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JANUARY 2018

Coachella Valley Community Associations Institute Magazine

9 Sun City Palm Desert Community Association “Time to Live the Dream�

FEATURING

Healthy HOA/Community Cohesiveness 14 A Road Map to That Happy Place 16 Community Newsletters: the Cornerstone of Your Association Becoming a Community


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Quorum January, 2018

RS

ON


Turning Common Interests Into Common Ground

General Legal Counsel Governing Document Amendments Legal Opinions Contracts Dispute Resolution Civil Litigation Enforcement Insurance Coverage/ Bad Faith Construction

REAL ROOFING KNOWLEDGE FOR REAL ROOFING SOLUTIONS

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CONTENTS

2018 QUORUM COMMITTEE MEMBERS CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

SUSAN BROWNE ROSENBERG, CHAIR Desert Cities Indoor Air, LLC PHYLLIS HARKINS, CO-CHAIR CMCA, AMS, CCAM-LS, CAMEX The Management Trust—Palm Desert

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

DEA FRANCK, ESQ., BOARD LIAISON Epsten Grinnell and Howell, APC RODNEY BISSELL Bissell Design Studios, Inc. SIERRA FASANO Trilogy La Quinta

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

JENNIFER JAMES, ESQ. Law Office of Jennifer James BRUCE LATTA Parc La Quinta JAY POWELL Ben’s Asphalt JIM SCHMID The Lakes Country Club DAVID SCHUKNECHT Personalized Property Management

9

STEVEN SHUEY, PCAM Personalized Property Management Co. CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

DAN STITES CBCI Construction, Inc. KAREN JOY TABBAH Palm Springs Regional Association of Realtors

3

MICHAEL TURNER Urban Habitat Environmental Landscapes CREATIVE DIRECTOR & GRAPHIC DESIGNER

17 14

FEATURES 9

4

Sun City Palm Desert “Time to Live the Dream”

By Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH, CIEC, CHMM

14

A Road Map to That Happy Place

By Phyllis Harkins

16

Community Newsletters: The Cornerstone of Your Association Becoming a Community

By David Schuknecht

Quorum January, 2018

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

RODNEY BISSELL Bissell Design Studios, Inc. rodney@bisselldesign.com (714) 293-3749

ARTICLE SUBMISSIONS OR ADVERTISING INFORMATION admin@cai-cv.org

SUBSCRIBER SERVICES

The Coachella Valley Quorum Magazine is a publication expressly prepared for association leaders, managers and related business professionals of the Community Associations Institute. Members are encouraged to submit articles for publishing consideration. All articles accepted for publication in Quorum are subject to editing and rewriting by the Quorum Committee.


ADVERTISERS ASPHALT AMS PAVING.................................................... 38 NPG ASPHALT.................................................... 2 ATTORNEYS BEAUMONT TASHJIAN....................................... 3 JENNIFER JAMES ATTORNEY.......................... 37

26

KASDAN LIPPSMITH WEBER TURNER LLP...... 39 BANKING MUTUAL OF OMAHA BANK................................ 7

CHAPTER NEWS

DEPARTMENTS

FIRST FOUNDATION BANK................................. 2

8

6

CONSTRUCTION

CAI-CV Chapter New & Renewing Members 28 Welcome Aboard New Business Partner Member

HOA Cleaning From The Heart By Jay Powell

31

Meet The Committee Chair

Eric Angle

By Cari Burleigh

Time Honored

Tad Black By Phyllis Harkins

8

President’s Message

22 Homeowners Association Law

When and How to Avoid a Lawsuit?

By Jennifer James, Esq.

24 A Manager's Perspective

VANTAGE POINT CONSTRUCTION, INC.............. 7 FLOOD REPAIR FLOOD RESPONSE............................................. 3 DESIGN BISSELL DESIGN STUDIOS INC........................ 13 INSURANCE BROKERS CLINE AGENCY................................................ 12

Essential Communications Will 36 Join a CAI-CV Committee Improve Community Spirit 2018 Volunteer Form By Steven Shuey, PCAM 36 CLAC Buck-A-Door 29 About CLAC Campaign The California Legislative Action 37 CAI-CV Educated Committee is Still Paying Attention Business Partners

LAKE MAINTENANCE

CHAPTER EVENTS

WATERRITE - VINTAGE ASSOCIATES, INC....... 37

26 CAI-CV’s Annual Holiday Open House & Charity Event

Benefiting the Narrow Door's Christmas Store Friday, December 1, 2017

27 Board Member Workshop

Ask the Attorney Friday, December 1, 2017

35 2018 Calendar

Community Associations Institute - Coachella Valley

40 Upcoming Chapter Events

By Steven Shuey, PCAM

30 Maintenance

Roof Inspection, Maintenance and Repair By Dan Stites

34 Platinum Spotlight

DWI.................................................................. 19 LANDSCAPING CONSERVE LANDCARE...................................... 3 PRO LANDSCAPING......................................... 11 RGA LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS, INC................ 19

LODGING AGUA CALIENTE.............................................. 21 PEST CONTROL

Roof Asset Management Inc.

POWERFUL PEST MANAGEMENT...................... 3

11

Water Wise

ROOFING

32

CVWD Announces FREE Landscape Workshop Schedule By Katie Evans, CVWD Pressure regulators can protect your home and property By The Coachella Valley Water District

ROOF ASSET MANAGEMENT............................. 3 WESTERN PACIFIC ROOFING........................... 37 SECURITY AMS SECURITY.......................................... 13, 25

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CAI-CV Chapter New & Renewing Members NEW BUSINESS PARTNER

HOA CLEANING FROM THE HEART Paul Roide (760) 774-1304 paulroide@gmail.com RENEWING BUSINESS PARTNERS

ASPHALT MD'S Gary Butler (760) 863-4500 RENEWING MULTI-CHAPTER BUSINESS PARTNERS

FIORE, RACOBS & POWERS A PLC Margaret Wangler (760) 776-6511 gwangler@fiorelaw.com HORIZON LIGHTING, INC. Catherine Gregory (949) 336-4336 catherine@horizonlightinginc.com RICHARDSON OBER PC Kelly Richardson (626) 449-5577 kelly@richardsonober.com ROY PALACIOS INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. Tina Neubauer (949) 582-0964 tinap@palinsur.com RENEWING MANAGER MEMBERSHIPS

ALDERWOOD RESORT MANAGEMENT James Crawford (909) 866-6531 Ext. 405 scrawford@lagonitalodge.com ASSOCIA DESERT RESORT MANAGEMENT Leslee Cicogna (760) 346-1161 Ext. 145 lcicogna@drminternet.com Rebecca Garrett (760) 777-8807 Ext. 1 bgarrett@drminternet.com Carl McCullough (760) 601-3228 cmccullough@drminternet.com ELDORADO COUNTRY CLUB Kristi Foster (760) 423-1587 kristi@eldoradocc.org PMI - COACHELLA VALLEY Kevin Crawford (442) 227-2030 Info@PMI-CV.com 6

Quorum January, 2018

WHITESTAR MANAGEMENT Irene Davis (760) 773-0123 Ext. 105 irene@whitestarmgmt.com Matthew Rittenhouse (760) 773-0123 Ext. 123 matt@whitestarmgmt.com RENEWING NATIONAL CORPORATE MEMBERSHIPS

IAN H. GRAHAM INSURANCE Sylvia Tagle (818) 742-1430 sylvia.tagle@aon.com POPULAR ASSOCIATION BANKING Molly Hime (800) 233-7164 mhime@popular.com NEW VOLUNTEER LEADERS

Jean Newcomer

PALM SPRINGS SUNDIAL HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Jaak Junkentaal Donald Macintosh Richard Pass Karen Tabbah Anthony Toia RENEWING VOLUNTEER LEADER

JACK IVEY RANCH HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Tom Kewish John Lotz Marvin Mizell Lynn Ross Barbara Smith PALM VALLEY HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Glenn Bjorklund Pete Browning James Colonna Art Coulter Neil Machlis Roger Peterson Nick Speliopoulos SUN CITY SHADOW HILLS Joan Dzuro Kim Fuller Erica Hedlund Agnes Kessler Carey Thompson

TIME HONORED Tad Black

By Phyllis Harkins

For over twelve years, Tad Black has been a familiar face at CAI-CV Chapter events and meetings. Since his 2005 arrival in the Coachella Valley, he has been an active member of multiple Chapter committees—Oktoberfest, Corks for CLAC, Programs, Awards and Business Partner to mention just a few. Since 2012 he has served on the Chapter Board of Directors in many officer positions, most importantly as Chapter President in 2015. During Tad’s service on the board, he was an integral part of the Chapter’s growth. Currently Tad is Western Regional Director of Field Operations for AssociaOnCall, supporting the Associa maintenance divisions in the western United States, and serving as Maintenance Director for AssociaOnCall at Desert Resort Management. Tad’s family is a very important part of his life. He and his wife Tiffany, after almost 20 years of marriage, have enjoyed their lives with their two girls. Katilyn (14) and Lauren (12). Their daughters are active in many school and volunteer activities, the same as Tad, who continues to serve on the board of directors for the The Warburton, a non-profit that benefits St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. And it might not be known by many Chapter members that Tad is an accomplished vocalist, singing every week at Sacred Heart Church in their choir. Personally, I will miss Tad at our monthly board meetings; his calm demeanor and on-point comments provide much needed wisdom to the directors as we continue to grow our Chapter and provide new and exciting opportunities to our Chapter. Thank you, Tad, for your years of Chapter service. We are blessed to have you as a part of our organization, and we hope that we can call on you in the future when we need your help.


2018 COACHELLA VALLEY CHAPTER BOARD OF DIRECTORS GEN WANGLER. ESQ., CCAL PRESIDENT Fiore, Racobs and Powers A PLC MIKE TRAIDMAN PRESIDENT ELECT Mira Vista HOA PHYLLIS HARKINS, CMCA AMS, CCAM-LS, CAMEX PAST PRESIDENT The Management Trust-Palm Desert CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

JOLEN ZEROSKI, CMCA TREASURER Union Bank

JOHN WALTERS-CLARK SECRETARY Associa Desert Resort Management CARDINAL AMBROSE, CMCA, AMS, CCAM DIRECTOR Albert Management, Inc. RHONDA DREWS, CMCA, AMS, PCAM DIRECTOR Associa Desert Resort Management CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

DEA FRANCK, ESQ. DIRECTOR Epsten, Grinnell and Howell GERARD GONZALES DIRECTOR Albert Management, Inc. MATT LAWTON, CIRMS DIRECTOR Prendiville Insurance Agency LOUISE STETTLER DIRECTOR Palm Valley Country Club HOA

CAI Coachella Valley Office 41-905 Boardwalk, Suite A-2 Palm Desert, CA 92211 Tel: (760) 341-0559 Fax: (760) 341-8443 Website: www.cai-cv.org CAL LOCKETT Executive Director clockett@cai-cv.org

The materials contained in this publication are designed to provide our members with timely and authoritative information; however, the CAI Coachella Valley Chapter is not engaging in the rendering of legal, accounting or other professional types of services. The Coachella Valley Chapter has not verified and/ or endorsed the contents of these articles or advertising. Readers should not act on the information contained herein without seeking more specific professional advice from legal, accounting or other experts as required.

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FROM THE CHAPTER

President’s Message Gen Wangler, ESQ., CCAL Fiore, Racobs and Powers A PLC

The new year brings many exciting opportunities for CAI-CV. Our move after 25 years to a new office with a classroom has changed the Chapter in significant ways. We already have 20 classes planned for 2018, significantly boosting our mission of providing education to community associations. CAI-CV now offers education to board members through the Board Member Workshops (BMW), the one-day certificate program now called the Board Leadership Development Workshop, and our new Board Basic Training classes. Education for managers includes our Manager on the Run (MOTR) classes and, in 2018, we will be offering three CAI National courses: the M204 on governance, the M203 on leadership, and the M100, the basics of community management. Then, in December, CAI-CV will once again offer a one-day preparatory course for managers who want to earn their CACM designation and then the pencil and paper exam. Additionally, CAI-CV will offer the California Common Interest Development Law Course twice in 2018 for managers. Managers must take this class to be certified under California law. Two years ago, we began offering CAI’s Educated Business Partner (EBP) Course to Chapter business partners. Last year, CAI National decided to make the EBP a true designation that business partners can add to their business cards and marketing materials. CAI-CV was the first chapter to design a logo to go along with the designation. We are proud to have nearly 40 business partners who have received the designation. Please see the list on page 37. CAI National has asked us to participate in the production of their new online EBP course. CAI-CV Business Partners will participate in the filming of the new course on Tuesday, January 30th at the La Quinta Resort & Spa. As your new President, I am excited to continue the momentum CAI-CV has developed over the past few years. We will work diligently to bring education to every sector of the common interest development (CID) industry while fostering meaningful networking opportunities for all our members. Over the past 40 years, CAI National has conducted regular surveys that show that education translates to harmonious communities. We can all be proud of our Chapter’s achievements and look forward to improving and expanding our outreach in the Coachella Valley. CAI-CV’s first Program of the year will be on Friday, January 19, at Palm Valley Country Club. Rob Felix, CMCA, LSM, PCAM, RS, Owner of Consolidated Community Services, Inc. & The Felix Reserve Group is our guest speaker. The CAI-CV 2018 Awards & Monte Carlo Night is scheduled for Friday, January 26, 2018, at Agua Caliente Casino Resort. This is our first year combining Awards with Monte Carlo Night and the Committee and the management of Agua Caliente have an amazing evening planned. You won’t want to miss it. CAI’s National Law Seminar will be held at the La Quinta Resort from January 31 through February 3, 2018. This is a excellent conference for board members and managers interested in an in-depth legal briefing on the CID industry. Our first Manager on the Run (MOTR) program will be held on Friday, February 2, 2018.

Gen Wangler, Esq. Gen Wangler, ESQ., CCAL Fiore, Racobs and Powers A PLC

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Quorum January, 2018

C AI-C V MISSION STATE ME NT The mission of CAI-CV is to provide leadership for successful development and operation of community associations through information, research and education.


COVER FEATURE

Sun City Palm Desert “Time to Live the Dream” By Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH, CIEC, CHMM

T

he Community of Sun City Palm Desert is larger than some small towns and has its own Wikipedia page. There are 4,985 homes with over 9,000 residents. Compare this to the population of Palm Desert at around 50,000 full time residents. Wow! Did you know SCPD was built on 1,600 acres? There are 500 acres of turf and 35 plus miles of road. The property was originally a vineyard, according to Francesca Holmbo, the Association Executive Coordinator. The original dedication in 1992 was by Roy Wilson, John Benoit and Corky Larson; they were all past Riverside County Supervisors. Corky Larson had a home there. Steven Campbell, CMCA, AMS, PCAM is the General Manager and oversees a staff of 200 plus employees. Such a large community with over two million gate entries a year is a big challenge to maintain. Steve told Quorum Magazine that “My greatest reward

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9


COVER FEATURE is watching our residents show the property to their visiting family members. They are so proud and excited to share where they live.” The gated adult community began construction in 1992 by Del Webb/Pulte and was completed in 2003. Sun City Palm Desert offers an array of homes for purchase, lease or seasonal rental. There are over 50 floorplans ranging from 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom, 1,000 square feet up to 3 bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms and 3,300 sf. Whether it be a traditional or greatroom layout, a home with a casita (guest house) or a home with a golf cart garage, each floorplan has its own personality, allowing owners to turn the house into their home. Prices range from the low $200,000’s to $800,000. Other than the size of the home, the factors most influential in determining the price of a home are its location (golf course vs. privacy lot), the abundance of upgrades and finally the floorplan itself. The monthly assessment of $246 (golf not included) includes the use of an extensive array of recreational amenities. There are three large clubhouses, each with free Wi-Fi. There are nine tennis courts, five pools and five spas, eight pickleball courts, bocce ball courts, a softball field and an indoor track which comes in handy when outdoor temperatures are above 100°F. There are also two state of the art fitness centers and one fitness studio. When asked what homeowners like best, Francesca wrote that SCPD is well maintained, beautiful, offers a wide variety of activities and is fiscally sound/financially secure, featuring superb landscaping, mountain vistas and lavish water features. SCPD offers an extensive schedule of entertainment. Thirty-six spectacular holes on two magnificently maintained golf courses, designed by former PGA star Billy Casper, provide resort-style golf play for everyone. The facilities include exceptional practice facilities — driving range, multiple putting and chipping courses, plus a complete pro shop. Mountain View Golf Club offers pay-as-you-play opportunities seven days a week and preferential rates for residents. Gorgeous and green 365 days a year, every golfer will be smitten by the breathtaking mountain views, magnificent fairways and greens, splendid lakes and water features, and golf luxury usually found only on America’s finest courses. Mountain Vista Golf Club is a golfers’ paradise. Four PGA Professionals staff Mountain Vista Golf Club with over 40 years' of teaching experience. There are seven board members and 16 active committees. The SCPD Committees are a research and analysis arm for the Board of Directors. They make recommendations to the Board and meet monthly or quarterly. Steve Bailey, former Board President stated, “Our preventive maintenance is thorough and regularly scheduled. Maintenance/replacement is never deferred unless it is not needed.” The community has a monthly newsletter that is nearly 100 pages in length.

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Quorum January, 2018


COVER FEATURE

Residents can easily find information on how and where their assessment money is spent, what projects and issues the Board is dealing with and what activities are happening. SCPD also has their very own on-site Post Office, RV Storage Compound, Free Lending Library, Speakers Hall Forum, Pavilion Studio, Meeting Rooms, over 80 Chartered Clubs and social groups for a variety of personal interests. Notable entertainers in the Sierra Ballroom have been Mary Lou Harris, Tony Orlando, Glen Campbell and Lucy Arnaz. There is a large shopping center adjacent to SCPD accessible via a private gate for golf carts and bicycles. As a way of breaking down the community into smaller, more manageable numbers, there are 15 Districts each with its own Delegates to the Delegate Council and their own webpage on the website http://www.scpdca.com What do the residents think makes SCPD different? Steve stated several things: a well-funded reserve fund and an aggressive refurbishment program that is possible with some of the lowest HOA assessments in the area. “The twenty five year old property has the

appearance of a newer property. A resident run architectural and landscape committee provides for extraordinarily maintained neighborhoods. The rich social and activity oriented atmosphere offers something for everyone. Finally a history of stable Boards of Directors assisted by 30 Delegates and Alternates (two representatives for each of our fifteen districts) and the sixteen Committees who provide a communication link between the seven members Board of Directors and Staff.� The Community is dealing with water conservation and energy issues with an ongoing desertscape conversion program, LED Light conversion program, and replacement of AC units at the end of life cycle. Staff has completed upgrades on 18 holes of golf with state of the art irrigation with the latest Toro technology on the Santa Rosa Course and transferring all resident access to Radio Frequency Identification Tags. If you want more information about Sun City Palm Desert, contact Francesca Holmbo, Association Executive Coordinator at francesca.holmbo@scpdca.com or by phone at 760-200-2223. CAI-CV.org

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11


WATER WISE

CVWD ANNOUNCES FREE LANDSCAPE WORKSHOP SCHEDULE By Katie Evans The Coachella Valley Water District (CVWD) will host a series of free landscape workshops in the first four months of 2018. These workshops are designed for home gardeners who want to learn more about water-efficient irrigation, desert horticulture and how to better manage their water use. Topics include soil identification, citrus trees, pollinatorfriendly landscapes and landscape water efficiency. Speakers include CVWD staff members who hold credentials in irrigation, landscape and arboriculture, and local Master Gardeners. All the sessions will be offered on Wednesdays at CVWD’s Steve Robbins Administration Building, 75-515 Hovley Lane East, Palm Desert. No registration is required for the free classes.

THE SCHEDULE FOLLOWS: JAN. 17 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. What’s your soil type? This workshop will cover the five different local soil types in the Coachella Valley and how to irrigate them to build a thriving landscape.

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Phone: 760- 343-0162 • Fax: 760-343-4804 P.O. BOX 265 Thousand Palms CA 92276 Email: office@proland-inc.com

www.prolandscapingca.com

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Quorum January, 2018

MARCH 14 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Get the buzz on pollinator-friendly landscapes Learn how to create a landscape to support hundreds of species of butterflies, hummingbirds, bees and other pollinating insects.

APRIL 11 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Improve water efficiency in your landscape with CIMIS Learn how to save water, energy and money by using the California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS) to estimate the daily water needs of your landscape.

For more information, visit www.cwvd.org and click on “Education,” look on Facebook or call (760) 398-2651. Katie Evans is the Conservation Manager for the Coachella Valley Water District. She can be reached at kevans@cvwd.org or (760) 398-2661.


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13


FEATURE

A Road Map to That Happy Place By Phyllis Harkins

I

n a recent Common Ground article, the author spoke about how to arrive at that “Happy Place”, a place where a homeowners’ association community can be a place that not only works well together, but also has some fun along the way. This article struck a chord both with my community’s board president and with me, interestingly at the same time. Just prior to publication of the article, she and I spoke about how to get Portola Country Club to a place where the community members could work towards common goals, and although at times disagree, be forward thinking for the community’s best interests. As our board president Marilyn Loewy said in a recent column for our community magazine, “It’s hard to know if you got 'there' [Happy Place], if you don’t have a plan on where you wanted to go.” Portola’s Board has six steps, developed with the assistance of President Marilyn Loewy, that it hopes will get their community to the Happy Place in the next five to ten years.

1

Develop a Strategic Plan—Identify our mission and vision statements, and look at all proposed ideas considering both statements. Set goals, develop an action plan towards those goals, and along the way, monitor and update the plan based on current circumstances and what is seen for the short-term future. Annually, the Board of Directors, Finance Committee and manager will have to sign off on the five to ten-year plan as a rolling forecast of projects, regardless of the persons in place as each year occurs. Annual budgetary work, separate from projects, will be ongoing with the Board, Finance Committee and manager.

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Quorum January, 2018

The Board’s Fiscal Actions Need to Reinforce Steps Toward that Happy Place—Create a financial plan by working with the Finance Committee, all the Committee Chairs, the Reserve Specialist and CPA for the community and the General Manager. Develop an ongoing maintenance plan to prevent any unexpected items that could derail the action plan and build that maintenance plan into the annual budget.

3

Create a Solid Working Relationship with the Board, the Manager, and the Management Company—Utilize the management skills and HOA knowledge that the manager and management company bring to the community to assist in developing this road map. The management company is an integral part of this process as their knowledge of other communities strategic planning can benefit yours.

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1

2

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Be Transparent with the Community—Open and honest communication with the members is the most critically important aspect of any road map to the Happy Place. At the end of the day, it’s their money that funds the trip to the Happy Place. As Marilyn Loewy has often said at Board meetings: “They [Portola members] may not be happy when they hear that money needs to be spent, or certain things may have to be postponed, but if they have a voice or comment in those decisions, they will be ok with the outcome.” Portola held its first of three Town Hall meetings in December, with two more to follow in January and March. At the first one, every idea presented by committee chairs and the member audience were written down on jumbo post-it notes. The General Manager and Golf Superintendent are now tasked with gathering budget numbers for each item. At the January meeting, these budget numbers will be presented, and the community will be asked: Which of these do you want, and what are you willing to fund?” At the March Town Hall, the selected items from January will be prioritized with solid numbers, and the community will learn how much each of the items will cost them over the next five to ten years in their monthly assessment.


MANAGER'S CORNER

"At the end of the day, it’s their money that funds the trip to the Happy Place."

5

By Steven Shuey

Educate Homeowners—Before the December Town Hall, each of Portola’s 18 committees and clubs chairs received a letter from President Loewy, asking them to meet with their respective committee/club, and gather their members’ input as to where they see Portola in the next five to ten years. At December’s meeting, every member who wanted to speak was afforded the opportunity. No idea presented was dismissed.

6

Strong Community Social Network—This is one of Portola’s strengths with its active Social Club, Ladies Golf and Men’s Golf clubs. There are over 100 various social or golf Portola events held during the season. These events, whether golf or social themed, build community by allowing members to share time together. Events are reasonably priced; all groups utilize a large group of volunteers, with some help from the HOA staff.

5 6

"Open and honest communication with the members is the most critically important aspect of any road map to the Happy Place." Strategic planning towards the Happy Place is not a community’s wish list. It is a strategic direction that a community not only wants, but embraces. There will always be specific goals that specific members will not agree upon, but there is a genuine need for most members to say, yes, this is where we want to see our community in five to ten years. Are you ready to draw the road map to your Happy Place for your community? Phyllis Harkins, CMCA, AMS, CCAM-LS, CAMEx, is the general manager of Portola Country Club HOA, which is managed by the Management Trust. She can be reached at 760.346.5481, or phyllis.harkins@managmenttrust.com.

CAI-CV.org

Are you, as a manager, a part of the problem or part of the solution? Be proactive and be part of the solution! When it comes to the health of a community, managers can usually see the issues because they are on the outside looking in. With that in mind, managers should be making clear recommendations to the board of directors on how the health of the community can be improved, like recommending a newsletter be published on a regular basis to inform the residents. Most managers may be thinking… "are you kidding??? I'm not increasing my workload!!! Hold on! No one is asking you to increase your workload. When you recommend something like a newsletter, you may also ask, "which one of you board members is willing to take this on?" When they point their finger back at you, it is a good opportunity to remind them of the contractual agreement and what is and is not included. If they ask you to do it, they will likely pay you for the service. To become a leading manager in your field, you need to be proactive. Start today! Lead your board of directors in the direction they should go in the operation of their community. Steven Shuey is a certified professional community association manager. He is a community association consultant with Personalized Property Management here in the Coachella Valley. He may be contacted at IslandMgr@aol.com. You can follow him on Twitter (twitter.com/@IslandMgr) facebook.com/CAICV

twitter.com/CAI_CV

15


FEATURE

Community Newsletters: The Cornerstone of Your Association Becoming a Community By David Schuknecht

N

ewsletters, often overlooked by smaller communities, are one of the most important contributing factors to the harmony of an association. However, many larger communities also do not realize that their newsletters are failing to meet the most important goals a newsletter should strive to meet. Most newsletters are used merely for informational purposes and, while that is a necessary component of newsletters, it fails to establish the community togetherness boards strive to achieve. Key components for every newsletter are to be aesthetically pleasing, inclusionary of important content, positive in tone and peak human interest.

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While everyone has their own opinion on what does and does not look good, the board along with their community manager should work with one another to find a template that is consistent and attractive in nature. While more content could be included and the costs lower for a newsletter that includes no pictures or color, this newsletter often ends up lining the trash sooner than later. A simple test can help guide a board’s decision making regarding the aesthetic appeal of the newsletter—the refrigerator test. When one’s child produces a work of art that they are just so proud of, it often ends up on the refrigerator to be displayed for all visitors coming to the home. While it may seem unlikely that a community newsletter will end up on the refrigerator of a homeowner it can and will happen. The first step in passing that test is ensuring that the homeowner won’t mind seeing it several times a day, several days in a row. Aesthetics combined with content will ensure inclusion of the community newsletters alongside the great works of your homeowner’s children and grandchildren. Content, the driving force behind the creation and maintenance of a community newsletter, is the cornerstone of all newsletters. This is the time for the board to advertise all the positive things that are happening in the community. As transparency is an issue that is eventually brought up at every association, the board explaining where they are at in various projects does wonders to distinguish the myopia many homeowners experience. The homeowners are able to see where their assessments are being spent improving the community, instead of just running it. Homeowners get excited to learn that the street is set to be repaved in the next few months after the board reviews the various proposals obtained


FEATURE NEWSLETT

ER FLYER A

4 PAPER T

EMPLATE

by management or that the NEWSLETT ER FLYER A4 PAPER TEMP LATE board has contracted with a landscaper to begin landscape refurbishment around the community. If you want to draw readers to your newsletters, you must provide them with something that they want, and those items that impact their pocketbook are the most successful in doing so. Remember, the more interesting the content the more that homeowners will not only enjoy the newsletter but look forward to the next one. Failure to provide quality content will turn the homeowners to view the factors. Focusing on negative news is a newsletter from a community service to way to do just the opposite. community newsletter may seem like a cost center of the association and board While facts and figures will make up a hefty item to undertake. However, propaganda. Thorough, positive content the majority of your newsletters, includ- if pushed by the board, you will likely will foster a new found respect between ing the human side in newsletters is just find many residents who are willing to homeowners, the board, vendors, and as important. While these items may help contribute to making the newsletmanagement. seem trivial at first they often become ter a cornerstone of the community. Associations don’t differ from any homeowners' favorite part of the news- Starting a newsletter committee can other corporation: things go wrong, letters; however, they are often ignored as help alleviate the board’s pressure to feelings get hurt, and disagreements obtaining information for this requires create such a document. Additionally, arise. It is important that the board, for some smaller communiwhile working with manage"This is time for the board to ties, monthly newsletters ment, understands this and are not necessary, as events advertise all the positive things that doen’t allow it to factor into and projects will be smaller the day to day operation of and more infrequent in are happening in the community." the community. However, it nature. Newsletters that go is important that such negatives don’t extra leg work. Association members' out every other month or even quarterly appear in the community newsletter. successes in business, members' but are higher quality in nature will Recent reports have found that news birthdays and anniversaries, child yield the same positive outcome or one coverage in the United States varies from accomplishments, and social events that is even better than if unpolished ~70% to 90% negative. Surrounded by are wonderful places to start. People monthly newsletters were being sent out. constant bad news, the homeowners of are proud of these items and people Newsletters are always a great first step your association do not want to hear that find them interesting. Nothing peaks for creating a more involved and caring their largest investment and their home the interests of homeowners more than community. is trending negative also. While trans- learning something about their neighparency is important, the community bor that they wouldn’t have otherwise David Schuknecht is a newsletter is no place for the board to known. Joan down the street just had community manager for share their unhappiness with certain her 5th grandchild and Bob and Pam Personalized Property vendors or that the gate is broken for the are celebrating their 50th anniversary Managment and has been a 5th time in as many months. Remember in June; be sure to congratulate them. portfolio manager for the last several that the newsletter is designed to serve These tidbits go a long way in fostering years. Mr. Schuknecht is a Coachella several purposes with harmonious community togetherness. Valley native and is a graduate of the community living being one of the key If starting from scratch, tackling a University of California, Santa Barbara. CAI-CV.org

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CAI-CLAC 2018

LEGISLATIVE DAY AT THE CAPITOL SAVE THE DATE

Sunday, April 8, through Monday, April 9, 2018 Hyatt Regency Sacramento Join movers and shakers from all over California as CAI-CLAC goes straight to the lawmakers in Sacramento to make our voices heard. Participate in education sessions for all levels of legislative experience, while the CAI-CLAC Delegates and Liaisons have their “position” meeting and get to know the CLAC Committee members at the Meet the Delegates event.

SIGNUP ONLINE AT WWW.CAICLAC.COM 888.909.7403 Sunday, 8, 2018 Sunday,April April 8, Schedule Hyatt Regency Sacramento

Monday, 2018 Sunday,April April9, 9, Schedule Hyatt Regency Sacramento

DELEGATE/LIAISON TRAC

2018 LEGISLATIVE DAY AT THE CAPITOL

11:00 a.m. – Noon

CAI-CLAC Executive Meeting

8:30 a.m.

Noon – 4:00 p.m.

CAI-CLAC Delegate/Liaison Meeting (boxed lunch provided)

6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Meet the Delegates/No-Host Reception

11:00 a.m. – Noon

Welcome!/How a Bill Becomes a Law (geared for first-time attendees)

Noon – 1:00 p.m.

Lunch/Roundtable (boxed lunch provided)

1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Education Session

2:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Break

2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Education Session

3:45 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Break

4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Hot Bills with Louie Brown, CAI-CLAC Advocate 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Meet the Delegates/No-Host Reception

CHAPTER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR TRAC Noon – 4:00 p.m.

CAI-CLAC Delegate/Liaison Meeting (boxed lunch provided)

5:30 p.m.

CED Feedback with CAI-CLAC Chair John MacDowell and CAI-CLAC Vice-Chair Nathan McGuire

6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Meet the Delegates/No-Host Reception

MEET THE DELEGATES • NO-HOST RECEPTION/BAR ALL WELCOME 6:00 - 9:00 pm

Hyatt Regency Sacramento, Capitol View 15th Floor 1209 L Street, (916) 321-3544 Register by March 28, 2018 to receive early registration discount

Quorum January, 2018

Check-In with Continental Breakfast

BILL BRIEFING/KEYNOTE SPEAKER/AWARDS 9:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Program Recommendation: Bring 20 pre-printed address labels with name, HOME address, phone, fax and e-mail

NON-DELEGATE TRAC

18

fax 916.550.9488

LEGISLATOR VISITS – CALIFORNIA STATE CAPITOL 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

To receive Legislative appointments with Senate and Assembly members, please indicate so on this registration form and include your HOME address by March 28, 2018. No exceptions.

CLOSING RECEPTION – HYATT REGENCY SACRAMENTO 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Hors d’oeuvres/No-host bar Share your day with CAI-CLAC Advocate and other CAI-CLAC members.


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SAVE THE DATE Friday, January 26, 2018, 5:30 p.m. Agua Caliente Spa Resort Casino 32250 Bob Hope Drive, Rancho Mirage Join us as we celebrate CAI-CV’s 2017 Volunteers and Accomplishments Kick off 2018 with the party of the year.

Wine Reception Award Winning Cuisine Awesome Awards Ceremony Real Gaming with Professional Instruction Dancing & Door Prizes

Reservations available online at www.cai-cv.org $65.00 for CAI members and guests with reservations prior to January 12, 2018 $80.00 for nonmembers, walk-ins and reservations after January 12, 2018 Desert Formal Attire | Valet Parking CAI-CV Room Block Available Now, 888.999.1995 Discounts for Spa and Hotel Services SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE 20

SPONSORS Platinum Sponsors Associa Desert Resort Management NPG Asphalt Sunshine Landscape Champagne Sponsor Roof Asset Management Wine Reception Sponsors Frazier Pest Control PrimeCo Western Pacific Roofing Cigar Sponsor Vantage Point Construction Gold Sponsor Fiore Racobs & Powers A PLC Silver Sponsors Alliance Association Bank Asphalt MD’s Bronze Sponsor BRS Roofing Photography Sponsors Dunn-Edwards Corp Flood Response Chip Sponsor CBCI Construction Special Event Design Sponsor G4S Secure Solutions Grand Jackpot Sponsor United Paving Valet Sponsor Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Entertainment Sponsor LaBarre/Oksnee Insurance Agency Food Sponsors EmpireWorks Seacoast Commerce Bank Shelter Security

Venue Sponsor Agua Caliente Casino Resort Spa


BE|DAZZLING

Warm Desert Evenings Glimmering Pools of Water Exhilarating Entertainment Delectable Dining Your Dazzling Four-Diamond Escape is Here

I-10 and Bob Hope Drive CAI-CV.org

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21


HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION LAW

When and How to Avoid a Lawsuit? By Jennifer James, Esq.

I

t is estimated that approximately 75% of homeowners associations are embroiled in a legal tangle of some kind. Lawsuits can cost associations thousands of dollars, especially if the association’s insurance carrier rejects coverage. Often times, homeowners fail to realize that the homeowners, including the homeowner suing the association, ultimately pay for the defense of the lawsuit usually through a special assessment or by borrowing from the reserve account. A special assessment exceeding 5% of the budgeted gross expenses of the association for that fiscal year requires approval by a majority of a quorum of members. Many homeowners association reserve accounts are underfunded, if funded at all, and expensive litigation could deplete those reserve funds further leaving little or no funds for the repair, restoration, or additions to major components which the association is obligated to maintain. In addition to the expense of lawsuits, homeowners may find it difficult to sell their homes during a lawsuit. Also, banks are less likely to lend money or offer decent lending rates to homeowners associations during a lawsuit.

WHEN SHOULD YOU SUE? Attempting to resolve a dispute prior to litigation could potentially save the association and its homeowners thousands of dollars. Often times, there is a lack of effective communication hindering the resolution of disputes. Therefore, it is important 22

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to adopt effective procedures for resolving disputes between the association and its members. First, the board and homeowner should attempt to resolve a dispute through internal dispute resolution (“IDR�). IDR is less formal than mediation and provides the opportunity for both parties to resolve the dispute without court intervention, saving both parties the expense of litigation. For those disagreements the homeowners and board are unable to resolve on their own, mediation may be a viable option. Mediation, unlike arbitration or litigation, is an informal process wherein both parties try to resolve their differences without involving a judge or the court system. Instead, a mediator assists the parties to work through possible solutions. A mediator does not make any binding decisions, so either party could still proceed to court if the matter is not resolved. Ultimately, the parties decide whether they will agree to a solution in mediation. If an agreement is reached during mediation, the agreement must be put in writing and signed by both parties. Mediation has been a very useful tool in helping to resolve disputes prior to litigation. However, not all matters are resolved easily and litigation may be a recommended approach, especially if mediation is unsuccessful. Because there is no one size fits all, homeowners and boards contemplating a lawsuit should seek legal advice from their association counsel to determine the pros and cons to litigation.


HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION LAW HOW TO AVOID A LAWSUIT? While there are certainly times when a lawsuit is appropriate and even necessary to seek justice, sometimes litigation is unnecessary and can be avoided if, in addition to adopting and using an effective resolution procedure, you follow these simple guidelines:

1

Lead by example. I am always amazed when I hear a board complain about the turmoil in their community when the board members engage in verbal arguments with each other during meetings. Nothing speaks louder than your actions. Some of the most successful meetings I have attended began with a summary of the positive aspects of the community and publicly thanking individuals for various community affairs. If you want a harmonious community, set the stage at the board level.

2

Create a sense of community. Members that live in homeowners associations with a sense of community are less likely to sue their homeowners association. Town hall gatherings, socials, and community emergency preparedness and crime watch can help to foster a community feeling. In my experience, homeowners associations that encourage homeowner participation and community involvement are entangled in less lawsuits. Why? Because homeowners feel they are a part of the community as opposed to living in a dictatorship and less likely to sue their homeowners association.

3

Educate homeowners and directors. Many lawsuits result from lack of knowledge. Gentle reminders to homeowners could help alleviate the need for enforcement action. For example, if an association is experiencing in influx of parking violations, a gentle reminder of the parking rules could avoid potential disagreements. Likewise, new board members may be lacking adequate leadership skills. There are many trainings and seminars available to board members to increase their knowledge of homeowners associations and their respective role as a board member.

4

Hire experienced professionals. A director is entitled to rely on information, opinions, reports or statements, including financial statements and other financial data, provided by professionals. Relying on professional service providers protects the association from liability. When in doubt, I always recommend seeking advice from an expert in the field.

5

Pick your battles. I often hear angry homeowners or board members say they want to file a lawsuit based on principle. Before initiating a lawsuit, ask whether the cost is worth the financial burden to the entire association. Not all battles are worth the expense of litigation. There is a time and place for lawsuits. Frivolous lawsuits, however, waste everyone’s time and money, and in some extreme cases, could lead to bankruptcy. By resolving disputes prior to a lawsuit, the association could avoid spending thousands of dollars. Always seek guidance from the association’s professionals in deciding what is in the best interest of the association. Jennifer James, Esq. is an HOA attorney located in the City of Palm Desert and has been providing legal services to common interest communities for more than 14 years. She established her own law practice, Jennifer James Law, in 2014. Ms. James has been actively involved with CAI since 2004. She can be reached at (760) 834-8913 or Jennifer@JenniferJamesLaw.com. CAI-CV.org

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23


A MANAGER'S PERSPECTIVE

Essential Communications Will Improve Community Spirit By Steven Shuey, PCAM

T

he spirit of a community is an important factor. It affects the lifestyle, home sales, and overall operations. Keeping the spirit high and positive helps; allowing the spirit to fall to a low can damage a community. A question may be, how can we keep the community spirit high or fix it if it has fallen? This author has had the extreme privilege of working with a number of communities in my over 40 years of service to the community association industry. I've seen and heard a lot of stories and witnessed the stranger than strange to the greater than great in community spirit. I worked intimately with one community that went from crying and complaining to happy and joyful due to specific efforts. You have likely seen the same thing I have seen. Sometimes a community just doesn't feel good. There is this negative atmosphere that is difficult to explain. I think I know what causes it and how to change it. In life, we become what we think about. If we think about wonderful and joyful things and experiences we tend to be on a spiritual high. When we dwell on negative uncomfortable issues and things, we tend to see everything in a bad light. In a community such as yours and mine, the board of directors has an opportunity to help lift the spirit of the people or cause the spirit to sink. It is easy to allow it to go in either direction. It takes special effort to make sure community spirit stays as high as possible.

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In most communities, rumors travel quickly, particularly if they are "bad news" rumors. It seems that people love to talk about what's going on and for some reason, bad news is a hotter topic than good news. When it comes to rumors, there are two schools of thought: ignore them or fight back with the truth. Deciding which path to take will impact the outcome of community spirit. Preventing rumors with wrong information is fairly easy, although it may not be inexpensive. My plan calls for getting ahead of the game when you can. If the community has a plan to "do something", it needs to be properly announced well in advance. Wording and timing of the announcement can be critical. For example, if the community is planning a special assessment for a capital improvement that needs to be sold to the membership, unless it is an emergency assessment, start planning a year or more in advance. Broadcast the idea for the project that needs the funding, then broadcast regular updates in the planning, including potential costs that are anticipated. Eventually, share with the community ideas on how funding can be accomplished, that is, various methods being considered. Finally, announce the special assessment, again fully describing the need and use for the funds to be assessed. Done properly, rumors can be prevented or stopped in their tracks with an update report. When it comes to cost,

"WHEN IT SEEMS TOO LATE AND RUMORS HAVE STARTED, STOP THEM QUICKLY BY BROADCASTING THE TRUTH." newsletters sent by US Mail, can seem costly. If the idea for the project could be controversial, a public relations (marketing) consultant may need to be hired. Keep in mind that the cost of marketing or advertising (announcing) the project are all part of the cost of the overall project and not the least bit inappropriate. When it seems too late and rumors have started, stop them quickly by broadcasting the truth. Ignoring bad rumors can have long term devastating effects. Stopping bad rumors is not


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necessarily easy, is time consuming, and requires much more effort than preventing them in the first place. For the spirit of the community, it is important to do so and do it quickly. Another thing that dampens the spirit of a community is rules written in the negative. Let's face it, no one likes to be told what to do or how to live in their own home or neighborhood. At the same time, everyone wants to know the plan for the lifestyle of the neighborhood or, community guidelines for living. If your community rules and regulations are the kind that say, "don't to this or NO to that", these rules are likely dampening the community spirit. It is rather subliminal, but the negative spirit it there just the same. Change those rules! Try telling the residents what you DO want rather than what you proclaim is illegal. For example, try "please use plastic or paper cups at the pool rather than glassware". It sounds a whole lot better than "NO glass at the pool". One community I'm familiar with changed all their rules and regulations from negative rules to positive community guidelines. Within a year it was obvious the spirit of the community had lifted. All in all, good communication is key to the spirit and health of the community. If change is coming and the leadership is not talking about it, you can be sure the rumor-mill is. People want to be informed. A regular and timely newsletter can be a great help keeping the people informed. It can be on paper or via email and online. Will the people read it? No one knows

for sure, but the leadership could certainly encourage it. As a final note, when someone passes you a rumor, particularly if you know or believe it could be false, ask the person passing it to you to stop. Tell them of the negative impact on community spirit and home (neighborhood) values when inappropriate rumors get around. Stopping the spread of bad rumors, in itself, will raise community spirit. Even when rumors are true, like, "the golf course is failing and going broke", it may be true, but talking about it will only make matters worse. A better word to pass out is, "the golf course and clubhouse need our support to continue to be prosperous". Try turning the bad news around and see what happens. Community spirit is on the rise - join the movement! Steven Shuey is a certified professional community association manager. He serves on the National Faculty of CAI and a past board member of the APCM. He also serves as your delegate on the California Legislative Action Committee (CLAC). He is a community association consultant with Personalized Property Management here in the Coachella Valley. In January 2017 he was awarded the lifetime achievement award from CAI-CV. He may be contacted at IslandMgr@aol.com. You can follow him on Twitter (www.twitter.com/@IslandMgr)

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25


CHAPTER EVENTS

CAI-CV’S ANN UAL

Holiday Open House & Charity Event BENEFITING THE NARROW DOOR’S CHRISTMAS STORE

THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS TITLE SPONSOR Associa Desert Resort Management WINE SPONSOR SERVPRO of Indian Wells & Palm Springs SANTA SPONSORS AMS Paving, Inc. Pacific Western Bank Peters & Freedman, LLP Vantage Point Construction, Inc. ENTERTAINMENT SPONSORS CBCI Construction, Inc. Conserve LandCare Fiore Racobs & Powers, PLC Pacific Western Bank CLAC SPONSOR Pacific Western Bank ELF SPONSORS Asphalt MD’s Dunn-Edwards Corporation Frazier Pest Control, Inc. NPG Asphalt PrimeCo Seacoast Commerce Bank SERVPRO of Palm Desert 26

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B O A R D MEMBER WORKSHOP

CHAPTER EVENTS

Ask the Attorney

TOPICS & SPEAKERS Legislative Update & Case Law Cang Le, Esq. Adams Stirling, PLC

Board Governance & Leadership Christina Baine De Jardin, Esq. Peters & Freedman, L.L.P.

Elections & Annual Meetings Gen Wangler, Esq. CCAL, Fiore Racobs & Powers, A PLC

General & Executive Meetings Steve Tinnelly, Esq. Tinnelly Law Group

A – Z Free Legal Advice Dea Franck, Esq. Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC

Restating Governing Documents Jeff French, Esq. Green Bryant & French, LLP

Effective & Proactive Communication Angelina Reynolds, Esq. Naumann Law Firm, PC

Board Disputes Lisa Tashjian, Esq. Beaumont Gitlin Tashjian CAI-CV.org

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27


Welcome Aboard New Business Partner Member

HOA Cleaning From The Heart By Jay Powell HOA Cleaning From The Heart is a local business owned by Coachella Valley residents Nezha and Paul Roide. HOA Cleaning is a full-service cleaning company. They clean pool decks, pool furniture, common area bathrooms, kitchens and barbeques. They also clean common area meeting rooms, clubhouses, gyms, laundry areas and anywhere else homeowners gather to use common area facilities. Established in 2009, and based in Palm Springs, HOA Cleaning From the Heart currently has responsibility for eight associations and works closely with two management companies. They joined CAI with the hope of expanding their business to more HOAs and introducing their services to board members and community managers who are looking for that "Resort" type of property maintenance that leaves residents feeling like they truly are on vacation. Many Valley HOAs rely on homeowner volunteers to clean up after parties and HOA meetings. The thoroughness of cleaning by volunteers can be hit and miss, which can be a frustration for boards and managers. HOA Cleaning From the Heart solves all the association’s cleaning problems. Nezha and Paul told us their clients love the work they do and are unlikely to ever go back to using volunteers. Before starting a maintenance program, Nezha and Paul send in their team to conduct a thorough deep cleaning. They then create the maintenance program with checklists to ensure the property always looks great and ready for residents to enjoy during any season. Cleaning From The Heart offers daily, weekly, or bimonthly cleaning schedules, depending on the size of the property and needs of the community. Nezha started the original company 28

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in 1995 cleaning homes. When she was thinking of a name for the business, her seven-year-old daughter, Sarah, suggested "Cleaning From the Heart" because she knew her mom cleaned like she was cleaning her own home – with love and caring from her heart. Since moving to the desert in 2001, the company has focused on commercial janitorial work and now does HOA cleaning exclusively. They use the same cleaning techniques developed for home cleaning, paying particular attention to details and proper cleaning techniques. Each area to be cleaned is categorized and scheduled for cleaning so even out-of-the-way spots like ceiling fans and window casements are regularly cleaned. Nezha conducts random walk-thru job inspections to ensure quality control. Paul handles the administrative side of the business. He does the invoicing, writes quotes and helps with hiring new employees. He also leads the company’s marketing efforts. Nezha was born in Morocco and when she’s not working, she enjoys cooking and sharing the adventures of food with her family and friends. She and Paul enjoy traveling to other countries to learn more about cultures and customs. Paul is a garage inventor and likes tinkering with tools and technology. Their favorite place to relax is Hawaii and they try to get there at least once a year visiting each of the islands and walking on the beaches and learning more about the "Huna" way of living. You can visit their website at www.hoacleaningfromtheheart.com to learn more or call Paul at (760) 774-1304. Jay Powell is the Business Development Manager for Ben's Asphalt. He can be reached at 760-413-2466 or by email at jay.powell@bensasphalt.com.


ABOUT CLAC

The California Legislative Action Committee is Still Paying Attention By Steven Shuey, PCAM

Y

our CLAC, California Legislative Action Committee for the CV Chapter, is paying attention to what is happening in the legislature and you should be as well. Newly passed laws come into effect and uncomfortable issues are right around the corner. Here is the news.

NEW YEAR BRINGS NEW LAWS IMPACTING CIDS Several bills passed by the Legislature and signed by Governor Jerry Brown in 2017 will take effect January 1, 2018. AB 1412 -- Among those will be AB 1412. Sponsored by CLAC and authored by Assemblyman Steven Choi (R-Irvine), this bill extends liability protection privileges enjoyed by directors in entirely residential common interest developments to those representing mixed-use developments. SB 2 -- Opposed by most state business organizations, including CLAC, SB 2 imposes new fees on most real estate transactions, including Deeds of Trust, Requests for Notice of Default, Notice of Trustee Sale, Quit Claim Deeds, among others. AB 634 -- This new law will allow residents to apply for access to and installation of solar panels on common area roofs in common interest developments. AB 407 -- This bill expands association member access to common area clubhouses for the purpose of holding meetings related to political campaign or other free speech exercises. This access does not apply to commercial solicitation or outside groups not invited by a member of the association. On January 3rd, the California Legislature officially reconvened for its 2018 session.

Among the many bills CLAC is analyzing for their potential impact on California common interest developments is Senate Bill 721. This legislation, first introduced last year by Senator Jerry Hill before being temporarily shelved as a two-year bill, would require mandatory inspections and maintenance of all walkways and balconies in multi-residential structures within homeowners associations. CLAC opposed this bill for many reasons, notably because California law already requires inspections of accessible areas of the major components that the association is obligated to repair, replace or maintain (Civil Code Section 5550). This includes all walkways and balconies. This duplication will certainly have a negative financial impact on homeowners associations and their residents, some of which may be required to dip into reserve funds or resort to special assessments in order to fund these additional inspection activities. What's more, this unnecessary state mandate completely usurps local control and governance. For these reasons, CLAC will continue opposing this bill in its current form and will keep members notified as it and other relevant bills work their way through the legislature. We welcome, encourage and appreciate our members' continued advocacy on these important bills throughout the 2018 legislative session. Steven Shuey is a certified professional community association manager. He serves as your delegate on the California Legislative Action Committee (CLAC). He also serves on the National Faculty of CAI and a past board member of the APCM. He is a community association consultant with Personalized Property Management here in the Coachella Valley. In January 2017 he was awarded the lifetime achievement award from CAI-CV. He may be contacted at IslandMgr@aol.com. You can follow him on Twitter (www.twitter.com/@IslandMgr) CAI-CV.org

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29


MAINTENANCE

Roof Inspection, Maintenance and Repair By Dan Stites

Y

our roofing system is no different than your car – it needs regular maintenance and repair in order to ensure reliable performance and longevity. And, like your car, lack of regular servicing can result in inconvenience, costly repairs, and a shorter life. The other thing that your roof and your car have in common is that most warranties are voided if you cannot provide documentation of regular maintenance in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations. The bottom line is that regular roof inspection and maintenance needs to be a mandatory part of the HOA’s overall community maintenance program.

A NEW 20 YEAR WARRANTED ROOF MAY NOT LAST 20 YEARS! The advertised life on a typical flat (built up) roof is 20 years, yet the actual average life across the United States is only 12 years; and the statistics on sloped roofs show the same trend. While the life of a roof depends on many factors, there are some over which we have no control and this valley seems to have its share of elements that tend to shorten roof life: • High levels of UV radiation – breaks down roofing material • Hot summers / cool nights – breaks down roofing material, cracking and breaking of the waterproofing system due to expansion/contraction • Air pollution – breaks down waterproofing material • Earthquakes – cracks and breaks waterproofing system with each movement • Expansive soils – cracks and breaks waterproofing with each movement (less common in the desert)

OTHER FACTORS THAT CAN REDUCE YOUR ROOF’S LIFESPAN INCLUDE: • Workmen servicing roof-mounted equipment • Leaking rooftop equipment such as coolers and AC units • Debris collecting on roof top • Plugged drains and gutters • Animal damage • Vandalism • Leaks that go undetected and un-repaired Even a professionally and properly installed new roof in Southern California can begin to leak within a few years of installation if it is ignored (and the first leak usually occurs the day after the roofing contractor’s warranty expires)! A US Federal Government study determined that the average new roof had its first leak within five years of installation.

NOW IS THE TIME TO GET READY FOR THE RAINS AND PROTECT YOUR ROOFING INVESTMENT By implementing a Preventive Roof Maintenance program for your building, you not only prepare for the rains but also: • Keep the manufacturer’s warranty in effect (most are invalidated unless the roof is properly maintained) • Minimize or prevent water damage to buildings and contents caused by leaks • Reduce the likelihood of structural damage due to water intrusion

"As the rainy season approaches, better take a look at your building’s first line of defense – its ROOFING SYSTEM" 30

Quorum January, 2018


• Reduce the risk of toxic mold formation or other biological growth • Avoid insurance cost hikes or cancellation due to multiple water damage claims • Eliminate energy loss and expense due to moist roofing or insulation during both the heating and cooling seasons • Extend roof life by 50% or more, avoiding the cost of premature roof replacement Preventive roof and building maintenance services help save money, avoid headaches, and reduce legal risks for the property owner / manager – all for just pennies per square foot.

SO, EXACTLY WHAT DOES A PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE PROGRAM ENTAIL? An effective Preventative Roof Maintenance program should be implemented by a professional roofing contractor and the scope will vary depending upon roof type (sloped, flat, built-up, single ply, etc.) In general, it will include the following regularly scheduled activities: • Visually inspect entire roofing system on an annual basis • Remove all loose debris (Power wash/ air blow as necessary) • Clean out roof accessible drains and gutters • Repair all splits and cracks in roofing material • Build up low areas on flat roofs to minimize ponding • Repair or replace missing or damaged tiles, shingles, or other sloped roof materials • Repair or replace loose or damaged flashings and seals around all roof penetrations • Repair any known leaks • Other roof repairs as needed to ensure a water tight roof. If you hire a qualified, professional roofing or waterproofing contractor to implement a preventive maintenance program for your building, you can rest assured that you will get the maximum life out of your roof with minimal cost and disruption. Your roofing system is an expensive investment that safeguards the building and all of the assets within the building. It pays to protect it and NOW is the best time to start! Dan Stites is a degreed and licensed Professional Engineer with over 35 years of experience in the construction industry. He also holds C-39 Roofing and Waterproofing and “B” General Building Contractor licenses and has completed graduate studies in business at Rice University and Thunderbird School of Global Management.

MEET THE COMMITTEE CHAIR Eric Angle By Cari Burleigh As the General Manager of Trilogy at La Quinta maintenance Association, an active adult community in La Quinta, CA, Eric Angle is proud to call the Coachella Valley home for 25 years. Originally and currently, a real estate broker, Eric chose the Coachella Valley as a haven to raise his children, now young adults. Previous to serving the Trilogy at La Quinta Community, Eric was the General Manager for Del Webb Kern Canyon, and served as the Activities Director for Sun City Shadow Hills. As many of you are familiar with the Trilogy brand and the quality of living associated with a Trilogy community, Trilogy at La Quinta is no different: It is a 55+ golf community with 1,238 single family homes and a busy and beautiful community to call home for many. Eric is enjoying his role in the smooth running of this community. What does Eric do with any spare time? Eric gives back to community and CAI through his involvement with various committees he serves on. Eric has been involved with CAI for 8 years and is currently serving as Chair for the Awards Committee and Co-Chair for Professional Management, Education and Bowling Committees. In his extra spare time, right…Eric enjoys hiking, biking and staying fit at 40ish…. Currently, the CAI Awards Committee is working on the CAI-CV Awards & Monte Carlo Night, “Putting on the Glitz.” The awards night will be held on Friday, January 26, 2018, at 5:30 p.m. at Aqua Caliente Spa Resort Casino. This will be an amazing night with award winning cuisine and wine. Included in the event will be the awards ceremony, real gaming with professional instruction, dancing, and door prizes. Please make sure and register prior to January 12th for $65.00 per person. For more information please contact: the CAI-CV office at (760)341-0559. Cari Burleigh, CCAM, AMS, is the General Manager of Rancho Casa Blanca Owners Association, which is professionally managed by The Management Trust. She can be reached at (760) 347-1999 or cari.burleigh@managementtrust.com. CAI-CV.org

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31


WATER WISE

Pressure Regulators Can Protect Your Home and Property By The Coachella Valley Water District

Q

uestions about pressure regulators, for household pressure or irrigation system regulation, have been raised recently. Do I have one, do I need one, what are they for and can they be damaged by fluctuations in water pressure coming into the device are among the range of questions that have been sent our way. Here are some answers to frequently asked questions and some general information. There are a number of different manufacturers for pressure regulating devices. They all work under the same premise and that is to take water pressure coming into a line and reducing it to a suitable pressure for end use. By design, they are intended to provide for a pre-set and constant pressure coming out of the valve regardless of how high or varied the pressure of the water coming into the valve is. Household systems with excessively high water pressures could experience damage to the pipes and fixtures. The same holds true for irrigation systems where sprinkler heads and other valves can be blown off or damaged by surges of high water pressure.

32

Quorum January, 2018

Q1: WHAT IS THE FUNCTION OF A WATER PRESSURE REGULATOR?

A household water pressure regulator reduces the water pressure from the public water main to a pressure that is usable by the customer and compatible with normal household plumbing and fixtures. It also helps prevent pressure surges from entering the household plumbing from the main. High water presure can result in dripping faucets and water pipes, and it can damage appliances.

Q2: HOW DOES A PRESSURE REGULATOR WORK?

A pressure regulator is a spring-loaded valve that regulates pressure on the downstream (house) side of the valve. Altering the degree of spring compression changes the downstream pressure.

Q3: WHY IS THE WATER PRESSURE IN THE MAIN LINES HIGH?

Ensuring practical, safe working water pressures, municipal and private water supply companies use pumps and pumping stations to boost water supply pressures in supply mains to be able to supply water for fire fighting,

"Household systems with excessively high water pressures could experience damage the pipes and fixtures."


WATER WISE high rise buildings to overcome loss of pressure as the elevation increases, and to maintain water supply in water towers and supply tanks. Pressure in water supply mains can exceed 200psi. Most plumbing codes require water pressure reducing valves on domestic systems where the municipal water main’s pressure exceeds 80psi. Higher pressures could rupture pipes, damage fixtures,and injure the people using them.

house water pressure and turning the screw counter-clockwise reduces house pressure. Repair kits for rebuilding pressure regulators are usually available from the manufacturer.

Q7: TO WHAT PRESSURE SHOULD I ADJUST MY PRESSURE REGULATOR?

Q4: WHERE SHOULD THE PRESSURE REGULATOR BE INSTALLED?

On new installations, the pressure regulator is usually installed just downstream, (on the house side) of the water meter. On some older installations, the pressure regulator might be found on the street side of the water meter. Distribution Department staff can help with determining the location of new regulators and helping to find existing regulators.

Q5: HOW DO I KNOW IF THE PRESSURE REGULATOR IS WORKING?

The best way to know if the pressure regulator is working is to install a pressure gauge on each side of the regulator. If the upstream gage reads higher than the downstream gauge, then the regulator is probably working. If there are no gauges, you might notice symptoms of pressure regulator malfunction. These include sustained or initial bursts of unusually high pressure at faucets and showerheads and water being discharged from the relief valve on your domestic water heater.

Q6: CAN I ADJUST AND REPAIR MY PRESSURE REGULATOR?

Yes. A homeowner or a plumber can use manufacturer’s instructions for adjustment. The adjustment mechanism is usually a screw on top of the regulator. Turning this screw changes the degree of spring compression. Generally, turning the screw clockwise increases

This is partly a matter of owner preference. Most homeowners set their pressure at approximately 50 pounds per square inch (psi). Lower settings will help conserve water and prolong plumbing and fitting life while higher settings will have the opposite effects.

Q8: ARE PRESSURE REGULATORS REQUIRED?

Yes. The Commission and its member municipalities require that pressure regulators be installed to prevent high pressure-related damage to household plumbing, fixtures and equipment.

Q9: WHY MUST I HAVE A PRESSURE REGULATOR IF THE WATER PRESSURE AT THE PUBLIC MAIN IS LOW OR MODERATE?

There are two reasons: 1.) Most public water mains are supplied by pumps or pressure reducing valves. This equipment may produce temporary high pressure surges, which can be transmitted to household plumbing. A properly operating household pressure regulator will help prevent these surges from entering your plumbing. 2.) Your municipality might increase the pressure in the main that supplies your house.

Q10: WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR INSTALLING AND MAINTAINING THE PRESSURE REGULATOR?

The property owner is responsible for installing and maintaining the pressure regulator.

For more information, please contact Coachella Valley Water District at (760) 391-9600.

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33


2017 PLATINUM SPONSOR SPOTLIGHT CAI-CV

ROOF A S S E T M A N A G E M E N T LIC # 677708

R

oof Asset Management Inc. is a local, family-owned, full-service roofing company serving the entire Coachella Valley. Specializing in homeowners’ associations, we provide everything from leak repair service to complete large-scale re-roofing programs. Our success is attributed to our core beliefs: act with integrity, treat people like family, and “do the right thing.” The Winkle family has been in the roofing industry here in the valley for over 35 years and serves on several boards of directors for prominent industry organizations. Although the roof is one of the most important components of a building, it is often “out of sight out of mind.” Roofs not only protect the building itself from the elements, they protect the contents of the home from sustaining water damage. Our harsh desert climate is particularly hard on roofing systems with the extreme temperature changes. Roof Asset Management Inc. provides maintenance programs that extend the serviceable life of all roofing systems. The minor cost of a well-designed and professionally implemented program can help roofing systems exceed their original expectations. Many leaks can be prevented from ever developing when annual maintenance is performed. When interviewing a roofing contractor for any project remember that you are “buying a promise.” As opposed to shopping for goods at different stores and finding the best price, roofing systems are built-in-place by journeyman roofers. There is truly no such thing as “apples to apples.” There are wide variances between materials, amounts of materials used, and installation techniques that separates roofing contractors. Hire a roofing professional that you trust will provide you with the highest level of quality and customer service. The personnel at Roof Asset Management Inc. prides themselves in “doing what we say.” The relationships that have been established are built on caring about our customers’ needs and addressing them with true professionalism. Our employees are well trained and very knowledgeable. As qualified installers of most major material manufacturers, we can install the right roofing system designed specifically for each project. Our family looks forward to continuing our support of CAI and other local organizations. We are thankful for the tremendous support that we have received from the community. You may reach Roof Asset Management, Inc. at 760-813-9999 or www.ramroof.com

Thank you to Roof Asset Management Inc. for their generous support of CAI-CV! 34

Quorum January, 2018


2018 CALENDAR

CAI-CV

COMMUNITY ASSOCIATIONS INSTITUTE - COACHELLA VALLEY • LOCAL CHAPTER & NATIONAL EVENTS & COURSES – BLUE • SOUTHERN CA COURSES & NATIONAL EVENTS – GREEN JANUARY 1 15 16 19 24 26 26 30 31-3

MONDAY MONDAY TUESDAY FRIDAY WEDNESDAY FRIDAY FRIDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY – SATURDAY

JULY NEW YEARS – HOLIDAY MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY – HOLIDAY HOA BOARD BASIC TRAINING LUNCH PROGRAM & MINI TRADE SHOW – CEU CAI-CV BOARD MEETING 2017 AWARDS & MONTE CARLO NIGHT CAI’S M202 COMMUNICATIONS – SANTA ANA – CEU CAI’S EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER COURSE CAI’S NA LAW SEMINAR – LA QUINTA – CEU

FEBRUARY 31-3 2 8-9 8-9 9 13 16 19 20 28

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY FRIDAY THURSDAY – FRIDAY THURSDAY – FRIDAY FRIDAY TUESDAY FRIDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY

CAI’S NA LAW SEMINAR – LA QUINTA (CONTINUED) – CEU MANAGER ON THE RUN (MOTR) – CEU CAI’S M203 LEADERSHIP – OXNARD – CEU CAI’S M350 MANAGER & THE LAW – RIVERSIDE – CEU LEADERSHIP & COMMITTEE TRAINING NEW MEMBER ORIENTATION LUNCH PROGRAM & MINI TRADE SHOW – CEU PRESIDENT’S DAY – HOLIDAY HOA BOARD BASIC TRAINING CAI-CV BOARD MEETING

MARCH 8-10 9 23 23 28 29-30

THURSDAY – SATURDAY FRIDAY FRIDAY FRIDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY – FRIDAY

CAI’S M100 CA ESSENTIALS – LOS ANGELES – CEU LUNCH PROGRAM & MINI TRADE SHOW – CEU CORKS FOR CLAC WINE TASTING BOARD MEMBER WORKSHOP (BMW) CAI-CV BOARD MEETING CAI’S M205 RISK MANAGEMENT - SANTA ANA – CEU

APRIL 6 8-9 12-13 13 17 19-20 20 25 27

FRIDAY SUNDAY – MONDAY THURSDAY – FRIDAY FRIDAY TUESDAY THURSDAY – FRIDAY FRIDAY WEDNESDAY FRIDAY

MANAGER ON THE RUN (MOTR) – CEU CAI’S DAY AT THE CAPITOL – SACRAMENTO – CEU CAI’S M204 GOVERNANCE – LOS ANGELES – CEU CAI’S BOARD LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP NEW MEMBER ORIENTATION CAI’S M201 FACILITIES – SAN DIEGO – CEU LUNCH PROGRAM & MINI TRADE SHOW – CEU CAI-CV BOARD MEETING SPRING GOLF TOURNAMENT

MAY 9-12 15 18 28 30

WEDNESDAY – SATURDAY TUESDAY FRIDAY MONDAY WEDNESDAY

CAI’S NA CONFERENCE – WASHINGTON, D.C. – CEU HOA BOARD BASIC TRAINING LUNCH PROGRAM & MINI TRADE SHOW – CEU MEMORIAL DAY – HOLIDAY CAI-CV BOARD MEETING

JUNE 7-8 THURSDAY – FRIDAY 8 FRIDAY 12 TUESDAY 15 FRIDAY 15 FRIDAY 21-23 THURSDAY - SATURDAY 21-22 THURSDAY – FRIDAY 27 WEDNESDAY 29 FRIDAY

• HOLIDAYS – CAI-CV OFFICE CLOSED – RED • CEU = CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS OFFERED

CAI’S M205 RISK MANAGEMENT – LOS ANGELES – CEU LUNCH PROGRAM & MINI TRADE SHOW – CEU HOA BOARD BASIC TRAINING MANAGER ON THE RUN (MOTR) – CEU SUMMER SIZZLER CAI’S M100 CA ESSENTIALS - SAN DIEGO - CEU CAI’S M201 FACILITIES – SANTA ANA – CEU CAI-CV BOARD MEETING BOWLING TOURNAMENT

4 12-13 12-14 20 20 25 27

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY – FRIDAY THURSDAY – SATURDAY FRIDAY FRIDAY WEDNESDAY FRIDAY

INDEPENDENCE DAY – HOLIDAY CAI’S M204 GOVERNANCE – PALM DESERT – CEU CAI’S M100 CA ESSENTIALS – SANTA ANA – CEU CAI’S CID LAW COURSE – PALM DESERT – CEU CAI’S M202 COMMUNICATIONS - RIVERSIDE - CEU CAI-CV BOARD MEETING CAI’S EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER COURSE

AUGUST 3 14 16-17 17 23-24 29

FRIDAY MANAGER ON THE RUN (MOTR) – CEU TUESDAY HOA BOARD BASIC TRAINING THURSDAY – FRIDAY CAI’S M203 LEADERSHIP – PALM DESERT – CEU FRIDAY (Date May Change) DAY AT THE RACES – DEL MAR – CEU THURSDAY – FRIDAY CAI’S M206 FINANCIAL – SANTA ANA – CEU WEDNESDAY BOARD MEETING

SEPTEMBER 3 11 12-15 21 25 26 27-28

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY FRIDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY - FRIDAY

LABOR DAY – HOLIDAY HOA BOARD BASIC TRAINING CAI’S LARGE-SCALE WORKSHOP – CEU LUNCH PROGRAM & MINI TRADE SHOW – CEU NEW MEMBER ORIENTATION BOARD MEETING CAI’S M203 LEADERSHIP - SANTA ANA - CEU

OCTOBER 5 8 11-13 12 16 18 19 24 26 31

FRIDAY MONDAY THURSDAY-SATURDAY FRIDAY TUESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY WEDNESDAY FRIDAY WEDNESDAY

MANAGER ON THE RUN (MOTR) – CEU COLUMBUS DAY – HOLIDAY CAI’S MANAGEMENT COMPANY CEO RETREAT – CEU OKTOBERFEST HOA BOARD BASIC TRAINING CAI’S CLAC LEGAL FORUM FUNDRAISING DINNER CAI’S CA STATEWIDE LEGAL FORUM – CEU CAI’S CID LAW COURSE – PALM DESERT – CEU LUNCH PROGRAM & MINI TRADE SHOW – CEU CAI-CV ANNUAL MEETING & ELECTION

NOVEMBER 1-3 9 12 13 15-16 16 22-23 28

THURSDAY-SATURDAY FRIDAY MONDAY TUESDAY THURSDAY-FRIDAY FRIDAY THURSDAY-FRIDAY WEDNESDAY

CAI’S M100 COURSE – PALM DESERT – CEU CAI-CV STRATEGIC PLANNING VETERANS DAY – HOLIDAY HOA BOARD BASIC TRAINING CAI’S M204 GOVERNANCE – SANTA ANA – CEU LEGISLATIVE UPDATE & MINI TRADE SHOW – CEU THANKSGIVING – HOLIDAY CAI-CV BOARD MEETING

DECEMBER 6-8 7 7 7 7 19 24-25

THURSDAY-SATURDAY FRIDAY FRIDAY FRIDAY FRIDAY WEDNESDAY MONDAY-TUESDAY

CAI’S M100 COURSE – SANTA ANA – CEU BOARD MEMBER WORKSHOP (BMW) MANAGER ON THE RUN (MOTR) – CEU HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE CMCA CHALLENGE - CEU CAI-CV BOARD MEETING CHRISTMAS – HOLIDAY

JANUARY 2019 26

FRIDAY

CAI-CV.org

2018 AWARDS & MONTE CARLO NIGHT

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35


JOIN A CAI-CV COMMITTEE

CLAC Buck-A-Door Campaign

2018 VOLUNTEER FORM Join CAI-CV’s volunteer leadership team by becoming a member of a committee. Committee members have the opportunity to build lasting relationships with CAI-CV members from every membership class. Committee members help raise funds, promote education and work to make CAI-CV the best place to network in the Coachella Valley. If you are enthusiastic, energetic, a good team player and have the time to volunteer, we want you on one of our committees! MEMBER INFORMATION Name Company/Association Name

The California Legislative Action Committee (CLAC) is a volunteer committee of Community Associations Institute (CAI), consisting of homeowners and professionals serving homeowner associations (HOAs). CAI is the largest organization in California dedicated to the monitoring of legislation, educating elected state lawmakers and protecting the interests of those living in community associations. CLAC is working toward legislative solutions that are right for California homeowner associations with the ongoing and generous support of HOA communities across the state. Join CLAC’s efforts by donating one dollar for each household in your community. YES, I’D LIKE TO SUPPORT CAI-CLAC WITH A PLEDGE! YES, I’D LIKE TO SUPPORT CAI-CLAC WITH A PLEDGE!

Street Address City

State

Zip

Work Phone

CLAC PLEDGE FORM HOA PLEDGE HOA PLEDGE Number of Doors Number of Doors

X X

A Buck a Door or More A Buck a Door or More

PLEASE LET US KNOW WHICH CAI PLEASE LET US KNOW WHICH CAI CHAPTER(S) YOU ARE DONATING TO: CHAPTER(S) YOU ARE DONATING TO:

= =

Bay Area Central Bay Area Central California North California North Channel Islands Channel Islands Coachella Valley Coachella Valley Greater Inland Empire Greater Inland Empire Greater Los Angeles Greater Los Angeles Orange County Regional Orange County Regional San Diego San Diego

Total Pledge Total Pledge

PROFESSIONAL’S PLEDGE PROFESSIONAL’S PLEDGE

Cell Phone E-Mail Address

Professional Hourly Rate Professional Hourly Rate

X X

Number of People in Firm Number of People in Firm

= =

Total Pledge Total Pledge

FLAT RATE PLEDGE FLAT RATE PLEDGE

Total Pledge Total Pledge

COMMITTEE SELECTION Please list the committee(s) where you believe your service can be most beneficial to you and the chapter. You may request to serve on more than one committee. 1.

NAME NAME TITLE TITLE

FIRM/COMPANY NAME FIRM/COMPANY NAME

ASSOCIATION NAME ASSOCIATION NAME

2.

ADDRESS ADDRESS

3.

SPECIAL SKILLS OR QUALIFICATIONS If you have special skills that you want considered by the committee chairs, please list them here:

CITY CITY

STATE STATE

PHONE PHONE

E-MAIL E-MAIL

ZIP ZIP

METHOD OF PAYMENT - Return this completed form to the address below METHOD OF PAYMENT - Return this completed form to the address below Check enclosed payable to CAI-CLAC Check enclosed payable to CAI-CLAC

Credit Card – Amex Credit Card – Amex

Visa Mastercard Discover (circle one) Visa Mastercard Discover (circle one)

NAME ON CARD NAME ON CARD

BILLING ADDRESS BILLING ADDRESS

CITY CITY

I understand the two-hour per month time commitment required to serve on a CAI-CV committee(s) and I have read and understand the responsibilities of committees and their members.

Signature

Date

Please return this form to the chapter office via fax (760) 341-8443 or email to admin@cai-cv.org. 36

Quorum January, 2018

STATE STATE

ZIP ZIP

CREDIT CARD NUMBER CREDIT CARD NUMBER

SECURITY CODE SECURITY CODE

EXPIRATION DATE EXPIRATION DATE

SIGNATURE SIGNATURE

DATE DATE

CAI California Legislative Action Committee (CLAC), is a 501(c)(6) not-for-profit CAI CaliforniaContributions Legislative Action Committee (CLAC), Legislative is a 501(c)(6) not-for-profit organization. or gifts to CAI California Action Committee organization. Contributions orincome gifts to tax CAIpurposes. California Legislative Action Committee are not deductible for federal are not deductible for federal income tax purposes.

888.909.7403 || 916.550.9488 916.550.9488 fax fax || www.caiclac.com www.caiclac.com 888.909.7403 1809 S Street | Suite 101-245 | Sacramento, CA 95811 1809 S Street | Suite 101-245 | Sacramento, CA 95811


CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

We can help you meet your CVWD "Efficient" budget!

Choose Educated Business Partners Micha Ballesteros, Flood Response Rodney Bissell, Bissell Design Studios Inc. Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH, Desert Cities Indoor Air, LLC Linda Cardoza, Alliance Association Bank Rick Cech, Western Pacific Roofing Corporation Tiffany Christian, Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC

Fernando Fregoso (760) 772-3673

Adam Eves, Empire Works Lori Fahnestock, Powerful Pest Management

fernandof@thevintageco.com

Dea Franck, Esq., Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Julie Frazier, Frazier Pest Control, Inc. Erin Fujioka, G4S Secure Solutions, USA Elaine Gower, The Naumann Law Michael Graves, SCT Reserve Consultants Matthew Hills, Securitas Security Services USA, Inc. Tim Hoss, BEHR & KILZ Paints & Primers

Contractors Lic. # 235717

Jennifer James, Esq., Law Office of Jennifer James, Esq.

WESTERN PACIFIC

Megan Kirkpatrick, Kirkpatrick Landscaping Services Jared Knight, Vista Paint Corporation

Roofing Corporation

Since 1949

Cyndi Koester, PCAM, SwedelsonGottlieb Katy Krupp, Fenton, Grant, Mayfield, Kaneda & Litt, LLP Larry Layton, Kirkpatrick Landscaping Services Alison LeBoeuf, PrimeCo Mike Mastropietro, OCBS, Inc. Chris Meyer, Asphalt MD's Greg Morrow, Eagle Roofing Products Fran Mullahy, Vintage Associates Mike Murrell, Farmers Insurance - Mike Murrell Agency

“Complete Roofing Services” Repairs • Re-roofing Roof Inspection • Maintenance Programs Polyurethane Foam • Built-up • Tile • Patios 3462 La Campana Way, Palm Springs, CA 92262 Phone (760) 416-5877 Fax (760) 320-8912 FIND US ONLINE AT www.westpacroof.com

Chet Oshiro, EmpireWorks Mallory Paproth, SCT Reserve Consultants

Jennifer James Attorney

Elisa Perez, Esq., Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Dana Pride, Automation Pride Brent Sherman, Animal Pest Management Services, Inc. Brittany Smith, Vantage Point Construction, Inc.

HOA Legal Services since 2003

Jillian Steele, Patio Products USA Dan Stites, CBCI Construction

75100 Mediterranean Palm Desert, CA 92211

Kymberli Taylor-Burke, NPG Asphalt Jolen Zeroski, Union Bank Homeowners Association Services

Jennifer@JenniferJamesLaw.com www.JenniferJamesLaw.com (760) 834-8913

The next Educated Business Partner class will be held Tuesday, January 30, 2018 at the La Quinta Resort & Spa or take the class any time at www.CAIONLINE.ORG. CAI-CV.org

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37


38


ASK ABOUT OUR PROPERTY CONDITION ASSESSMENT

kasdan LippSmith Weber Turner llp Have Recovered Over

$1BILLION for Construction Defects

Ritchie Lipson, Esq.

Senior Counsel-Business Relations

rlipson@kasdancdlaw.com (866) 578.3328 x 317

klwtlaw.com

arizona california hawaii* new mexico

* Hawaii is through an afďŹ liation with Kasdan LippSmith LLP


41-905 Boardwalk, A-2 Palm Desert, CA 92211

GREEN IS FOR LOCAL EVENTS

CAI-CV UPCOMING EVENTS

SIGN UP FOR LOCAL EVENTS AT CAI-CV.ORG AND FOR CAI NATIONAL EVENTS AT CAIONLINE.ORG

JANUARY

FEBRUARY

CAI-CV Educational Lunch Program & Mini Trade Show (for all members) WHEN: Friday, January 19, 2018, 11:30 Registration WHERE: Palm Valley Country Club, Palm Desert CAI-CV Awards & Monte Carlo Night WHEN: Friday, January 26, 2018, 5:30 p.m. WHERE: Agua Caliente Casino Resort Spa CAI National’s M202 Communications (for managers) WHEN: Friday, January 26, 2018 WHERE: Santa Ana CAI-CV Hosts CAI National’s Educated Business Partner Course (for business partners) WHAT: CAI National is Filming the ALL NEW EBP Course – Get Your Company Mentioned on the Video While You Earn Your EBP Designation WHEN: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 WHERE: La Quinta Resort & Club, La Quinta CAI’s National Law Seminar WHEN: Wednesday – Saturday, January 31 – February 3, 2018 WHERE: La Quinta Resort & Club, La Quinta

CAI-CV’s Manager on the Run (MOTR) (for managers) WHEN: Friday, February 2, 2018 WHERE: CAI-CV’s NEW OFFICE – 75410 Gerald Ford Drive, Suite 102, Palm Desert CAI National’s M203 Leadership (for managers) WHEN: Thursday - Friday, February 8-9, 2018 WHERE: Oxnard CAI National’s M350 Manager & the Law (for managers) WHEN: Thursday - Friday, February 8-9, 2018 WHERE: Riverside CAI-CV Educational Lunch Program & Mini Trade Show (for all members) WHEN: Friday, February 16, 2018, 11:30 Registration WHERE: Palm Valley Country Club, Palm Desert

REGISTER ONLINE AT WWW.CAIONLINE.ORG, EVENTS

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Quorum January 2018  

Sun City Palm Desert Community Association “Time to Live the Dream” Healthy HOA/Community Cohesiveness A Road Map to That Happy Place Com...

Quorum January 2018  

Sun City Palm Desert Community Association “Time to Live the Dream” Healthy HOA/Community Cohesiveness A Road Map to That Happy Place Com...

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