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OCTOBER 2018

OCTOBER 2018

JOIN US FOR OKTOBERFEST FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2018, 5:30 P.M. SUNSHINE LANDSCAPE THOUSAND PALMS FIND THE NEW CAI-CV APP AT YOUR APP STORE

ENGAGING HOMEOWNERS 8 Engaging Homeowners by Building Community Spirit 12 Communication Strategies 14 Communications? Think Disneyland! 18 Create Newsletters That Owners Want to Read 39 Meet the Homeowner Leadership Committee

2017 STEIN-HOLD CHAMPION FRANCESCO BALBINI


TWENTY THREE BILLION U.S. DOLLARS ALLOCATED TO COMMON INTEREST DEVELOPMENT RESERVE FUNDS EACH YEAR FOR THE REPAIR, REPLACEMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF COMMON AREA ASSETS SUCH AS ROOF REPLACEMENT, STREET RESURFACING AND POOL REPAIRS.

OF SQUARE FEET IN THE COACHELLA VALLEY ARE PART OF A HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION. 21% OF THE U.S. POPULATION RESIDE IN COMMON INTEREST DEVELOPMENTS.

UPON THOUSANDS OF HOURS OF SERVICE AND OTHER DUTIES PERFORMED ANNUALLY BY VOLUNTEER BOARD AND COMMITTEE MEMBERS.

TEAM OF TRUE PROFESSIONALS WHO PROVIDE EXCEPTIONAL LEADERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES TO HOMEOWNER ASSOCIATIONS IN THE COACHELLA VALLEY.

trueprofessionals.com.com I 760 346-9000 41-865 Boardwalk Ave, Suite 11, Palm Desert, CA 92211

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Quorum October, 2018


Barcode Automation, inc. More Reliable, Longer Lasting, and Less Expensive vehicle identification for large gated communities. “The cost savings is the biggest motivator. There’s also nothing that can disrupt its read range.” Western Door & Gate when asked why they recommend Barcode Automation, inc. “Your equipment is bulletproof, in this heat I’m having trouble with everything but BAi.” Phoenix Fence Co. when asked how Barcode Automation, inc. holds up in extreme heat. Schedule a demo by calling 1-800-528-9167.

www.Barcode-Automation.com

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2018 QUORUM COMMITTEE MEMBERS

CONTENTS CAI-CV

SUSAN BROWNE ROSENBERG, CHAIR Desert Cities Indoor Air, LLC

CAI-CV

RODNEY BISSELL, CO-CHAIR Bissell Design Studios, Inc.

CAI-CV

DEA FRANCK, ESQ., BOARD LIAISON Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

KIMBERLY BURNETT U.S. Security Associates DIANE CARMONY Coachella Valley Water District SIERRA CARR, CMCA Trilogy La Quinta

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

JENNIFER JAMES, ESQ. Green Bryant & French, LLP BRUCE LATTA, CMCA Parc La Quinta

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MARNE LOGAN, CMCA The Management Trust Desert Division CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

JAY POWELL Ben’s Asphalt JIM SCHMID The Lakes Country Club

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DAVID SCHUKNECHT, CMCA, AMS Personalized Property Management

39

STEVEN SHUEY, PCAM Personalized Property Management GEN WANGLER, ESQ., CCAL Fiore Racobs & Powers, A PLC

14

JOSH WIDENMANN MRC Smart Technology Solutions A Xerox Company

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CREATIVE DIRECTOR & GRAPHIC DESIGNER CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

FEATURES 8 Engaging Homeowners by Building Community Spirit

By Bruce Latta, CMCA

12 Communication Strategies

By David Schuknecht, CMCA, AMS

14 Communications? Think Disneyland!

By Steven Shuey, PCAM

18 Create Newsletters That Owners Want to Read

By Lisa Olson

39 Meet the Homeowner Leadership Committee

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Quorum October, 2018

RODNEY BISSELL Bissell Design Studios, Inc. rodney@bisselldesign.com (714) 293-3749

ARTICLE SUBMISSIONS OR ADVERTISING INFORMATION admin@cai-cv.org

SUBSCRIBER SERVICES

The Coachella Valley Quorum Magazine is a publication expressly prepared for association leaders, managers and related business professionals of the Community Associations Institute. Members are encouraged to submit articles for publishing consideration. All articles accepted for publication in Quorum are subject to editing and rewriting by the Quorum Committee.

Quorum Magazine is printed at the CAI-CV Office on a Xerox Versant 180 Press. Discounted printing is now available to CAI members. Call Bissell Design Studios, Inc. at (714) 293-3749 or the CAI-CV office for more information, (760) 345-0559.


ADVERTISERS ACCOUNTANTS & BOOKKEEPERS BRABO & CARLSEN, LLP................................. 24

ASPHALT

AMS PAVING.................................................... 43 ASPHALT MD'S................................................ 45 DIVERSIFIED ASPHALT PRODUCTS................. 51 NPG ASPHALT.................................................. 35

ATTORNEYS

30

FIORE RACOBS & POWERS, A PLC.................. 33 GREEN BRYANT & FRENCH, LLP...................... 45 GURALNICK GILLILAND & KNIGHTEN.............. 15 LAW OFFICE OF PEGGY REDMON.................... 23 PETERS & FREEDMAN, L.L.P............................ 50

BANKING

MUTUAL OF OMAHA BANK.............................. 33 POPULAR ASSOCIATION BANKING.................. 19

CHAPTER NEWS

DESIGN

BISSELL DESIGN STUDIOS, INC....................... 37

7 CAI-CV New & Renewing Members 33 Meet the President Elect

ELECTIONS

THE INSPECTORS OF ELECTION...................... 40

Michael Traidman By Sierra Carr, CMCA

FLOOD REPAIR

FLOOD RESPONSE........................................... 16

45 CAI-CV Educated Business Partners 46 CAI-CV Elections – Candidate Statements

GATES & GARAGE DOORS

AUTOMATION PRIDE........................................ 24

INSURANCE BROKERS

CHAPTER EVENTS

CLINE AGENCY INSURANCE BROKERS............ 24

26 The Price is Right Educational Lunch Program and Mini Trade Show

AMS CONNECT................................................ 23

30 CAI-CV Community Association Management as a Career Open House 52 Upcoming Chapter Events

LANDSCAPING

IT SERVICES

LAKE MAINTENANCE

By Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH, CHMM

DWI.................................................................. 13 CONSERVE LANDCARE.................................... 24 PRO LANDSCAPING INC................................... 16 RGA LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS, INC................ 38 SUNSHINE LANDSCAPE................................... 37 URBAN HABITAT.............................................. 50 WATER RITE - VINTAGE ASSOCIATES, INC...... 23

DEPARTMENTS

MANAGEMENT COMPANIES

6 President’s Message Maintenance 20 12 Questions to Evaluate Your HOA’s Maintenance Plan

ALBERT MANAGEMENT INC.............................. 2 ASSOCIA DESERT RESORT MANAGEMENT..... 16

PEST CONTROL

By Sierra Carr, CMCA 41 The Environmental and Health Benefits of Turfgrass Lawns By Steven Kirkpatrick

FRAZIER PEST CONTROL, INC......................... 15 POWERFUL PEST MANAGEMENT.................... 50

22 Welcome Aboard

GARDNER OUTDOOR AND POOL REMODELING......................................... 13

POOL REMODELING

Roxi Bardwell, Advanced Reserve Solutions, Inc. By Jay Powell

REALTORS

PALM SPRINGS REGIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS.................................................. 19

Platinum Spotlight 31 Flood Response 34 Sunshine Landscape 42 CLAC Update

ROOFING

By Steven Shuey, PCAM

BRS ROOFING INC........................................... 15 ROOF ASSET MANAGEMENT........................... 24 SUNTECH CONSULTING & ROOFING, INC......... 50 WESTERN PACIFIC ROOFING........................... 23

Water Wise 44 Desert Water Agency Rebates

AMS CONNECT................................................ 38 BARCODE AUTOMATION, INC............................ 3

SECURITY

By Desert Water Agency

CAI-CV.org

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FROM THE CHAPTER

President’s Message Gen Wangler, ESQ., CCAL Fiore Racobs & Powers, A PLC CAI-CV hosted its first Board Basic Training workshop on Tuesday, September 11th, to a classroom full of appreciative association board members. Steven Shuey, PCAM, (Personalized Property Management) and I taught the one-hour workshop covering basic fiduciary duties of directors. We are excited about this new program that will be offered free of charge on a near-monthly basis at CAI-CV’s new classroom. Don’t miss the next Board Basic Training on October 16th. The topic is “Understanding Budgets and Reserves,” taught by industry experts Keith Lavery, PCAM (Associa Desert Resort Management) and Mallory Paproth (SCT Reserve Consultants). Our thanks to the Programs Committee for another excellent Educational Lunch Program and Mini Trade Show on Friday, September 21st. “The Price is Right – HOA Edition” was amazing. Thanks to all our members who participated as experts and contestants, and a special thanks to Ryan Gesell, CIRMS, CMCA, (Cline Agency Insurance Brokers) for emceeing the show. Immediately following the program, the new Homeowner Leader Committee held a brief meeting with association board members to discuss CAI’s plans for board member education. This fall, we are offering a total of 20 hours of education for our Homeowner Leader members. CAI-CV reached another milestone on September 25th by hosting its first open house to inform job seekers about choosing community association management as a career. The Professional Managers Committee mailed and handdelivered posters and flyers to more than 60 career centers around the Valley and in Riverside and San Bernardino, and attended a Valley-wide career expo. More than 25 people from the community attended and many others indicated their interest. Our thanks to Lori Albert (Albert Management), Mark Dodge (Associa Desert Resort Management), Lisa Glogow (Powerstone Property Management), Steven Shuey (Personalized Property Management), and Karen Tillotson (FirstService Residential) for presenting. This is the first time CAI-CV (or, to my knowledge, any CAI chapter) has clearly defined community association management as a career and invited job seekers to meet industry executives. Our hope is that this effort will eventually bring more managers into the industry. One last item. On September 21st, CAI-CV launched the Chapter’s new app, which is now available at Apple and Google Play. Search for “CAI Coachella” and the app will appear. The app allows CAI-CV members to quickly access the directory and signup for events and programs. See page 17 for detailed instructions. Wow, September was busy! On October 5th, we will host another Manager on the Run (MOTR) program at the CAI-CV office. Michael Knighten, Esq., will be teaching the class on what can go wrong at annual meetings. Oktoberfest will be held again at Sunshine Landscape in Thousand Palms on Friday, October 12th. I hope this month’s Quorum cover will encourage you to attend! This is one of the best networking events of the year. We will hold CAI’s California Common Interest Development (CID) Law Course on Wednesday, October 24th, at the CAI-CV office. This day-long course provides an in-depth look at the laws governing CIDs. If you are a manager or a homeowner leader seeking advanced knowledge, you will enjoy this class. Julie Balbini, Esq., (Fiore Racobs & Powers) and Jennifer James, Esq., (Greene, Bryant & French), will be our instructors. We are looking forward to our October Educational Lunch Program and Mini Trade show on Friday, October 26th where Janet Powers, Esq., CCAL (Fiore Racobs & Powers) and Gregory Mann, Esq. (CA Department of Fair Employment and Housing), will update Chapter members about the new Department of Fair Employment and Housing Regulations. Recent changes significantly impact CIDs so you won’t want to miss this important program. As you can see, CAI-CV is focusing on providing our members with many more educational opportunities this year. The CID industry is becoming increasingly complex and we hope our members are finding it easier and more enjoyable to stay informed. If you have ideas for future programs, please call the CAI-CV office. We want to hear from you.

Gen Wangler, Esq. Gen Wangler, ESQ., CCAL

Fiore Racobs & Powers, A PLC 6

Quorum October, 2018


CAI-CV NEW & RENEWING MEMBERS NEW BUSINESS PARTNER TEAM///AIC

2018 COACHELLA VALLEY CHAPTER BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Jordan Hood (213) 716-1802 jh@team-aic.com

GEN WANGLER, ESQ., CCAL PRESIDENT Fiore Racobs & Powers, A PLC

RENEWING BUSINESS PARTNERS 1 STOP POOL PROS, INC. Rachel Noesser (800) 880-6919 Ext. 210 Rachel@1StopPoolPros.com

MIKE TRAIDMAN PRESIDENT ELECT Mira Vista at Mission Hills HOA

AMERICAN TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

PHYLLIS HARKINS, CMCA AMS, CCAM-LS, CAMEX PAST PRESIDENT Portola Country Club HOA JOLEN ZEROSKI, CMCA TREASURER Union Bank

Cindy Helmstead (951) 682-9200 cindyhelmstead@ATIrestoration.com CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

JOHN WALTERS-CLARK SECRETARY Associa Desert Resort Management CARDINAL AMBROSE, CMCA, AMS, CCAM, PCAM DIRECTOR The Vintage Group

Doug Bothe (760) 323-7475 doug@cafshoa.com

DESERT CITIES INDOOR AIR, LLC CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

Susan Rosenberg (760) 902-2545 sbriaq@gmail.com

DUNN-EDWARDS CORPORATION

RHONDA DREWS, CMCA, AMS, PCAM DIRECTOR Associa Desert Resort Management DEA FRANCK, ESQ. DIRECTOR Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

GERARD GONZALES DIRECTOR Albert Management, Inc. MATT LAWTON, CIC, CIRMS DIRECTOR Prendiville Insurance Agency

COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION FINANCIAL SERVICES, LLC

CAI-CV

LOUISE STETTLER DIRECTOR Palm Valley Country Club HOA

CAI Coachella Valley Office 75410 Gerald Ford Drive, Suite 102 Palm Desert, CA 92211 Tel: (760) 341-0559 Fax: (760) 341-8443 Website: www.cai-cv.org CAL LOCKETT Executive Director clockett@cai-cv.org The materials contained in this publication are designed to provide our members with timely and authoritative information; however, the CAI Coachella Valley Chapter is not engaging in the rendering of legal, accounting or other professional types of services. The Coachella Valley Chapter has not verified and/or endorsed the contents of these articles or advertising. Readers should not act on the information contained herein without seeking more specific professional advice from legal, accounting or other experts as required.

Rudy Garza (760) 775-7216 jodi@rudyspest.com

RENEWING MANAGEMENT COMPANY MEMBERSHIPS ALBERT MANAGEMENT INC. Lori Albert (760) 346-9000 lori@albertmgt.com

ASSOCIA-PCM Clint Warrell (949) 465-2280 clint.warrell@associa.us

NEW MANAGER MEMBERSHIP J & W MANAGEMENT CO. John McGara (602) 540-9643 john@jandwmgmt.com

RENEWING MANAGER MEMBERSHIPS ASSOCIA DESERT RESORT MANAGEMENT

Bridget Nigh (760) 972-6830 Bridget.Nigh@dunnedwards.com

Mark Dodge (760) 346-1161 mdodge@drminternet.com

HORIZON LIGHTING, INC.

Ashley Layton (760) 346-1161 alayton@drminternet.com

Catherine Gregory (949) 336-4336 catherine@horizonlightinginc.com

LABARRE/OKSNEE INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

RUDY'S TERMITE AND PEST CONTROL, INC.

Carol Fulton (760) 346-7251 Ext. 264 carolf@hoa-insurance.com

MARTIN SWEEPING/PRESSURE WASHING Curtis Oldenkamp (760) 200-9510 curtis@martinsweeping.com

PAINTING UNLIMITED, INC.

Samuel Rodriguez (760) 346-1161 srodriguez@drminternet.com

MILLENNIUM COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT, LLC Kimberly Hansele (866) 508-2780 kim@mcmiskey.com

POWERSTONE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Lisa Glogow (760) 469-4315 lglogow@powerstonepm.com

Jackie Fromdahl (714) 380-9796 jackie@paintingunlimited-inc.com

Holly Smith (909) 521-6829 hsmith@powerstonepm.com

PAUL DAVIS RESTORATION AND REMODELING

THE RESERVE COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION

Scott Williams (760) 360-1855 Scott.williams@pauldavis.com

Julie Reese (760) 674-2242 jreese@thereserveca.com

PRIMECO

TRILOGY AT LA QUINTA MAINTENANCE ASSOCIATION

Kellen Brown (800) 881-8067 kellen@primecoconstruction.com

RICHARDSON OBER Kelly Richardson (626) 449-5577 kelly@richardsonober.com

Eric Angle (760) 802-1948 ericangle@msn.com

BELLA VIDA AT SHADOW HILLS Joyce Gaurre Sue Gonzales Angela Hines Jeff Miller Randall Tackett

DESERT BREEZES CASAS Sheryl Carnevale Ron Downing Stephen Jimenez William Miller Charlene Young

HIGHLAND SPRINGS COUNTRY CLUB HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Patricia Aspan Linda Bonnie Lorraine Boyd Bruce Byers Andrea Lawrence Rosemarie Peterson Ed Schula Karren Warren

LAS BRISAS NORTH Michael Aubry Morgen Bentsen Leslie Dullman Claire Erlam Ruben Franz

PUEBLO SANDS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Thomas Cannon John Gallucci Alan Krug Loretta Tremper

SHADOW HILLS James Collins Rex Jennings Patrick Marchesson Sandra Nemecek Todd Rous

THE FAIRWAYS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Steven Hannegan Fran Nocella Scott Wills

RENEWING VOLUNTEER LEADERS SUN CITY SHADOW HILLS Erica Hedlund

TRI-PALM UNIFIED OWNERS ASSOCIATION Marcee Williams

VISTA MONTANA HOA John Aulerich Connie Imerti Connie Lichtfuss

NEW VOLUNTEER LEADERS ALDEA AT JACKSON Osualdo Beltran Michael Bonilla Laidley Gordon Lolita Vega

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FEATURE

Engaging Homeowners by Building Community Spirit By Bruce Latta, CMCA

A

ll of us involved in managing community associations run into disgruntled homeowners who just can’t be satisfied. Problems that occur where people live are understandably emotional. However, if we don’t respond quickly, matters can spread to other homeowners and become unmanageable. The entire community suffers. How do we stop negativity and build community spirit instead? When faced with unreasonable homeowners, I often recall when my children were too young to reason with. My wife, who still reads “self-help” books, would yell out “REDIRECT THEM!” Those of you who raised millennials and Gen X kids will remember the “redirect” trend.

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It worked. Can this be a lesson for association managers and board members? Can we redirect homeowners to focus on something positive instead of tearing down the community? The answer, according to CAI is a resounding YES. The standard dictionary definition for community spirit is, “People coming

many opportunities for homeowners to get involved as volunteers. If a homeowner has time to complain, imagine if they spent the same amount of time volunteering to make the community better. Make sure your community has volunteer committees set up to deal with typical community problems. Then, you respond to complaints with, “Why don’t you volunteer for the committee that advises the board on that issue?” Giving disgruntled people the opportunity to

"IF A HOMEOWNER HAS TIME TO COMPLAIN, IMAGINE IF THEY SPENT THE SAME AMOUNT OF TIME VOLUNTEERING TO MAKE THE COMMUNITY BETTER." together to improve the community in which they live; it is people as a group affecting each other in a positive way.” That’s certainly worth pursuing. CAI’s Research Foundation took a hard look at community spirit and suggests that a healthy community has

put their time and efforts into solving their problem through committee work can quickly diffuse them. In addition to making sure you have committees to redirect homeowners, associations across the country are building community spirt by adopting


FEATURE a charity. For example, most common interest development’s (CID’s) governing documents require the HOA to host garage sales periodically. Why not go the extra step and announce that your association is adopting a charity that will pick up all the left-over garage sale items? Include that charity’s fundraising events in your community newsletter. Sell T-shirts. Host a fundraiser or encourage homeowners to send money during the holidays. Some charities like Desert Arc provide employment to people with disabilities. You can promote Desert Arc’s landscaping service to individual homeowners or encourage your landscape contractor to include a Desert Arc crew in their bid. Desert Arc is in Palm Desert and can be reached at www.desertarc.org or by calling 760-346-1611. Your efforts to build community spirit will fall flat if you don’t communicate often with homeowners about opportunities to get involved and opportunities to serve the less fortunate in our greater community. If you are thinking that maybe it is time to form a newsletter committee, you are on the right track. Having more homeowners involved in the governance and preservation of your community will build pride. When word spreads that your community is a great place to call home, you may also see property values increase. It’s time to make community spirit officially part of your community’s goals. Get a group of disgruntled homeowners to form a community spirt committee and get them redirected on providing positive recommendations to the board. You can find more helpful information at CAI’s Foundation for Community Research at www.foundation.caionline.org. Check out all their Best Practice Reports while you’re there! Their booklet called Community Harmony and Spirit provides numerous examples of activities by various associations. Use it for developing ideas but don’t forget to ask residents for their input. With input from homeowners and CAI’s best practice tools, the board can develop a “vision” for your community. With this vision, policies can be developed, and practices put in place that foster a shared positive vision.

"GET A GROUP OF DISGRUNTLED HOMEOWNERS TO FORM A COMMUNITY SPIRT COMMITTEE AND GET THEM REDIRECTED ON PROVIDING POSITIVE RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE BOARD."

HERE ARE SOME SPECIFIC BEST PRACTICE EXAMPLES OF ACTIVITIES FROM CAI: • One of the easiest ways to ways to build community spirit is to welcome new members to the community. Have a Welcoming Committee with someone making a visit to the new owners. Make new owners to the community feel a part of something, that an actual community exists. Also, it’s an opportunity to reinforce the community rules by giving them a community binder with all the various governing documents indexed within it. It also gives the new residents a contact within their new community. • Social media is available to use to highlight all the goings-on in the community. Communications and transparency make members feel a part of their association because they feel informed and aware of the association’s business activities. Podcasts? Anyone in the community that will volunteer to produce them? Interview individuals of interest to the community such as the board president, city mayor, vendor, local school principle. It's intended to be as informative as possible for all the residents. • A calendar of all events and important dates for the year for the members. Include sending periodic updates with any changes. • A newsletter in both hard copy and digital. Ask for volunteers to submit stories and photos. Have some written criteria for the community to understand how and what to submit for publishing, including photos. It doesn’t have to be limited to monthly but should be on some type of schedule, so residents know when to expect it.

CAI-CV.org

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neighborhood watch program. • Hold regular townhall meetings for input. Invite guest speakers such as the mayor, police chief, fire chief, school superintendent and announce all members are welcome. Just announcing and holding town hall meetings, even if they can’t attend, will make members feel more appreciated. • Celebrate national holidays like Arbor Day or Independence Day. Hold a picnic or potluck with games at the park or community facility. • Form clubs. Allow them to announce they are looking for other members to join them. • If residents want to lead an exercise group, encourage residents to join their neighbors. • Many associations have implemented community traditions revolving around major seasonal events, giving residents something • Provide meeting agendas and minutes. Again, in both digital and hard copies. Supply to all members not just those who have made a written request. • Use a website as an information and resource portal for members updating them on all activities. It is also a marketing tool for the community. A useful attractive up-to-date website creates a positive image to the outside world about the community. Have a members' only sign-in section for association business. • Create a community bulletin board. Include announcements from the association and also a community section for members' announcements. Make sure you have written criteria, so everyone understands prior to using it what can be posted (i.e., no personal attacks, a time limit, a max size

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"CELEBRATE NATIONAL HOLIDAYS LIKE ARBOR DAY OR INDEPENDENCE DAY. HOLD A PICNIC OR POTLUCK WITH GAMES AT THE PARK OR COMMUNITY FACILITY." and number of postings). • Schedule block parties or potlucks a few times per year. • Conduct member surveys and ask for feedback which makes residents feel like they matter. • Ask if people would buy embroidered polo shirts or printed T-shirts with the community name and logo. Take pre-orders with payments and have them made. • Work with local law enforcement and set up a

to look forward to each year. • Community spirit is also furthered by recognizing all volunteers within the community Try out a few of these ideas and watch your community improve. It’s difficult for a homeowner to stay disgruntled if they understand your efforts to make the community more enjoyable and more valuable, while building a reputation as a great place to call home. Bruce Latta, CMCA, is president of Parc La Quinta HOA, and is Chair of CAI-CV’s Homeowner Leader Committee. Bruce can reached by email at plqhoablatta@gmail.com or by phone at (760) 285-5617.


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OACHELLA V CAI C ALL E

OCT

Y

OBER 12, 2018

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CALL FOR DETAILS 760-341-0559 SPONSORS Title Sponsor ........... Flood Response Stein Sponsor................................................Allied Universal T-Shirt Sponsors ..............Powerstone Property Management Sunshine Landscape Cornhole Sponsors ............................................... Bay Alarm Pacific Western Bank Securitas Vision Roof Services Beer Pong Table Sponsors........................... Flood Response MRC - Smart Technology Solutions - A Xerox Company Peters & Freedman, L.L.P. SCT Reserve Consultants Photo Sponsor...................................................Heart 2 Heart Polka Sponsor ......................... Diversified Asphalt Products Prize Sponsor ......................................................AMS Paving

Game Cup Sponsors ... Associa Desert Resort Management Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Vantage Point Construction Lowenbrau Sponsors ................................Automation Pride Fiore Racobs & Powers, A PLC Green, Bryant & French, LLP Millennium Community Management Western Pacific Roofing Wristband Sponsor .................................................. PrimeCo Bratwurst Food Sponsors ................................ Asphalt MD’s Frazier Pest Control LaBarre/Oksnee Insurance Agency Pacific Western Bank Vista Paint Corporation Pretzel Sponsor................................................ EmpireWorks Dessert Sponsor ....................... Dunn-Edwards Corporation FirstService Residential Scholarship Sponsor ..................Seacoast Commerce Bank CLAC Sponsor ........................... Powerful Pest Management

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FEATURE

Communication Strategies By David Schuknecht, CMCA, AMS

Composing correspondence that is directed to an entire association can prove to be a difficult task. Communicating effectively with hundreds of different personalities, reading styles, and reading comprehension levels is challenging. For that reason, journalists are often instructed to curtail their writing to an 8th grade or below level. In fact, USA Today rose to notoriety due to their simple easy-to-read style. Here are some tips from journalism experts to consider while composing your next communication. Map out your key message points and get them on paper (or screen). Add only the detail you need to get your message across. Too much detail will detract from the message.

Make sure all your detail reinforces your key message points. Don’t stray. If offering a lot of complex information, periodically remind readers of your key points.

When using examples, make sure readers can relate to them. For example, most people have no idea how big 100,000 square feet is, but they can relate to the example if you use two football fields instead.

Anticipate the important questions and answer them as soon as possible in the text. If you leave readers hanging without answers, you will lose them altogether.

Once you engage your readers, give them a way to take action. Provide the next steps they can take. Let them know how they can get involved.

Keep your language understandable. Avoid technical language when possible. If you use a word that an 8th grader may not know, use a simple descriptive or example. You don’t want your readers to feel uneducated. Skip the 100-point Scrabble words. Always spell out acronyms the first time you use them.

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Quorum October, 2018

Don't be afraid to ask for help composing your message. Other managers, administrative staff, and the board of directors are all people who could be interested in helping make sure your message is clear and easily understood.

Proof! When people see bad grammar, misspellings and typos, they figure if you couldn’t take the time to proofread your work, then why should they take the time to read it. Best practice is to have at least one other person read your messages before they are published.

David Schuknecht, CMCA, AMS, is a community manager for Personalized Property Managment and has been a portfolio manager for the last several years. David can be reached at (760) 325-9500 or by email at David@ppminternet.com.


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FEATURE

Communications? Think Disneyland! By Steven Shuey, PCAM

C

ommunities were designed to be wonderful and friendly places to live. Sadly, some communities are wedged in turmoil with “difficult” people. While trying to figure out what the dysfunction is and how to resolve it, we may lose sight of a great tool--communications. In more than 40 years of community association management, I've learned that most difficult situations can be remedied with direct, simple and clear communications. The resulting relationships formed with homeowners will eventually lead to a harmonious community.

PEOPLE WANT TO KNOW People want to know what is going on in the community that impacts their lives at home. They want to know about changes and even improvements before the work gets started. Few things grate on homeowners more than being surprised that their driveway is blocked by a plumbing truck there to fix a pipe. Stop and think about how homeowners see their world. They are headed for their sanctuary and they are unexpectedly blocked. Understand their frustration. Informing homeowners beforehand is paramount. For those who have been to Disneyland, you have seen the "countdown clock" near the end of every line letting you know how long of a wait to expect. You choose to stand in line for an hour or move on to the next ride. You are informed and somewhat in control of your destiny. An informed homeowner may feel inconvenienced by whatever is going on, but they are not likely to be angry. Tell homeowners what is going to happen; tell them how it will happen; and then tell the success story after it happens. I like to call this the “Disneyland” method of communication. With this communication style, you can satisfy even the most difficult people.

DISNEY HAD IT FIGURED OUT

"IN MORE THAN 40 YEARS OF COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION MANAGEMENT, I'VE LEARNED THAT MOST DIFFICULT SITUATIONS CAN BE REMEDIED WITH DIRECT, SIMPLE AND CLEAR COMMUNICATIONS."

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Quorum October, 2018

Disney told his executives, "Make the people feel good about the journey through the park." They do this better than most organizations, and probably after millions spent on research. Disneyland’s communications with guests are complex to execute but simple for guests to understand. That can be true in community management too. Homeowners don’t expect to know all the details behind the board’s complex decisions. They are typically more interested in knowing how these decisions are going to impact their lives. Back to Disneyland. As you enter the park and pass by the huge WELCOME sign and take a whiff of freshly popped popcorn, your heart starts to race in anticipation of what’s to come. You are handed a map! Who needs a map at Disneyland? You continue and follow the clearly marked signs and well-thought-out paths to all your favorite places. It’s no accident that as you enter, you face the Cinderella Castle in the distance, leading to adventure. After a long day, you head back to the entrance and see the comforting train station that confirms it is time to go home. Disney insisted on walking in the shoes of his


NO guests and every care was taken to anticipate their needs and expectations during their journey through the park. Homeowners in your community deserve the same. You are headed for disaster if the board’s plans are kept secret or are a surprise to residents. Disgruntled homeowners can be avoided if boards plan in advance and communicate their plans before work gets started. Freshly popped popcorn helps too. One of the most effective communications a board can develop for homeowners is a Community Vision Statement. Some of you are thinking, “that seems like a lot of work.” Remember the success of Disney and your

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"ONE OF THE MOST EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATIONS A BOARD CAN DEVELOP FOR HOMEOWNERS IS A COMMUNITY VISION STATEMENT." duty to protect home values. It is worth the investment. Set up a brainstorming session with the board. Survey residents. Review your budget and reserve study and create a plan for the future. Once the vision is known by leadership, communicate it to residents. Get their feedback and tweak your plan as needed. At the end of the process, you’ll have a plan to guide your decisions and most important, you will have community buy-in. CAI knows that community newsletters are one of the most difficult animals to feed. It is, however, critically important to achieving a harmonious community. Use as few words as possible to report on all of the board's actions that impact general (not individual) homeowner living. The few hours it takes to write an informative newsletter each month will alleviate many hours of homeowner complaints. Additionally, more residents are turning to the Internet to find information. Websites are easier than ever to create, and many are free to use. Make sure your newsletters and important announcements are easily attainable on the web. A website is a contemporary necessity for all communities. Don’t avoid this awesome technology. Honestly, if you invest in a solid communications plan for your community, you will achieve harmony with most homeowners. However, there are always one or two difficult people who will never be happy. Suggest they spend some time at Disneyland. Steven Shuey, PCAM, is a CLAC Delegate representing CAI-CV and serves on the national faculty of CAI. He is a community association consultant with Personalized Property Management and can be reached at IslandMgr@aol.com.

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Quorum October, 2018

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I N T R O D U C I N G

CAI-CV’s MEMBER APP DOWNLOAD FOR FREE

For Apple Smartphones 1 Go to the Apple Store or press the

For Android Smartphones 1 Go to Google Play or press the

2

2

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Apple App icon on your phone Press the magnifying glass symbol to search Search for CAI Coachella Valley Look for this icon Download the app Start enjoying

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With the push of a button, you’ll have CAI-CV’s

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In one touch, see CAI-CV’s Online Directory. Is your information incorrect? Don’t worry. Press the Update Member button and update your information just the way you want it. In a few hours, your corrections will appear.

Events Register for events and purchase sponsorships. Quick List Find CAI-CV Corporate Sponsors and Educated Business Partners.

Quorum

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Do you know someone who might be interested in joining CAI? Refer them here and you can be entered in the new App drawing for a quarterly $50 gift card. If your referral joins, you can be entered into the Recruiter of the Month drawing locally and with National CAI, and you might win the CAI-CV grand prize of $1,000!

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The CAI-CV app gives you everything you need to maximize your membership at your fingertips. Do you have suggestions for improving the app? Please let us know by emailing admin@cai-cv.org or join the CAI-CV Communications Committee and help us improve the app and manage all of CAI-CV’s social media and web presence. Call the CAI-CV office for more information – 760-341-0559.

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FEATURE

Create Newsletters That Owners Want to Read By Lisa Olson

P

roducing a newsletter that people look forward to reading is easier than you think. Just follow these simple guidelines to increase readership and build community.

MOST IMPORTANT INGREDIENTS! Well planned newsletters use information and education to direct everyone’s attention to the benefits of being a part of your HOA by supporting clear lines of communication, building trust, and creating predictability in the community. The result: a contribution to community spirit that makes owners feel positive overall. Well-read newsletters help owners stay informed and supports other communication activities that, combined, causes owners to be more likely to participate in association issues and activities. The bonus… governance and business operations become less problematic for the board and management.

OTHER IMPORTANT INGREDIENTS Relevant content – Make the content personal to the owner. State obvious benefits and demonstrate how the point applies to the reader. Get personal – use “you,” “your,” and to bring people 18

Quorum October, 2018

together use, “us,” “we,” and “our.” Short and sweet - Get to the “why” the topic is important to them as quickly as possible. Bullet points work well. Use of a photo with quick caption and a short paragraph may be all you need. Visual appeal – Colorful photos, white space, type size appropriate for the age of the readers, easy to read headlines and, clean graphics. Benefit-oriented headlines – A “Desert Landscaping Coming” headline becomes, “Desert Landscaping Adds Color and Saves Money Too.”

TOPICS MADE EASY “How do I come up with a topic?,” is the question I am asked most often. Actually, it’s not as difficult as it sounds. Just keep your eyes and ears open for stories. Approvals, decisions, changes – Meeting minutes are chuck full of great topics. People naturally want to know what is happening before it happens. This provides a sense of security, calms owners’ fears of the unknown, and helps them feel part of the community. Plans and follow-ups – Announce what is happening, explain why it is happening, and what result/ benefit owners can expect.

In a future newsletter, show owners the progress and/or results of projects. Tip: Before and after photos can be very effective with a caption stating the benefits of the project. Owners themselves – What are owners talking about around the pool, at social events and in committee meetings? What do they comment on or have questions about during the homeowner’s forum? Where does the money go? Pull out the financial statements and a calculator. Break it down into digestible numbers. For instance, take the monthly assessment and show how much money goes to each category of expense in meaningful dollars and cents. Better yet, include a colorful pie chart. Little known facts – These make great topics. For instance, owners are not aware of an HOA benefit like common area exterminator service and the discount given by this vendor to owners for service for their own property. Add a photo of the exterminator spraying.


"Well planned newsletters use information and education to direct everyone’s attention to the benefits of being a part of your HOA by supporting clear lines of communication, building trust, and creating predictability in the community."

MONTHLY

the Palm Springs ®

JULY/AUG 2018

IN THIS ISSUE Issues Mobilization Grant 3 What You Need to Know About Logos and Trademarks Page 5 July/Aug Calendar Page 6 You’re Even More Vital to New-Home Buyers Page 14 PSRAR Affiliate Network News Page 16

Industry Professionals - CAI has articles that you can use for FREE both nationally and through CAI-CV. Look through these for topics and articles. Remember to edit so it is directly relevant to YOUR reader. Vendors – Remodelers, insurance agents, bankers, security companies, dog sitters, etc. can all provide great information and advice. Want to keep owners up to date on the real estate market in your HOA? Many vendors are willing to write a specific article for a mention of their name and contact information at the bottom. Just remember to tie it back to YOUR reader’s specific interests. Lisa Olson is five-year veteran board member of Mountain Villas HOA. She is on the board of the Desert Cities HOA Council and is an active member of CAI-CV’s Homeowner Leader Committee. Lisa has more than 30 years’ experience in the marketing communications industry. She can be reached at (503) 539-4963 or by email at lisaomtvillas@gmail.com.

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MAINTENANCE

12 Questions to Evaluate Your HOA’s Maintenance Plan By Sierra Carr, CMCA

H

ow well do you know your association’s preventative maintenance (PM) plan? Whether your management company has a proactive or reactive maintenance style, having a solid PM plan is critical to ensuring that your HOA doesn’t face surprise costs. A thoughtful and robust PM plan can help prepare you for the future and give you a competitive edge with potential home buyers in the community at large. To make sure you and your management company are on the same page when it comes to preventative maintenance, sit down with them to discuss the steps needed to create a PM plan for your community. You can use these questions to guide you through the process.

1. DO WE ALREADY HAVE A PM PLAN? It’s a no-brainer, right? Maybe so, but the first question you want to ask your HOA management company is whether they already have a PM plan in place. Some companies have generic plans that they impose on all their clients. Ask for details. Then ask how you can work together to develop a specific plan crafted for your community. Even if your community has a PM plan, keep going with these questions. You may find some important components to consider.

2. IS OUR PM PLAN DOCUMENTED? You likely already know this, but when it comes to association business, make sure you aren’t just dealing with verbal PM planning. Everything should be documented digitally or in print, and that includes your PM program. This step is important because it ensures that everyone understands your maintenance schedule going forward. Your board of directors and manager may not be there in a year (or five years), so having a written plan in place provides direction for future boards and managers.

3. ARE YOU TAKING THE RESERVE STUDY INTO ACCOUNT WHEN PLANNING MAINTENANCE? Don’t confuse a reserve study with a PM plan; the two are vastly different. They should, however, complement each other. Most importantly, the reserve study should be reviewed when developing a PM plan.

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Rodney Riepenhoff, corporate engineer at FirstService Residential, said, “Reviewing an association’s reserve study annually helps us ensure that a community’s preventative maintenance program matches equipment life expectancies.” He noted, “A timely review of the reserve study allows us to help associations mitigate surprise costs and save money.”

4. HAS AN ENGINEERING SPECIALIST ASSESSED THE EQUIPMENT AND FACILITIES? Ask your management company to partner with an appropriately licensed engineer to assess your equipment and facilities. Don’t rely on an amateur when you require the help of a professional. Partnering with an experienced engineering specialist often leads to more informed solutions and cost savings for your HOA. For instance, one 228-unit Los Angeles high-rise called in corporate engineer Riepenhoff to assess several ongoing water drainage issues. These issues had been affecting the pool area and causing multiple leaks into the parking lot below. Originally, the association had received an estimate of $400,000 to solve the water drainage issues. With a long list of other repairs and limited funds to work with, they were in need of a more cost-effective solution. By utilizing Riepenhoff’s engineering expertise, they immediately identified the cause of the problem and found that it would require $280,000 less to fix than the original assessment.

5. WHAT KINDS OF TESTING METHODS ARE BEING USED? To ensure that your PM plan is accurate and thorough, ask what testing methods are being used to assess your facilities and equipment. Seek professional advisers to determine if these are appropriate methods. For example, vibration analysis can be used to measure the vibration of moving parts in machines to anticipate failures and help determine the useful life of components. The data collected can then be used to help determine the condition of equipment like pumps and motors for your PM plan. Examples of other critical tests include plumbing stack


MAINTENANCE inspection, laser shaft alignment, thermal imaging, sound testing, oil sampling and analysis and trends analysis.

6. HOW OFTEN ARE YOU INSPECTING FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT? Your community’s maintenance schedule depends on the size and scope of your facilities and your association’s specific needs. How do you determine this schedule? Your management company can arrange to have an engineering specialist perform a quality assurance assessment or full inspection of all your components. After 30 days, they will be able to determine a baseline that can be used to determine how often maintenance and inspections will need to take place. The maintenance schedule should also support your reserve study; if the reserve study’s estimated timelines do not align with your PM plan, there’s a good chance your program is outdated. Lastly, your maintenance schedule should remain fluid to accommodate emergencies, such as extreme weather.

7. WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO EXTEND THE USEFUL LIFE OF EQUIPMENT AND FACILITIES? Manufacturers often determine the useful life of components, but your management company and board can take actions to help extend a component’s useful life. On the flipside, an association that doesn’t have a solid PM plan in place may inadvertently be reducing a component’s useful life. That’s why it’s important to determine if your PM is following a manufacturer’s recommended maintenance, and to determine what steps are being taken to improve useful life. Useful life can be extended by instituting regular testing of equipment (per question five), investing in ongoing maintenance and replacing parts with better-quality or more efficient materials.

8. WHAT TYPES OF VENDORS DOES YOUR ASSOCIATION CONTRACT WITH? You should only work with business partners that have been vetted carefully. CAI offers a database of credentialed business partners for reserve studies, insurance and legal matters. Many management companies have preferred vendors that have been screened. Associations have a duty to call in professional advisors that are licensed and insured to help them with all aspects of managing a community, especially maintenance.

"Because of Riepenhoff’s engineering expertise, he immediately identified the cause of the problem and found that it would require $280,000 less to fix it than the original assessment."

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MAINTENANCE 9. WHAT SYSTEM IS USED TO TRACK MAINTENANCE PROJECTS? A Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) or some type of digital tracking system should be used to monitor maintenance projects and automate all of your scheduled processes. Most management companies offer some form of CMMS. Ask whether the CMMS can be accessed via mobile and if it tracks items like inventory, work requests and scheduled maintenance. These functions will ensure adequate controls and ease of use.

10. WHAT HAPPENS WHEN EMERGENCY MAINTENANCE ISSUES OCCUR? No matter how well prepared you are, natural disasters and emergencies are a part of life. It is important to include emergency procedures in your PM plan to prepare for unexpected emergencies.

11. DO THE MAINTENANCE PROJECTS REQUIRE A PROJECT MANAGER? Depending on the size of your community and the components within it, you may need to take on large maintenance projects or capital improvements. For these types of projects, it’s in your community’s best interest to have the support of a dedicated project manager to help facilitate these projects. Ask your management company how they contract for project consulting services. A project manager helps provide support for a number of important tasks, like establishing the budget and guiding the bidding process.

12. HOW ROBUST IS THE PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE PLAN? Without a doubt, a thorough PM plan can help mitigate unexpected costs and repairs, ultimately saving your association money. That’s why it’s important to have an in-depth conversation with your management company about taking steps to ensure the health of your community now and in the future. Sierra Carr, CMCA, is the Comptroller for Trilogy at La Quinta and works for FirstService Residential. She can be reached at (760) 702-3038 or by email at scarr@mytlq.com.

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Quorum October, 2018

Welcome Aboard Roxi Bardwell, PCAM with Advanced Reserve Solutions, Inc. By Jay Powell

Advanced Reserve Solutions, Inc.

You may recognize both names, Roxi Bardwell and Advanced Reserve Solutions (ARS) because both have been doing business in the Coachella Valley for years. Roxi’s previous career was in private country club management. Her experience in the Coachella Valley started at Mission Hills Country Club in 2001. She transitioned from club management to community association management in 2003, managing large-scale communities. Over the past few years, Roxi has added to her expertise by learning (and working in) the specialized field of reserve studies. Roxi found she enjoys helping communities with their individual challenges involved in long-range planning and funding their reserve plans. Roxi has two long-time industry reserve specialists as mentors. Advanced Reserve Solutions was founded in 1996 by principals, Steve Jackson and Richard Ruffle who hold CAI Reserve Specialist (RS) numbers 7 and 12, respectively. Known for their flexible WinReserve™ industry specialized software, Advanced Reserve Solutions has been providing reserve studies to Coachella Valley communities for years. Roxi is working toward her CAI Reserve Specialist (RS) credential and is excited to serve the Coachella Valley from their new Palm Desert office. Roxi is passionate about helping managers and board members plan for their community’s future. Like a puzzle, Roxi believes each community has its own pieces to fit into their unique reserve study plan. She views the reserve study as the primary tool for a long-range plan and has observed the benefits of proper planning, which is evidenced by increased property values and community pride. Roxi is active in the Coachella Valley Chapter, currently serving on the Membership and Education Committees. In her leisure time, she enjoys golfing, surfing and spending time with Tony (Antonio), her Italian Greyhound. As you plan the future of your community, she hopes you will consider getting a proposal from Roxi and Advanced Reserve Solutions. Jay Powell is the Business Development Manager for Ben's Asphalt. He can be reached at (760) 413-2466 or by email at jay.powell@bensasphalt.com.


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Quorum October, 2018

C OAC H E L L A VA L L E Y C H A P T E R

A SS O C I AT I O N S I N ST I T U T E

Consulting


OCTOBER

CAI-CV’s Board Member Workshop (BMW) Series

FALL 2018

BOARD MEMBER WORKSHOP

WHAT: Board Basic Training WHEN: Tuesday, October 16, 2018 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. TOPIC: Understanding Budgets & Reserves WHERE: CAI-CV Office 75410 Gerald Ford Drive, Suite 102 Palm Desert COST: Free w/RSVP WHAT: CAI’s Common Interest Development (CID) Law Course WHEN: Wednesday, October 24, 2018 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. TOPIC: In-depth legal review of state and federal statutes governing CIDs Certificate Course (continental breakfast, lunch and test included) WHERE: CAI-CV Office 75410 Gerald Ford Drive, Suite 102 Palm Desert COST: $95 Members | $130 Nonmembers (Board member education may be covered by your HOA)

NOVEMBER

HOA Education for Board Members, Committee Chairs and Homeowner Volunteers CAI-CV EDUCATIONAL EVENTS REQUIRE AN RSVP, EITHER ONLINE AT WWW.CAI-CV.ORG OR CALL THE CAI-CV OFFICE AT (760) 341-0559. CAI IS THE MOST TRUSTED SOURCE OF EDUCATION FOR COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION BOARD MEMBERS IN THE UNITED STATES AND ABROAD. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT CAI, VISIT WWW.CAIONLINE.ORG OR WWW.CAI-CV.ORG.

CAI-CV.org

WHAT: Board Basic Training WHEN: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. TOPIC: Are You Covered? HOA Insurance WHERE: CAI-CV Office 75410 Gerald Ford Drive, Suite 102 Palm Desert COST: Free w/RSVP

DECEMBER

WHAT: CAI’s Board Leadership Development Workshop WHEN: Friday, December 7, 2018 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. TOPICS: Certificate Course (continental breakfast, lunch and wine reception included) Module 1: Governing Documents and Roles and Responsibilities Module 2: Communications, Meetings and Volunteerism Module 3: Fundamentals of Financial Management Module 4: Professional Advisors and Service Providers Module 5: Association Rules and Conflict Resolution Ask the Attorney Roundtable WHERE: Palm Valley Country Club 39205 Palm Valley Dr. Palm Desert COST: $95 Members | $130 Nonmembers (Board member education may be covered by your HOA) (Join us for CAI’s Holiday Open House at Palm Valley Country Club at 5:30 p.m. for free)

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25


EVENTS

CAI-CV’S

the PRice is Right

HOA EDition

26

Quorum October, 2018

Educational Lunch Program and Mini Trade Show Friday, September 21, 2018 Palm Valley Country Club, Palm Desert


EVENTS

Your Host Ryan Gesell, CIRMS, CMCA Cline Agency Insurance Brokers, Inc.

Guest Panel of Experts Dea Franck, Esq. Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Attorneys at Law

Gary Butler Asphalt MD’s

Lori Fahnestock Powerful Pest Management

Mike Graves, RS SCT Reserve Consultants, Inc.

Rick Cech, CMCA Roof Asset Management

Recap of the Program By Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH, CHMM

T

he September Educational Lunch Program & Mini Trade Show had more than 200 CAI-CV members in attendance and was highlighted by an energetic The Price is Right game show presentation. Contestants were chosen from the general audience and competed for Starbucks gift cards. Each group of four contestants had four questions from a panel of experts and had to guess the correct answers. The game show was hosted by Ryan Gesell, CIRMS, CMCA (Cline Agency Insurance Brokers). The panel of experts included Gary Butler (Asphalt MD’s), Rick Cech, CMCA, (Roof Asset Management), Lori Fahnestock (Powerful Pest Management), Dea Franck, Esq. (Epsten Grinnell & Howell), and Mike Graves, RS, (SCT Reserve Consultants).

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ON NEXT PAGE

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the PRice is Right

HOA EDition From Insurance Expert Ryan Gesell, CIRMS, CMCA, Cline Agency Insurance Brokers

Q: According to CAI National, as of the year 2016, California had how many Community Associations?

A: 45,400.

Q: How long does a termite queen live? A: A termite queen can live up to seven years. From Roofing Expert Rick Cech, CMCA, Roof Asset Management

Q: According to CAI National, as of the year 2016, how many Q: What percent of roof leaks can be prevented if a states had more community associations than California?

comprehensive roof maintenance program is completed?

A: One, Florida had 47,900, about 2,500 more than California. A: 90 percent. The extreme heat here in the desert results Q: According to the CA Civil Code, what is the minimum limit of liability that an association with more than 100 units must maintain on their Directors and Officers (D&O) insurance policy?

A: It depends -- Per CA Civil Code 5800, the Board of Directors shall not be personally liable in excess of the coverage of insurance maintained to any person who suffers injury, provided they maintain the following limits: At least $500,000 if the CID consists of 100 or fewer separate interests or at least $1,000,000 if the CID consists of more than 100 units.

Q: What is the average dollar amount sought by an owner in most Directors and Officers liability claims?

A: Zero. Most D&O claims are non-monetary claims, where an owner is not suing for monetary compensation, but instead, sues for a reversal of decision or to challenge an election. Boards and managers should ask their agent/ broker if their D&O policy covers non-monetary claims and if it extends coverage to the management company.

From Pest Control Expert Lori Fahnestock, Powerful Pest Management

Q: How many pups can a rat have per litter? A: Rats can begin reproducing at the age of three months and can have four to five litters per year, each with five to 12 pups.

Q: How many days can a cockroach live without its head? A: A cockroach can live up to four days without its head. Cockroaches breathe through “spiracles” which are in each body segment. The brain does not control the breathing so they eventually starve to death.

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Quorum October, 2018

in expansion and contraction of the roof membrane at a different rate than sheet metal, resulting in cracks and voids at termination points such as gravel stops, vent pipes, and solar supports.

Q: What is the average percent of energy savings if you install an SPF (Spray Polyurethane Foam) roof system with acrylic roof coating?

A: 30 percent. This is the average savings by home owners that had 1-1/2-inch SPF installed over their flat rooves with “standard” mineral surface.

Q: What is the average life span of a roof in the Coachella Valley?

A: 20 years. This is the average from various roof types. From Legal Expert Dea Franck, Esq., Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC

Q: What is the total not-to-exceed amount an association may bill a requesting member for the time actually and reasonably involved in redacting a requested enhanced association record?

A: $200. While an association may bill a requesting member for the direct and actual costs of copying and mailing the requested documents in an amount not exceeding $10 per hour, an association may only charge an owner no more than $200 total per written request for the time actually and reasonably involved in redacting an enhanced association record. (Civil Code section 5205(g)).

Q: According to Civil Code section 5500(a), how many times a year must a board review a current reconciliation of the association’s operating accounts?

A: Until December 31, 2018, a board must review a current reconciliation of the association’s operating accounts on at least a quarterly basis unless the association’s governing


EVENTS Join Us for CAI-CV’s

Educational Lunch Program & Mini Trade Show Friday, October 26, 2018, 11:15 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. Palm Valley Country Club 39205 Palm Valley Dr, Palm Desert documents impose more stringent standards. However, Civil Code section 5500 has recently been amended, and after January 1, 2019, a board must review a current reconciliation of the association’s operating accounts every month unless the association’s governing documents impose stricter requirements.

Q: If an association and a homeowner agree to participate in alternative dispute resolution (“ADR”) (e.g. mediation), how many days do the parties have to complete the ADR?

A: Pursuant to Civil Code section 5940(a), the parties have ninety (90) days from the date the association receives the homeowner’s written acceptance to participate in ADR unless the parties agree to a longer period to complete the ADR.

From Paving Expert Gary Butler, Asphalt MD’s

Q: What is the estimated average useful life of asphalt in the desert’s

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association streets?

A: 25-30 years. Cracking is inevitable in the desert environment. Even though cracked, with regular maintenance, streets can last well beyond the 25-30 year average.

Q: How long do you think it will take before cracks will begin to reappear after having streets overlayed with 1-1/2 inches of new asphalt?

A: Six months. An overlay is the placement of new hot mix asphalt over the top of an existing cracked asphalt surface. It is not removing the entire cracked structure so cracks in the existing old asphalt will soon be seen in the surface of the new asphalt due to continued extreme temperature-related expansion and contraction.

Q: How long do you think it will take for cracks to reappear after having your streets sealcoated/slurry sealed?

A: Immediately! Sealcoat, also known as slurry seal, is a very thin layer of an asphalt emulsion coating that serves as a sunscreen for the asphalt. It has no measurable depth and as a result, all existing cracks in the asphalt will be visible before the sealer is even dry! The Q&A for the game show was a huge success with lots of laughs and a bunch of Starbucks cards given away. Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH, CIEC, CHMM, and CAI EBP, is president and co-owner of Desert Cities Indoor Air, LLC in Palm Desert, CA. Her company assists HOAs in assessing the extent of water damage and mold contamination. She can be reached at (760) 902-2545 or sbriaq@gmail.com. CAI-CV.org

• What are regulations regarding discrimination? • Do associations have potential liability for discriminatory housing practices? • How do the new Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) regulations classify “assistance animals”? • How should associations handle requests for reasonable accommodations? • What is the “Verification of Disability Process”? • When can an association deny a request for a reasonable accommodation? • What is the “Interactive Process” that is required by the new DFEH regulations? • What are “Discriminatory Effect” and “Discriminatory Impact”? • Can associations use information about someone’s criminal history in making decisions?

COST

Members - $32 | Nonmembers - $42 CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS – 1

If you know someone who is interested in learning more about CAI-CV, call the CAI-CV office for a complimentary ticket for your guest, (760) 341-0559. SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE AT WWW.CAI-CV.ORG facebook.com/CAICV

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29


CHAPTER EVENTS

A CAREER in Community Association Management On September 25th, the Professional Managers Committee hosted CAI-CV’s first career outreach to help attract more managers to the CID industry. Our thanks to Lori Albert (Albert Management), Mark Dodge (Associa Desert Resort Management), Lisa Glogow (Powerstone Property Management), Steven Shuey, (Personalized Property Management), Karen Tillotson (FirstService Residential), and Gen Wangler, Esq. for assisting with the program. If you are interested in helping CAI-CV promote community association management as a career, call the office at (760) 341-0559.

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Quorum October, 2018


CAI-CV

2018 PLATINUM SPONSOR SPOTLIGHT

FLOOD RESPONSE WAS ESTABLISHED IN 2002 WITH SEVERAL SPECIFIC TENETS IN MIND:

1: Be decent.

2: Be fair.

3: Be honest.

Flood Response is more than just a service company. Flood Response is a demanding, high paced, 24/7/365 emergency response organization and full service general contractor. By offering both emergency services and repairs, Flood Response is committed to providing property owners with a single-source solution to their loss. We deal with people and companies in times of their greatest need. It’s incumbent upon us to serve and do right by our clients. Likewise for our amazing employees, vendors, partners and the community as a whole. We’ve been blessed by the trust of thousands of clients over the years and equally blessed to have the best team of employees a company could ask for. Flood Response is now the Coachella Valley’s largest full service restoration company. We specialize in the restoration of commercial and residential property damaged by fire, smoke, water, mold, wind, vandalism and other perils. We just celebrated nine years of CAI-CV membership and over 16 years of business in the Coachella Valley. In addition, Flood Response is the only IICRC accredited Master Water Restorer in the Coachella Valley and was the first in the desert to have staff recognized as Educated Business Partners with CAI-CV. Since Flood Response first joined CAI-CV, we have grown from a fleet of five vehicles and 12 employees to a fleet of over 20 vehicles and more than 35 employees, allowing us the opportunity to respond to multiple projects at the same time. Our involvement with CAI-CV has provided education and insight to becoming a better, stronger and more tenacious business partner in the community. Flood Response has expanded several services over the last few years in an effort to continue to provide quality, ensure seamless transition and administer confidence within the restoration, construction and HOA industries.

AS A FULLY LICENSED GENERAL CONTRACTOR, FLOOD RESPONSE OFFERS: • Complete Renovations of Residential and Common Areas • Remodeling of Residential and Common Areas • Flooring, Carpet, Tile, Wood, Laminate or Natural Stone Replacement • Floor Care Solutions for Carpet, Tile, Wood and Natural Stone • Countertop Repair or Replacement • Cabinetry Refinishing or Replacement

• Soffit and Fascia Repair or Replacement • Drywall Repair or Replacement • Pool Enclosure Repair or Replacement • Water Damage Restoration and Repair • Mold Remediation and Repair • Fire Damage Restoration and Repair

Thank you to Flood Response for their generous support of CAI-CV! CAI-CV.org

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31


M-100

CAI’S

FOR MANAGERS AND COMMUNITY BOARD MEMBERS

Thursday, November 1st through Saturday, November 3rd, 2018 CAI-CV Office & Classroom 75410 Gerald Ford Drive, Suite 102, Palm Desert

Advanced Education

CAI’S

CALIFORNIA

CID LAW COURSE California Common Interest Development (CID) Wednesday, October 24, 2018 | 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

THE ESSENTIALS OF COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION MANAGEMENT

CAI-CV CLASSROOM 75410 Gerald Ford Drive, Suite 102, Palm Desert

Successful community management starts with the essentials! This comprehensive community association management course provides a practical overview for new managers, an essential review for veteran managers and an advanced course for board members. Successful completion of the M-100 can be the first step toward earning the CMCA credential, awarded by CAMICB.

CAI’s California CID Law Course is the most comprehensive legal course available for professionals managing community associations, including managers, board members and professionals who provide services to associations. Participants will be provided with a broad review of California and Federal laws affecting community associations including the Business and Professions Code, Uniform Common Interest Ownership Act, Davis-Stirling Act, and the California Corporations Code. This course is approved by the California Department of Real Estate to satisfy the law course requirement for California manager certification.

HOSTED BY CAI-CV

The M-100 is also approved as one of the two courses required to be a “certified” manager in California.

M-100 TOPICS INCLUDE:

Roles and responsibilities of managers, owners, committees and the board Management ethics Developing, implementing and enforcing rules Organizing and conducting board meetings Preparing budgets and funding reserves Assessment collection policies and procedures Collecting delinquent payments Financial statements, reporting methods and operations Evaluating risk management and insurance programs Implementing maintenance programs Preparing bid requests and identifying key contract provisions Recruiting, selecting and managing personnel Managing sustainable and developing communities

COURSE MATERIALS:

Participant guide and flash drive with bonus readings and materials.

COURSE LENGTH:

2.5 Days | Days 1-2: 8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Day 3: 8:30 a.m. - noon A multiple-choice examination is given at the end of the class.

TUITION:

CAI member: $459 | Nonmember: $559

REGISTRATION:

Sign Up Now at WWW.CAIONLINE.ORG 32

Quorum October, 2018

INSTRUCTORS Julie R. Balbini, Esq. Fiore Racobs & Powers, A Professional Law Corporation and Jennifer L. James, Esq. Green, Bryant & French, LLP WHO SHOULD ATTEND? Managers of Community Associations Community Board Members Attorneys Practicing Community Association Law Professionals Who Provide Services to Community Associations COST $95 Members | $130 Nonmembers and Walk-ins Includes: Continental Breakfast, Lunch, CID Law Reference Manual, CAI National Test MANAGERS WILL RECEIVE 8 CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS (CEU) Register at CAI-CV.ORG or call the CAI-CV office at (760) 341-0559 THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS Flood Response | PrimeCo


Meet

President Elect Michael Traidman By Sierra Carr, CMCA Michael Traidman, or Mike as many know him, is our current CAI Board of Directors President Elect. He has been a resident of the Coachella Valley for seventeen years and a member of CAI for over three years and has attended CAI functions for six years. He joined CAI to be an active board member for his community association, Mira Vista at Mission Hills. “I believe it is important to be educated on our industry and what my role on the board entails. CAI helps me with that goal.” In addition to serving as President Elect, Mike is the board liaison for the Public Relations Committee and the Volunteer Committee. He spends his leisure time playing tennis and golf, and serving as Board President of his community association. As if that didn’t keep him busy enough, he is also a docent for the Palm Springs Historical Society, a committee member at Mission Hills Country Club, and chairman of the Desert Cities Homeowners Association Council, a non-profit organization consisting of board presidents learning how they can manage their homeowner associations more efficiently. Mike earned his bachelor's degree in chemistry and physics from Bowling Green University and has taken additional courses in business and sales management. He has been married to his wife Sally for 46 years, has two sons, and four grandchildren. Thank you, Mike, for your service with the Chapter. We are honored to have you as a part of our organization! Sierra Carr, CMCA, is the Comptroller for Trilogy at La Quinta and works for FirstService Residential. She can be reached at (760) 702-3038 or by email at scarr@mytlq.com. CAI-CV.org

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33


CAI-CV

2018 PLATINUM SPONSOR SPOTLIGHT

SUNSHINE LANDSCAPE

Since 1979, Sunshine Landscape has offered full landscape services at the highest quality standards throughout the Coachella Valley. We are a locally owned corporation focusing on homeowners' associations, country clubs, golf courses, hotels and casinos. We value the long-term relationships we have created over the years with our customers. We believe the best confirmation of a job well done is to have sustained these relationships year after year. Sunshine Landscape is headquartered in Thousand Palms, north of Interstate 10 at Bob Hope Drive, in the newly developed Thousand Palms Business Park. The 22,000-square-foot building is owned and occupied by Sunshine Landscape, and was designed and built for our landscape business. With a committed staff of over 375 employees and a large selection of resources, Sunshine Landscape is a company that is capable of exceeding the expectations of every one of our clients. By offering the highest quality products in our landscape and hardscape divisions, we have made the outdoor living experience an easy going and accessible innovation. The training, support, and constant drive of each member of the company have allowed us to surpass goals and deadlines consistently and to continue growing over the last 39 years. Sunshine Landscape is a proud and actively involved member of our local CAI. Sunshinelandscapecv.com (760) 346-3999

Thank you to Sunshine Landscape for their generous support of CAI-CV! 34

Quorum October, 2018


Oct. 2018| Temecula, | Temecula, CA CA Oct.18–19, 19, 2018

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A one-day event for California community managers, association board members and other homeowners from Community Associations Institute—the leader in HOA and condo education, advocacy, and professional development. For event details and registration, visit www.caionline.org/Events/CALaw or call CAI Member Services at (888) 224-4321 (M–F, 9 a.m.–6 p.m. ET).

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START THE HOL IDAY SEASON WITH CAI-CV’S AN N UAL

Holiday Open House & Charity Event BE NEFITIN G THE N ARR OW DOOR’ S CHRISTM AS STO RE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2018 5:30 P.M.

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HOLIDAY PASTA NIGHT

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Italian Buffet, Wine with Dinner, Door Prizes

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FREE ADMISSION

GET YOUR COMMUNITY INVOLVED

Each year, CAI-CV collects gifts for underprivileged local children by asking our members and guests to bring gifts in lieu of buying a ticket. Spread the holiday cheer by bringing an unwrapped gift for a child between 8 and 16 years old for The Narrow Door’s Christmas Store.

You and your neighbors can volunteer this year at the Christmas Store by contacting TheNarrowDoor.org or by calling 760-775-6200. The Narrow Door is a faith-based nonprofit charity that works year-round to aid the Valley’s less fortunate of any faith.

BE A SPONSOR Register online at CAI-CV.ORG or call 760-341-0559

SAVE THE DATE — Also at Palm Valley Country Club on Friday, December 7, 2018 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. – CMCA Review & Exam (for managers) 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. – Manager on the Run (MOTR) (for managers) 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. – Board Leadership Development Workshop (for board members)

36

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38


FEATURE

Meet the Homeowner Leadership Committee

C

AI-CV is made up of three primary membership groups that include managers, business partners, and homeowner leaders (association board members and committee volunteers). With CAI’s new pricing structure that allows an entire board and other volunteers, up to 15 members, to join for $250 per year, the Chapter’s homeowner leader membership has grown rapidly. As a result, CAI-CV has formed a Homeowner Leader Committee to promote education and networking. The Homeowner Leader Committee meets monthly to consider educational programs and other activities that would benefit the homeowner volunteers who sit on association boards or assist with association committee work. One recent idea was to start holding networking meetings, so homeowner leaders could gather to share experiences and best practices. The first meeting was held immediately after the lunch program on September 21st and they plan to meet again after the October 26th lunch program. In terms of education, the committee is working with CAI-CV’s Education Committee and together they have already scheduled 20 hours of education between now and the end of the year. The first free Board Basic Training class was held the evening of September 11th at the CAI office classroom. The education topic was Board

Fiduciary Duties and was taught by Gen Wangler, Esq., CCAL, an attorney with Fiore Racobs & Powers, and Steven Shuey, PCAM, a management consultant with Personalized Property Management. See page 52 for other educational programs. Future plans include offering a section in Quorum Magazine that provides best practices for homeowner leaders, develop a web page with board tools, start a local blog or communication message board much like the one CAI National uses, only this one would be for our members exclusively. Additionally, the Committee wants to provide associations with tips and content for community newsletters. To assist the Committee, they are working with the Communications Committee to survey existing homeowner leader members for more ideas. They are also continuing their work to accumulate contact information for nonmember HOAs so they can invite them to educational programs. The Homeowner Leader Committee membership is open to all CAI-CV members. If you are interested in serving on this important committee, please contact the CAI-CV office at (760) 341-0559 or fill out the volunteer form online at www.cai-cv.org.

CAI-CV.org

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39


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MAINTENANCE

The Environmental and Health Benefits of Turfgrass Lawns By Steven Kirkpatrick

R

ecently I read an article by Terri Williams in Outdoor. I found the information to be most interesting during a time period when many of us are reducing or eliminating turfgrass from our landscapes here in the desert. It goes without saying, a well-maintained lawn is both appealing and adds to the value of your property! Dan Sandor, a postdoctoral associate in turfgrass science at the University of Minnesota talks about some of the benefits of turfgrass. A well-maintained lawn is central to your home’s curb appeal and even adds to the value of your property. However, your turfgrass lawn is more than just eye

ecosystem for wildlife and, specifically, for many different species of invertebrates, such as insects and earthworms. Turfgrass lawns and landscape plantings can reduce noise levels by absorbing and deflecting sounds. Additionally, they reduce glare and light reflection during the day. “Turfgrasses also function as natural firebreaks, which can lower the fire hazard of a home on the property,” Sandor says.

The health benefits of turfgrass

Turfgrass lawns also have health benefits, such as cleaning the air, which makes it easier to breathe. “By reducing pollution and allergy-related pollens (except for those allergic to "IT GOES WITHOUT SAYING, A WELLgrasses themselves), a MAINTAINED LAWN IS BOTH APPEALING AND properly-maintained ADDS TO THE VALUE OF YOUR PROPERTY!" lawn (i.e., a routinely mowed, dense lawn) candy. It provides a variety of environ- reduces the amount of weeds and undemental and health benefits. sired flowering plant species that can “Environmental and functional ben- contribute to allergies,” Sandor explains. efits of turfgrasses include soil erosion Grass lawns also save energy by discontrol; dust stabilization; carbon sipating heat. Sandor says this reduces sequestration; groundwater recharge and the required costs associated with improvement of surface water quality; cooling the inside of the home during the reduction in pollution and contamination summer. According to one estimate, just from runoff of sediments, nutrients and planting lawns and plants could lower other organic chemicals; heat dissipation your air conditioning energy requireand temperature moderation and much ments by 25 percent. much more,” Sandor says. A temperature comparison study in Sandor explains that turfgrasses also College Station, Texas found that green, promote biodiversity, serving as an growing turf had a maximum daytime CAI-CV.org

surface temperature of 88 degrees. Dry, bare soil had a maximum daytime surface temperate of 102 degrees and synthetic turf had a maximum daytime temperature of 158 degrees. Turfgrass lawns have a therapeutic impact. Studies have shown mental health benefits and improvements to overall well-being when people are near green, densely vegetated areas, such as lawns, especially in urban environments such as the workplace, hospitals, lowincome areas, prisons and retirement communities.

The positives from well-maintained living turfgrass: • Improves air quality • Lowers temperature • Creates oxygen • Provides erosion control • Relieves stress • Our pets enjoy turfgrass So, there you have it. Let us create a good balance of turfgrass in our landscapes and practice good turfgrass management. Turfgrass is good for us and our pets – it’s good for our health and the environment. Steven Kirkpatrick is the owner and president of Kirkpatrick Landscaping Services, Inc. He can be reached at (760) 347-4846 or by email at stevekls@msn.com.

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41


ABOUT CLAC

THIS JUST IN

CLAC Update

O

ur legislative activity is calming down for the season with the exception of one issue. By the time you read this, everything may be resolved, although not necessarily to our liking. The hot issue is SB 1265, a bill intended to prohibit an association from prescribing requirements for individuals to serve on the board of directors and makes other changes to the DavisStirling Act which will ultimately increase the cost of living in an HOA. The bill passed the Legislature and is (at the time of this writing) awaiting action

By Steven Shuey, PCAM

by the governor. CLAC and numerous attorneys sent out email blasts asking everyone within reach to both email and call the governor asking him to veto this bill. Hopefully, by the time you are reading this, we'll have some news. SB 1128 allows for election by acclamation when the number of director nominees at the close of the nomination period is less than the number of vacant director positions on the board. The bill also includes the candidate disqualification language in SB 1265. It passed the Legislature and is now awaiting action by the governor. The last amendments to SB 1265 and SB 1128 have brought about additional opposition to the bills. The California Building Industry Association (CBIA) and California Business Properties Association (CBPA) now oppose the bill and will be working with CLAC to get a veto from the governor. We are hoping, along with your help, this will be successful. AB 2912 is CLAC sponsored legislation that seeks to strengthen the Davis-Stirling Act requirements for board oversight of finances. This bill passed the assembly and Senate and was signed by the governor and chaptered

"A REMINDER TO ALL OF US THAT STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS THAT COULD IMPACT LIFE-SAFETY IF NOT PROPERLY MAINTAINED, NEED TO BE CAREFULLY INSPECTED FROM TIME TO TIME." on September 14th. It will become law January 1, 2019. Associations will need to be aware of its impacts, such as fidelity insurance requirements and financial review requirements but they are all good. There will be more about this at the Legislative Update in November. Be

42

Quorum October, 2018

On September 30, 2018, Governor Jerry Brown vetoed both SB 1128 and SB 1265. Thank you to all of our members who called the Governor's office!

sure to attend that luncheon. SB 721 was called "the balcony bill" and it no longer affects CIDs, but is enrolled and on the governor's desk for signature. All of its impacts still apply, only not to common interest developments. I must say, this gave most of us who were following the bill as it related to HOAs, quite a scare as it was going through the legislative process. It should be a reminder to all of us that structural elements that could impact life-safety if not properly maintained, need to be carefully inspected from time to time. Water damage to hidden components can be a real safety issue. Therefore waterproofing of exposed surfaces must be properly maintained. The CAI-CV Chapter will be holding its annual Legislative Update luncheon on Friday, November 16, 2018. Everyone is encouraged to attend. It is the best way to stay current on present legislative activity in a simple and quick luncheon forum. The California Communities Legal Forum is Friday, October 19, 2018. This all-day event takes place at the not-sofar-away Pechanga Resort & Casino in Temecula. If you are involved in your community, you should consider attending this event. The education offered there is very good and enlightening. If you are looking for a mini-vacation, you should drive down the night before and attend the fundraising event. This event is always a good time and proceeds go toward CLAC. Steven Shuey, PCAM, is a CLAC Delegate representing CAI-CV and serves on the national faculty of CAI. He is a community association consultant with Personalized Property Management and can be reached at IslandMgr@aol.com.


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43


WATER WISE

Desert Water Agency Rebates

T

By Desert Water Agency

he drought may officially be over, but water conservation is here to stay across California and especially in our desert. There are many ways to save water and money both inside and outside without drastically changing your lifestyle. From installing efficient toilets to converting grass to beautiful and colorful desert landscaping, there’s a wide spectrum of ways that HOAs can avoid water waste and do their part for sustainability. One new way to help is by installing efficient sprinkler nozzles that can save up to 1,400 gallons per nozzle per year. We have this rebate and others available to help HOAs cut their water use. These measures and many others are key in helping Desert Water Agency and its customers reach the goal of 10-13 percent water conservation compared to 2013. This will help ensure that future generations can use and enjoy water like we do today.

HERE ARE DETAILS ON DESERT WATER AGENCY’S PROGRAMS: Irrigation nozzle and fixed head bubblers: Rebates of $7 per sprinkler nozzle or fixed head bubbler ($5 per head and $2 per head for labor) are provided for the installation of precision nozzles which distribute water more evenly, more slowly and in larger droplets to reduce runoff. There is a limit of 100 nozzles for residential and 1000 nozzles for commercial customers. Check out our website for eligible sprinklers and bubblers. Toilet rebate program: Residents and businesses in Desert Water Agency’s water service area can get up to $100 per toilet by replacing old inefficient toilets with high efficient models that use 1.28 gallons per flush or less. The limit is two toilets for households and 100 for businesses.

Grass to desert landscape: HOA and commercial properties are eligible for $2 per square foot for conversion, while singlefamily homeowners are eligible for $1 per square foot from DWA and may be eligible for another $1 per square foot from the State of California. Rebates are not retroactive. Turf must be in place at the time of rebate application. Participants can opt for desert landscaping or artificial turf (the state will not rebate artificial turf). Weather-based irrigation controllers: Homeowners' associations can get a rebate of up to $2,500 for irrigation controller(s) that use weather data and up to $750 toward professional installation from Desert Water Agency. These devices adjust the watering times based on the weather. Coupons: Those who want to save money on a variety of services are encouraged to download and print coupons from our website. There are coupons that range from $2 to $7 off car washes that use recycled water. There are also discounts for the treatment of purifying pool water which may eliminate the need to drain and refill a pool. And for those curious or worried about potential leaks, Desert Water Agency has connected with various local leak detection companies which provide discounts for their services – from 20 percent off to $75 off services. Water audits: Desert Water Agency visits HOAs to review water use and help improve water efficiency. Programs have limited funding. Apply today but keep in mind that completed applications don’t guarantee a rebate. For more information on rebates, how to apply, or to request a water audit, go to www.dwa.org/rebates.

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Quorum October, 2018


CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

Choose Educated Business Partners Micha Ballesteros, Flood Response Rodney Bissell, Bissell Design Studios, Inc. Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH, Desert Cities Indoor Air, LLC Kimberly Burnett, U.S. Security Associates Linda Cardoza, Alliance Association Bank Rick Cech, Western Pacific Roofing Corporation Todd Chism, Patio Shoppers Tiffany Christian, Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Adam Eves, EmpireWorks Lori Fahnestock, Powerful Pest Management Dea Franck, Esq., Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Julie Frazier, Frazier Pest Control, Inc. Erin Fujioka, G4S Secure Solutions, USA Elaine Gower, The Naumann Law Michael Graves, SCT Reserve Consultants Ronda Henry, SERVPRO of Palm Desert Matthew Hills, Securitas Security Services USA, Inc. Tim Hoss, BEHR & KILZ Paints & Primers Jennifer James, Esq., Law Office of Jennifer James, Esq. Megan Kirkpatrick, Kirkpatrick Landscaping Services Jared Knight, Vista Paint Corporation Cyndi Koester, PCAM, SwedelsonGottlieb Katy Krupp, Fenton, Grant, Mayfield, Kaneda & Litt, LLP Matt Lawton, CIC, Prendiville Insurance Agency Larry Layton, Kirkpatrick Landscaping Services Alison LeBoeuf, PrimeCo Mike Mastropietro, OCBS, Inc. Chris Meyer, Asphalt MD's Greg Morrow, Eagle Roofing Products Fran Mullahy, Vintage Associates Mike Murrell, Farmers Insurance - Mike Murrell Agency Matt Ober, Esq., Richardson Ober, PC Chet Oshiro, EmpireWorks Mallory Paproth, SCT Reserve Consultants Elisa Perez, Esq., Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Jay Powell, Ben's Asphalt Dana Pride, Automation Pride Kelly Richardson, Esq., Richardson Ober, PC Brent Sherman, Animal Pest Management Services, Inc. Brittany Smith, Vantage Point Construction, Inc. Jillian Steele, Patio Products USA Dan Stites, CBCI Construction Kymberli Taylor-Burke, NPG Asphalt Liz Williams, AMS Paving Bevan Worsham, AMS Paving Jolen Zeroski, Union Bank Homeowners Association Services

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45


CAI-CV ELECTION OF DIRECTORS

T

he Annual Election of Directors for the Coachella Valley Chapter of CAI is underway. All CAI-CV members should have received a login ID and password from the Inspectors of Elections. The election will be open to CAI-CV members until Tuesday, October 30th. Winners will be announced at the Chapter Annual Meeting on Wednesday, October 31, 2018, at 3:00 p.m., at the CAI-CV Chapter office, 75410 Gerald Ford Drive, Suite 102, Palm Desert, CA 92211. If you are a business partner who is on the CAI-CV local database but not on the CAI National database, please contact the CAI-CV office to find out where your company’s ballot information was sent. There are three open seats for three-year terms, from January 1, 2019 through December 31, 2021. Eight CAI-CV members, including two incumbents, are running for director seats. Each member will receive three votes to cast for the candidates of their choice. The top three candidates will win. We hope all Chapter members will participate by voting. Please call the CAI-CV office at (760) 341-0559 if you have questions about the election.

8 1 20 s V on e C - ti at s I c A e C El did ent n m a C ate St

Cardinal Ambrose, CCAM, CMCA, AMS, PCAM (Incumbent) MEMBERSHIP CATEGORY: COMMUNITY MANAGER I am the Director of Community Management for the Vintage Group in Palm Desert. I would be honored to serve a second term on the Board of Directors for CAI-CV. As a former Chapter Executive Director, I understand how the organization operates. As a certified association manager, I understand the importance of education and promoting professionalism at all levels of the industry. My qualifications include serving as a community association manager for more than eight years and serving as the CAI-CV Executive Director for two years. I have served on the Chapter’s Membership Committee for six years, Co-chair for one year and as Chair for two years. I have written

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and contributed to articles in the Quorum Magazine and served on the Education Committee for five years. I hold the following CAI designations: Certified Manager of Community Associations (CMCA), the Association Management Specialist (AMS) and Professional Community Association Manager (PCAM). I also hold the Certified Community Association Manager (CCAM), through the California Association of Community Managers. I also have a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Master of Business Administration degree from Trevecca Nazarene University. While attending school I worked fulltime as a business banker, responsible for overseeing business accounts for five Metro Nashville branches of Amsouth Bank. I have also served as controller for Guy Evans, Inc. and as the HR/Office Manager for Orr Builders. Thank you for your consideration.


CAI-CV ELECTION OF DIRECTORS Micha Ballesteros, WRT, ASD, FSRT, EBP MEMBERSHIP CATEGORY: BUSINESS PARTNER Over the course of the last 10 years, I have moved from Business Development to Vice President of Operations of the Valley’s largest Disaster Response Company, Flood Response. Through 9 of those years, I have been highly involved in CAI. It has been a tremendous experience for both me and the company. The cooperation, insight and experiences afforded to me from the partnership with CAI have been invaluable. CAI has personally taught me how to be of better service to my clients, business partners and an overall asset to the community at large. I am exceptionally grateful for the experience. Entering into my next chapter both personally and professionally, I feel I would be an asset to the CAI-CV Board of Directors and respectfully submit my name for your consideration. While there is no designation or credentialing for my industry to achieve with CAI, I did become the first locally to achieve the Educated Business Partner accreditation through CAI. I feel that I would be able to bring new and exciting ideas based on my experience with CAI thus far. My professional position parallels CAI in various ways. I’m often required to tactfully and smoothly coordinate nuanced projects and transitions while being conscientious of the details, people and events involved. My professional position has allowed me to hone key abilities of maintaining focus, finding new ideas and achieving stated goals. Ultimately, my nine years of participating with CAI has allowed me to observe ideas that are worth elaborating on and providing the assistance and leadership on ideas that may need restructuring. I believe I can help keep CAI-CV fresh, fun and fruitful for the membership and new participants. Thank you for your consideration.

Involvement with CAI-CV 1. Golf Committee member since 2009 2. Bowling Committee member since 2010 3. Bowling Committee Chair 2015 and 2013 4. Country Western Round Up Committee member 2011 5. Casino Night Committee Member 2011-2014 6. Business Partner Committee 2011-2014 7. Quorum “What to do when Water Intrudes” November 2013

Professional Awards Received

Rick Cech, CMCA, EBP MEMBERSHIP CATEGORY: BUSINESS PARTNER I am interested in serving as a director for CAI-CV. I’ve been working in the construction/roofing industry for over 40 years in Orange County and held the position of president of Coastline Engineering from 1985 to 2016. I sold my company to my son-in-law two years ago and moved to the desert. I currently serve as the business development manager for Roof Asset Management. Through my volunteer work at CAI, and serving on five committees, I’ve met many people and have developed close friendships. I’m no longer running a company, so now I can slow down a bit and refocus on new goals. At this stage of my life, I want to find a way to give back. I enjoy the synergy of the various committee members who give their spare time to help CAI and their fellow peers.

My qualifications to serve on the board, based on the previous positions I've held throughout my career, are as follows: 1. Roofing Contractors Association of Southern California (RCASC): I was an active member for over 25 years and served on many committees including chairing the technical/codes committee. I worked my way through the officer positions and served as president for three terms. 2. California Energy Commission: While serving as President of the RCASC, I represented the roofing industry during the development of the 2008 Title 24 Energy Regulations. We met quarterly in Sacramento at the Energy Commission office. 3. CAI-CV: I served on various committees including Awards, Public Relations, Volunteer, CLAC/Wine Tasting, and Chairman of the Membership Committee. I’ve earned my CMCA and EBP credentials. 4. Toastmaster International: Toastmasters International is a non-profit educational organization that teaches public speaking and leadership skills through a worldwide network of clubs. I’ve been a member for over five years. I’ve completed my first manual and earned my “Competent Communicator Designation.” I’m currently working on the second manual which is the Club Leadership Handbook. I currently hold the position of Vice President of Public Relations.

1. 2012 Committee of the Year Casino 2. 2013 CAI-CV Rookie of the Year 3. 2015 Business Partner of the Year CAI-CV.org

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CAI-CV ELECTION OF DIRECTORS 5. Roofing Contractors Association of California (RCAC): Deals with legislative issues of the roofing industry. I served on their board. 6. Chamber of Commerce: I’m an Ambassador for the Palm Desert Chamber and serve on the Executive Leadership Committee. I’m also a member of the GCVCC, Palm Springs, and Rancho Mirage chambers. 7. USAF: I spent eight years in the Air Force Reserves. I received my pilot license in 1975 and enjoyed my service in the military. I’m excited about this opportunity to serve on the CAI-CV board for next year. CAI has been extremely helpful to me since I moved to the Coachella Valley. Through the many educational programs, I have learned much about the CID industry. My goal is to stay engaged with CAI and help where I’m needed and give back to the industry. I appreciate your consideration for this board position.

Lisa Glogow, CMCA, AMS, CCAM MEMBERSHIP CATEGORY: MANAGER I am interested in serving on the CAI-CV Board of Directors for the 2019 – 2021 term. I have been actively involved with CAI since moving to the desert four years ago. I have served on the Oktoberfest and Awards Committees for the past two years and I am currently serving in a leadership role as Committee Chair for both the Professional Manager and Awards Committees. Working with CAI-CV has been a great experience and I have worked sideby-side with some amazing people in the Coachella Valley. I am currently working with Powerstone Property Management as a Director of Community Management. My 25 plus years as a proven leader and vast knowledge of community management, real estate, financing and property management has all lead to where I am today. I currently have my CMCA, AMS, CCAM designations and I am working on my PCAM. I am a believer in education. As Committee Chair for the Professional Manager Committee, I am dedicated to bringing education and building awareness for community managers in our Valley. Over the next few years, I see a lot of changes for our industry. Serving on the board will allow me to help make a difference for community managers. I no longer want to stand on the sidelines; I want to give back to our community and represent all the people that work hard every day to keep our communities safe, clean and financially sound. Mohammed Ali once said, “What keeps me going is goals.” I believe that this is true for myself. If you have nothing to aim for, you have no motivation, no dreams and no desire. I have a strong

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desire to prosper, an abundance of enthusiasm and a passion for what I do for a living. If you choose to elect me to serve on the board, I promise I will represent all CAI-CV members when making decisions. Thank you for considering my candidacy for the Board of Directors.

Jennifer L. James, Esq. MEMBERSHIP CATEGORY: BUSINESS PARTNER I would like to serve on the CAI-CV Board of Directors. I have been an active and dedicated member of CAI for over 14 years, and a member of CAI-CV for 10 years. During my membership, I have served on many committees, including, but not limited to, Quorum Committee, Professional Manager Committee, Volunteer Committee, Membership Committee, Programs Committee, and served as a delegate for the California Legislative Action Committee attending the Legislative Day at the Capitol in 2009. I have also served as co-chair and chair of various committees, including the Volunteer Committee. Most recently, I volunteered to chair the Quorum Committee and am currently serving on the Quorum Committee, Professional Manager Committee, as well as the Volunteer Committee. I have been in charge of and manage the law articles for Quorum for the last two years and volunteer for most of the CAI-CV events, including registration. I am dedicated to assisting the CAI-CV chapter and helping in any capacity possible. Upon graduation from law school in 2001, my primary focus has been common interest communities. I currently work for the law firm of Green, Bryant & French, LLP. I am passionate about my legal career in working with HOAs and enjoy giving back to my fellow community. I also enjoy and appreciate collaborative team effort and believe serving on the Board of Directors for CAI-CV is an exceptional opportunity to utilize my education, experience, and skills to better our industry. Family is important to me and after years of membership and dedicated service, I truly feel the CAI community is like a family. Why should you vote for me? I strongly believe it is important to truly listen to our members and their concerns and implement innovative ideas to accommodate changes. If given this opportunity to be a part of the CAI-CV Board of Directors, I will serve to the best of my abilities and strive to be an effective and positive member of the team. Thank you for your consideration.


CAI-CV ELECTION OF DIRECTORS Loni Peterson CCAM, CMCA, AMS, PCAM MEMBERSHIP CATEGORY: MANAGER I am a General Manager with Associa - Desert Resort Management. The Coachella Valley Chapter of CAI holds a special place in my heart, I have been a part of this chapter since 2007. I fell in love with CAI- CV because of the networking and comradery of the chapter. In 2010, I became a Community Manager and served as Chair of the Country Western Roundup committee. I proudly served on that committee until its final year. It wasn’t until recently I focused more on giving back to CAI-CV by serving on multiple committees with the intent of helping to grow the chapter, educate managers and support CLAC. Volunteering in an organization that you believe in makes all the difference in the world, as such it would be an honor to serve the organization in a leadership capacity. Over the years, I have developed and strengthened many bonds with members of this chapter including business partners, managers and homeowner leaders/volunteers. In addition, my community management skills will enhance the current board makeup. I’m proud to work for a company, Associa, that is equally committed to CAI. As a board member, my focus and priority would be on: growing our chapter, supporting our business partners with valuable opportunities for networking, and supporting homeowner leaders by reinforcing our commitment to educational programs. Understanding that “it takes a village,” I would encourage my fellow board members and committee chairs to collaborate in supporting the sustainability of our chapter. At the core of our industry is education, which I place tremendous value on. As a chapter, our commitment to education will ensure that managers and management firms support our efforts to elevate the CID industry. I look forward to having the opportunity to serve the membership of our chapter.

Steven Shuey, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, CCAM MEMBERSHIP CATEGORY: MANAGER I am asking to be elected to the Chapter Board of Directors because I believe I can provide "aged wisdom" to the board. I am a long-time member of the Coachella Valley Chapter of CAI, having joined under the membership of the community and developer in 1978. When CAI transitioned to individual membership I immediately joined and have remained an active member ever since. I was elected to the Chapter board in 1996, and subsequently became president of the Chapter in 2001. I was elected to the Association of Professional Community Managers board (at the national level), now referred to as the

Community Association Managers Council, where I served for four years. I Joined the National CAI Faculty in 2010 and currently teach PMDP courses M-100 and M-206 for CAI chapters all over the country. I was asked to join the Quorum Committee in 1994 and shortly thereafter became the editor of the newsletter, which transitioned to the full magazine you see today. I have remained on the Quorum Committee ever since. I have served as a delegate to the California Legislative Action Committee (CLAC) and continue to serve on the Legislative Support Committee for the Chapter. I currently serve the Chapter on the Education Committee (chaired that committee in 2017), the Professional Managers (PM) Committee, and the Homeowner Leader (HL) Committee (as a liaison to PM). With my 33 years of maintenance and management experience on-site at Desert Island, followed by the most recent 10 years as the Operations Manager and Community Association Consultant for Personalized Property Management (one of the largest locally owned and operated management companies serving the Coachella Valley exclusively), along with my years of CAI experience locally and nationally, I believe I can bring appropriate wisdom to the Chapter board of directors as it propels into the future. Thank you for your support.

Margaret G. “Gen” Wangler, Esq., CCAL (Incumbent) MEMBERSHIP CATEGORY: BUSINESS PARTNER I am seeking reelection to the Chapter Board of Directors in order to continue to contribute to the success of the Chapter. I have been honored to serve as Chapter President this year and, if reelected, will serve as Past President on the Executive Committee. I also serve on the Education Committee, and, in the past, served on the Quorum Committee and the Programs Committee. I have been representing community associations for over 25 years, and have been very active in the Chapter during that same period. I am a senior shareholder of Fiore, Racobs & Powers in Palm Desert. I received my B.A. in history from the University of Iowa and my law degree from Thomas M. Cooley Law School in Michigan. I am a fellow of CAI’s College of Community Association Lawyers (CCAL). This year has been extremely exciting and productive for the Chapter, with the move into the new office, the expansion of our educational offerings, the efforts to attract Valley residents to the profession of association management, our reaching out to the city governments and to generally be the source of information about the CID industry for the Coachella Valley. If elected, I will work with the Board and staff to continue this progress. I will also work to enhance the professionalism of the community association industry, and to make sure we continue to offer excellent programs, and attract and retain members. CAI-CV.org

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TURQUOISE IS FOR LOCAL EVENTS

CAI-CV UPCOMING EVENTS

SIGN UP FOR LOCAL EVENTS AT CAI-CV.ORG AND FOR CAI NATIONAL EVENTS AT CAIONLINE.ORG

OCTOBER CAI-CV’s Manager on the Run (MOTR) (for managers) WHEN: Friday, October 5, 2018 W HERE: CAI-CV Office & Classroom CAI’S Management Company CEO Retreat (for CEOs) WHEN: Thursday – Saturday, October 11-13, 2018 W HERE: Boca Raton, FL CAI-CV’s Oktoberfest (for all members) WHEN: Friday, October 12, 2018 W HERE: Sunshine Landscape, Thousand Palms CAI-CV’s Board Basic Training (for homeowner leaders) WHEN: Tuesday, October 16, 2018 W HERE: CAI-CV Office & Classroom CAI’s CLAC Fundraising Dinner (for all members) WHEN: Thursday, October 18, 2018 W HERE: Pechanga Resort & Casino, Temecula CAI’s California Legal Forum (for all members) WHEN: Friday, October 19, 2018 W HERE: Pechanga Resort & Casino, Temecula CAI’s CID Law Course (for managers & homeowner leaders) WHEN: Wednesday, October 24, 2018 W HERE: CAI-CV Office & Classroom

CAI-CV’s Educational Lunch Program & Mini Trade Show (for all members) WHEN: Friday, October 26, 2018 W HERE: Palm Valley Country Club, Palm Desert CAI-CV’s Annual Meeting & Election (for all members) WHEN: Wednesday, October 31, 2018 W HERE: CAI-CV Office & Classroom

DECEMBER CAI’s Board Leadership Development Workshop (for homeowner leaders)

WHEN: Friday, December 7, 2018 (certificate program, all day class) W HERE: Palm Valley Country Club, Palm Desert CMCA Preparatory Course & Pen & Paper Test (for managers)

NOVEMBER CAI’s M-100 Course (for managers & advanced board members) WHEN: Thursday – Saturday, November 1-3, 2018 W HERE: CAI-CV Office & Classroom CAI-CV’s Board Basic Training (for homeowner leaders) WHEN: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 W HERE: CAI-CV Office & Classroom CAI’s M-204 – Governance (for managers) WHEN: Thursday – Friday, November 15-16, 2018 W HERE: Santa Ana CAI-CV’s Educational Lunch Program & Mini Trade Show (for all members) TOPIC: LEGISLATIVE UPDATE WHEN: Friday, November 16, 2018 W HERE: Palm Valley Country Club, Palm Desert

WHEN: Friday, December 7, 2018 (all day course and exam) W HERE: Palm Valley Country Club, Palm Desert CAI-CV's Manager on the Run (MOTR) (for managers) WHEN: Friday, December 7, 2018 (4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.) W HERE: Palm Valley Country Club, Palm Desert CAI-CV’s Holiday Open House & Charity Event WHEN: Friday, December 7, 2018 (5:30 p.m.) W HERE: Palm Valley Country Club, Palm Desert Free with RSVP; bring an unwrapped gift for The Narrow Door’s Christmas Store

2018 CORPORATE SPONSORS PLATINUM______

GOLD________

Automation Pride AMS Paving BRS Roofing AMS Security Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Asphalt MD's Horizon Lighting Associa Desert Resort Management Peters & Freedman, LLP Bissell Design Studios, Inc. Prendiville Insurance Agency Conserve LandCare PrimeCo Diversified Asphalt Products Vintage Associates Fiore Racobs & Powers, A PLC Flood Response MRC - Smart Technology Solutions - A Xerox Company NPG Asphalt Pacific Western Bank Roof Asset Management Signarama Sunshine Landscape Vantage Point Construction Western Pacific Roofing

SILVER________ Barcode Automation, Inc. Ben's Asphalt, Inc. Cline Agency Insurance Brokers DWI First Foundation Bank Frazier Pest Control Green Bryant & French, LLP Nissho of California, Inc. O'Connell Landscape Powerful Pest Management Pro Landscaping, Inc. Seacoast Commerce Bank Sherwin-Williams Paint Co. Three Phase Electric

BRONZE______ Adams Stirling, PLC Albert Management, Inc. Alliance Association Bank Animal Pest Management Association Reserves Bank of Southern California Beaumont Tashjian Blue Sky Landscape Brabo & Carlsen, LLP CBCI Construction Dunn-Edwards Corporation Farley Interlocking Pavers FirstService Residential Guralnick, Gilliland & Knighten Hort Tech Landscape Kasdan LippSmith Weber Turner, LLP LaBarre/Oksnee Insurance

Law Office of Jennifer James, Esq. Law Office of Peggy Redmon, APC Mutual of Omaha Painting Unlimited PatioShoppers Commercial Furnishings Popular Association Bank Powerstone Property Management S.B.S. Lien Services SCT Reserve Consultants SERVPRO of Palm Desert Shetler Security Silldorf Law, LLP Suntech Consulting & Roofing The Management Trust, Desert Division U.S. Security Associates, Inc. Union Bank HOA Services United Paving Vista Paint Corporation

Quorum Magazine is printed at the CAI-CV Office on a Xerox Versant 180 Press. Discounted printing is now available to CAI members. Call Bissell Design Studios, Inc. at (714) 293-3749 or the CAI-CV office for more information, (760) 341-0559.

Profile for CAI-Coachella Valley Chapter

Quorum October 2018  

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