award is a tremendous honor. “Darrel Chapman was very livestock saavy. He was great judge and was very exhibitor friendly in his role at the Cow Palace,” Vietheer said. “It is very much an honor I am very humbled to be thought of for this award. It means a lot. Cow Palace has been a big part of my life since the early 60s. I even met my wife there and to see it rejuventated is very

©Vietheer

special to me and my family.” Vietheer serves on the California State Fair Livestock Advisory Committee and is a certified beef cattle judge who has judged open and junior livestock shows throughout the West. He is a past president of the California Angus Association and currently serves as second vice president of the Western States Angus Association. In 2010, he received the California Angus Association’s Distinguished Cattleman Award. Vietheer lives in Wilton with his wife Karen and daughter Elizabeth. His son Richard and his family reside in Cottonwood. Vietheer will be honored at the Grand National Rodeo on Oct. 17. CCA extends congratualtions to him and his family for this well-deserved honor.

©THD

Pictured above ( Lto R) at the Red Bluff Bull Sale are:: Karen Vietheer, Mel Hansen, Elizabeth Vietheer, Darrell Hansen and Richie Vietheer.

42 California Cattleman October 2014


CALIFORNIA CHAMBER HONORS ORANGE COUNTY RANCHER In the California ranching industry, few honors are as notable as the California Chamber of Commerce’s Livestock Person of the Year. This year Orange County rancher Gilbert Aguirre, San Juan Capistrano, joins an elite club of agriculturists to receive the recognition. As the Rancho Mission Viejo Executive Vice President of Ranch Operations, Aguirre is responsible for the ranching, farming, agricultural and industrial leasing, as well as the daily land management of the historic 23,000-acre Rancho Mission Viejo, the largest familyheld landholding in Orange County and the last remaining active cattle ranch in the region. A respected member of the Rancho Mission Viejo family for 47 years, Aguirre sits on the ranch’s executive committee and has participated in all major land use decision-making for more than four decades. Aguirre is also an owner and managing partner of a 14,000-acre ranch near Cuyama. In addition, he has served as the managing partner of the North Fork Cattle Company for 40 years; and in that role, was an owner and general manager of the historic PX Ranch at North Fork, Nev., for 30 years. Presented on an annual basis, the Livestock Person of the Year award recognizes the local, state and national leadership, achievements, and professional service of a man or woman within the California livestock industry. The honoree is determined by a committee of peers from the California Cattlemen’s Association, California Beef Council, Western United Dairymen, California Wool Growers, California Pork Producers, California Farm Bureau Federation, past award recipients, and recognized leaders in the California agricultural industry as well as the California Chamber of Commerce. The California Livestock Person of the Year has been an annual honored bestowed on its best and finest cattlemen since 1950. Aguirre will receive the honor during the annual Cattlemen’s Day celebration conducted on Oct. 18, during the 2014 Grand National Livestock Exposition, Horse Show and Rodeo at the Cow Palace in San Francisco. “I am honored and humbled to receive this award,” said Aguirre. “I join an impressive list of past recipients who have helped shape the state’s ranching, farming and livestock industry over the decades. I thank Tony Moiso and the Ranch Mission Viejo family for allowing me to lead their ranching and agricultural operations for the past 47 years. I also

recognize the support of my family, especially my daughter, Lissa Freese, my son Gilbert Jr. (1958-1995), and my grandchildren, Tara and Brent, in joining me on the journey.” Born in Tucson, Ariz., Aguirre is a sixth generation rancher and well-respected leader in the ranching industry. He has served as an officer of the Board of Directors for the California Cattlemen’s Association, past president of Producers Livestock Marketing, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Past Director-National Livestock Marketing, Denver, Colo. He is a board member of the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City, Okla., and is a member of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association. As the president and general manager of the annual Rancho Mission Viejo Rodeo Committee, Aguirre was elected into the California Rodeo Hall of Fame in 2008. In 2009, Aguirre received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the University of Arizona for his unwavering support of the University’s College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. Throughout Orange County and within the city of San Juan Capistrano, Aguirre enjoys a long history of community involvement including serving as a member of the Executive Board for the J.F. Shea Therapeutic Riding Center Committee, a FounderDirector of Capital Bank, and a member of the Mission Preservation Foundation for the Mission San Juan Capistrano. He is a long-time supporter of the Heart of Jesus Retreat Center in Santa Ana, operated by the Sisters of the Society Devoted to the Sacred Heart. In addition, he is a member, director, and four-time “El Presidente” of El Viaje de Portolá, Rancho Mission Viejo’s annual trail ride, and an honorary member and director of Los Rancheros Visitadores trail ride in the Santa Ynez Valley. Aguirre served as the Founding President of the Donna O’Neill Conservancy, situated on 1,200 acres of Rancho Mission Viejo. The Conservancy is now part of The Reserve at Rancho Mission Viejo, destined to become one of the largest private reserves in the state. “My family and I owe Gilbert Aguirre a great deal of gratitude,” said Rancho Mission Viejo President and CEO Tony Moiso. “Under Gilbert’s direction, our ranching operation in Orange County has endured and prospered. We’ve become leaders in the citrus industry, recognized stewards of our land, and local caretakers of the cowboy way of life. We are so blessed to have Gilbert

GILBERT AGUIRRE

Aguirre as a member of our ranch family; and we join the ranching, farming and livestock industry’s leadership and the California Chamber of Commerce in honoring our great friend, Gilbert, as Livestock Person of the Year.” Fourteen years ago, Aguirre and the Rancho Mission Viejo family hosted the first Rancho Mission Viejo Rodeo, now acclaimed as “The Richest Two Day Rodeo in America.” A PRCA-sanctioned competition, the Rancho Mission Viejo Rodeo has become one of the most popular events in the world of rodeo as well as one of the largest sources of charitable funds within South Orange County. Since its inception, the Rodeo has raised more than $1,300,000 for local charities. Today, Aguirre is joined in conducting the annual Rodeo and overseeing all of Rancho Mission Viejo’s farming and ranching operations by his daughter, Lissa Freese, who serves as Rancho Mission Viejo’s Sr. Vice President/Operations. Both of Freese’s children are now active participants in the annual Rancho Mission Viejo Rodeo. Freese’s daughter, Tara, graduated from Loyola Marymount University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Urban Studies and earned a Master of Business Administration degree in Environmental Studies from California State University, Fullerton. Freese’s son, Brent, recently graduated from California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Agricultural Business and competed on Cal Poly San Luis Obispo’s rodeo team. Gilbert Aguirre is a graduate of Tucson High School (Class of 1953) and the University of Arizona where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Science in 1957. Aguirre resides on Rancho Mission Viejo’s historic Cow Camp. October 2014 California Cattleman 43


Cattlemen’s Report Terry Cotton and John Joses

Pictured at O’Neal Ranch’s Performance Plus Sale are (L to R) American Angus Association’s Casey Jentz and Terry Cotton; John Dickinson, Gary, Betzy and Taylor Cardoza; Col. John Rodgers, Logan Ipsen and Kris Gudel.

The 2014 bull sale season started off hot, both in terms of weather and bull prices. As commercial cattlemen experienced some of their highest prices ever this summer, they were certainly perpared to invest their hard-earned dollars on genetics to continue to improve their herd. So far this season, seedstock producers should be very pleased by the results of the sales as averages have been up and optimism for rain remains high. These sale results reflect sales that have concluded as of press time Sept. 22. The results of the remainder of the fall bull sales will be printed in upcoming issues of this publication.

Carter Pierce and J.J. Reinhardt

2014 FALL BULL SALE RESULTS & AVERAGES

O’NEAL RANCH “PERFORMANCE PLUS” BULL SALE

© THD

SEPT. 2, MADERA, CA

Darrell Silveira and Joe Ferrara

Col. John Rodgers

58 Angus Bulls

$5,085

SILVEIRA BROS. “PARTNERS FOR PERFORMANCE” BULL SALE

© THD © THD

Ray and Mary Alger with Col. Rick Machado

The work crew at Ray-Mar Ranches’ Bull sale was (back row L to R): Justin Barnes, Bodie Scruggs, Ty Reichard, John Peirano, Trevor Waag. Front Row (L to R): Gina Liberini, Jade Reichard, Shane Lucore, Hannah Peirano.

SEPT. 3, FIREBAUGH, CA

Col. John Rodgers and Col. Rick Machado Managed by Matt Macfarlane Marketing

120 Angus & Red Angus Bulls

$5,410

VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH & SIERRA RANCHES “CARCASS MAKER” BULL SALE SEPT. 4, LA GRANGE, CA

Beef Northwest’s Eric Drees and Dan Byrd

Col. John Rodgers and Col. Rick Machado 155 ANGUS BULLS $8,128 24 HEREFORD BULLS $4,392

BYRD CATTLE CO. “BEST OF BOTH WORLDS” BULL SALE SEPT . 5, RED BLUFF, CA

Natalie Reis and Jaime Sanchez

Col. Rick Machado and Col. Trent Stewart 111 ANGUS BULLS AVERAGED $ 6,793

RAY-MAR RANCHES “COMMITMENT TO PERFORMANCE” SALE SEPT. 6, ESCALON, CA

Byrd Cattle Co. Family (L to R standing): Melissa and Braxxton, Ty, Hayden, Brooke, Keith, Chris, Hayley, Jayden and Dan. Front kneeling are Hannah and Harrison.

Col. Trent Stewart and Col. Rick Machado

Col. Rick Machado Managed by Matt Macfarlane Marketing 95 ANGUS BULLS $4987

HERITAGE BULL SALE

Five Star Land and Livestock & Bar R Angus SEPT. 7, WILTON, CA Col. John Rodgers Managed by Matt Macfarlane Marketing 56 ANGUS BULLS $5,501 Donati Ranches’ Rocky and Tom Donati with Larry Holman.

Greg Schafer and David Forester

44 California Cattleman October 2014

Matt Macfalane and Dan O’Connell welcome folks to the Black Gold Bull Sale.


2014 FALL BULL SALE RESULTS & AVERAGES (Continued from Previous Page)

CALIFORNIA BULLFEST

with Genoa Livestock & Schohr Herefords SEPT. 9, OAKDALE, CA

Cattlemen’s Report

Col. Rick Machado Managed by James Danekas and Associates 31 HEREFORD BULLS $3,876

BLACK GOLD BULL SALE

Dawson, David and Jeanene Dal Porto

Donati Ranches, O’Connell Ranches, Wulff Brothers Livestock and Broken Box Ranch SEPT. 11, COLUSA, CA Col. Rick Machado Managed by Matt Macfarlane Marketing 91 ANGUS BULLS $5,362 6 CHAROLAIS $3,575

TEHAMA ANGUS RANCH 40TH ANNIVERSARY “GENERATIONS OF PERFORMANCE” BULL SALE

Pictured at the Heritage Bull Sale in Wilton are the Reinhardt and Nelson families. Back row (L to R) are: Mark Nelson, Jhett Nelson, Andra Campbell, Ryan Nelson and Colton Campbell. Front row (L to R) are: Craig Reinhardt, Abbie Nelson, Julie “J.J.” Reinhardt, Hailey Nelson and Billie Holman.

Hailey, Jamie and Jimmy Traynham

SEPT. 12, GERBER, CA

Col. Rick Machado and Col. John Rodgers 126 ANGUS BULLS $6.389

ARELLANO BRAVO PRODUCTION SALE SEPT. 13, MADERA, CA

Col. Rick Machado

58 Angus Bulls

Cindy and Marty Williamson with Mike Hall

$5,184

OAK RIDGE ANGUS BULL SALE SEPT. 14, CALISTOGA, CA

Col. John Rodgers

68 ANGUS BULLS

$5,805

Jerry Hemsted with Terry and Tom Bengard

Some of the Borror Family at the 40th Anniversary Tehama Angus Ranch Bull Sale. Pictured on the back row (L to R): John Thompson Callie Borror, Kevin Borror, Eric Borror, Erin Borror and Bryce Borror. Front row (L to R) are: Rochelle Thompson, Linda Borror and Karen Borror. Not pictured are Bill and Sandy Borror.

BULLS EYE BREEDERS BULL SALE

Gonsalves Ranch, Diamond Oak Cattle Co., Flood Bros. Cattle, and Double M Ranch SEPT. 17, OAKDALE, CA Col. John Rodgers

40 ANGUS BULLS 16 SIMANGUS BULLS

$5,051 $5,987

Dennis Lopez and Duane Martin, Sr.

RANCHO CASINO AND DAL PORTO LIVESTOCK BULL SALE

Timoteo Arellano welcomes buyers to the Arellano Bravo Production Sale.

Tino and Gail Lucchetti

Katie and Gary Ward

Paul Banke and David Dal Porto

SEPT. 18, DENAIR, CA

Col. Rick Machado and Col. John Rodgers

118 ANGUS BULLS

$7,385

MID-VALLEY BULL SALE SEPT. 20, GALT, CA

Col. Jake Parnell

46 ANGUS BULLS

Marti and Peter Bradford

$4,148

CCA extends sincere congratulations to seedstock producers on a very successful sale season thus far and wishes good luck to all the sales that are yet to come! Carol and David Medeiros

Ed Amador, Greg Schafer and Bill Traylor at the Mid-Valley Bull Sale.

John Dickinson and Col. Jake Parnell

October 2014 California Cattleman 45


California Cattlemen’s Association

BUYERS’ GUIDE Services for all your on-the-ranch needs

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46 California Cattleman October 2014


JUNIOR HERDSIRES

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THANK YOU TO OUR 2014 “COMMITMENT TO PERFORMANCE” BULL BUYERS!

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October 2014 California Cattleman 47


THANK YOU TO OUR 2014 BULL CUSTOMERS!

Brangus • angus • Ultrablacks

THE DOIRON FAMILY Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

THD ©

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48 California Cattleman October 2014

3L

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THANK YOU TO OUR CALIFORNIA BULLFEST CUSTOMERS!

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October 2014 California Cattleman 49


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50 California Cattleman October 2014


Sammis Honored at Siskiyou County Annual Summer Meeting followed by a short program where the Siskiyou County The annual Siskiyou County Cattlemen’s Association Cattleman of the Year was announced. This year, past Annual Summer Meeting and Field Day was held Aug. Siskiyou County Cattlemen’s President Joe Sammis was 21 at Prather Ranch located near MacDoel. In addition honored with the award. Sammis raises registered Angus in to the regular meeting of the local association, meeting Dorris along with his wife Michele. attendees of this year’s field day had the opportunity to Sponsors for the program include Pelican Tractor tour the Prather Ranch processing plant in small groups. Company, Zoetis, Animal Health International, John Prather Ranch employee Adam Cotton and Shasta County Bennet, Cowley D & L, Inc., American AgCredit (Alturas), Livestock Farm Advisor Larry Forero, Ph.D., shared Shasta Livestock Auction Yard and the National Cattlemen’s information and demonstrated quality and yield grading. Beef Association. Participants then had the opportunity to estimate quality grade yield grades on carcasses. Prizes were awarded to the top carcass judges. Ron Gill, Ph.D., a Texas A & M University Professor and Extension Livestock Specialist and nationally acclaimed livestock handling specialist presented an extensive Stockmanship and Stewardship beef demonstration on live cattle. Those who attended the demonstration GATES, CHUTES, PANELS & MORE! were recertified in CCA’s Beef Quality AVAILABLE FROM: Assurance Program. A barbeque lunch was served by the Siskiyou County CattleWomen, which was

THE FARM & RANCH SUPPLY DESTINATION 576 WARNERVILLE ROAD • OAKDALE, CA • (209) 847-8977 © VASEY

Joe and Michelle Sammis at the annual Siskiyou County Cattlemen’s Association Summer Meeting and Field Day.

717 E. CHILDS AVE. • MERCED, CA • (209) 725-1100 DELIVERY AVAILABLE WWW.CONLINSUPPLY.COM October 2014 California Cattleman 51


IN MEMORY NELL JESS

Nell Jess, 95, passed away suddenly as a result of an auto accident on Friday, Sept. 5, 2014, she was surrounded by her loving family. Nell was born on May 25, 1919, to Antonio and Maria (Augelli) Guilliano in Fresno. She was one of their 10 children and spent her childhood in the Fresno area; until meeting her husband, John Jess in 1938 and then moving to Avarado, now known as Fremont. John and Nell were a farming and ranching family that resided in Hayward, and then moved to the Tracy, Altamont area in 1958, where Nell still resided. She raised two sons, who also continued in the ranching business. After her sons graduated from High School, she went to work for the Freidan Calculator Company in San Leandro, until retiring in the early 70’s. Nell was a member of St. Bernard’s Catholic Church and a Director of St. Anthony Council #5 of Tracy. She loved to entertain friends and family with delicious meals; Nell was famous among family and friends for her wonderful banana cream and apricot pies, rum and apple cakes. Throughout her life she also enjoyed gardening, crocheting, crafts, reading and was an avid card player. She will be deeply missed by all who knew and loved her. Nell is survived by her son, Joseph Jess Sr., Daughter in-laws Connie Jess and Joan Jess; six grandchildren, Joseph Jess, Jeff Jess, Danny Jess, Jerrod Jess, Tina Williams and Jill Jess-Burtschi; 11 great-grandchildren; three great greatgrandchildren. She also leaves behind siblings Lorriane Kincaid and Evelyn Melton. Preceding her in death are her beloved husband of 57 years, John Jess, and son, Donald Jess, her parents, five brothers and two sisters.

New Arrival HALEY ZANA MEBANE Haley Zana Mebane was born on Aug. 21 to parents Col. Justin Mebane and Jennifer Mebane of Western Stockman’s Market in Bakersfield. She was born 8 pounds 9 ounces and 21 inches long, at 10:03 p.m. Along with her parents, Haley was welcomed by grandparents Dwight and Helen Mebane, and Bill and Sharon Wonderly, all of Bakersfield

52 California Cattleman October 2014

CAROL SILACCI

Carol Milias Silacci, a lifelong resident of Gilroy, passed away peacefully on Aug. 30, surrounded by family. Born on Christmas day in 1935, Carol grew up being a part of the family business, the Milias Hotel and Restaurant which was run by her parents, George C. Milias and Rachel Milias. Carol then found her soul mate and partner for life, when she married Donald Silacci of Gilroy in 1959. Together they owned and operated a commercial cattle ranch along with the family feed store. She was always a high energy person who loved being outdoors. She enjoyed horseback riding and hunting every chance she could get, loved socializing and had a wonderful smile that could light up a room. Carol is survived by husband, Donald Silacci; children, Christine Bianchi and Donna Silacci; and grandchildren, Erica Bianchi and Andrea Silacci. During the years of her life, her family has remained by her side through it all and loves her dearly. She will be greatly missed but never forgotten. Services were held in her honor Sunday, Sept. 14 on the family ranch in Gilroy.

DID YOU KNOW? 45 years ago, President Ronald Reagan made an appearance at a general session of the 23rd Annual CCA/CCW Convention. Registration for this year’s convention is now avaiable online and by mail. Please join us at this year’s convention Nov. 20-22!


Cal Poly Hosts Annual Field Day in SLO CCA officers and staff traveled to California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo on Aug. 23 to participate in the annual Cal Poly Bull Test Field Day alongside bull test consignors, allied industry partners and other Cal Poly supporters. In addition to releasing results of the test, producers also get to take advantage of a variety of producer education options during the day-long event. Dan Tracy DVM, MS, a technical services veterinarian with Multimin spoke on the importance of trace minerals in beef reproduction and cattle immunity. Tracy’s presentation was a perfect segway into the Beef Quality Assurance workshop that CCA and the California Beef Council presented to producers. The BQA certification workshop was sponsored by Zoetis, who offered free certification for the producers in attendance.

In addition to on-the-ranch education, other presenters included CCA President Tim Koopmann, Sunol and past president Kevin Kester, Parkfield, who is currently serving as the vice chair of policy for the CCA President Tim Koopmann spoke about CCA’s current issues. National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. Koopmann and Kester shared lobbying and regulation insight both on the state level as well as nationally and spoke about the efforts CCA and NCBA are making to address ranchers’ concerns at what is a very interesting time for the beef industry. Kevin Kester gave an NCBA update. As always the annual field day would not be complete without the final results from the bull test. For complete results, visit the bull test website at http://bulltest.calpoly. edu. The 58th annual Cal Poly Bull Test Sale will be held at 1 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 5 at the Cal Poly Beef Center in San Luis CBC’s Jill Scofield helped present Obispo. a BQA program for producers.

s e t i r o v a F ll a F y Heart

One-dish Beef Stroganoff Time: 30 to 35 minutes • Makes 4 servings

INGREDIENTS 1 pound Ground Beef (93% lean or leaner) 1/2 pound sliced button or cremini mushrooms 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves 2 cups uncooked whole grain wide noodle-style pasta 1 can (14-1/2 ounces) reduced-sodium beef broth 1 cup frozen peas 1/4 cup regular or reduced-fat dairy sour cream plus additional for topping 1 tablespoon regular or coarse-grain Dijon-style mustard Salt and pepper

INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Heat large nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot. Add Ground Beef, mushrooms, garlic and thyme; cook 8 to 10 minutes, breaking Ground Beef into 3/4-inch crumbles and stirring occasionally.

2. Stir noodles and broth into beef mixture. Bring to a boil. Cover and cook 9 to 10 minutes or until noodles are tender, stirring twice. Stir in peas; continue cooking, uncovered, 3 to 5 minutes or until peas are heated through, stirring occasionally. 3. Remove from heat; stir in 1/4 cup sour cream and mustard. Season with salt and pepper, as desired. Garnish with additional sour cream, if desired. October 2014 California Cattleman 53


Advertisers’ Index Schafer Ranch.............................................47 Schohr Herefords........................................49 Scott Valley Angus......................................13 Shasta Bull Sale...........................................13 Shasta Livestock Auction Yard....................9 Sierra Ranches.............................................49 Silveira Bros.................................................47 Siskiyou Angus............................................13 Sonoma Mountain Herefords...............7, 49 Spanish Ranch.............................................48 Spencer Cattle Co.......................................13 Spencer Ranch............................................13 Steve Smith Angus......................................13 Sunbright Angus Ranch.............................13 Sweetlix........................................................31 Tehama Angus Ranch................................47 Teixeira Cattle Co...................................3, 47 The Next Generation Bull Sale....................7 Thomas Angus Ranch................................27 Tulare County Stockyard...........................50 Tumbleweed Ranch....................................48 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard.................1 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard.................6 UC Davis College of Agriculture..............11 Universal Semen Sales, Inc........................50 Veterinary Service, Inc...............................50 VF Red Angus................................ 14, 15, 49 Vintage Angus Ranch................................48 Western Fence Company...........................50 Western Stockman’s Market......................19 Western Video Market.................................2 World of Bulls.............................................23

Escalon Livestock Market..........................12 Five Star Land Company...........................50 Freitas Rangeland Improvements.............38 Fresno State Agriculture............................49 Furtado Angus............................................47 Genoa Livestock...................................13, 48 Gonsalves Ranch.........................................47 HAVE Angus...............................................47 Hone Ranch.................................................48 Huffords Herefords.....................................48 J/V Angus....................................................47 Kaaekrest Angus.........................................13 Kerndt Livestock Products........................50 Kodiak Ranch..............................................13 Kohl Creek Angus Ranch..........................13 Lambert Ranch.......................................7, 48 Lewallen Land and Cattle Co....................22 Little Shasta Ranch.....................................49 McPhee Red Angus....................................49 Morrell Ranches..........................................13 Multi Min....................................................41 Noahs Angus Ranch...................................47 O’Connell Ranch........................................47 Oak Knoll Herefords..................................13 ORIgen.........................................................50 Orvis Cattle Company...............................48 P&M Waltz Ranches..................................13 Pacific Trace Minerals..........................38, 50 Peets Rancho Capay Gelbvieh..................13 Pitchfork Cattle Co. ...................................48 Ray-Mar Ranches.......................................47 Sammis Ranch......................................13, 47 San Juan Ranch...........................................48

All West-Select Sires...................................39 Allen Skinner Transportation...................50 Amador Angus............................................46 American Angus Association...................40 Apache Polled Herefords...........................48 Avila Cattle Co............................................13 Bagley Cattle Co.........................................13 Bar Ale.........................................................36 Bar R Angus................................................46 Bar-N-Bar Angus........................................13 Big Bale Flaker............................................39 BMW Angus...............................................46 Bo Bo Cattle................................................37 Broken Arrow ............................................46 Broken Box Ranch......................................49 Byrd Cattle Co.......................................46, 56 California Custom......................................50 California State University, Chico............49 California Wagyu Breeders, Inc................49 California-Nevada Hereford Assn............25 Cargill Beef..................................................30 Cattlemen’s Livestock Market...................23 CB Ranch.....................................................13 Cherry Glen Beefmasters..........................48 Conlan Ranches California.......................49 Conlin Fence Company.............................50 Conlin Supply Company...........................50 Corsair Angus Ranch.................................46 Dal Porto Livestock....................................46 DeForest Livestock.....................................13 Diamond Back Ranch................................49 Donati Ranch..............................................46 Edwards, Lien & Toso, Inc.........................50

Welcome New Members Producer Members

NICK AND NIKKI AVDIS, AVDIS RANCH, SACRAMENTO BRYAN & CAROLINE GRIFFIN, GRIFFIN LIVESTOCK, SIERRAVILLE JOE & SANDY BELL, PETALUMA DEBBIE BENSON, RIDGECREST E.J. DOLCINI RANCH, PETALUMA BRIAN & JODY EVANS, MORRO BAY CHRIS GOODRICH, BOISE, IDAHO CATHY MARSON, CHICAGO, ILL. ADAM MCNABB, BOISE, IDAHO VICTORIA MOONEY, RIDGECREST LEE PHILLIPS, RIDGECREST JOHN AND BETTY ROEN, SIERRAVILLE CARI ZORZI, RIDGECREST

Associate Members

JEFF CURTIS, CURTIS CUSTOM FEEDERS, CONNELL, WASH DAVE THORNBERG, HARVEST FUEL, INC., SWEET PRO 54 California Cattleman October 2014

FEEDS, NISSWA, MINN. DAN JOHN, RIO LINDA BONNIE LIND, CLOVIS BUDDY SIMONS, SOUTHWEST FENCE, OAKDALE STEVE STAFFORD, VIGORTONE, BELGRADE, MONT.

Young Members

KATY GAEDE, CLOVIS AMY MCBIRNEY, MORGAN HILL WYATT SPENCER, RED BLUFF JACQUELINE CIMA, EL DORADO HILLS JOSHUA DOWELL, COARSE GOLD JENNA FIELDS, COYOTE DAVID GUERRA, SANTA MARIA SIERRA HARLAN, PENNGROVE JUSTINE HENDERSON, CHICO ANNA MILLER, LINDEN MACY PERRY, PRATHER KELSEY TANNER, WOODLAND MO TEHRANI, SAN LUIS OBISPO


THD PHOTOS©

CCA©

BYRD CATTLE COMPANY, LLC

Extends our most sincere thanks to all who bought bulls, the folks who bid and those who came to enjoy the evening at BCC on September 5. 56 California Cattleman October 2014

October 2014 cca magazine online  
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