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JUNE 2019

JUNE 2019

June 28

2019

Palm Springs

Lanes 5:00pm 68051 Ramon Rd Cathedral City

I’m Not

“Joking” this time! There are Spectator Tickets for Only $20

Title Sponsor

Sign up at www.cai-cv.org or call the CAI-CV office (760) 341-0559.

CAI-CV 760-341-0559 SIGN UP TODAY

$20

Includes Dinner and Door Prize Opportunity

Batman!

You need more info!


Grand Prize Sponsor

Title Sponsor

Lane Sponsors ALBERT MANAGEMENT, INC. ALLIED UNIVERSAL AMS PAVING ASPHALT MD'S ASSOCIA DESERT RESORT MANAGEMENT BRS ROOFING CARTWRIGHT TERMITE & PEST CONTROL, INC. CONSERVE LANDCARE EMPIREWORKS FLOOD RESPONSE FRAZIER PEST CONTROL, INC. HORIZON LIGHTING NPG ASPHALT O'CONNELL LANDSCAPE X2 PACIFIC WESTERN BANK PRO LANDSCAPING, INC. ROOF ASSET MANAGEMENT X4 S.B.S. LIEN SERVICES SCT RESERVE CONSULTANTS SUNSHINE LANDSCAPE X2 VANTAGE POINT CONSTRUCTION WESTERN PACIFIC ROOFING X2

LANES AVAILABLE

Cartwright Termite & Pest Control, inc.

DIVERSIFIED ASPHALT PRODUCTS

Greeting Sponsor

WristBand Sponsor

Strike Sponsors

Dessert Sponsor

DSI SECURITY SERVICES

EPSTEN GRINNELL & HOWELL, APC VISTA PAINT CORPORATION

Bar Sponsors

M.C. BUILDERS, INC.

O’CONNELL LANDSCAPE

Popcorn Sponsors

BEHR PAINTS FIORE RACOBS & POWERS, A PLC GREEN BRYANT & FRENCH, LLP PACIFIC WESTERN BANK

ASSOCIA DESERT RESORT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIA ONCALL

Scholarship Sponsor

Food Sponsor

EAGLE ROOFING PRODUCTS

Lane Assignment Sponsors

AVAILABLE

DUNN-EDWARDS PAINT

LABARRE/OKSNEE INSURANCE AGENCY ROOF ASSET MANAGEMENT

CLAC Sponsor

WHAT T HE AVAILA'S BILITY BATMAN?

CAI-CV Hero Charity ANIMAL SAMARITANS Animal Samaritans is a non-profit animal welfare organization committed to saving the lives of healthy and treatable animals, offering low-cost spay and neuter; low-cost vaccinations; microchipping; shelter and care; and adoptions to lifelong homes. Bring Kirkland dog or cat food, or COSTCO gift cards to support our hero charity!

Door Prizes Needed! Call the CAI-CV office (760) 341-0559 or Email Admin@CAI-CV.org 2

Quorum June, 2019


MAKING [COMMUNITY]

HAPPEN Secure your community’s future with national resources and local expertise. Associa Desert Resort Management is uniquely positioned to help your community accomplish any goals. Top-tier management, comprehensive maintenance and a customizable menu of additional services ensure your community thrives, and our local, qualified staff are committed to being your trusted advisors every step of the way.

CONTACT US TODAY! 42-635 Melanie Place | Suite 103 Palm Desert, CA 92211 | 760.346.1161

www.drminternet.com

CAI-CV.org

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@CAI-CV

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2019 QUORUM COMMITTEE MEMBERS

CONTENTS CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

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CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

JENNIFER JAMES, ESQ., CHAIR Green Bryant & French, LLP RODNEY BISSELL, CO-CHAIR Bissell Design Studios, Inc. GEN WANGLER, ESQ., CCAL, BOARD LIAISON Fiore Racobs & Powers, A PLC KIMBERLY BURNETT DSI Security Services DIANE CARMONY Coachella Valley Water District SIERRA CARR, CMCA Trilogy La Quinta

CAI-CV

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EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

DEA FRANCK, ESQ. Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC LISA GLOGOW, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, CCAM® PowerStone Property Management BRUCE LATTA, CMCA Parc La Quinta MARNE LOGAN, CCAM The Management Trust Desert Division GRACE PALUCK, CMCA The Management Trust Desert Division KUMAR S. RAJA, ESQ. Tinnelly Law Group MIKE REY Rey Insurance Services A FARMERS® Insurance Agency

24 CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

SUSAN BROWNE ROSENBERG Desert Cities Indoor Air, LLC STEVEN SHUEY, PCAM Personalized Property Management JOSH WIDENMANN MRC Smart Technology Solutions A Xerox Company CREATIVE DIRECTOR & GRAPHIC DESIGNER

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FEATURES 12

The Importance of Building Ordinance & Law Coverage By Mike Rey

18

Ten Ways to Keep the Lawyers at Bay By Kelly G. Richardson, Esq. CCAL

24 Six Ways to Make Community Budgeting Easier By Sierra Carr, CMCA

30 Plant Replacement Budgets By Marne Logan, CCAM 4

Quorum June, 2019

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

RODNEY BISSELL Bissell Design Studios, Inc. rodney@bisselldesign.com (714) 293-3749

ARTICLE SUBMISSIONS OR ADVERTISING INFORMATION admin@cai-cv.org SUBSCRIBER SERVICES

The Coachella Valley Quorum Magazine is a publication expressly prepared for association leaders, managers and related business professionals of the Community Associations Institute. Members are encouraged to submit articles for publishing consideration. All articles accepted for publication in Quorum are subject to editing and rewriting by the Quorum Committee. Quorum Magazine is printed at the CAI-CV Office on a Xerox Versant 180 Press. Discounted printing is now available to CAI members. Call Bissell Design Studios, Inc. at (714) 293-3749 or the CAI-CV office for more information, (760) 345-0559.


ADVERTISERS ACCOUNTANTS & BOOKKEEPERS BRABO & CARLSEN, LLP................................. 21

ASPHALT AMS PAVING.................................................... 34 ASPHALT MD'S................................................ 29 DIVERSIFIED ASPHALT PRODUCTS................. 16 NPG ASPHALT.................................................. 43

ATTORNEYS FIORE RACOBS & POWERS, A PLC.................. 33 GREEN BRYANT & FRENCH, LLP...................... 27 GURALNICK & GILLILAND................................ 21

CONSTRUCTION VANTAGE POINT CONSTRUCTION, INC............ 19

DESIGN BISSELL DESIGN STUDIOS, INC....................... 42

GATES & GARAGE DOORS

22

AUTOMATION PRIDE........................................ 21

LANDSCAPING CONSERVE LANDCARE.................................... 21

CHAPTER NEWS

DEPARTMENTS

7 CAI-CV New & Renewing Members 31 Welcome Aboard

6 President’s Message 9 Security

Karen Sloat By Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH

35 Time Honored

Jennifer James By Grace Paluck, CMCA, CamEx, CCAM

35 CAI-CV Educated Business Partners 44 2019 Corporate Sponsors

MANAGEMENT

Thermal Radar By Kimberly Burnett

ASSOCIA DESERT RESORT MANAGEMENT....... 3

PEST CONTROL

Heading Out For The Season? By Lisa Glogow, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, CCAM

CARTWRIGHT TERMITE & PEST CONTROL...... 33 POWERFUL PEST MANAGEMENT.................... 42

REALTORS

26 Maintenance

PALM SPRINGS REGIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS.................................................. 29

22 Lunch Program and Mini Trade Show

44 Upcoming Chapter Events

PRO LANDSCAPING INC................................... 34

11 Platinum Spotlight

Friday, May 10, 2019 Rainy Day Fund: How to Keep Your Reserves Healthy

WATER RITE - VINTAGE ASSOCIATES, INC...... 19

10 Managers' Corner

CHAPTER EVENTS

PWLC II, INC. LANDCARE MANAGEMENT........ 42

Sunshine Landscape

How to Properly SPEC Out a Successful Commercial Pool Replaster Request By Alan Smith

RESERVE STUDIES ADVANCED RESERVE SOLUTIONS, INC. ......... 34

ROOFING

32 Water Wise

CVWD Bus Tours Are a Great Way to Learn About Local Water Resources By Coachella Valley Water District

36 About CLAC

A Buck-A-Door Helps Protect HOA Home Values By CAI-CV

CAI-CV.org

BRS ROOFING INC. ......................................... 19 ROOF ASSET MANAGEMENT........................... 42 SUNTECH ROOFING......................................... 21 WESTERN PACIFIC ROOFING........................... 34

SECURITY AMS CONNECT................................................ 43 facebook.com/CAICV

@CAI-CV

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FROM THE CHAPTER

President’s Message Mike Traidman Mira Vista at Mission Hills HOA

CAI-CV stood out among CAI’s 64 chapters last month as we received seven national chapter achievement awards in front of more than 2,000 members attending CAI’s National Conference in Orlando. We can all be proud of our achievements. The National Conference was packed with useful presentations, a fantastic trade show and some fun evenings with our local chapter members. Additionally, Cal Lockett and Matt Lawton attended leadership training and Cal presented our achievements to the other executive directors–seven presentations over four days. We also facilitated a productive meeting with the other California chapter presidents and presidents-elect to begin discussions on how to coordinate efforts and share best practices. Among the ideas discussed was the possibility of offering a California Certification program for community board members. We will keep you posted in Quorum as this idea takes shape. I want to thank Roxi Bardwell, PCAM (Advanced Reserve Solutions) for teaching our second Assistant Manager on the Run (AMOTR) program on May 3rd. The program was focused on understanding financial statements from a manager’s perspective. The surveys after the class showed that this new AMOTR program is a success. If you are an assistant manager or would like your assistant to attend our July 12th class, you can sign up now online. The Programs Committee did another outstanding job with our May 10th Educational Lunch Program & Mini Trade Show that focused on Reserve Studies. Mike Graves, RS (SCT Reserve Consultants) and Sharron Badham, PCAM (Associa Desert Resort Management) provided an informative and humorous presentation. Thank you, Mike and Sharron, for your time and efforts on our behalf. On June 7th, the Business Partner Committee will team up with the Education Committee for our annual MOTR/Summer Sizzler event at the CAI-CV office. For this event, managers are invited to attend the one-hour MOTR class on “How to Deal with Board and Demographic Changes” and then migrate to Margaritaville Summer Sizzler where there will be games, music, margaritas and a Mexican buffet. Community board members and managers may attend the Summer Sizzler for free. Our next Educational Lunch Program & Mini Trade Show will be Friday, June 14th, at Palm Valley Country Club. Our guest speakers will be John Beaman, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, LSM (The Management Trust) and Mark Dodge, CMCA, AMS (Associa Desert Resort Management) who will tell us how to survive another year of minimum wage increases and give us pointers on budgeting for the future. Our annual Bowling Tournament will be held at Palm Springs Lanes on Friday, June 28th. All CAI-CV members are invited to attend the bowling festivities. Spectator tickets are on sale now. Also, don’t forget to save the date of Thursday, July 18th, for the CAI-CV Annual Day at the Races. We have booked the sixth-floor IL PALIO restaurant again and will provide first-class bus transportation to and from the Del Mar Thoroughbred Club. This is a great time for networking. I encourage you to sign up for this amazing day away from the desert heat. Seats are limited, so sign up soon. I wish you all a fantastic June.

Mike Traidman

Mike Traidman, Mira Vista at Mission Hills HOA

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Quorum June, 2019


CAI-CV NEW & RENEWING MEMBERS

2019 COACHELLA VALLEY CHAPTER BOARD OF DIRECTORS MIKE TRAIDMAN PRESIDENT Mira Vista at Mission Hills HOA MATT LAWTON, CIC, CIRMS PRESIDENT-ELECT Prendiville Insurance Agency

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

MARGARET "GEN" WANGLER, ESQ., CCAL PAST-PRESIDENT Fiore Racobs & Powers, A PLC JOLEN ZEROSKI, CMCA TREASURER Union Bank

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

DEA FRANCK, ESQ. SECRETARY Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

CARDINAL AMBROSE, CMCA, AMS, PCAM DIRECTOR Associa Desert Resort Management MICHA BALLESTEROS DIRECTOR Flood Response

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

RHONDA DREWS, CMCA, AMS, PCAM DIRECTOR Associa Desert Resort Management LONI PETERSON, CMCA, AMS, PCAM DIRECTOR Associa Desert Resort Management STEVEN SHUEY, PCAM DIRECTOR Personalized Property Management LOUISE STETTLER DIRECTOR Palm Valley Country Club HOA

CAI Coachella Valley Office 75410 Gerald Ford Drive, Suite 102 Palm Desert, CA 92211 Tel: (760) 341-0559 Fax: (760) 341-8443 Website: www.cai-cv.org CAL LOCKETT Executive Director clockett@cai-cv.org The materials contained in this publication are designed to provide our members with timely and authoritative information; however, the CAI Coachella Valley Chapter is not engaging in the rendering of legal, accounting or other professional types of services. The Coachella Valley Chapter has not verified and/or endorsed the contents of these articles or advertising. Readers should not act on the information contained herein without seeking more specific professional advice from legal, accounting or other experts as required.

NEW BUSINESS PARTNERS

NEW MANAGER MEMBERSHIPS

BORAL ROOFING Shannon Delgado (800) 669-8453 sdelgado@boralroofing.com

SEABREEZE MANAGEMENT COMPANY, INC. AAMC Alisa Toalson (951) 808-3587 alisa.toalson@seabreezemgmt.com

EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS Eric Mosser (760) 333-5193 eric.mosser@edwardjones.com SUSTAINABLE WATER SOLUTIONS Rick Reinmuth (619) 972-1100 rick@sustainablewatersolutions.us

RENEWING BUSINESS PARTNERS BIG SKY GATE KEEPER Patrick Ross (760) 346-9090 bigskygatekeeper1@verizon.net BISSELL DESIGN STUDIOS INC. Rodney Bissell (714) 293-3749 rodney@bisselldesign.com CLINE AGENCY INSURANCE BROKERS Timothy Cline (800) 966-9566 Ext. 22 tim@clineagency.com EPSTEN GRINNELL & HOWELL, APC Tiffany Christian (858) 527-0111 tchristian@epsten.com JAMES ERNST ACCOUNTING James Ernst (707) 576-7070 jim@ernst-cpa.com KHATRI INTERNATIONAL INC. Dilip Khatri (626) 475-7660 dkhatri2006@gmail.com KIRKPATRICK LANDSCAPING SERVICES Steven Kirkpatrick (760) 347-6926 stevekls@msn.com NISSHO OF CALIFORNIA, INC. Tom Baird (760) 727-9719 tbaird@nisshoca.com QUALITY STREET SERVICE, INC. Sean McElvy (909) 373-6914 shugie@sweepershop.com VINTAGE ASSOCIATES/ECOWISE LANDCARE Fran Mullahy (760) 772-3673 fmullahy@thevintageco.com

RENEWING MANAGER MEMBERSHIPS ASSOCIA DESERT RESORT MANAGEMENT Vanessa Ayon (760) 345-4349 vanessa.ayon@associa.us Shelly Bricker (760) 346-1161 sbricker@drminternet.com Cari Burleigh (760) 347-1999 cburleigh@drminternet.com Jennifer Carroll (760) 346-1161 jcarroll@drminternet.com Christie Curtis (760) 285-0817 ccurtis@drminternet.com Erin Grossman (760) 346-1161 Ext. 7779 egrossman@drminternet.com Elizabeth Weber (760) 346-1161 eweber@drminternet.com Jennifer Zeivel (760) 346-1161 jzeivel@drminternet.com AVAIL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Veronica Delgado (760) 771-9546 veronica@availhoa.com Michell Santiago (760) 771-9546 michell@availhoa.com KEYSTONE Christine Rodgers (949) 430-5803 crodgers@keystonepacific.com MARABELLE ESTATES John Edwards (760) 323-7157 managermarabelle@gmail.com

PGA WEST RESIDENTIAL ASSOCIATION Michael Walker (760) 771-1234 Ext. 13 mikew@pgawest.org

CAI-CV.org

NEW VOLUNTEER LEADERS BANNING ESTATES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Daniel Squires Betty Treadway

VIP MANAGEMENT Heather Farmer (760) 567-7901 heather@vip-mgmt.com

MILLENNIUM COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT, LLC Nancy Stegehuis (760) 834-8948 nancy@mcmiskey.com

THE VINTAGE GROUP Jaime Mann (760) 534-1498 jaimemann1031@gmail.com

LAKE LA QUINTA HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Rosemary Anaya Jim Boucher Bob Griffith Holly Moose Donna Spafford Diana Herkimer MIRA VISTA AT MISSION HILLS Paul Sepulveda MOUNTAIN VIEW COUNTRY CLUB HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCIATION Roy Adorni Janalee Arthur PARC LA QUINTA, HOA Patricia Von Iderstein PORTOLA COUNTRY CLUB Cindi Crist Geraldine Davis Myron Mudgett RAMON ESTADOS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Bruce Baland William Galaway David Greig Ed Huber Mark Mees

RENEWING VOLUNTEER LEADERS Louise Stettler Susan Wells

BANNING ESTATES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Dana Champ Jonathon Conant Kathleen Dale Linda Ellis Kay Litras Kathleen Murphy MOUNTAIN VIEW COUNTRY CLUB HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCIATION Susan Holtzman Cheryl Krausfeldt Phyllis Nollan PALM SPRINGS GOLF & TENNIS CLUB Andrew Johnson SUNRISE RACQUET CLUB OWNERS ASSOCIATION Jack Helscher Nancy Luckritz Leslie Wheeler

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MOTR &

Margaritaville SUMMER SIZZLER

Friday, June 7, 2019 | 4 - 7 PM | CAI-CV Office & Classroom 75410 Gerald Ford Drive, Suite 102, Palm Desert 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM Manager on the Run MOTR: (for managers only) TOPIC: Dealing with Board Member and Homeowner Demographic Changes SPEAKERS: Clint Atherton, PCAM, General Manager, Outdoor Resorts Palm Springs Renee Gumbel, PCAM, Associa Desert Resort Management Nena Rutherford-Milward, PCAM, General Manager, Rancho La Quinta HOA $10 MEMBERS | $20 NONMEMBERS Earn 1 CEU and Attend Summer Sizzler for FREE MARGARITAVILLE SUMMER SIZZLER | 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM | (FOR ALL MEMBERS) Come Celebrate the End-of-Season with CAI-CV PRICE: Managers: FREE for Managers attending MOTR Board Members: FREE with registration Business Partners: $100 Donation for CAI-CV Education

TITLE SPONSOR

SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE (INCLUDES REGISTRATION)

Thanks to our Sponsors MOTR SPONSOR Sherwin Williams Paint Company

SUMMER SIZZLER SPONSORS GAME SPONSORS Animal Pest Management Services O’Connell Landscape BAR SPONSOR Roof Asset Management Scholarship Sponsor Green, Bryant and French, LLP

FOOD SPONSORS Automation Pride Conserve LandCare Frazier Pest Control Pacific Western Banking Seacoast Commercial Bank Vantage Point Construction CLAC SPONSOR EmpireWorks

WHAT’S INCLUDED Unlimited Margarita Bar | Mexican Fiesta Dinner | Jimmy Buffett Style Entertainment | Tropical Bar Games Beer & Wine | Grand Prize

AVAILABLE SPONSORSHIPS GAME SPONSOR – LIMIT 4 - $500 BAR SPONSOR – LIMIT 6 - $400 FOOD SPONSOR – NO LIMIT - $300

REGISTRATION

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Tickets Available Online at CAI-CV.ORG or by Calling 760-341-0559


SECURITY

Thermal Radar By Kimberly Burnett

New technological solutions are being created all the time; however, we can see some surprising new developments in the area of surveillance that will help community associations. Protecting open areas in associations, such as construction sites or undeveloped land, are often challenging because they typically require cameras that have their own power source, along with the ability to monitor the area night and day and withstand the extreme desert heat. Thermal Radar is a fully self-contained surveillance solution that provides its own power, analytics and alerting. You can literally take it anywhere an ATV can go and deploy it in minutes. Simple, easy to use Onboard Video Analytics allow the user to quickly identify intrusions over the entire 360° field of view (FOV) or to establish areas of interest (AOIs) that can

be tailored to just the right sensitivity and confidence levels. Thermal Cameras also have a “Day or Night/Fair or Bad Weather System” that gives them the unique ability to penetrate dust storms, fog, smoke and complete darkness. No lights, emitters or other devices are required. Thermal Radar is uniquely designed so that all its components are rugged and reliable. The entire rotating assembly is completely protected from the elements inside a sealed enclosure. There are no rotating seals to fail, no more sandblasted lenses, and no

more fogged out images. Once an alert has been identified by the analytics, Thermal Radar can send these event notifications along with coordinates and JPEG images via email, text or cellular. You can vary the alert notifications by time of day, day of week, person, alert category or group so sending what you want to whom you want, when you want, is easy. Thermal Radar is lightweight and portable, tipping the scales at less than five pounds. When combined with its optional, portable, aluminum tower, Thermal Radar can be easily towed to any site with a conventional ATV and deployed 25 feet in the air in minutes. No supporting infrastructure is required. This combination is completely self-contained. Once calibrated, Thermal Radar is “GeoSpatial,” having the ability to pinpoint any alert on a map and to send those coordinates to the user as part of the event notification. This makes Thermal Radar the ideal platform for tracking objects and can be used in conjunction with other camera systems to provide “slew to cue” data. Thermal Radar’s unique ability to multiply the power and capability of a single thermal sensor and do the work of up to 16 separate sensors allows it to provide a cost-effective blanket of thermal coverage to any site. Thermal Radar is all inclusive service with installation, maintenance, warranty and support. One camera can scan an area equal to 150 football fields. If your association has large open areas that need to be monitored, Thermal Radar may be the right solution for you. Kimberly Burnett is the Business Development Manager for DSI Security Services. You can reach her at (909) 238-3827 or by email at kburnett@ dsisecurity.com.

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MANAGERS' CORNER Lisa Glogow, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, CCAM

Heading Out For The Season?

S

nowbirds seeking a warm and dry climate will not find anywhere better than the Coachella Valley, located about 100 miles east of Los Angeles and northeast of San Diego. Over 120 golf courses, hiking, biking and little rainfall make this a great destination. When the desert starts to warm up and summer is not far away, the snowbirds across the valley start to head back to cooler temperatures. Preparing for your departure does not have to be overwhelming or complicated. Below is a checklist so important items are not forgotten:

• Notify the management company and post office of your change of address • If you are living in a gated community, let the guards know how to reach you • Hold or cancel newspaper deliveries • Store patio furniture including cushions in your home or garage • Place new batteries in your smoke detectors • Place a large book on your toilet to avoid having rodents come through the pipes

• Make sure that sliders are locked • Clean out the refrigerator • Turn down the volume on your phone ringer • Place buckets of water throughout your house to keep moisture in the air to protect wooden furniture • Unplug all electronics • Turn off water to your home • Invest in timers for lights to set while you are away

• Make your home unattractive to pests and rodents

• Hire a company to check on your home while you are away

• Turn off ice maker/empty ice out of the freezer

• Leave a key with a friend or neighbor

• Store any valuables in a safe or safe deposit box • Lock all doors and windows

A little planning to secure your home and belongings will make your return as welcoming as possible. Enjoy your summer.

Lisa Glogow, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, CCAM, is Director of Community Management for Powerstone Property Management in Palm Desert. Lisa was named 2018 CAI-CV Manager of the Year. She can be reached at (760) 797-7797 or lglogow@powerstonepm.com.

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Quorum June, 2019


2019 PLATINUM SPONSOR SPOTLIGHT

CAI-CV

Thank you to Sunshine Landscape for their generous support of CAI-CV! CAI-CV.org

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FEATURE

The Importance of Building Ordinance & Law Coverage

P

icture yourself at home having a cup of coffee while overlooking your peaceful common area greenbelt. The morning is beautiful, nice and clear, with a slight breeze. Later that morning, you notice the wind picking up and changing into strong gusts. In Southern California, we call them “Santa Anas” and we all know what that means—fire danger. Off in the distance, you see smoke and pray that it is confined and will be put

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Quorum June, 2019

By Mike Rey out quickly. A half hour later, the winds gain strength and the plume of smoke becomes ominous. As you watch, large flames can be seen through the dense smoke. You hear sirens and see first responders coming into your neighborhood. The dreaded knock at your door lets you know it’s time to evacuate. There is no time to plan so you grab a few photos and leave your home and all your possessions behind, hoping for the best.

"THERE IS NO TIME TO PLAN SO YOU GRAB A FEW PHOTOS AND LEAVE YOUR HOME AND ALL YOUR POSSESSIONS BEHIND, HOPING FOR THE BEST."


FEATURE

Photos from Oakland Tunnel Fire Search

On the morning of October 19, 1991 at approximately 11:30 am, this very scenario happened among the hillsides of Oakland and is known as the “Tunnel Fire.” Strong winds and an improperly extinguished house fire are to blame. What firefighters thought of as a routine house fire, quickly erupted into a raging inferno. Known to fire experts as an “Urban Interface Conflagration,” this is what happens when large fires occur in suburban communities. In California, we have experienced Urban Interface Conflagration in Santa Barbara, Simi Valley, Malibu and most recently in Thousand Oaks. The economic losses in such fires reach billions. The Tunnel Fire had an estimated loss of $1.5 billion with human loss of 25 persons and more

than 150 injured, including fire fighters. It burned an estimated 1520 acres, destroying 2,843 single family homes and 437 apartment and condominium units. Driving the fire were wind gusts of 65 mile per hour. Many of the destroyed homes from this upscale area were old and some had been built in the early 1900’s and were registered as historic sites. When it came to settling claims with insurance companies, homeowners learned that the costs to bring these homes up to current code was not covered under the standard insurance contract. This resulted in multiple lawsuits against the insurance carriers. The insurance industry rejected the costs for upgrades partly because many of these homes had CAI-CV.org

"WHEN IT CAME TO SETTLING CLAIMS WITH INSURANCE COMPANIES, HOMEOWNERS LEARNED THAT THE COSTS TO BRING THESE HOMES UP TO CURRENT CODE WAS NOT COVERED UNDER THE STANDARD INSURANCE CONTRACT."

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FEATURE not been recently reviewed and were therefore underinsured. At that time, there was no coverage in existence to pay for building code changes. As a result of the lawsuits, Building Ordinance and Law coverage was born. This coverage is designed to bring all structures up to current building standards to meet not only fire codes but all codes such as ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) codes. The outcome of these devastating fires is the addition of new codes to protect homes during a fire. These new codes work to protect homes but also increase the

"THE OUTCOME OF THESE DEVASTATING FIRES IS THE ADDITION OF NEW CODES TO PROTECT HOMES DURING A FIRE. THESE NEW CODES WORK TO

FOR EXAMPLE, THE DEVASTATING “TRIANGLE COMPLEX FIRE” OF YORBA LINDA LEAD TO THE FOLLOWING NEW CODES: • The requirement for pump stations to be built in communities. During the fire, there was a lack of water pressure in the hills, which made it necessary for fire fighters to borrow mobile pumps from Laguna Beach to get water up to the fire. • Homes in Yorba Linda must now have enclosed roof eaves with ventilation to prevent embers from settling under the roof and thus destroying the home. • Homes over 2500 square feet must have a fire sprinkler system within the attic of the home. These are just a few of the costly but potentially lifesaving code changes that have been passed since this fire occurred in 2008.

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Quorum June, 2019

PROTECT HOMES BUT ALSO INCREASE THE COST OF REBUILDING HOMES THAT ARE DESTROYED."

SOME RECENT STANDARDIZED STATEWIDE ORDINANCES INCLUDE: • Fire hydrants must have 4 ½ and 2 ½ inch outlets • Residential buildings must have carbon monoxide and smoke alarms installed if renovation or new construction exceeds $1,000 • Smoke alarms must be located outside each separate dwelling unit and the sleeping area of any bedroom • Fire system pressure valves must be checked every five years • Alarm devices must be checked quarterly


FEATURE cost of rebuilding homes that are destroyed. Rebuilding a destroyed structure to conform to the latest building codes can add an additional 50% or more to recovery costs. Estimated replacement ordinance costs are between $60 to $80 per square foot. In an article found in the March 2018 issue of CAI’s Common Ground, Dana Wilke states that, “Retrofitting an existing structure is substantial…from $5,000 to $15,000 per unit.” When you review your association’s coverage, it is important that you specifically ask about Building Ordinance and Law coverage. It can be overlooked, especially if the board is primarily focused on cost. Don’t make that mistake.

MANY CARRIERS HAVE A BASE MINIMUM OF COVERAGE RANGING FROM $25,000 TO $250,000. BUILDING ORDINANCE AND LAWS COVERAGE INCORPORATES THREE PARTS: • COVERAGE A – Undamaged Building Cost. This coverage is for required demolition of parts of a building not damaged by the peril; • COVERAGE B – Demolition and Debris Removal. This pays the cost to demolish and clear the site of undamaged parts of the building caused by enforcement of building, zoning or land use ordinance or law in force at the time of loss; • COVERAGE C – Increase Cost of Construction. Pays for the increase in cost to repair, rebuild or construct the property caused by enforcement of building, zoning or land use ordinance or law when loss results from a peril.

Building Ordinance and Law coverage is a vital component to the overall property coverage for any building. Since building codes are revised frequently, having adequate coverage prior to a loss is important. Check your policy because some property policies exclude Ordinance and Law coverage, however, you can usually purchase a separate endorsement if needed. When obtaining bids for your association, ask the agent or broker to specifically discuss this coverage with the board. Be prepared because Building Ordinance and Law coverage could increase the annual premium by a few thousand dollars depending on the size of the association. The additional cost is typically worthwhile when compared to potential losses. When basing your insurance coverage purely on price, the actual cost to the association after a fire could be substantial. Some policies have higher limits than others so work with your agent to find the proper amount of coverage for your association. The agent will be able to calculate a recommended amount of coverage. In conclusion, when you have your insurance program reviewed, make sure you include Building Ordinance and Law Coverage. While it is important for associations to be cost conscious, skimping on insurance can lead to a secondary disaster - special assessments. Make sure your agent/broker is an expert in common interest development (CID) insurance and rely on his or her counsel when making these important decisions.

Mike Rey is the owner of Rey Insurance Services, a FARMERS® Insurance Agency. Mike can be reached at (949) 487-9661 or by email at Mike@ReyInsuranceServices.com.

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FEATURE

Ten Ways to Keep the Lawyers at Bay

S

By Kelly G. Richardson, Esq. CCAL

erving as a volunteer director is often thankless, but it shouldn’t be risky. Here are ten ways to reduce if not prevent personal risk from your service. Learn and follow the Business Judgment Rule. Found at California Corporations Code 7231 and 7231.5 and contained in most bylaws, the Rule protects volunteers from liability while acting in good faith, for the association’s best interests, and upon reasonable inquiry. Only serve if the association has directors and officers (“D&O”) insurance coverage. Civil Code 5800 protects directors from personal liability if the HOA with more than 100 memberships has $1,000,000 of D&O insurance or $500,000 if less members. Refuse compensation. Whether called a “stipend” or assessment reduction, reject any form of renumeration for board service. Upon receiving even one dollar of compensation the director is no longer a volunteer and loses all the immunities of volunteers. Reimbursement for a director’s time serving the HOA is not reimbursement – it is compensation.

Reimbursements are repayments of out-of-pocket expenses. Don’t get mad… or even. “Good faith” doesn’t just mean a pure heart. However, it certainly does exclude any willful, malicious or retaliatory intent. The nastiest homeowner has the same rights as the saintly ones. Enforce the rules evenly. Don’t take matters into your own hands. HOA governance is a team sport, not an individual event. What you think is valid instruction may be viewed by the board (and the HOA’s attorney) as interference. A director (even the president) must use restraint and wait for the board to act. Follow the corporate process. Is the association making a contract, or the director? The corporate process is what makes it clear that the corporation is acting and not you. The corporation acts by the board voting in a meeting and then documenting that vote in the minutes. Sign contracts in the name of the corporation, not in your own name - “Shady Acres HOA, by John Smith, director.” Do not make commitments to HOA vendors without having clear board authority. A director committing to spend HOA

"HOA GOVERNANCE IS A TEAM SPORT, NOT AN INDIVIDUAL EVENT. WHAT YOU THINK IS VALID INSTRUCTION MAY BE VIEWED BY THE BOARD (AND THE HOA’S ATTORNEY) AS INTERFERENCE."

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funds without board authority may be held to have made a binding commitment under the doctrine of “ostensible agency.” The association in that event would have to pay, but the board could decide the expenditure was not in the HOA’s best interests and sue the director for reimbursement. Get the advice necessary for the decision at hand. Most of the time your manager will supply the board’s advice for ordinary decisions, but sometimes more specialized expertise is needed. Don’t rely on a fellow director for specialized advice – it is not fair to ask them to take on the responsibility of a free expert, even if they truly do have the required expertise. Deal promptly with danger. Earlier in 2018, a Nevada association was shocked when a jury imposed a $20,000,000 verdict including $10,000,000 punitive damages, arising from a serious playground injury, finding that the HOA ignored previous failures of playground equipment. A willful failure to deal with known hazards can expose directors to personal liability. Avoid conflicts of interest like the plague. Don’t seek or accept special favors or treatment. Volunteers should avoid personal risk arising out of their service. Understand the protections the law provides and stay within them.

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Kelly G. Richardson, Esq. is a Fellow of the College of Community Association Lawyers and Senior Partner of Richardson Ober PC. Kelly can be reached at (626) 449-5577 or by email at kelly@richardsonober.com.

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CHAPTER EVENTS

CAI-CV's Educational Lunch Program & Mini Trade Show Friday, May 10, 2019

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CHAPTER EVENTS RAINY DAY FUND: HOW TO KEEP YOUR RESERVES HEALTHY GUEST SPEAKERS SHARRON BADHAM, PCAM Association General Manager The Hideaway Property Owners Association

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EXHIBITOR BOOTH SPONSORS Alliance Association Bank AMS Paving, Inc. Animal Pest Management Services, Inc. BPR Inc. BRS Roofing Inc. Cline Agency Insurance Brokers Conserve LandCare DSI Security Services Edward Jones First Foundation Bank Flanders Painting Frazier Pest Control, Inc. Horizon Lighting Inc. Nissho of California NPG Asphalt O'Connell Landscape Maintenance Pacific Western Bank Patio Shoppers, Inc. Prendiville Insurance Agency Roseman Law, APC S. B. S. Lien Services SCT Reserve Consultants, Inc. Seacoast Commerce Bank Sherwin-Williams Paint Company Sustainable Water Solutions Three Phase Electric Tinnelly Law Group Western Pacific Roofing

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FEATURE

Six Ways to Make Community Budgeting Easier By Sierra Carr, CMCA

W

hen you are on the board of a homeowners association (HOA), budgeting is a critical part of your responsibilities. Your community’s budget provides the sound structure for all the initiatives that your board wants to accomplish. It is more than a series of numbers; it’s the framework for reaching your community’s goals. That’s what makes it so important—and what can make it so stressful. Unfortunately, many boards are challenged when it comes to creating and managing budgets. Here are six basic principles of budgeting that will help ensure you’ve covered all the bases.

1. Keep GERT in mind as you develop your budget. That may sound like a nonsense word, but it’s an acronym for everything you’ll need to remember to create a successful budget: • Goals and objectives of your association • Estimated common element expenses and income • Reserves that you’ve calculated • Timeline for your budget

Taken together, these four elements create the framework for budgeting successfully. Focusing on the goals of your HOA helps you focus on the big picture while you’re sifting through the details. Estimated expenses and income form the numerical foundation. Reserves provide an important resource for capital improvements or, if necessary, a source of revenue. And the timeline is critical to delivering your budget so that it can take effect promptly.

2. Collect necessary documents.

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You have defined your GERT and collected important historical data and records. Now it’s time to compile all that information into budget categories and line items. Every budget is different, but you probably need to include most of the following items. Operating budget: • Estimated common expenses • Expenses per unit owner • Management fees

This probably isn’t the first budget your HOA has ever created. Even if it is, many of these documents are monthly records that you should have on hand. Either way, you should be able to access past documents that provide the data and the structure you need to build a good budget. Try to gather the following items: • Past budgets • Financial statements • Association documents

• Administration • Security provisions • Maintenance • Insurance • “Other” expenses (specific to your community or part of the state) • Landscaping • Provision for bad debts Reserve budget for projects such as: • Painting the building

• Monthly management report

• Replacing the roof

• Schedule of delinquent unit owner accounts

• Resurfacing driveways or a pool

• Vendor contracts • Wish list items

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3. Determine your budget categories.

• Capital expenditure or deferred maintenance greater than $10,000


FEATURE

4. Keep these considerations in mind. As you fill in the sections in Step 3 with data, think about: • The level of service and amenities you want to provide residents • Whether owners offer or design any programs (classes, clubs, events, etc.) • Historical data that may affect how you budget for the upcoming year • Economic variables (such as changing gas prices, utility costs, labor costs and insurance premiums, and wages) • How your assessments compare with properties of a similar size and with similar services and amenities In addition, you’ll want to closely review your vendor agreements, see if there are any anticipated changes in their rates and factor those in. Be sure to budget for capital improvement projects if you wish to avoid special assessments. Your HOA document requirements will provide more information on maintenance requirements and costs associated with your common elements.

It is also a good idea to plan for some upkeep (such as painting) before the community actually looks like it needs it. Keep in mind that the older your property is, the greater your maintenance costs will be. Putting off maintenance can increase costs for a community of any age. A good community manager will have the tools to help your HOA schedule and budget for predictive maintenance.

5. Understand your revenue sources. Of course, your budget isn’t just about money going out. It’s also about what is coming in. Know how your budget will be funded and look for every possible source of revenue. Beyond the assessments paid by each owner, this can include rent, interest and other sources. You also need to determine a payment schedule and, if necessary, take collection actions so your budget does not contain funding gaps.

6. Use the right software for the job. Now that you have the right mindset, a good plan, all the necessary

background information and a framework, it’s time to track your budget with financial software. Although you could use spreadsheet programs such as Excel for PC and Numbers for Apple products, they will only provide you with the basics. The best professional community managers and management companies have advanced systems and tools to help in the production and ongoing analysis of budgets. You should now be on the path to successfully creating your HOA’s budget. Yes, it’s still a lot of work, but it’s not a mystery anymore. Just remember that your budget isn’t simply a spreadsheet. It’s the driver for positive change and for ensuring the financial health of your community. Sierra Carr, CMCA, works for FirstService Residential and is the Comptroller at Trilogy La Quinta. Sierra can be reached at (760) 702-3038 or by email at scarr@mytlq.com. This article was adapted from FirstService Residential’s article library at https:// www.fsresidential.com/california/ hoa-best-practices.

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MAINTENANCE

How to Properly SPEC Out a Successful Commercial Pool Replaster Request By Alan Smith

U

sually, a pool plaster bid request goes something like this: “We need a bid for a replaster and retile of our pool and spa at such and such a location.” Once sent out to your preferred vendors, you wait for pricing and then a contract is awarded. It seems easy enough, but do you know what you are really getting, and that you have many valuable options for every phase of this project? If you don’t ask for specifics or “specifications,” you get whatever the vendor wants to bid, which is often the cheapest product and process available so they can be the most competitive. Let’s review some of these valuable “need to know specifications” from beginning to end of the project.

1. PERMITTING Did you know that all commercial pool and spas located in Los Angeles, Riverside, Orange, and San Diego

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counties require health department permits prior to starting the project? The degree of detail required from each county can differ, even from office to office within a county can differ from easy over-the-counter submission by form letter to complete drawings, site plans, and hydraulic schematics. Also, many cities are now requiring a “city permit” for the same project in addition to the county permits. If so, you will now have double permit fees. This should be known prior for the proper bid request: “Please acquire all necessary county and city permits.” The best way to find out if the city is requiring permits is to simply call the city planning department and ask. Be prepared for questions concerning the scope of work, just plaster or possible decking, underground plumbing, skimmers, electrical or pool equipment. Knowing all this prior to the bid request will help level the bidding playing field and avoid possible shutdowns from “red tagging” by the city after the job starts.

2. ELECTRICAL SAFETY INSPECTIONS CERTIFICATION This is a BIG ONE. Eighty percent of the pools we check do not pass! Now is the perfect time to check the safety of your pool or spa for possible electrical issues. Stray electrical currents can occur in the water emanating from pool lights, or pool equipment. Unbonded metal products throughout the pool or spa system, handrails, grab rails, light rings, pool equipment, and any metal fixture within 5 feet of the water should be properly bonded to avoid possible electrocution. There is a 20-point checklist for an electrical safety inspection. Simply ask for an “electrical safety inspection certification.” The contractor will need to be properly licensed for this inspection.


3. POOL SHELL PREPARATION METHODS

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How you prepare the old pool plaster surface to receive the new surface is critically important. The National Plasterers Council recognizes several methods for pool shell preparations. The whole idea is to get a sound surface for the new plaster to adhere to. Much like prepping a surface for painting, the proper preparation is often as or more critical than the plaster quality itself. The three most used methods are: 1. Jackhammering or “stripping” the old plaster off down to the original gunite shell. 2. Sandblasting to roughen up the old plaster and then apply a bonding coat. 3. High pressure 40,000 psi water jetting to remove and/or scarify the old surface. You will need to specify which method you are expecting because each method has a different cost point, bonding success, and impact on the life expectancy of the pool shell. Let’s take these methods one at a time. 1. The stripping method is the most commonly used because it is fast, cheap, and has a successful bonding record. The downside is that stripping is strongly discouraged by pool engineers because every time a pool is stripped, some of the structural gunite is removed thus weakening the pool shell. This exposes structural steel and causes microfractures and bruising of the pool shell. Eventually, the pool will need to be regunited or rebuilt. If a pool is specified to be stripped, 2”- 3” flat chisels should be used to minimize gunite loss. Also, this is a very dusty process (big AQMD silica issue). 2. The sandblast bond coat method is similar in cost to stripping but has a higher “fail rate” of bonding. However, this is noninvasive to the shell method. Some contractors have better success than others depending on the quality of the bond coat they use. Specifying out a high quality acrylic bond coat would be advised. 3. The high pressure 40,000 psi water jetting method probably gives you the

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MAINTENANCE best bonding platform for the new plaster to adhere to. The high water pressure literally carves out the old plaster surface to the original gunite and will leave such a rough profile on the old plaster that the new surface has the best chance for long-term bonding. This happens without causing gunite damage or shell trauma like the stripping method. This is also a dust-free process. The downside is it’s usually a bit more costly and fewer contractors have this water blast technology.

4. PLASTER MATERIALS Plaster surface materials have evolved over the past 10-15 years. Simple white plaster is still commonly used for its less expensive pricing but is the softest, most easily etched by aggressive water chemistry and chemicals. Much more

good products with pozzolans included. Specifying any one of these “or equal” will help uncomplicate the bidding process. Most quartz finishes will bump the price 20%-30% higher than standard plaster but will have much longer plaster surface life expectancies.

5. START-UP PROCEDURE After the pool is plastered, the critical filling and startup process starts. Fresh plaster needs to be “pond cured” underwater so the filling begins immediately after the final set. The fill water needs to be immediately and properly adjusted for calcium hardness, PH and total alkalinity. If properly and timely adjustment is not made, the water can dissolve or remove important calcium compounds from the plaster surface and shorten the life expectancy. The National Plasterers

"Replacing the soft white marble aggregate in regular plaster and replacing it with much harder and more durable white quartz aggregate can up the life expectancy of the finish." durable products are now on the market. For instance, replacing the soft white marble aggregate in regular plaster and replacing it with much harder and more durable white quartz aggregate can up the life expectancy of the finish. The most soluble part of the plaster is the cement itself. Adding a “pozzolan modifier” to the cement chemically changes the cement and makes it much less soluble. Adding quartz and pozzolans together can almost double your pool surface life expectancy. For instance, if you were to get 10 years normally from a regular plaster job, these products could effectively get you 15-20 years in the same water environment. Specifying out a high quality material such as Universal Commercial Quartz Blend, Wet Edge Altima, Pebble Tec Pebble Sheen or National Pool Tile QuartzScape are all 28

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Council start-up recommendations are a very good resource for specifications.

6. WARRANTY There are two different expectations on warranties. One is delamination. That’s how confident the company is that its product will successfully adhere to the old surface. Our company gives 10-year delamination warranties because we use the water jetting method and have a lot of confidence in this process. Standard warranties are 3-5 years but you as the spec writer can call out the expected warranty. The other is materials. Material manufacturers usually give 1-5-year warranties. Sometimes the contractor will give extended warranties if asked, or if it’s specified by you. If you don’t ask, you only get what the contractor offers.


EXAMPLE BID REQUEST Please provide a bid for replastering the pool and spa at the Hightower Community Center, 1000 Hightower Dr., Normal Town, CA. Access code 5555. Pump room keys can be picked up at the office. Please call for access: 888-888-8888.

PLEASE FOLLOW THE SPECIFICATIONS AS FOLLOWS:

1. Please include all county and city permits, plans and fees.

MONTHLY

the Palm Springs ®

2. Provide electrical safety

JULY/AUG 2018

inspection and certificate.

3. Drain pool and spa to the appropriate location.

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4. 40,000 PSI water blast the old pool and spa surface. Haul away debris to appropriate dump site.

5. Apply two coats Universal Commercial Quartz Blend or Wet Edge Altima Premium Pool Finish.

6. Supply and install code compliant suction covers as needed.

7. Provide 5-7-day startup as recommended by the National Plasterers Council.

8. Retile all waterline tile with group 4 tile or equivalent. Grout color TBD.

9. Install all new nonslip 2” step and bench tile.

10. Provide a 10-year warranty on plaster material and against delamination. Five years on all tile work.

11. Provide workers comp and liability insurance certificates at the time of acceptance. Alan Smith is the owner and CEO of Alan Smith Pools. He can be reached at (714) 628-9494 or by email at www.alansmithpools.com. CAI-CV.org

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FEATURE

Plant Replacement Budgets

By Marne Logan, CCAM

I

t is not too early to think about your association’s budgeted amounts for fall landscape enhancement work. Now is ideal actually. You have time to ponder plants for fall. With the latest edict from the governor, we all know that being water wise is imperative. How to make the best use of the water we have has been on everyone’s mind anyway. So, while we are all digesting how to make our budgets work for the upcoming fall season and beyond, we have to factor in how to work with less and less water here in the valley. Bottom line is it will cost more in the future and you will have less water. So, planning now is the key. Next in the planning phase is irrigation repair costs, utility

"In some cases, your landscape vendor fails to let you know there are bare areas needing plants. Then when the bare area issue arises, there are far more plants needed than your budget allows for."

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water costs and possible high plant material mortality contributing to budget constraints. (Also, make sure your landscape vendor chooses plants with an eye for your geographic location as well as for tolerance with less water). Your association may not have the financial capacity to replace all removed plant material at home sites and in common areas (locations depend upon your association and how much is maintained by staff or crew). Furthermore, landscape edits such as overgrown plant replacements may not happen when the replacements are needed. Or in some cases, your landscape vendor fails to let you know there are bare areas needing plants. Then when the bare area issue arises, there are far more plants needed than your budget allows for. Hence, I use the term “planning” loosely because there are so many variables. Plant replacement type, quantity and location may not match removed material. Your landscape crew generally has put a lot of thought into an appropriate plant palette to match site conditions, and to provide longevity without high amounts of water, pesticide or fertilizer use. (At least, we hope they take this into consideration). To make your budget more foolproof there will be a lot riding on the depth of knowledge of your landscape crew or vendor(s). Yes, another variable.


Welcome Aboard

Karen Sloat By Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH

Lastly, remember that, generally, if your community members desire immediate landscape enhancements and changes or wish to install plant material specific to their taste, they might be able to do that as long as the members adhere to association guidelines and rules. Your community may even have a garden program allowing members to make their own choices within specific guidelines set forth by your landscape committee. This will have a positive impact on your budget in one way: plants you do not have to install or maintain; a negative, is if the member fails to uphold the guidelines set forth by the Landscape Committee…which means staff must write letters or make calls to bring the offender back into compliance. With that being said, enjoy the upcoming budget season. Cheers. Marne Logan, CCAM, is a community association manager for The Management Trust Desert Division. She can be reached at 760-340-1703, or by email to marne. logan@managementtrust.com.

Karen J. Sloat is an AV-Rated (Preeminent) attorney with over 30 years of experience in various types of law, and in three states (California, Colorado, and Hawaii). Ms. Sloat’s current law practice in Indian Wells, California, focuses on labor and employment law; transactions and contracts; and litigation in a number of areas and venues. Ms. Sloat represents a variety of clients, including for profit and non-profit businesses and individuals. Among Ms. Sloat’s clients are businesses in the fields of construction and maintenance, private club ownership, real estate ownership and management, planning, technology, manufacturing, entertainment, gaming, restaurant ownership, and physician groups or senior care companies, as well as a number of non-profit or charitable organizations, private or religious schools, places of worship, a Native American tribe, and many individuals. The team’s legal services encompass a wide scope of issues including employment counseling and advice; employment contracts; employment handbooks, policies and forms (English and Spanish); wage and hour compliance tools; management training; evaluation of practices and procedures for compliance and training and seminars. Karen is a certified mediator and a member of the California State Bar. She is a past president of the Desert Bar Association (DBA). Karen was born in Washington D.C., and attended the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, and graduated from Loyola Law School in Los Angeles with a Juris Doctor in 1987.

Contact details for the Law Office of Karen J. Sloat, APC are: 74-900 Highway 111, Suite 211, Indian Wells, CA 92210 www.KarenSloatLaw.com | (760) 779-1313 karen@karensloatlaw.com | secretary@karensloatlaw.com Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH, CIEC, CHMM, and CAI EBP, is president and co-owner of Desert Cities Indoor Air, LLC in Palm Desert, CA. Her company assists HOAs in assessing the extent of water damage and mold contamination. She can be reached at (760) 902-2545 or sbriaq@gmail.com. CAI-CV.org

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WATER WISE

CVWD Bus Tours Are a Great Way to Learn About Local Water Resources By the Coachella Valley Water District

I

t’s inevitable. With such a dry climate, at some point, Coachella Valley residents and visitors alike will ask the question: “Where does the water come from?” For a convenient and comfortable learning experience where you will see responsible water management in action, take one of the district’s popular bus tours. You visit CVWD facilities while tour guides discuss water issues. The tours are part of CVWD’s commitment to educate the public about the importance of protecting the aquifer that provides drinking water for all customers. Through these educational opportunities, participants learn how they can do their part toward preserving our most precious resource by engaging in desert-friendly gardening and conservation programs. Participants also see first-hand how CVWD ensures the supply and quality of water, as exemplified in the current “your water is our promise” campaign. CVWD offers four different tours, three are free. They are described here. To learn more, or to register for a tour, visit CVWD’s tour resources page at www.cvwd.org/421/Tours.

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CVWD LOOKS FORWARD TO YOUR PARTICIPATION IN THE FOLLOWING, UPCOMING TOURS:

1

Canal, Agriculture & Replenishment Tour (Free, Half-Day)

Learn how CVWD monitors and accounts for water resources in the district’s state-of-the-art Control Room. Tour east valley farmland. See examples of ultra-efficient micro-irrigation practices. Also, visit a groundwater replenishment facility and see how Colorado River water percolates into and recharges the valley’s aquifer.

2. Wastewater Treatment, Mid-Valley Pipeline & Groundwater Sustainability Tour (Free, Half-Day)

Learn how wastewater is treated and reused for irrigating golf courses and other landscapes. Also, see how recycled water is blended with Colorado River water at the Mid-Valley Pump Station to further conservation efforts in the middle portion of the valley. Finally, visit the Desert Willow Golf Resort and hear a discussion about how they exclusively use recycled water for irrigation.


3. Domestic & Stormwater Tour (Free, Half-Day)

Visit a well site where CVWD pumps water from the aquifer and delivers it to customers through an integrated distribution system. Learn how CVWD collects and tests more than 20,000 water samples annually to ensure safe, high-quality drinking water. A stop at a reservoir will show how water is stored for reliable delivery to homes and businesses 24/7. Also, visit a small portion of CVWD’s stormwater protection and flood control facilities. See how CVWD protects 590 square miles of the valley from flooding.

4. Imperial Dam Tour ($40, Full-Day, 10 to 12 hours)

This tour traces the path and the history of Colorado River water delivery in Southern California. From the Coachella Valley to the Imperial Dam, 18 miles north of Yuma, Arizona. Stops are also made at the Glamis Sand Dunes and the Salton Sea.

Did you know? Upon request, CVWD provides speakers to discuss local water issues. Speaker Request Forms can be filled out and submitted online at http:// www.cvwd.org/contact. CAI-CV.org

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Time Honored Jennifer James, Esq.

By Grace Paluck, CMCA, CamEx, CCAM

Choose Educated Business Partners Micha Ballesteros, Flood Response Rodney Bissell, Bissell Design Studios, Inc. Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH, Desert Cities Indoor Air, LLC Kimberly Burnett, DSI Security Services Linda Cardoza, Alliance Association Bank Will Cartwright, Cartwright Termite & Pest Control, Inc. Rick Cech, Roof Asset Management Todd Chism, Patio Shoppers Tiffany Christian, Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Adam Eves, EmpireWorks Lori Fahnestock, Powerful Pest Management Dea Franck, Esq., Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Julie Frazier, Frazier Pest Control, Inc. Elaine Gower, Naumann Law Firm, PC Michael Graves, SCT Reserve Consultants Matthew Hills, Securitas Security Services USA, Inc. Tim Hoss, BEHR & KILZ Paints & Primers Jennifer James, Esq., Green Bryant & French, LLP Megan Kirkpatrick, Kirkpatrick Landscaping Services Jared Knight, Vista Paint Corporation Katy Krupp, Fenton Grant Mayfield Kaneda & Litt, LLP Matt Lawton, CIC, Prendiville Insurance Agency Larry Layton, Kirkpatrick Landscaping Services Alison LeBoeuf, Sherwin-Williams Mike Mastropietro, OCBS, Inc. Chris Meyer, Asphalt MD's Greg Morrow, Eagle Roofing Products Fran Mullahy, Vintage Associates Mike Murrell, Farmers Insurance - Mike Murrell Agency Matt Ober, Esq., Richardson Ober, PC Chet Oshiro, EmpireWorks Mallory Paproth, SCT Reserve Consultants Elisa Perez, Esq., Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Jay Powell, Ben's Asphalt Dana Pride, Automation Pride Kelly Richardson, Esq., Richardson Ober, PC Brent Sherman, Animal Pest Management Services, Inc. Brittany Smith, Vantage Point Construction, Inc. Kymberli Taylor-Burke, NPG Asphalt Liz Williams, AMS Paving Taylor Winkle, Roof Asset Management Bevan Worsham, AMS Paving Jolen Zeroski, Union Bank Homeowners Association Services

Become an Educated Business Partner Call the CAI-CV office or go to www.cai-cv.org for more information.

Jennifer James is of counsel to the law firm of Green Bryant & French, LLP, focusing her practice on community association law. Ms. James received her law degree from Washburn University School of Law in 2001 and successfully completed a comparative legal study program in London, England. She began her undergraduate studies at Vanderbilt University, was one of only two students selected to attend a study abroad program in Sweden, and graduated Magna Cum Laude from Utah State University with a Bachelor of Science in Education and emphasis in Mathematics. Ms. James is licensed to practice law in the states of California, Nevada, and Utah. As a former teacher, Ms. James' clients benefit from her ability to simplify and explain difficult legal concepts as well as her unparalleled ability to resolve contentious disputes through alternative dispute resolution. Ms. James began her legal practice with a litigation law firm in Las Vegas, Nevada, focusing her career in representing community associations. Ms. James moved to the Coachella Valley in 2006, utilizing her expertise in community association law. Continuing to provide CAI-CV.org

exceptional legal services to her clients with a hands-on approach, and prior to joining Green Bryant & French, LLP, Ms. James established her own law practice in 2014. When asked about her mentor, Jennifer had this to say: “There have been several inspirational mentors throughout my lifetime but one of the most inspirational has been my amazing father, also an attorney. It is because of my father’s loving guidance and wisdom that I became an attorney and am who I am today.” During law school, she served as a “court appointed special advocate” for children in need. Throughout college she also served on the 24 hour mobile crisis team for rape and domestic violence intervention. She has also volunteered for the Special Olympics and other related organizations. Jennifer has a beautiful 9-year-old daughter that is the light of her life. Being a Girl Scout troop leader gives her the opportunity to spend more quality time with her daughter. As a troop leader, she just launched Project Kindness which involves giving painted rocks with kind words to those that need a little extra boost. The idea is for each person with a rock to pass it on to someone else in need. In addition to Project Kindness, her troop made holiday cards for senior citizens and passed them out after caroling at a senior center, assisted with maintenance at the Coachella Valley Horse Rescue, and posted signs around the school to conserve water. Grace Paluck is the Division Executive Vice President for The Management Trust. She can be reached at (760) 776-5100 or by email at grace.paluck@managementtrust.com. facebook.com/CAICV

@CAI-CV

35


ABOUT CLAC

A BUCK-A-DOOR

HELPS PROTECT HOA HOME VALUES How HOA Boards Can Participate in the Legislative Process ABOUT CLAC Each year, the California Legislature proposes dozens of new laws that directly impact homeowners associations (HOAs). Legislation that is signed into law may immediately change the way boards conduct HOA business and may impose fines for noncompliance. The Community Associations Institute (CAI) helps associations stay informed about HOA legislation. CAI’s California Legislative Action Committee (CLAC) represents HOAs in Sacramento by advocating on their behalf to protect associations from damaging legislation and to promote proactive legislation. CLAC is made up of members from the Community Associations Institute like you. As a member of CAI, you are automatically a member of CLAC. CLAC is directly supported by HOAs through the Buck-A-Door campaign, where HOAs give a dollar per household to CLAC annually. 36

Quorum June, 2019

TO PARTICIPATE

1

STEP ONE

2

STEP TWO

3

Add CLAC financial support to your board agenda. This article will help make the case for your support. CLAC asks each HOA to donate $1 per door annually. CLAC is asking HOAs to make this annual donation part of their annual operating budget.

Customize the board resolution on page 38 for your specific association and add it to your board packet for the board’s consideration. An electronic version of the resolution is available on the CAI-CV website at www.cai-cv.org.

STEP THREE Make a motion to approve the enclosed Board Resolution and begin discussion. If you need additional information, please contact the CAI-CV office at 760-341-0559 or go to the CLAC website at www. caiclac.com. After discussion, call for a vote.

4

STEP FOUR

5

THANK YOU

When approved, ask your treasurer or manager to prepare and send a check directly to CLAC. Make the check payable to CAI-CLAC. The mailing address is 1809 S Street, Suite 101-245, Sacramento, CA 95811. IMPORTANT: Please indicate CAI-CV in the memo line so our local chapter is aware of your donation.

CAI is grateful to all HOAs who participate in funding our advocacy efforts in Sacramento. CAI-CV will publish your association’s name in Quorum Magazine and recognize you at our annual Legislative Update on Friday, November 15, 2019.


ABOUT CLAC

12 REASONS Why You Should Donate to CLAC CAI’s California Legislative Action Committee (CLAC) is a nonprofit educational organization dedicated to monitoring and influencing legislation that affects community associations in California. CLAC is proactive in introducing and advocating for legislation that is beneficial to homeowners associations (HOAs) and actively opposes legislation that may have an adverse impact on HOAs. CLAC has influenced legislation affecting many aspects of the Davis-Stirling Act, including covenant enforcement, elections, board meetings, assessment collection, electronic voting and resale disclosure. 1

Your donation gives your community a voice. CLAC’s legislative advocacy efforts are entirely dependent upon the support, opinions and experience of industry professionals and homeowner leaders. CLAC serves the interests of approximately 10,000,000 people who live in and work with HOAs in the state of California. CLAC communicates with legislators and other elected and appointed officials about HOA concerns through letters, phone calls and personal visits.

2

4

6

CLAC is not a Political Action Committee (PAC) and does not give money to legislators or their campaigns.

CLAC organizes “grassroots” advocacy efforts that include letters, emails and phone communications from HOA residents to elected officials on important HOA-related issues and proposed laws.

7

CLAC exercises members’ constitutional right to participate in the political process. CLAC builds important relationships with government officials and develops a network of peers that helps protect HOA home values.

CLAC meets regularly with lawmakers in their district and Sacramento offices to help advance HOA issues. CLAC educates lawmakers, legislative and executive staff, and other organizations. CLAC also testifies before legislative bodies. CLAC holds an annual Legislative Day at the Capitol in Sacramento where CAI members are invited to meet with legislators and advocate on important HOA issues being considered.

CLAC provides immediate action alerts and input on bills that affect HOAs. Legislators rely on CLAC input on HOA issues. HOAs rely on CLAC’s input on breaking issues and its ability to effectively influence the formulation and outcome of public policy. CAI members have access to timely information on bills related to HOAs at www.caiclac.com.

CLAC is dedicated to monitoring and influencing legislation that impacts HOAs in California. CLAC researches and reviews proposed legislation and takes positions on bills affecting HOAs.

3

5

8

Giving is easy and can be done online at www.caiclac.com or by filling out and returning the BuckA-Door donation form on page 6.

9

It is legal for HOAs to donate money from assessments to CLAC. The board may spend community funds on protecting the association and its owners by supporting constructive state legislation and opposing offensive legislation.

CAI-CV.org

FOLLOWING ARE 12 IMPORTANT REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD DONATE TO CLAC. 10 Donations received are used for

legislative advocacy, and may include printing and mailing expenses, lobbyist fees, and administrative services. 11 Senate and Assembly committees

ask CLAC for input as HOA legislation is proposed and debated. CLAC is also contacted by the Governor’s Office for input about HOA legislation before it is vetoed or signed into law. 12 CLAC has become the recognized

resource for providing accurate, timely and influential input to California legislators. CLAC employs a fulltime contract lobbyist in Sacramento. The CLAC representatives that determine industry positions on proposed legislation include representatives from the three major CAI membership categories: Homeowner Leaders (homeowners, HOA board members); Business Partners (attorneys, developers, reserve analysts, contractors, accountants, insurance representatives, and others) and Community Managers (managers and management companies). Each of the eight California chapters provides two delegates and one liaison to CLAC. If you are interested in serving on CLAC, contact the CAI-CV office.

facebook.com/CAICV

@CAI-CV

37


ABOUT CLAC

Community Association Board Resolution for CAI-CLAC Contribution Whereas, The Association (hereafter referenced as the “Association”) board serves in the best interests of all owners in the community; and Whereas, The Association directors have the fiduciary responsibility to manage the assets of the Association according to California law, established business practices and principles, and pursuant to competent, ethical and positive community governance; and Whereas, Community Associations Institute (CAI) is the leading advocate for common-interest communities before state and federal legislative and regulatory bodies; and Whereas, CAI's California Legislative Action Committee (CLAC) represents the interests of community associations in California, sponsors legislation which benefits community associations and their members, and disseminates information to California community associations about legislative issues; and Whereas, Current and future Association residents benefit directly from CLAC's advocacy efforts; and Whereas, CLAC's efforts are funded solely through contributions from CAI members and fundraising efforts by CAI chapters in California; and Whereas, contributing to the CAI-CLAC will not affect the association’s nonprofit tax status; and Therefore be it Resolved, That the Association invest in a full or partial board membership package; and That it is the policy of the Association that the Association make an annual contribution to CLAC for , in the amount of $ , that is, ($1 for each (unit/lot) in the Association, coded to general administration; and That the Association strongly encourages its manager and directors to take advantage of the information provided by CLAC regarding pending and enacted state legislation that allows them to keep abreast of the rights and responsibilities of community associations under California law. SO RESOLVED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS on this, the of in the year .

day

Name Secretary of the Association

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Quorum June, 2019

Our thanks to the law firm of Richardson | Ober for preparing this sample resolution. An electronic version is available online at www.cai-cv.org.


ABOUT CLAC

CLAC Buck-A-Door Campaign HOA PLEDGE __________________ X $__________________ = $_________________

Number of Doors

Buck A Door

Total Pledge

PLEASE LET US KNOW YOUR CAI CHAPTER Bay Area Central California North

Channel Islands Coachella Valley

Greater Inland Empire Greater Los Angeles

Orange County Regional San Diego

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ NAME

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ TITLE

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ ASSOCIATION NAME

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ ADDRESS

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ CITY

STATE ZIP

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ PHONE E-MAIL

METHOD OF PAYMENT – RETURN THIS COMPLETED FORM TO THE ADDRESS BELOW Check enclosed payable to cai-clac Credit Card – Amex Visa Mastercard Discover (circle one) __________________________________________________________________________________________________ NAME ON CARD

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ BILLING ADDRESS

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ CITY

STATE ZIP

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ CREDIT CARD NUMBER

SECURITY CODE

EXPIRATION DATE

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ SIGNATURE DATE

Send contributions to CLAC at 1809 S Street, Suite 101-245, Sacramento, CA 95811. CAI California Legislative Action Committee (CLAC), is a 501(C)_(6) not-for-profit organization. Contributions or gifts to CAI California Legislative Action Committee are not deductible for federal income tax purposes.

CAI-CV.org

facebook.com/CAICV

@CAI-CV

39


EVENTS

S ORSHIP SPONS BLE NOW AVAILA

Atlantis an Evening Under the Sea

COMING UP! FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 2020 AWARDS AND MONTE CARLO NIGHT

GOLD SPONSOR........................................ $750 (No limit) • Company name on professionally designed event signage • Company name in Quorum Magazine • Two (2) participant registrations

Maximize your sponsorships! Choose one sponsorship for Awards and one for Monte Carlo.

ATLANTIS AWARDS & MONTE CARLO TITLE SPONSOR

OLD S (Limit 1 – Sponsor will receive top billing at Awards)

TITLE SPONSOR...................................... $2,000 • Company name on invitation • Company name placed prominently on professionally designed event signage • Company name included on event flyer • Company name in Quorum Magazine • Four (4) participant registrations

AWARDS CEREMONY SPONSORSHIPS PLATINUM SPONSOR.............................. $1,250 (Limit 10) • • • • •

Company will help with presenting awards Company name on invitation Company name on professionally designed event signage Company name in Quorum Magazine Reserved table for ten (10) participants with ten (10) registrations • Table placement close to stage

PEARL RESERVED TABLE SPONSOR....... $1,000 (Limit 10) • • • •

40

Company name on invitation Company name on professionally designed event signage Company name in Quorum Magazine Reserved table for ten (10) participants with ten (10) registrations

Quorum June, 2019

AWARDS SPONSOR................................... $750 (Limit 4 - CAI-CV will provide awards) • Company name on professionally designed event signage • Company name in Quorum Magazine • Two (2) participant registrations

ENTERTAINMENT SPONSOR...................... $750 (Limit 3 - CAI-CV will provide entertainment) • Company name on professionally designed event signage • Company name in Quorum Magazine • Two (2) participant registrations

PHOTOGRAPHY SPONSOR........................ $750 (Limit 3 - CAI-CV will provide photographer) • • • •

Company name on back of photo given to each attendee Company name on professionally designed event signage Company name in Quorum Magazine Two (2) participant registrations

DECORATION SPONSOR............................ $650 (Limit 3 - CAI-CV will provide decorations) • Company name on professionally designed event signage • Company name in Quorum Magazine • One (1) participant registration

CANDY BUFFET TABLE SPONSOR............. $500 (Limit 3 - CAI-CV will provide candy) • Company name on professionally designed event signage • Company name in Quorum Magazine • One (1) participant registration


EVENTS

SOLD

VALET SPONSOR........................................ $500

TRIPLE SHOT BONUS SPONSOR................ $500

(Limit 1)

(Limit 1)

• Company name on professionally designed event signage near valet • Company name on event flyer • Company name in Quorum Magazine • One (1) participant registration

MONTE CARLO SPONSORSHIPS

SOLD

CARD SPONSOR....................................... $1000 (Limit 1 - CAI-CV will purchase cards with sponsor’s logo to give to all attendees) • Company name on professionally designed event signage • Company name in Quorum Magazine • Two (2) participant registrations

OLD S (Limit 1 - Sponsor will provide chips with company logo)

CHIPS SPONSOR...................................... $1000 • Company name on professionally designed event signage • Company name in Quorum Magazine • Two (2) participant registrations

BLACKJACK TABLE SPONSOR................... $500 (Limit 7) • Company name on professionally designed event signage • Company name in Quorum Magazine • One (1) participant registration

ROULETTE SPONSOR................................. $500 (Limit 2)

• Company name on professionally designed event signage • Company name in Quorum Magazine • One (1) participant registration

GRAND JACKPOT SPONSOR..................... $450 (Limit 1 – Sponsor to provide prize valued at $300 minimum) • • • •

Company name on professionally designed event signage Company name included on event flyer Company name in Quorum Magazine Two (2) participant registrations

FOOD SPONSOR........................................ $300 (No limit) • Company name on professionally designed event signage at buffet table(s) • Company name in Quorum Magazine

SCHOLARSHIP SPONSOR........................... $250 (Limit 2) • Company name on professionally designed event signage • Company name included on event flyer • Company name in Quorum Magazine

CLAC SPONSOR......................................... $200 (Limit 1) • Company name on professionally designed event signage • Company name included on event flyer • Company name in Quorum Magazine

• Company name on professionally designed event signage • Company name in Quorum Magazine • One (1) participant registration

CRAPS TABLE SPONSOR............................ $500 (Limit 1) • Company name on professionally designed event signage • Company name in Quorum Magazine • One (1) participant registration

SPECIALITY GAMING SPONSOR................ $500 (Limit 2) • Company name on professionally designed event signage • Company name in Quorum Magazine • One (1) participant registration

SPONSORSHIPS ARE CURRENTLY AVAILABLE ONLINE AT WWW.CAI-CV.ORG OR BY CALLING THE CAI-CV OFFICE AT (760) 341-0559. PLATINUM AND RESERVED TABLES ARE AVAILABLE NOW AND WILL SELL OUT QUICKLY. COMMUNITY ASSOCIATIONS INSTITUTE COACHELLA VALLEY CHAPTER (760) 341–0559 | WWW.CAI-CV.ORG CAI-CV.org

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41


CREATIVE | BRAND | CONSULTING Proud to be a part of the 2018 award winning CAI-CV team!

(714) 293-3749 BissellDesign.com

REAL ROOFING KNOWLEDGE FOR REAL ROOFING SOLUTIONS

Inc.

Spray Polyurethane Foam Systems Roof Repairs

Tile Systems

Roof System Maintenance

Shingle & Shake Systems

Budget Reserves

Consulting

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Quorum June, 2019

C OAC H E L L A VA L L E Y C H A P T E R

A SS O C I AT I O N S I N ST I T U T E

PWLC II, INC LANDCARE MANAGEMENT

PWLC II, INC. has been providing quality landscape and golf course maintenane for our clients in Southern California since 1977. Our Palm Springs office employs more than 100 landscape professionals. PWLC specializes in "High End Landscape and Golf Course Maintenance Services". In addition to our maintenance services, PWLC II, INC has a Commercial Tree Division and a Landscape Enhancement Division. We are fully licensed and insured with a $2 Million Liability Insurance. PWLC II, INC licenses include a C27 Landscape Contractors License, California Pest Control License and a "Certified Arborist" on staff. For more information please contact us at (760) 323-9341 or email conniea@pwlc2.com


Community security to network security: HOA protection and IT solutions. The world is changing. From electronic security systems that protect your community and residents to advanced IT environment solutions, get ironclad protection. As industry leaders, we’ve forged two decades of trusted relationships. Providing integrated, technology enabled services from a single source, we safeguard everything from perimeter walls to firewalls. So whether it’s your community or your IT network, we’ve got your back. Always.

For more, go to amsconnectme.com or call 760.341.3593. We’ll get you protected and connected. You’ll see.

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Asphalt Concrete Seal Coating Striping ADA Compliance Grinding & Pulverizing

NPGASPHALT.COM So-Cal: 951.940.0200 Desert Division: 760.320.9600 Proud Members of: BIA,BOMA,CAI,IREM,CACM,CREW CAI-CV.org

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43


PRESORTED STD US POSTAGE

PAID PALM DESERT, CA PERMIT NO 149

75410 Gerald Ford Drive, Suite 102 Palm Desert, CA 92211

CAI-CV UPCOMING EVENTS

TURQUOISE IS FOR LOCAL EVENTS

SIGN UP FOR LOCAL EVENTS AT CAI-CV.ORG AND FOR CAI NATIONAL EVENTS AT CAIONLINE.ORG JUNE

JULY

CAI’s M205 Risk Management (for managers) WHEN: Thursday – Friday, June 6-7, 2019 W HERE: Santa Ana

CAI’s M-203 Leadership (for managers) WHEN: Friday, June 21, 2019 W HERE: Los Angeles

CAI-CV’s Manager on the Run (MOTR) (for managers) & Summer Sizzler (for all members) MARGARITAVILLE SIZZLER WHEN: Friday, June 7, 2019, MOTR 4:30 – 5:30 p.m.; Margaritaville Sizzler 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. W HERE: CAI-CV Office 75410 Gerald Ford Drive, Suite 102, Palm Desert

CAI’s M-206 Financial (for managers) WHEN: Thursday – Friday, June 27-28, 2019 W HERE: Riverside

CAI-CV’s Board Basic Training (for association board members) WHEN: Tuesday, June 11, 2019, 5:30 p.m. W HERE: CAI-CV Office 75410 Gerald Ford Drive, Suite 102 Palm Desert

CAI-CV’s Annual Bowling Tournament

CAI’s M-201 Facilities (for managers) WHEN: Friday, June 28, 2019 W HERE: Santa Ana (for all members)

WHEN: Friday, June 28, 2019, 5:00 p.m. W HERE: Palm Springs Lanes, Cathedral City

CAI-CV’s Educational Lunch Program & Mini Trade Show (for all members) WHEN: Friday, June 14, 2019, 11:15 a.m. Registration W HERE: Palm Valley Country Club, Palm Desert

CAI’s M100 Essentials of Community Management (for all members)

WHEN: Thursday – Saturday, July 11-13, 2019 W HERE: Santa Ana CAI-CV’s Assistant Manager on the Run (AMOTR) (for assistant managers)

WHEN: Friday, July 12, 2019, 8:30 a.m. W HERE: CAI-CV Classroom CAI-CV’s Annual Day at the Races (for all members) WHEN: Thursday, July 18, 2019, 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. W HERE: Del Mar Thoroughbred Club, Del Mar (meet at the CAI-CV office) CAI’s California Common Interest Development (CID) Law Course (for all members) WHEN: Friday, July 26, 2019 W HERE: CAI-CV Classroom

2019 CORPORATE SPONSORS PLATINUM______

AMS Paving Asphalt MD's Associa Desert Resort Management Bissell Design Studios, Inc. Cartwright Termite & Pest Control, Inc. Conserve LandCare Diversified Asphalt Products Fiore Racobs & Powers, A PLC NPG Asphalt Pacific Western Bank Prendiville Insurance Agency Roof Asset Management Sign-A-Rama Sunshine Landscape Vantage Point Construction Western Pacific Roofing

GOLD________

AMS Connect Automation Pride Ben’s Asphalt, Inc. BRS Roofing Delphi Law Group, LLP Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Flood Response Frazier Pest Control Green Bryant & French, LLP Horizon Lighting PrimeCo PWLC II Sherwin Williams Paint Company Vintage Associates

SILVER________ Advanced Reserve Solutions Albert Management Animal Pest Management Barcode Automation, Inc. C.L. Sigler & Associates Dunn-Edwards Paint EmpireWorks Flanders Painting Lloyd Pest Control Mutual of Omaha O'Connell Landscape Patrol Masters Powerful Pest Management Pro Landscaping, Inc. Richardson | Ober Roseman Law, APC SCT Reserve Consultants Seacoast Commerce Bank Three Phase Electric Tinnelly Law Group

BRONZE______ Adams Stirling, PLC All Counties Fence and Supply Alliance Association Bank A-Rising Builders Artistic Maintenance, Inc Association Reserves Bank of Southern California Brabo & Carlsen, LLP Coachella Valley Water District DWI Farley Interlocking Pavingstones First Foundation Bank FirstService Residential Flock Safety Frontier Communications G4S Secure Solutions Guralnick & Gilliland, LLP Kasdan Lippsmith Weber Turner, LLP

LaBarre/Oksnee Insurance Agency Leon's Landscaping & Tree Service Millennium Community Management Painting Unlimited, Inc. PatioShoppers Commercial Furnishings Powerstone Property Management S.B.S. Lien Services SERVPRO of Palm Desert SERVPRO of Palm Springs/Indian Wells Shetler Security Silldorf Law, LLP Suntech Consulting & Roofing The Management Trust Union Bank Homeowners Association Services United Paving Vintage Group Vista Paint Corporation

Quorum Magazine is printed at the CAI-CV Office on a Xerox Versant 180 Press. Discounted printing is now available to CAI members. Call Bissell Design Studios, Inc. at (714) 293-3749 or the CAI-CV office for more information, (760) 341-0559.

Profile for CAI-Coachella Valley Chapter

Quorum June 2019