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CCAIN is seribusiness and

The

Correspondent

The Newsletter for The Creative Arts Investment Network

ous about the commercial

Issue 5 - September 2010

Inside this Issue:

Treading the Boards

Treading the Boards

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CAIN takes a look at the UK theatre industry and explores the opportunities for digital theatre as a new way forward.

Network Update

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Overview from Network Director, Nicki Hattingh.

Propositions in the Pipeline

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A quick guide to future projects being presented through CAIN

Industry Focus - Theatre

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Theatre gets a digital makeover. Jackie Balchin reviews the latest trend in theatre.

A Little Fun

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Customer Service - Is CAIN getting it right?. A little theatre trivia

Industry Focus - Theatre

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Digital cinema and theatre : a virtuous circle. Drew Kaza of Odeon UCI Cinema Group gives his thought on the digitalisation of theatre.

Industry Focus - Theatre

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Can technology help with West End space issues? Jackie Balchin asks the technology question.

With an industry focus on Theatre for this edition of The CAIN Correspondent and the CAIN Awareness Event on Film for Angel Investors hailed a success by those attending, CAIN investors continue to support the UK film industry and West-End theatre with further investments into both sectors.

Industry Focus - Theatre

(Success stories on Page 10).

Network News

CAIN takes a look at the UK theatre industry and explores the exciting opportunities to utilise new technologies and considers digital theatre as a new way forward for theatre producers. Guest contributors, Drew Kaza from Odeon UCI Cinema Group and Michele Fabian-Jones from digital content producer, Lane Fabian Jones, give their thoughts on how digital technologies, live streaming and filmed theatre content might affect theatre production in the coming years.

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So what does digital theatre offer the audience? Michele Fabian Jones considers ‘Romancing the Subject’.

Editorial: The Anjali Dance Company

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Money Giving with a difference

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CAIN gets Social Film Event Success The Next Event A Little Light Reading

CAIN Company Success Stories

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Onassis Artemis Films

Contact Details

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Presentee Company Updates (members only) Status updates on the companies and projects already submitted to the CAIN membership and currently looking for investment will be sent to members in the next Monthly Update.

CAIN - The Creative Arts Investment Network

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The CAIN Correspondent

Issue 5 - September 2010

Network Update Propositions in the Pipeline Nicki Hattingh CAIN Founder & MD Welcome …. back from what appears to have been an extended Summer break for many of our members. Although we have not been particularly active with new propositions during these quieter Summer months, we have been updating our marketing materials and preparing for the new investment year, which has now started in earnest with the first of our Investor Awareness Events. (more details on page 9) I would like to extend a very warm welcome from the CAIN team to those new members that have joined us over the Summer and we look forward to working with you over the coming months.

CAIN is currently working with a number of creative arts companies to bring their propositions to our investor members in the near future. These include: •

CAIN is currently working with a company who have been given the opportunity to obtain the rights to both the life story and the music rights for a full-length feature film on the story of ’The Godfather of Soul’, James Brown. One of the partners in this film production company, a well-known screenplay writer, has been asked to write the screenplay by the daughter who is in control of the James Brown estate. There is also confirmed, written interest in the production funding from a major US film investment organisation.

CAIN is currently working with a well known and successful CGI family entertainment production and licensing company with a unique production process for delivering animation across multiple platforms simultaneously. With a steadily increasing order book, this company is already revenue generating and delivering content in CGI and 3D Stereoscopic formats.

CAIN is currently working with a well known film production company on the feature length film about a group of pub-friends who ultimately gamble their life savings and redundancy money on a race-horse. With an instantly recognisable cast already attached and interested in the project, this is a story with wide family appeal.

The New Investment Year The Network has settled into a series of three ‘terms’ for investment activity. The investment year for CAIN starts in September and will quieten over December and the first week of January. We then see a flurry of activity in February and March as investors tend to conclude their final deals prior to April and before the end of the tax year, and then we see a bright start to a new tax year with our third ‘term’ prior to the extended Summer break. New Investments Since our last Newsletter, CAIN members have recently contributed to the West End production of Onassis, starring Robert Lindsay, Artemis Films with a slate of first class projects in development and several of the Network’s members have also followed-up on their Legally Blonde interest with investment into the West End production of Sebastian Faulks’s Birdsong. (more details on page 10)

If you have any preliminary interest and/or would like further information on any of the above propositions, please do not hesitate to contact CAIN on admin@cainuk.com

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The CAIN Correspondent

Issue 5 – September 2010

Industry Focus : Theatre

Theatre gets a digital makeover Jackie Balchin reviews the latest trend in Theatre. In theatre, digital technology has mostly been associated with better lighting, set design, special effects and so on. However the world of theatre, taking a slice from the film and television industries, is ready to capitalise on broadcasting technology. For years the appeal, but also possibly the misfortune of the theatre, has been its limited location, and its exclusivity as it can only be seen at one time, in one place. Although this limits the selection of audiences, which can be a blessing at it creates a luxurious and elite experience for theatre goers, but it also limits others from attending, decreasing overall viewing numbers and therefore possible profits. However, since 2009, two major digital projects with the common aim to widen theatre’s reach around the Nation have changed the way we go to the theatre.

These statistics are most promising, as not only does ‘NT Live’ allow more audiences to view the theatre, but it is a also a further marketing tool as it encourages the Nation to make the trip to the theatre to enjoy the real thing. Additionally, NESTA research found that the ‘NT Live’ cinema experience draws a lower income audience, statistics reporting that a quarter of those watching earned less than £20,000 a year compared to 16% of theatre audience. Jonathan Kestenbaum, Chief Executive of NESTA commented, “Through new digital technologies, the performing arts have an exciting opportunity to reach wider audiences and generate new revenue streams. This is a prime example of how new technology can help change the dynamic of a traditional sector, bringing benefits for all.” (NESTA New Research Reveals audience thirst for ‘Digital Theatre’).

In June 2009, the National Theatre launched a pilot program, funded by NESTA, with the intent to broadcast live theatre performances via satellite through the widescreen of the cinema across the UK. The aim behind the pilot program called ‘NT Live’ is to make the theatre closer and more available to the nation.

Following the initial success ‘NT Live’ now broadcasts regular theatre productions through a variety of cinemas around the country and is currently in its second season, and expanding worldwide. NESTA commented further: “NT Live is part of a

Using the cinema increases the proximity to people, and additionally it maximises on the existing relationship with the cinema and the public.

‘Live’ has pulling power

series of work to find ways that digital technologies can support traditional creative industries and extend their audience reach.”

The first results from the initial broadcast of Racine’s Phedre, starring Helen Mirren, have been beyond successful.

More evidence showed that 48% of cinema audiences felt real excitement because they knew that the performance was happening at that precise time and even more promising news reported that 48% would have watched a live streaming online, had it been available.

89% of cinema audiences confirmed they plan to attend more live cinema screenings in the future and after having watched the broadcast, a third stated that experiencing ‘NT Live’ has made them more likely to attend another broadcast in the future, with 37% being more likely to attend the National Theatre.

These statistics should be well received by ‘The Digital Theatre,’ another commercial venture launched in 2009, set up by directors Robert Delamere and TV and Radio producer Tom Shaw, also with the intent to make the theatre more accessible to the nation. Continued Overleaf

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The CAIN Correspondent

Theatre gets a digital makeover

Issue 5 - September 2010 (Continued from Page 4)

‘The Digital Theatre’ works in partnership with Britain’s leading theatres, including the The Royal Shakespeare Company, The Royal Court and The Young Vic, in order to capture live authentic performances and stream them online. Although delivering their content differently from the ‘NT Live’ program, as the streams can be watched at any time, the performance is live and similarly to ‘NT Live’ it is easily accessible, if not more accessible to audiences and also widens the variety of audience.

A LITTLE THEATRE TRIVIA Longevity in Theatre = Longevity in returns on investment? You decide. Top Ten Longest Running Shows

By using multiple camera angles and high definition technology, the viewer is promised access to the theatre experience from the comfort of their own homes. This I-player inspired initiative, allows the viewer autonomy in where, how and when to watch the play/musical of their choice.

The Mousetrap - 57 years Les Miserables - 24 years The Phantom of the Opera - 23 years

In an article by The Stage on ‘Digital Theatre,’ Royal Court Director, Dominic Cooke said:

Blood Brothers - 21 years The Woman in Black - 20 years

“The potential of digital technology to connect with a worldwide audience is genuinely exciting.” (The Stage)

Chicago - 12 years

These two initiatives are surely just the first stepping-stones of digital technology in theatre and a step in the right direction to continue to play a key role in the growth of the theatre sector and ultimately the UK economy. By widening the range of mediums and venues to view the theatre, more people can now watch a live play, or musical. This creates more revenue, as ticket profits wont just be based on the night’s performance at the theatre.

Mamma Mia! - 10 years Disney’s The Lion King - 10 years We Will Rock You - 7 years

This could be exciting news for angel investors as new avenues for potential revenue streams are being created to increase the potential for recoupment and profit margins for theatrical productions. (‘NT Live’ is partnered with Picturehouse, Odeon and Cineworld chains and several independent cinemas across the UK and over 170 cinemas abroad including the USA, Canada, Australia, Scandinavia and Europe).

Stomp - 7 years

(Data from officiallondontheatre.co.uk)

A little fun… At CAIN we pride ourselves on our customer service levels for both investors and presentee companies, so we thought we would share these customer service jokes with you - from those that don’t share our principles!

“ Thank you for calling CAIN. If you are a calm and rational Investor, press 1. If you’re a demanding Director, press 2 and if you are a hot headed Producer, press 3.” CAIN - The Creative Arts Investment Network

“Thank you for calling CAIN. This call may be monitored so we can play it back to your mother if you are rude or use bad words.”

“Thank you for calling CAIN. We are currently experiencing a high number of submissions to the Network. At this time, we’d like to remind you to eat and drink at regular intervals. Thank you for continuing to hold” 4


The CAIN Correspondent

Issue 5 - September 2010

Industry Focus : Theatre Digital Cinema & Theatre : A virtuous circle Industry expert, Drew Kaza (EVP Digital Development - Odeon UCI Cinemas Groups) gives his thoughts on the digitalisation of theatre. Whilst 3D film has understandably been hogging the spotlight around the cinema industry’s dramatic push from 35mm into digital technology, there has been another big beneficiary over the past 12—18 months: non-filmed entertainment, such as opera, sport and live theatre. The latter has been one of the most recent entries in the so-called “alternative-content:” realm of digital cinema. With pioneering efforts like NT Live, the cinema business in the UK, and elsewhere in Europe and North America are starting to find that theatre-goers are everywhere and not just in London’s West End or on Broadway. From the perspective of an exhibitor like Odeon, the advent of live theatre for cinema distribution is a complete “win-win” proposition. It provides us and more importantly, Odeon guests, with a distinct and unique high-quality event to promote. It helps us drive in a typically underserved audience, many of whom may have not trod the aisles of their local cinema for years, back to our screens. And perhaps best of all, it is easily programmed into one of the cinema’s “off-peak” nights like Monday or Tuesday, when candidly many auditoria can be like a ghost town without a major event such as World Cup football, the Royal Opera House or NT Live to spur attendance.

Results to date have been highly promising, although admittedly inconsistent. Big name productions, such as Phedre with Helen Mirren, were sell-outs in many locations and proved so successful that they end up as one of the top 3 “films” in terms of box office performance for those dates.

How high is up? With groups like Odeon, Cineworld and Vue all announcing digital deployment deals to facilitate the full roll-out of digital kit across their estates, the UK market will soon move from 15-20% digital penetration to 75-80% over the next 2-3 years. That development alone will greatly increase availability of non-film programming, such as theatre, to digital-availed screens. The propensity of most exhibitors to expand 3D, which again requires digital, suggests that there will be plenty of capacity for 3D experiments on live events as well. Already for 2011, the Royal Opera House has announced its intention to produce at least one ballet and one opera in 3D and the National Theatre is expressing similar interest. One thing is sure: If content owners produce for the cinema, we will do all we can to give it a proper cinema window. But windows, the timing of the theatrical run, star power and availability of the production through other means are all factors that will impact the relationship with cinema. As with most nascent business projects, this one will continue to be tweaked over time. However, the future is certainly burning bright for live (or “as live”) theatre productions enabled by digital projection into cinemas — as bright as the old-fashioned “footlights” or the super luminous lamps that power the digital projectors of tomorrow.

Those shows with less-established performers or attendant hype still normally play well in some of our “highest brow” markets (places like Brighton and Tunbridge Wells come to mind). But even where they are not huge hits, the results are usually good enough on early weeknight to outperform most of the other films in rota at that cinema.

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The CAIN Correspondent

Issue 5—September 2010

Industry Focus : Theatre Can technology help with West End space issues? As theatre plays are remaining popular for longer and new cast members are being introduced on a rotational basis to rejuvenate plays and musicals, the longevity of the theatre play or musical is incalculable. This longevity success however is increasingly building up a queue of new, fresh productions waiting in line for their turn to shine at the West End whilst other more seasoned productions continue to steal the limelight. For example, Les Miserable, the longest running musical in the West End at the Queen’s Theatre has been running for 24 years and is still going strong, so much so that the Barbican will be running a “limited production” of Les Miserable in Autumn from the 23rd September till the 2nd October to mark its 25th anniversary where new staging, re-imagined scenery inspired by the paintings of Victor Hugo will be designed for the musical. Les Miserable originally opened at the Barbican in 1985, so it would seem very fitting to mark its 25th anniversary in the place of its “birth.” It is now one of the world’s best-loved musicals produced in 38 countries and translated in 21 different languages and it proved so popular in the States that a Broadway production that opened in 1987 won eight Tony Awards. Its 25th anniversary not only marks its popularity and success but it will also be the first time anywhere in the world that two productions of the same musical will be playing in the same city, and with 22 performances it will give London theatre-goers a chance to see this new acclaimed production. Nevertheless this success poses the question:

When is the right time to pull the plug and give a new production the opportunity to shine? There is no right time to call it a day when productions are still successful and although all theatre producers aspire to open their shows in the West End, as it is THE theatre destination in the UK, like Broadway in New York, other options need to be explored if space is tight and theatres are in short supply.

The West End is seen as a theatre destination for theatre-goers and attracts many from around the country. Not being able to partake in the cache that the West End offers is unfortunate. However, perhaps it is now very timely for upcoming theatre producers to look for new distribution methods, such as the Digital Theatre? Digital Theatre was in fact created upon recognising that many productions only had short theatrical runs, as mentioned on the Arts and business organisation website case studying the Digital Theatre. “The theatres wanted to give these productions longevity, but it wasn’t always practical to provide it through a live arena. Such constraints meant that many potential theatre-goers were not able to attend, either for reasons of time or even geography. Digital Theatre is a way to combat this and reach more people.” Digital theatre does not require the play or musical to be at the West End, and once it is captured on camera it does not require it to be live when being streamed, contrary to the NT Live offer, where the National Theatre needs the play or musical to be “live” on stage when it is streaming through the cinema screen. Digital Theatre therefore provides a possibility of longevity for plays and captures audiences from around the country and oversees that do not have the possibility to make it to the real thing. It also provides quite an intimate experience and is transforming the way we see theatre and associate with it. The use of technological programs such as the Digital Theatre could therefore be the answer to the lack of space in the West End and other theatres nationwide, as well as widening the catchment area of an audience and attracting more people to participate in theatre. It is a new route to be explored and gives us a glimpse of how the theatre industry is changing and taking on more nontraditional routes to finding and building a larger audience and developing alternative revenue streams. However, for those who insisting on only having their play or musical on a West End stage, there is only one thing left for them and that is a long, winding queue. Jackie Balchin - September 2010

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The CAIN Correspondent

Issue 5—September 2010

Industry Focus : Theatre So what does Digital Theatre Offer the Audience? Romancing the Subject Michele Fabian-Jones of Lane Fabian Jones, offers her thoughts on the dynamic and immersive experience that digitally filmed production of theatre offers the audience, particularly the opportunity for 3D and Stereoscopic productions.

Imagine the excitement of sitting in the middle of a stage production, being able to watch a closeup of the speed and precision of a Spanish guitar player and footwork of a flamenco dancer or the intricate poise and beauty of a ballet dancer as she raises onto her points, or an opera diva’s face and bosom as she takes that deep breath to hit the right note. All this detail, body language, strength, beauty, finesse and passion can be captured when theatre and stage productions are filmed. When you film in Stereo 3D, you romance the subject even further. The audience will now be part of the emotional journey. You will see those beads of sweat, or the pronounced muscle tone and the pure, raw emotion that makes an exceptional performance. No matter how close you are to the subjects on the stage in a live performance, you are still a remote observer, no matter how good the seat is, you watch the whole show from one angle. 3D Stereoscopic production will give audiences that immersive experience either in the cinema environment, or as 3D televisions become the new must-have entertainment centre, in the home environment. To become technical, 3D (three-dimensional) or S3D (stereoscopic 3D) film is a motion picture that enhances the illusion of depth perception. Derived from stereoscopic photography, a special motion picture camera system is used to record the images as seen from two perspectives (or computer-generated imagery (CGI) generates the two perspectives and special projection hardware and/or eyewear are used to provide the illusion of depth when viewing the film. (Description from Wikipedia) CAIN - The Creative Arts Investment Network

For theatre and stage-show producers, filming a production for cinema screening or live streaming offers not only the opportunity to widen the audience reach, but an opportunity for ancillary revenue streams to be created with a longevity capable of outlasting the original staged production. Sky Sports is already delivering this experience for live football and rugby matches, which is enhancing supporter enjoyment of the games. Nothing will seemingly replace the special atmosphere that is ’being there’ at the live show, event or spectacle. However, as we already experience with sport, watching on the television or on the large cinema screen offers the viewer more detail from a close-up view of the action. Filming live theatre shows in this way will genuinely give the audience a dynamic entertainment experience that is not available from a fixed seat position in a theatre or at a live event. The future for theatre and live events is bright - the future is very clearly, digital.

Further information on LFJ can be found at www.lanefabianjones.com

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The CAIN Correspondent

Issue 5 - September 2010

Industry Focus : Theatre

In the interests of supporting all creative art forms and those charitable organisations that fall within the CAIN remit, CAIN will seek to produce editorial on one carefully selected project to promote for each edition of The CAIN Correspondent. This theatre-focused edition of the Newsletter sees the introduction of The Anjali Dance Company.

The Anjali Dance Company is a pioneering and • internationally renowned professional contemporary dance company and a world leader in developing the creativity of people with learning disabilities through dance. All of Anjali’s dancers have learning disabilities. The Company pursues its aims by creating and touring original dance works of excellence, developing professional training structures for its dancers and others and by running integrated education and outreach programmes. Over ten years of vital dance making, Anjali Dance Company has worked with some of the best choreographic talent in the UK including, Mathew Hawkins, Claire Russ, Charlotte Vincent, New Art Club, Maresa von Stockert and Luca Silvestrini and performed at venues throughout the UK and abroad from the Royal Festival Hall, The Place and the Royal Opera House and in Berlin, Madrid and Lisbon. Among Anjali’s many achievements, the most recent are: •

A commission to make a section of the opening ceremony of the UK Special Olympics in front of a crowd of 25,000 people.

The selection of Anjali’s Youth Dance company from hundreds nationwide to be one of the 12 companies taking part in the U. Dance National platform at the Birmingham Hippodrome.

The permanent salaried employment of two people with learning disabilities in the staff team working on education projects, funded by the Paul Hamlyn Foundation.

The selection of the Company’s latest work, Genius, for the Arts Council England sponsored international showcase, Decibel, in September 2009 in Manchester.

CAIN - The Creative Arts Investment Network

Developing a network of regular weekly dance teaching to a high standard for people with learning disabilities aged seven upwards in five locations in Oxfordshire, in the majority of which a skilled dancer with a learning disability is the assistant tutor. The promotion of an annual gala performance at the Company’s base at the Mill Arts Centre, which involves around 60 people with learning disabilities of all ages who take part in a full range of Anjali’s activities.

Anjali Dance Company is a registered charity and our friends, supporters, trustees and staff work all year to raise funds needed to run all our activities to an excellent standard. To celebrate the achievements of people with learning disabilities, we rely on donations and grants from individuals, companies, charitable trusts and foundations, local authorities and government agencies such as the Arts Council England. Although the Company squeezes maximum value out of every pound of income it remains a difficult task for a small organisation to raise the sums needed. Longer term grants recently donated, such as the Esme Fairbairn Foundation and the Paul Hamlyn Foundation, have made a significant difference, but Anjali needs a larger base of supporters. If you would like to help Anjali Dance Company continue this vital work, there are a number of ways you can do so. You can make an individual donation either online at www.anjali.co.uk or by cheque to our office address. Anjali will automatically receive gift aid on online donations unless you choose to give anonymously or opt out of the scheme. For further information on Anjali, please do not hesitate to contact CAIN.

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The CAIN Correspondent

Issue 5 - September 2010

Network News: CAIN gets social

The Next Event

Facebook and Twitter Pages now provide live, up-to-date, real-time information for CAIN’s social Network.

The next CAIN awareness event, ‘Understanding the Business of Theatre for Angel Investors’ is scheduled for:

CAIN has now established a public Facebook Page, which will be an extension of the information we provide on the CAIN website. This PAGE is open to the public and can be accessed through the page: CAIN—Creative Arts Investment Network.

Thursday 28 October 2010 In Central London

CAIN has also established a general CAIN Twitter Page, which will be an extension of the information we provide on the CAIN website. This Page is open to the public and can be accessed through: CAINangels. A private, members-only group has also been established for CAIN members on Facebook and Twitter, giving up-to-date updates on our presentee companies and information on up-coming projects that the Network is currently working on, but is yet to officially present to members. For further information, please contact CAIN.

Speakers include: Paul Renney of Keystone Law, Guy Chapman of Target Live and Steven Anderson of Anderson & Pennington. If you are an Angel Investor and would like further information on this event, please do not hesitate to contact CAIN.

A Little Light Reading …..

Film event success

The CAIN team were invited to a rather interesting book launch last week by one of CAIN’s illustrious members.

The CAIN awareness event ‘Understanding the Business of Film for Angel Investors’ was hailed as a big success by those attending.

Inspired by Rudyard Kipling’s Just So Stories, the ‘Just When Stories’ is a collection of nineteen new short stories by some of the World’s greatest authors, about the World’s most endangered animals. Published in aid of WildAid and The David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation’s campaigns to fight the illegal wildlife trade.

80% of the respondents to our event questionnaire said they learned what they set out to learn from this introductory overview of the sector. Although only 20% of respondents were currently investors in film, one very pleasing statistic is that 80% of the respondents said this introductory overview event had given them the confidence to now explore the opportunities to invest into film. So we feel that we got the mix of speakers and the tone and level of the information right for an introduction to the film sector. Specific events focusing on film financing and law will be scheduled for 2011.

Be inspired by stories that will take you deep into the animal kingdom, and experience life from a completely different point of view. Enter the minds of a giant tortoise and an elephant, fly with cranes and learn about courage, selfbelief and patience in the footsteps of a loris. Explore a whole new World. Eye opening, meticulously observed and entertaining, the stories capture the imagination and force us to ask some serious questions: Are we protecting our wildlife? Could we do more? Why are certain species becoming extinct? What can we do to stop it? The book can be purchased from Beautiful Books for £14:99 by using the link below. http://www.beautiful-books.co.uk/ tamara-gray-/79-just-when-stories-.html

CAIN Founder, Nicki Hattingh at the CAIN awareness event

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The CAIN Correspondent

Issue 5 - September 2010

CAIN Company Success Stories

Onassis CAIN investors support Robert Lindsay as Onassis

CAIN is delighted to announce that it has secured angel investment for the West End production of Martin Sherman’s Onassis. Directed by Nancy Meckler, the cast is led by Tony and Olivier Award winning, Robert Lindsay, as he reprises his performance as Aristotle Onassis, with other cast members including Anna Francolini as Maria Callas, Lydia Leonard as Jacqueline Kennedy as well as Tom Austen, Liz Crowther, Ben Grove, Robert Hastie, John Hodgkinson, Sue Kelvin, Graeme Taylor and Dawn Grainger. Onassis is a story about sex, money, and power and is inspired by the true story of the courtship and marriage of Onassis, the most powerful shipping magnate of his time, to Jackie Kennedy. Onassis is inspired by the story of the relationship between Aristotle Onassis, Jackie Kennedy and their extended families, and the great opera diva, Maria Callas. The play begins its West End run at London’s Novello theatre with previews from September 30th 2010, booking until January 8th 2011.

Artemis Films CAIN secures investment for Artemis Films.

CAIN is delighted to announce that it has secured angel investment for World Class independent production company, Artemis Films. Artemis has recently produced The Tempest, directed by Julie Taymor and starring Helen Mirren, Ben Whishaw, Djimon Hounsou, Alfred Molina and Russell Brand, with a release date from Disney scheduled to coincide with an Academy campaign for December 2010. Described by Variety and The Hollywood Reporter as the major festival ‘must have film’ The Tempest has been selected for both the closing film at The Venice Film Festival and the prestigious “Centrepiece” screening at the New York film festival. Artemis has also recently completed production on Ralph Fiennes’ Directorial debut, Coriolanus, starring Ralph Fiennes, Gerard Butler, Vanessa Redgrave and Brian Cox, which is currently in post-production and scheduled for release in February 2011 by Lionsgate. It will headline at Berlin festivals in 2011. Artemis Films is currently producing Mystica, an atmospheric supernatural thriller. The story of love, murder and supernatural is set against the backdrop of the Venice Carnival and is Artemis founder, Julia Taylor-Stanley’s screenplay based on her acclaimed novel. The production company currently has a slate of films in development, including The Ambassadors, adapted by Jane Dulin Jones from the masterwork by Henry James; Lollipop a film by Elaine Wickham starring Brenda Blethyn, Joanne Whalley and Hugh Bonnoville; Twitching, a great British comedy in tradition of the Full Monty and Bend It Like Beckham and starring Terrence Stamp and Phil Glenister (Life on Mars); and Nothing But The Blues, a metaphysical script in the tradition of Frank Kapra, which beautifully illustrates the world of blues and jazz musicians in Chicago.

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The CAIN Correspondent

Issue 5 - September 2010

CAIN Contact Details: CAIN Contact Details: Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Facebook: Twitter:

01869 337269 01869 337269 admin@cainuk.com www.cainuk.com CAIN—Creative Arts Investment Network CAINangels

Postal Address: PO Box 662, Banbury, Oxon, OX16 6GT

Further Information If you would like further information on any of the articles in this Newsletter, or would like to comment or submit editorial, please contact: admin@cainuk.com

CAIN Business Details The Creative Arts Investment Network Ltd Registered in England No 6581268 Registered Offices: 5th Floor Minories House, 2-5 Minories, London EC3N

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CAIN Newsletter  

A newsletter highlighting the latest trends and issues in the entertainment industry, film, theatre and music.

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