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nuway fitness & health center

caitlin powell


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for my family, who supports me through everything for my mom, with the biggest & strongest heart for my professors, who never stopped pushing me to achieve my greatest

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table of contents

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

project objectives

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historiography

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case studies

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3.1 greater plymouth community center 3.2 ambler ymca 3.3 riverside student recreation center 3.4 Estudio Pretto

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ergonomics & technical criteria

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topical explorations

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5.1 human behavior 5.2 color 5.3 technology in fitness

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existing site, context, climate & zoning

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program development & documentation

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building analysis, code, regulations, & standards

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final project research summary

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appendix

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image citations

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project objectives

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introduction In today’s society, more than two-thirds of the U.S. population is considered overweight or obese. While many people see that the cause is simply overeating and under-exercising, there is actually no single cause for obesity or being overweight.1 There can be many factors that lead to reasons why, and in many cases it is different with every person. While working out more heavily may be the answer for some, it is not the answer for all. Losing weight and staying healthy also requires eating healthier, being aware of what you put in your body, and taking care of your body. These tasks can be hard to keep up with on your own, and it can be very hard to stay motivated by one’s own will. In today’s society it is seen more and more that people need to be inspired or motivated. Motivation can be achieved through the help of physical trainers, or the use of technology for each user. Another problem seen with people not staying very active or going to the gym, is that many fitness centers are too expensive or unaffordable. In a study done, it shows that forty percent of people do not go the gym because it is too expensive and

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they cannot afford it.2 While a common goal in many people is to stay in shape and be active, the only problem could be that it is not accessible for them. With all of these issues and facts in mind, the project type that has been chosen is a Fitness and Health center. Not only will it be just a fitness center that houses fitness equipment and ways for users to be physically fit, but the NuWay Fitness and Health center will help users gain a better mentality in driving their healthy lifestyle goals. The center will provide inspiring motives and attitudes that will influence even the weakest minds to a stronger mentality, which in turn will increase the body to a stronger and healthier life. In a society that makes sitting at home or inside with thousands of technology advances, this fitness center will drive many users to breaking that “lazy” lifestyle.

General Design Goals The goal of this project is to create a fitness and wellness space that inspires, motivates, and aides each user in achieving their own


level of health and wellness at an affordable standard. While many people see the benefit of staying healthy and fit, they also have to enjoy it to a certain degree. The space must make the user enjoy being there, and not make it feel like a chore. The location that was chosen along the Delaware River offers many diverse recreation activities and events, and this space will bring about a new scene and even more influx of people to an already bustling location.

Research Goals and Methods Research will be done through reading articles and statistics on users of these spaces and what changes/updates that will need to be done for them to be more successful. There will also be searches of history in books and research in how and why these buildings are structured and what gets them flowing and working properly.

Role of the Designer:

Research will need to be conducted to

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know correct insight of users of the space and how this fitness and wellness center will be best suited for each individual. The role of the designer is to create a space that promotes the health and wellbeing of each person and attaining to their needs. The space that needs to be created is one of inspiration, motivation, but also of an ease of use that each user is comfortable with. The designer will need to improve a general space that is made for working out and staying fit, but also but creating an interior that people will enjoy going to and being in that will make them continue to keep coming back out of their own will.

Environmental/Sustainability Objectives Being in a location that has a marvelous view of the water on the Delaware River, but also surrounded by buildings and places that look more industrial, this space begs to have more of a natural look and feel. By human instinct, we all enjoy nature and being able to go outdoors and intermingling with the environment.

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The space will use as many natural materials as it can, with warm natural woods, bright colors, and many windows that can bring natural light into the different areas. There will also be use of green walls and solar panels on the outside roof. Many activities will be provided outside while available so that the use of technology and motorized machines are lessened.

Client The client is a local Philadelphian who enjoys going out and being active, but does not enjoy any of the spaces that are provided in the city. While there is an influx of different fitness spaces in the city, she does not enjoy most of them because of their simplicity. She also wants to create a space that integrates some of the health and wellness that hospitals in the city provide, without having to go to the hospital. Say you have a physical type of ailment, that you do not believe is serious enough to make a hospital visit, or that you just don’t want to deal with hospitals? This client wants to make this space available so that you can go for those types of needs, as well as continue with an enjoyable fitness center.

Users The users are the members that go there for fitness and wellness, as well as the employees, physical therapists, psychologists, camp counselors, counselors, and members of the community. The employees and people that work there have a specific job that will make members and people of the community wanting to continue coming back. The members and people of the community will aide to the design objectives by using the space to their own degree to promote health, wellness, and fitness.

Socio-Economic Conditions The goal of this space is that it should be available to all people. While yes, there needs to be set prices that people as members need to uphold and stay with, the desire is that it can be affordable for all and any types of people. The one problem with today’s society is that money has become somewhat of a luxury and not everyone has the funds to be a member of a fitness or wellness center. This space will offer the chance of a different range of upper and lower class demographics to use it however they desire. There will be different memberships and fees to pay, along with some discounts, sales, and group work offered.

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Demographics

This area along the Delaware tends to hold the attention more of the millennials age group. This space will appeal to them, as well as older users. Effects that bring the attention to millennials is cheap prices, use of more technology and social media, and spaces to go as groups that they enjoy. This space will include all of that, as well as certain spaces and times that users older than millennials can enjoy as well. Both of these aspects need be broadcast and known by the design so it does not get swept under as a demographic for one specific age group. Every single person’s physical and mental journey in life has one thing in common: a start. The goal of this space is to be just that; A start in a new direction in the world of health and wellness. Each individual users start to a healthier and better life. You have to start somewhere. Why not here?

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historiography

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From the beginning of time, all humans have incorporated some level of physical exercise in their daily lives. Modern America’s favored forms of exercise include running and weight lifting in a controlled environment like a gym; however, this has not always been the most popular form of physical activity. At one point, physical fitness was a way of life for the human species. Throughout time and rapidly developing technology, advancements since then had been made to add a range of activities and sports to accommodate all people. For example, the qualifications for the Olympics in the current twenty-first century are much more advanced than the first Olympics that occurred in 776BC and even the more modern Olympics in the early 1900s. Olympians have to go through much more advanced physical training and hard work to even qualify for the games. Starting all the way back to 10,000 BC with the first of humankind, they needed to be physically fit in order to sustain life. Humans had a “run for your life” mentality; as much as they were predators for their own food, they were also prey for another mammal’s source of food. Not only did they have to know how to run and hide, but how to walk, balance, crawl, jump, carry, and climb through all aspects of their environment. They also needed the physical strength to carry, throw, lift, catch, and fight. It was also believed during these times that the earliest modes of dance were performed when humans were not being predators or prey.1 From 10,000 to 8,000 BC, known as the dawn of civilization, advances were made that deemed the title of the Agricultural Revolution. The way of life was not hunter-gatherer as it was before; it soon became farmers that no longer relied on running, climbing, jumping, crawling, etc. Farmers mainly stayed in one place and did not move as much as before. It wasn’t until around 4,000 BC that men of all ages were being prepared for war and had to increase their physical activity. In preparation for battle, men were physically trained in aspects that were fairly similar to those of the hunter-gatherers; throw, carry, lift, fight, run, crawl, and balance, all however with the addition of better equipped weapons made for war.2 The culture for physical sport also developed during this time period. There are records of athletic competitions held in Greece which were known as the first Olympic games. These also were based on natural movement skills adapted from the hunter-gatherers. Greeks intended to best one another in these unique games like running, throwing, and fighting. The Greeks and Romans celebrated the physical body and its strength in training. They thought of it as an essential part of their complete education. Without it, they would not have the ideal of “a sound mind in a sound body.”3 Over time, with the beginning of the Industrial Revolution the way people lived and moved changed a notable amount. By production changing from manual methods to machinery, worker’s lives became more sedentary which proposed the need for intentional physical exercise opposed to needing it to stay alive. At this point, physical exercise was integrated into schools and education with the start of gymnastics and later, individual sports and exercises.

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These trends were seen across Europe, however in the United States, physical exercise was approached in its own way. Since the threat of war was not as apparent, the need for physical training was lessened. Because of this, physical fitness was founded later in the States than it was in Europe. The first person to bring about this awareness of physical fitness in the United States was Catharine Beecher.4 She implemented the need for a program called calisthenics in schools, which was the movement of the body to music. During this time, many Europeans were emigrating to the United States, and they brought with them their traditions of physical exercise. Over time, more and more improvements in physical exercise have been made technically and mentally. With the working people who sit at desks and work on electronics, this daily need for exercise to just merely stay alive is no longer existent. People have become less motivated and less inspired to keep their physical fitness. For this reason, gyms and fitness centers that better integrate its members is needed to ensure the health and wellbeing of each individual.

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case studies 23


3.1

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greater plymouth community center

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Overview The first case study building that was chosen was the Greater Plymouth Meeting Community Center located in Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania. The total square footage of the area is around 7,739. While it may seem that this building started out as a community center, it is actually an old school building used from the 50s-70s and was refurbished with additions built onto it in in 2001 by the Hughes Architect Group. Because this was more of a renovation rather than a building built from the ground up, it could be said that the budget for this community center had a middle to low construction budget. The Greater Plymouth Community Center is relevant to this project type, because it is an astounding example of a center that was much needed for its area, to provide the people in that community a space to convene and also promote health, wellness, and the need for fitness. The aspect that is most interesting about this center is its open and well-lit glass arch that covers the atrium and core of the building. This arch can be seen from any side of the exterior of the building, and is also a wonderful site while a user is standing inside under its span. The Plymouth Township owns the building and its members were also the client for this space. Their ultimate goal was to create a space that can be used as a center or “main street” for the community to gather. The users are those community members who use the space as just that. There are town meetings and events that take place in the center, and it is free to anyone in—or out of—the community who wants to use it for its many functions. Set in a very suburban area that is almost in the middle of a neighborhood, its location is right off of a main street Germantown Pike in Plymouth Meeting. It is on a fairly busy side street with cars coming and going. Although it cannot be seen from Germantown Pike, it is very well marked and visible from two opposing side streets. While the building itself holds its own ground, the community center also has ownership of additional acres in the neighborhood. It features an outdoor running track and play area, soccer and baseball fields, small concert/stage area, and two sand volleyball courts. The baseball field is home for a neighboring university baseball team and all other outdoor space is open for all users.

Design Concept and Style The overall concept of the designers for this building was to create a welcoming open space that everyone in the community would enjoy coming to and being a part of. The vestibule and lobby space does a good job with this by use of its structural glass arc that lets in a superfluous amount of light to the center of the building. From the lobby and atrium spaces, you are able to see into a number of the different activity areas. Big glass planes allow the user to see into the pool area, gymnasium, fitness center, and out back to the outside areas. This gives each user a scope of the most active areas used and creates a feeling of every aspect working together. There is only one floor of this building, but the areas that were an addition to the preexisting structure have higher steel-structured ceilings. The preexisting structure holds true to its original form and houses most of the offices, conference rooms, activity rooms, fitness center, and classrooms. These are all located on one side of the building while the other spaces housing the pool, gymnasium and indoor track, locker rooms, bathrooms, and a good bulk of the storage are located on the other side of the central “spine.” The building uses good use of circulation and wayfinding by hanging big fabric signs along the length of the entrance and lobby that point out where each main work areas are. There are also small floor plans and evacuation plans posted on occasional doors and exits to help aide users around.

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Interior Design Most of the materials used seem to be brick walls, with the variation of red brick from the existing building, which was continually used on the new construction to match. There is also use of painted concrete walls, vinyl, rubber, and carpet flooring. The vinyl and rubber flooring are pertinent options because of their easily cleanable surfaces and impact absorbing qualities. As stated before, throughout the space there is respectable use of natural lighting with the glass arc through the center, and glass window panes around the sides. There are newly updated LED lights throughout certain areas that provide better lighting when the sun goes down. In some of the back areas, however, they are pretty dimly lit with dull colors that create not so much of a welcoming presence as the lobby does. Most of the colors used are duller, minus a few bright colors in the pool and fitness areas. There is a lot of acoustic control throughout the center with panels hanging from the ceiling and high walls; however they are more structural than decorative. spaces, rooms, and adjancencies

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Post Occupancy Survey The user with who was interviewed believed that the space was all around a good community center that enables people of the Plymouth Meeting Township to gather together. He stated that people really enjoy the big open atrium with plenty of natural light flowing through, and that each user is able to see into all areas of the center from the central lobby. Although he identified the issue with some of the material and color changes—like removal of the carpeting and use of brighter colors—he agreed that everything worked well together. He also noted the issue of not enough storage and a few of the classrooms, fitness center, family locker room and babysitting rooms that could use some extra square footage to enhance the experience. The note for more storage space was clear in almost every room of the building, in that more and more equipment is needed for the amount of users and new things continually being added to each center.


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Evaluation Overall, the center achieves its main goal of creating a welcoming space that functions well to gather the community in one central hub. Each area in the building is easy to find with use of wayfinding, and a user can certainly see into most rooms from the lobby/vestibule. The colors are on the dull and neutral side, which can easily be repainted and updated to more vibrant colors that can excite and welcome new users to the center. In areas with higher ceilings, the sound bounced around the space a good deal, so the creation of more acoustics would be beneficial. All things considered, the building does achieve its goal and it is a very successful community center for its location and purpose.

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circulation plan

public vs private plan

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3.2

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ambler ymca

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Overview The second case study visited was the Ambler YMCA center, which is an 80,000 square foot, two floor health and fitness center. The building was constructed in early August 2010, by Architect firm Kramer Marks. The budget for this project is moderately in the middle to high range because of the need of it for the area. This fitness and recreation center is relevant to the proposed project because it highlights and shows the necessity of creating a space in a location where the bringing together of the community and the ones surrounding it is desired. These case studies have open atriums and lobbies that bring a user into the space and greet them with views of each of the uses of the center. This allows the user to be able to see what makes each of the centers special and gives them insight on exactly what they are being offered. The Philadelphia Freedom Valley YMCA owns the building, as well as about 18 other branches all among the Philadelphia local areas. This non-profit organization would also be considered the client of the architect and design group, since it was their original request of the building. The users are the people of the community and surrounding townships and publics that can benefit from the uses of the center. The site that the center sits in is actually not the first location for the Ambler area. There had been a preexisting building in a different location, however, that site no longer satisfied the client or user’s needs. The old site was much smaller—only 35,000 square feet—and could not house the many different spaces the center needed in order to achieve its longtime goal. It’s set in a suburban location, right across the street from a fairly busy business park. The building is easy to see from the road because of its monumental size and the manipulation of the landscape. Between the main road it is located on and the building itself is the parking lot and a few sloping hills that have an outdoor path running through. The sloping hills are just low or high enough to show the structure of the building off to cars as they pass by. The outdoor path connects to a continuous path that runs all throughout the township, so it keeps the building connected to the town and its users.

Design Concept and Style The design style is considered contemporary and local. All materials and motifs used were common to the area so that they fit well within the community. The design was not intended to fit in a certain type of architectural style, only to fit the need of the users and the program. The overall concept of the design was to create a type of “town-square” for the community to join together, integrated in one space. With the material and color selections being on the warmer side, it creates a welcoming feeling—both on the exterior and interior—and it merges the entire building as one unit. The building has two floors, with most of the program on the lower main floor and an indoor track, upper fitness mezzanine, and a number of classrooms for group activity. The lower floor houses the main fitness center, two basketball courts, back-of-house offices and conference rooms for employees, locker rooms, babysitting room, teen room, indoor and outdoor pool, and more classrooms. While the structure of the building was constructed by 2010, there were renovations made to add the outdoor pool later on, as well as a few more classrooms that occupy larger groups of people. There are a few corridors that lead you to classrooms and various spaces; however, there is not distinctly clear wayfinding to guide a user there. There is slight use of brighter lighting in the corridors that assists with a user getting around, but the individual rooms are more dimly lit. The main purpose of this move, was because each person who wants to become a member, is required to take a tour of the building before they can officially join. This allows each member to become better acquainted with the center and can make it feel like their own. There is HVAC systems throughout the entirety of the space, as well as ceiling fans that distribute more air evenly through each room. There are no clear stated sustainable uses besides what a user can see with their own eye. The center is structured with many windows, providing more natural light to evenly fill each room, some of which are operable.

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Interior Design

Evaluation

The main interior finishes are bare minimum; it is mainly just structure. For the open atrium and bigger rooms like the fitness center, gymnasium, pool, and a number of classrooms, the main structure is shown without anything being covered up by dry wall. The beams, columns, and posts, however are painted a warm orange/brown color. The main color throughout the center remains warm with deep neutrals and this orange/ brown. The lighting follows the warm tone and is mostly downlights, pendants, and spotlights for higher ceilings in the exposed trusses. There is not much decoration besides the switching of paint colors on walls, and posters and cases hung up around the lobby for events. There are blown up images around the lobby area going back into the program that include pictures of the community and how members can get more involved.

Overall I think this space is a welcoming and friendly recreation center that accomplishes its goal of integrating the surrounding towns into one center. The open structure and warm tones makes each member feel comfortable. I have personally been a member here for 6 years and have loved it. The staff, employees, and members are kind and friendly, and it feels like a town square where each person is welcome to do whatever they wish. With the new renovations it creates more opportunity for classes and members to come together as groups and enjoy their time spent at the YMCA.

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first floor circulation plan


program plan

second floor circulation plan

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3.3

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uc riverside student recreation center

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Overview In hot, sunny Southern California is where the University of California Riverside’s one-hundred and fifty-five thousand square foot Student Recreation Center is located. The building’s team from CannonDesign was comprised of design lead Carl Hampson, project architect Larry Taniguchi, project designer John Son, and interior designer Jack Poulin. Because of its demand from the growing University and the use of materiality, the budget for this expansion would be listed as moderate to high. This case study is relevant to the proposed project because it shows notable fluidity and openness throughout the spaces and through the various levels that integrates all people into a more social setting. The openness gives the user the full range of the center and a view into each feature the center provides. Unlike most facilities which remain in the hands of the university administration and then passed to the architect or design firm, this project was completely student driven.1 “This is what makes the building such a success,” said according to Ross French, a professor at the university.2

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The owner and client of the facility is the University of California, and the users are the students in the school. The reason this expansion was necessary was because of the such negative comments that were received about the school’s previous recreation center. The fitness center was always overcrowded during peak hours, the courts were constantly being used by the sports teams, and it was just a significantly small area for the students to be able to enjoy. The users wanted a bigger space that did not get so overcrowded, and provided each student with the ability to use the center to their own leisure.3

design concept and style The two-level expansion was intended to create its own style while also staying true and similar to the preexisting facility. Campus architect Don Caskey stated “You want a facility that is friendly, that feels inviting, and you are using the newer building to upgrade the overall


appearance and ambiance of the entire complex . . . It’s an opportunity to push the envelope a little bit and to create a building with its own identity. When you drive by the building, you will know that it is a special place.”4 The exterior is built from brick, glass and steel, and a curved perforated metal shade that allows users to see out from the inside, but blocks direct sunlight and heat from entering the facility. The center is connected to the preexisting recreation center by a cantilevered second floor exterior “bridge” that passes over a communal walkway. From that entrance, there is an indoor track as well as a majority of wellness functions on the second level. The open concept facility includes rock walls, fitness center and weights, classrooms, multi-activity court (MAC) and outdoor pools all on the first floor. The team and students intended to create this open concept to enhance visual connections through the space and to allow the users a broad view across campus and the surrounding mountains. “The project was required to achieve exemplary performance exceeding California’s

Title 24 mandate by 30% and acquiring Gold Certification.”5 They achieved this by the design of their perforated metal scrim shade across the upper floor windows. The shade reduced direct heat gain and glare, but allowed the daylight and views of California to still be visible. The exact design of the curved screen was compromised by the team through mapping of the annual movement of the sun. Throughout various times of the day, the screen also becomes less or more transparent and reflective, giving the entire building its own uniqueness.

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Evaluation Overall, I think the building is very unique and successful in achieving its goal. With more square footage than its previous facility, it allows the students more space and a social gathering area that is visually and aesthetically pleasing. The interior spaces work well with one another and the open concept makes wayfinding and walking through the building that much easier. I also think that the integration of the students to the design and the whole idea of the recreation center was a magnificent idea. The students are the ones who are ultimately using the facility, and the only way to ensure that they will enjoy it and use it for its functions is to get them directly involved. It shows just how successful the facility turned out to be when the considerations of the exact users were being monitored and noted every step of the building process. Visually and programmatically, the UC Student Recreation Center achieved its goal and is an outstanding facility.

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3.4

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estudio pretto

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Overview Estúdio Pretto is a small sports conditioning and training facility located in Porto Alegre, Brazil. This facility was finished in 2016 by architects Arquitetura Nacional with a total square footage of five thousand, nine-hundred and twenty. The old studio that used to house the company was in need of a bigger studio that also remained in the same neighborhood. The building where this new studio is located is a newer building, so the architects found it easier to keep the original structure exposed in the space. Based on size and location, this budget for the project is moderate to low. This sports training studio is relevant to the proposed project, because its main goal is to keep continual communication between the trainers and students. The areas with dissimilar functions within the studio were split up according to color and materiality that denoted work spaces, versus social spaces. The interaction between trainer and student is very important, and with the use of the space dividers, it enhances the one-on-one experience. The client and owner are two main trainers that run the program and the users are

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their students, or trainees. The studio is set in the middle city of Porto Alegre in a multi-story building.

Design Concept and Style The main design is laid out in a checkerboard shape that resembles old industrial buildings. There is a sort of vintage feel with the use of the yellow neon lights and small black and white tiles. “The idea is that it is a timeless space with elements that refer to good things from the past, but with a simple and contemporary language.”1 The designers wanted to create each space with varying functions, to have clear and easy to read separation. “It sought maximum visual integration of spaces.”2 In the reception and lounge area, locker rooms, warm-up area and training, there are changes in the floor designs to denote space change. The lounge and reception areas however have the strongest impact of spacial definition by painting the floors, walls, and ceiling a bright yellow. In the preexisting location, there was no


room or area for social activity or someplace to sit and relax. The reason this new location painted this lounge area a yellow was to create a living space where students can rest and socialize outside of training hours.3 Across the exposed ceilings, there are colorful ropes that all start out at the same point, but act as wayfinding that leads the user through the space to different functions. The building is sustainable because the designers kept the same preexisting concrete slab structure instead of using new materials. There is also plenty of natural light through the windows, and foliage all throughout the lounge and reception area.

Interior Design Since the original structure was kept, the only new use of material is the paint, tiles, and rubber flooring in certain areas. The tiles are shiny and reflect the bright neon lights, which add to the industrial feeling of the space. Lights are recessed into the concrete slabs, and there are neon lit shapes used as wayfinding, like a hanger for locker rooms, and a water bottle for a water station. It is mainly lit from natural lighting. There is not much decoration around the

area beside the ropes along the ceiling, neon lit signage, foliage, and a few posters on one wall.

Evaluation Overall, I think the Estúdio Pretto is a unique space that is not like many other sports training facilities. It is a fairly small location, but for its size, it does a good job of space layout and making it seem bigger than it actually is. I think the use of tile is very interesting and creates a retro feel, which is a nice contrast to many modern spaces in today’s fitness facilities. The wayfinding and space layout—like the entire yellow lounge area—is also notable because it adds a distinct touch to the overall facility. This studio seems like an enjoyable space to work out and train, without having numbers of people in a normal fitness center to be an audience.

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Ergonomics 53


Furniture Finishes and Equipment In a fitness center, it is pertinent to note that every piece of equipment needs to have clear distance all the way around each machine. This is not only for flow of traffic, but also for ease of maneuvering and ADA compliance. The Americans with Disabilities Act requires that there be a clear space of thirty by forty-eight inches around each machine with access to a distinct walking route.1 This allows ample amount of space needed if the machine moves out in a certain way while in use, and also to allow users in a wheelchair to pull up to each machine on one or more sides. Each machine has their own set of standards from the manufacturer they are built at which includes grab bars and handrails. Each machine also has a small diagram that explains how to use it properly and which muscles it works. Designers of fitness centers are not required, but encouraged to include exercise equipment that offers users with lower body extremity disabilities their own fitness opportunities.2

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In every recreation space, it is required to have locker room space. There should be female, male, and family locker rooms available, equipped with bathrooms, dressing, fitting and shower areas. These locker rooms must comply with ADA code. On a wall of lockers, at least five percent have to be accessible. Located adjacent to those lockers must be an accessible bench. Each locker room must have accessible benches that allow a disabled person to position themselves parallel to the short seat side of the bench. The seat depth can range from a minimum of twenty inches to a maximum of twenty-four inches. The length must be a minimum of forty-two inches, and the height of the back seventeen to nineteen inches off of the floor.3

Ergonomics Every fitness and recreation center is accountable for making sure that each user is able to take advantage of each function of the facility as per their needs. Therefore, when designing this facility space, it is pertinent to account the proper spacing needed in every distinct area. This includes enough


circulation around pools and courts, through fitness centers, and around running tracks. This also consists of sufficient distance between each machine for that of disabled and non-disabled persons. [See diagrams for more information].

Materials All materials for this recreation/fitness space must be easy to clean, non-porous fabrics and finishes. For workout areas, upholstered materials should be vinyls or polyurethanes that can withstand being scrubbed with cleaning products daily. Flooring must also be able to repel sweat and spills, and bear the possibility of people or heavy weights falling. The most suitable material for that would be rubber flooring. In heavy traffic areas, locker rooms, and classrooms, a harder flooring material like vinyl tiles or sheetsis highly appropriate.

Lighting In such big open spaces in recreation centers, the best way to get evenly distributed amounts of light would be by natural lighting. These areas

include—but are not limited to—the fitness centers, gymnasiums, pools, lobbies, and multi-purpose rooms. Windows should be located in areas where there will not be sun glares, or be accompanied by shades. While natural lighting is ideal during the daytime, that same lighting effect should be replicated and enhanced by artificial lighting when the sun goes down. In rooms with high ceilings, LED lights are appropriate because they have a strong light output and they last longer so that they will not need to be changed as frequently.

Sustainable Design The natural lighting talked about in the previous section plays a big role in sustainable design. By aided use of solar panels and solar systems, this assists with the facilities energy use and consumption. Materials used for the interior and exterior can be found from local resources and manufacturers. Occupancy sensors can be utilized in bigger spaces, and movement sensors can be used in offices and classrooms.

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Acoustic and Visual Controls Acoustic control plays a big role in recreation and fitness center designs. With high raised ceilings and many open spaces, sound can bounce around very easily. When these spaces are also used very frequently with high occupancy, noises from people and machines are constant. The use of acoustic panels in gym, fitness, and pool areas can significantly improve acoustic control and keep noise reverberations at a lower rate. Visual controls are also pertinent in certain areas in the facility. Users in fitness centers may need something to either distract them from the physical exertion, or keep them occupied. This is why many fitness and weight rooms have televisions throughout the space. This provides the users with the opportunity to keep their eyes focused on one thing, while their body is doing another. There are also many times mirrors that line the walls around free weights and in some classrooms. These aidethe users in making sure they have the proper form when lifting or exercising.

Wayfinding and Signage Because there are so many separate areas and rooms with various functions, there needs to be clear wayfinding. This can be accomplished through signs hanging at eye level or above, floor plans located at entrances and stairwells, and floor or wall patterns that indicate room changes. Adjacencies throughout the facility are also essentialto floor planning. For example, locker rooms must be accessible from the main circulation points, as well as the most highly used spaces: fitness center, gym,running track,and pool.

Security As it comes to security, the facility must be up to code, with fire alarms, fire extinguishers, and sprinklers. For weight lifting areas and areas with heavy machinery, it is required that there is an age limit to the use of this equipment, and physical trainers must be on the floor keeping close watch. It is also mandatory that all facilities must comply with DODINST 6055.1, applicable Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and Design: Fire Protection Engineering for Facilities.4

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5

58


topical explorations

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5.1

60


human behavior 61


human behavior To live a healthy life, is to make sure you are taking care of your body both physically and mentally. This is why exercise and staying fit is a very important part of a healthy lifestyle. In order to stay fit, humans can either be a part of a sport, or workout on their own in a gym or fitness center. Fitness centers provide various ways for users to stay fit on their own, or with help from a physical trainer. While most people’s goal is to stay fit by working out, the environment of a fitness center may not be every person’s ideal setting to achieve this fitness. Body image and mental health can be a very sensitive subject for many people, and what is a comfortable environment for some, may not be comfortable for others. Many people have no problem using fitness center machines and working out in front of others. On the other hand, many people are embarrassed or intimidated by fitness center environments and do not feel as if they belong. This is a big reason why so many people do not have fitness memberships. The way a person feels in a fitness environment is extremely pertinent. To have a facility that includes various spaces so that all people feel comfortable is a key part to having a successful fitness center. There are a few design elements that can help aide people in feeling more comfortable. One of these keys is lighting. “Without proper lighting, even the brightest colors seem dull, and your mental state is no different. Poor lighting conditions can cause fatigue, sleepiness, and stress. Besides feeling sleepy, your cortisol levels(a hormone responsible for aiding in muscle development) actually drop significantly in poor lighting conditions.”1 Brightness, whether it be from natural or artificial lighting, can create a more energized fitness environment, and the lack of it can lead to unsteady energy levels. This causes stress to both the body and mind. Studies show that gyms with an open layout and great natural lighting can make a human feel more alert and energized.2 Having the right materials for the space is also important. Finding materials that coordinate with stimulating and energizing colors is pertinent. For example, the flooring chosen should be a cushioning type of flooring. This will soften the impact when users jump or run. These fitness types of flooring also absorb sound and vibrations, which leads to increased shock absorption; in turn, decreasing injuries and the joint pain one might feel after jumping. While having the right kind of environment is important, there are other aspects that users of fitness centers may need. Self-motivation is also seen as a problem in modern health and fitness. Working out on one’s own can be tough, especially if one is not getting the results they desire. This can be aided by the help of a physical trainer. Working with another person who is seen as fit and healthy can increase motivation and provide support. The environment should be full of enthusiasm, giving off positive energy. The friendlier people are and their willingness to help, the more that users will enjoy and experience the success they strive for.

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5.2

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color 65


66


color exploration Color is important to think about when designing a fitness space, because certain colors create different psychological and physiological responses in people and their energies, and how that affects their workout. Each color that we see has a different influence on users depending on what physical activity is taking place. Certain colors are calming, exciting, or can ensure more productivity throughout a workout. Through research and studies done, it is proven that certain colors and hues can benefit the user by boosting intensity and endurance during the course of a workout.1 The colors blue and green are known for increasing productivity and enhancing the mental and physical aspects for the duration of exercising.2 Studies have shown that the color blue has most benefitted users in weight lifting rooms. Blue has a calming effect that actually produces calming chemicals in the human body3. Weightlifters have noted feeling comfortable in blue rooms and that they could increase their number of reps compared to being in other colored rooms. The color blue is also known to suppress people’s appetites which aides to more focus on the task at hand. Green is also a color that can be used more frequently in weight rooms. In two separate studies, it was proven that seeing the color green before a workout stimulated motivation and increased the levels of endurance.4 People in this study also reported that their mood was even better following a workout in a green room, and their levels of energy were higher. In more aerobic rooms for cardiovascular exercise, the main goal is to include bright colors.5 These colors can be any range from red to yellow. The color red increases heart rate and breathing. A slight splash of red in the room can be just the right amount to rejuvenate the mind to finish the workout. However, red does tend to stimulate hunger and appetite, so it is a shade to be more careful about. The colors yellow and orange speed metabolism and creates feelings of enthusiasm and joyfulness. For yoga rooms, it is important to use calmer colors, as yoga is a type of meditation of the mind and body and requires each person to be peaceful and focused. Colors found from nature have a tendency to be more calming, which include ocean blues and grass greens.6 These evoke serene and peaceful feelings; ones we may encounter while in nature. The color black brings the feeling of power and strength, which may act as a good accent color in a yoga room, as well as other weight lifting rooms. It is important to note that the colors and sizes of certain rooms may have various effects on how a user may feel in a room. For example, darker colors should not be used in smaller, low-lit rooms, because it will give the room a dingy, dungeon-like feeling. The paint colors should also coordinate with the flooring so nothing seems out of place or mismatched. “Color creates psychological and physiological responses in people and the color of your gym can affect your workout.�7 Color choices can be vital to ensure that each user is inspired and motivated to workout.

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5.3

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technology in fitness 69


70

technology in fitness “Everything in our lives is getting smarter, except gyms.”1 In New York City, an emerging type of fitness center is drawing crowds of people who truly enjoy the time they spend there. This is because this gym is no ordinary gym. TMPL (pronounced “temple”) is a gym that incorporates technology and personalized-based workouts for every user. A majority of today’s gyms include the same aspects. An open layout fitness center with cardiovascular machines, weight lifting, weight lifting aided machines, and open weights. These may also include pools, courts, and multi-purpose rooms for events, sports, and classes. This TMPL gym has all of these, however the layout, spacing, environment, and technology of it all is much different. Each member as they join, can download an app and put a “metabolic profile” of their own in. Whenever a member then uses a machine, they scan their device which pulls up personalized workouts for their body type and health.2 This gives each person workouts of their own by just the click of a button; Opposed to un-technology based gyms where each member is on their own unless they seek help. The technology is only one aspect of the new gym; it also includes mood lighting, intense music and various individualized rooms for each function. Instead of a small area of open weights like in normal gyms, there is an entire 2,500 square foot room utilized for just open weights. This provides the opportunity for more people to work out what they need without having to wait in one crowded place. These individualized separate rooms also offers a sense of enhanced privacy for people who may feel uncomfortable working out in front of crowds of people. Other new technology based gyms are following additional trends as well. A spin studio in New York has turned their classrooms into a virtual reality-like room. The front of the classroom has a giant screen that plays video of different scenes and routes, as if the class was outdoors. Instead of staring at a blank wall or a wall of mirrors, this virtual reality workout provides a fun alternative that makes it feel more like a video game than a workout session.3 Another New York based fitness class called Asphalt Green’s AG6 class acts as a different kind of video game. The classroom is filled with pressure-sensitive interactive LED lights that provide up to fifty-five various “games” and exercises.4 The demographics for the class can range from beginners to advanced health enthusiasts. In today’s “Technology Age,” the new and upcoming fitness centers and interactive classes provide a unique workout experience that is unlike anything you would get out of a normal gym. Like any workout, you get out of it what you put into it; however the difference between these new technological gyms is that members truly enjoy and want to keep coming back.


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6

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existing site 73


City/Town/Village With a population of around one thousand, five-hundred sixty seven, four hundred and fifty-four, and ranked the fifth most populous in the United States, the city of Philadelphia is known as the largest, most diverse city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.1 Philadelphia is a city known for its rich history, and diverse cultures and traditions. From its creation in the seventeenth century by William Penn, its main layout is structured in a grid with long straight streets running east to west and north to south, to help make travel easy. Both the Delaware and Schuylkill rivers, from the beginning, have served as a type of boundary that this gridlocked street plan was laid in. Penn had also created five public parks throughout the city as to create a break of green space into the industrial city. These five parks, which still stand today, are Centre Square, Franklin Square, Logan Square, Rittenhouse Square, and Washington Square.2

Neighborhood The Municipal Pier 9 is located in the historical Penn’s Landing. Penn’s Landing along the Delaware River is a very essential part of history including William Penn’s arrival to the city. Penn’s Landing stretches around 10 blocks from Vine Street down to South Street. After Penn had arrived here in his “greene country towne,” the area quickly became the center of Philly’s “maritime soul” and where many people gather for events and festivities.3 On the south end of the stretch of land is an ampitheather, Blue Cross River Rink, parks, large vessels that sit along the land allowing people to dine, many restaurants, a seaport museum, the navy yard, and a world sculpture garden. Across the river, you can see Camden, New Jersey with its lit up riverside attractions as well, that is accessible by the Ben Franklin Bridge. Penn’s Landing brings in an influx of tourists and crowds of people, and is close enough to be able to walk around to Old City, Society Hill, and even Jersey across the way.

Street The Municipal Pier is located on Christopher Columbus Boulevard, which is a fairly busy street. Right off of I-95, it brings the overflow of traffic from the highway to its quaint attraction heavy street. The Race Street pier just north of Pier 9 is a newly updated park that enables the bustling people a chance to unwind and relax with a beautiful view of the river and foliage. It is picnic friendly with smaller events, like musicians playing at night, or even firework displays.4 Just below Pier 9 is another pier that houses a Condominium Complex and its Property Management Company.

Site Analysis As mentioned before, Pier 9 includes heavy transportation areas by vehicle or public transportation and walking. Columbus Boulevard runs parallel to I-95 which is a major highway leading to and from the city and towns around the outskirts. There is a neighboring town which is within walking distance by paths and crosswalks across I-95. Columbus Boulevard’s traffic pattern runs both ways, but is split directionally down the middle by a thin island of greenery. This makes crossing the street only slightly more difficult, but there are timed street lights and pedestrian crossings. The Race Street Pier and Ben Franklin Bridge just north of Pier 9 is good greenery view from the building which can be utilized by the opening up of that facing wall by glass. The sun also points at the building from that direction and has windows on the roof that allow ample amounts of sunlight in to the building. The pier runs on a flat strip that sticks out onto the river, but the only flaw it has is some slight foundation issues that would need fixing with more support.

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site analysis

75


76


77


7

78


Program Development

79


Qty.

S.F.

Total S.F.

Adjacencies

Equipment/Furniture

Finishes

Acoustics

Vestibule

1

50+/-

50+/-

Lobby/waiting, reception, circulation

N/A

weather durable

mildly needed

Lobby/waiting

1

100+/-

100+/-

foliage, seating

open lighting, durable

mildly needed

Reception

1

40+/-

40+/-

reception desk

open lighting, durable

700+/-

700+/-

Name

Circulation

Vestibule, reception, circulation Vestibule, lobby/waiting, circulation, admin offices

Reception, private restrooms Reception, admin offices

desks, cabinets, filing

carpet

mildly needed mildly needed much needed

toilet, sink

easily cleanable

N/A

durable

Admin Offices

4

50+/-

200+/-

Private Restrooms

2

60+/-

60+/-

CafĂŠ

1

80+/-

80+/-

Men's Locker Room

1

250+/-

250+/-

Lobby/waiting Circulation, pool, fitness center, gym

Women's Locker Room

1

250+/-

250+/-

Circulation, pool, fitness center, gym

lockers, showers, benches, stalls

durable, easily cleanable

mildly needed

Family Locker Room

1

280+/-

280+/-

lockers, showers, benches, stalls

durable, easily cleanable

mildly needed

cardio machines, lifting machines, water filter, open area

durable, easily cleanable

much needed

cafĂŠ bar with smoothies and snacks easily cleanable lockers, showers, benches, stalls durable

needed mildly needed

Fitness Center

1

1,000+/-

1,000+/-

Circulation, pool, fitness center, gym Circulation, locker rooms, fitness storage, openweights, PT office

Classrooms

4

120+/-

480+/-

Circulation

varies

durable, easily cleanable

much needed

Training Rooms

3

100+/-

300+/-

Fitness Center

beds for trainers and PT

durable, easily cleanable

needed

PT Office

3

50+/-

50+/-

Training rooms

desks, cabinets, filing

durable, easily cleanable

needed

Gymnasium

2

850+/-

1,700+/-

Circulation, Locker rooms

courts, bleachers

wood floor, glass windows

much needed

Indoor Running Track

1

n/a

n/a

Circulation, classrooms

N/A

durable, easily cleanable

mildly needed

80


Multi-purpose Room

1

1,000+/-

1,000+/-

Open-weight/Crossfit

1

1,000+/-

1,000+/-

Locker rooms, Circulation Locker rooms, fitness center, training rooms, PT

Daycare/Babysitting

1

450+/-

450+/-

Classrooms, Multipurpose

Pool Sauna Storage Pool Storage Multi-purpose Storage Fitness Storage Gymnasium Storage

1 2 2 1 1 1 1

2,000+/150+/120+/150+/120+/120+/120+/-

2,000+/150+/240+/150+/120+/120+/120+/-

Maintenance

1

100+/-

100+/-

Janitor's Closet

1

50+/-

50+/-

Mechanical Room

1

50+/-

50+/-

any storage rooms maintenance, data closet

Rock wall Area Vending

1 1

350+/20+/-

350+/20+/-

lobby, waiting lobby, waiting

Employee break room

1

250+/-

250+/-

Data Closet Total Sq. Footage

1

50+/-

50+/10,590 sq ft

offices mech. Room, maintenance

Locker rooms, sauna, pool storage Pool, locker rooms pool multi-purpose fitness center gym Mech. Room, data closet

moveable tables, chairs, bikes, equipment for durable, easily classes cleanable

much needed

open weights, squat bars, etc

durable, easily cleanable

much needed

toys, activities, storage

durable, easily cleanable

mildly needed

lap pool and kid pool benches shelving shelving shelving shelving shelving

tile, durable durable N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

much needed N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

N/A mop sink, cleaning supplies

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

rock wall vanding machines

durable, easily cleanable N/A

much needed N/A

kitchen, tables and chairs

durable, easily cleanable

mildly needed

N/A

N/A

N/A

81


test fits:

main level

82


mezzanine

running track

pool

lobby/waiting/reception

classrooms

locker rooms

open weights

gym court

pt

fitness center

multi-purpose

83


8

84


building analysis

85


building codes 1. Project Data Project name: NuWay Fitness and Health center Address: 121 North Christopher Columbus Boulevard Date of completion: january 2nd, 2017 number of stories: one total gross square footage: 47,600 sq. ft. 2. applicable building code information in philadelphia zoning ordinance: C3, general commercial district fire code: IFC 2009 Building Code and Date: international building code 2012 Energy Code: 2009 energy conservation code 3. use group classification Business - B 4. Means of Egress sprinklered: dead end limit: 50’ - 0” net square feet: 35,722 sq. ft. business: 7 occupants minimum corridor width: 44” number of exits: 3 minimum exit access travel distance: 200’ without sprinkler systems / 250’ with sprinkler system

86


5. sanitation : male/female percentage split: 50/50 wc male: 1 per 25 for the first 50 & 1 per 50 for the remainder exceeding 50 wc female: 1 per 25 for the first 50 & 1 per 50 for the remainder exceeding 50 lavoratories male: 1 per 40 for the first 80 & 1 per 80 for the remaincer exceeding 80 lavoratories female: 1 per 40 for the first 80 & 1 per 80 for the remaincer exceeding 80 drinking fountains: 1 per 100 6. fire protection requirements fire exit enclosures: 2 hours shafts and elevator holstways: 2 hours tenant space separations: 2 hours smoke barriers: assume 30 minutes corridor fire-resistant rating: 1 without sprinkler system / 0 with sprinkler system storage over 100 square feet: 1 hour, provide automatic fire extinguishing system 7. building limitations national historis registry: old city - historic district urban redevelopment requirements: philadelphia redevelopment authoritiesrequired to submit a proposal

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88


89


90


91


92


93


9

94


PROJECT RESEARCH SUMMARY

95


summary Through my research and programming of this Fitness and Health center, I can confidently say that the significance and need of this specific type-based building in its location for the community is very important. Fitness will always be a part of today’s society, but it is the distinct fitness and health centers that drive the want for users to keep coming back that are the most successful. The case studies and information provided through research backs up this theory. The centers that are more user-friendly and geared to pleasing all ranges of users are the ones that retain the most active members. This includes everything from the right amount of lighting, to the use of certain colors, and the various functions the building provides. The Municipal Pier located on the Delaware River is an ideal location to house this fitness and health center. It is complete with a great view of the river, plenty of square footage with the possibility of the addition of a mezzanine needed for multiple functions. Columbus Boulevard is a bustling street active with parks, hotels, venues, and the well-known Penns Landing that attract numbers of people. The goal of this project will be to utilize the space provided and create a fitness and health center that appeals to the needs of each individual. Through the use of technology and an open and inviting concept of planning and program, the space will achieve its goal in being an active building for its location. Each user will have their own personal experience and can make the space their own. The many functions will aide further improvements in each member’s journey to living a better and healthier life.

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“to keep the body in good health is a duty... otherwise we shall not be able to keep our mind strong and clear� ~buddha

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appendix

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“Philadelphia, The Original American Melting Pot.” NPR. Accessed December 02, 2016. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=92155970. Schulman, Michael. “David Barton Reinvents His Gym Empire.” The New York Times. The New York Times, 09 Mar. 2016. Web. “Spaces for Sports and Movement.” @GI_weltweit. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Aug. 2016. “SRC-HOME.” SRC-HOME. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Oct. 2016. http://recreation.ucr.edu/ Stenson, Jacqueline. “Another Hurdle to Exercise: Embarrassment.” NBCNews. com. NBCUniversal News Group, 06 Dec. 2006. Web. 03 Jan. 2017. “The Best Colors to Paint an Exercise Room.” LIVESTRONG.COM. April 20, 2015. Accessed December 02, 2016. http://www.livestrong.com/ article/405282-the-best-colors-to-paint-an-exercise-room/. “The History of Fitness Project.” Bodytribe Fitness. N.p., 31 Dec. 2009. Web. “The Psychology of Exercise.” Www.ideafit.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Dec. 2016. “UC Riverside Student Recreation Center Expansion / CannonDesign.” ArchDaily. N.p., 03 May 2016. Web. 04 Oct. 2016. Verrill, Courtney. “New York City’ High-tech Gym.” Business Insider. Business Insider, 28 Mar. 2016. Web. 18, 2015 June. “The Ideal Fitness Environment: Choosing the Right Gym.” Field Fit. N.p., 18 June 2015. Web.

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