Page 1

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SCIENCES

SUMMER 2018

3D PRINTING IS

FUTURE OF AGRICULTURE?

VOLUNTEERS HELP FARMERS IN INDIA

MUSCADINE GRAPES

FIRST COMPLETE GENOME SEQUENCING

STUDENT SUCCESS

OUTREACH

TOMATO & PEPPER GROWERS FAMU’S PROGRAMS HELP FLORIDA

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

FAMU USAID FARMER-TO-FARMER

RESEARCH

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

GLOBAL

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

THE

IMANI COOPER A BLACK WOMAN IN STEM

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

1


find us on social: facebook

twitter

facebook/famucafs

@cafsnews

instagram

youtube

dean

message from the

Robert W. Taylor, Ph.D.

Greetings, Over the past academic year, we all worked hard to accomplish what we had set out to do. The achievements of our students, faculty and staff continues to demonstrate their commitment to the University’s as well as the college’s mission and strategic goals. The foundation for excellence and success of our programs in the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences (CAFS) is dependent and relies on the quality of student, faculty and staff who study and work in the college. As a land-grant institution, it is our mission to find solutions to the many challenges facing global food security, being good stewards of agricultural resources and enriching the lives of underserved, as well as other youths and families. We are doing so by providing a world class education to our students, conducting cutting-edge research, developing new ideas, disseminating research-

youtube/famu_cafs

CAFS Magazine Summer 2018

instagram/famu_cafs

DEANS OFFICE Dean and Director of Land-grant Progrms, College of Agriculture and Food Sciences: Robert W. Taylor, Ph.D. Editor: Andrine Stanhope, Ph.D. Sr. Admin. Assistant: Phyllis Moore Assoc. Dir. Research: Wayne Walker Asst. Dir. Research: Jenaya Anderson-Hayes Coord. Admin. Services: Courtnay Pilcher CREATIVE Layout & Design: azure77.com COMMUNICATIONS Copy Editing: FAMU Office of Communications STAFF WRITERS Anthony Ananga, Ph.D.

Imani Cooper

Lt. Ryan Corridan

Kalen Johnson

Satyanarayan Dev, Ph.D. Amaya Mann

based information to our clientele, making discoveries, and developing innovative

Andrine Stanhope, Ph.D. Cynthia Portalatín

technologies, that will benefit our region, nation and the world.

Aavudai Swamy, Ph.D.

Harriett Paul

CAFS continues to be a great place for students to explore various agricultural fields of study that will lead to successful careers that makes a difference. In today’s complex and ever changing world, we are cognizant that the best education

CONTRIBUTING AUTHORS Jaci Schreckengost

is one that prepares students to face the unexpected and tackle the challenges, by

Southern Wine Trails

fostering curiosity, creativity, flexibility, and excellent communication skills. This requires an education and responsiveness to the advancements and challenges of the world. Our goal therefore, is to maintain a vibrant environment that engenders in students the desire to be lifelong learners, transforms innovative ideas into reality and impacts the world around us. Our top cadre of faculty, are committed to helping students realize their full potential by creating opportunities inside and outside the classroom that help prepare them to be good and responsible citizens. I am equally excited about our staff who supports our goals, objectives, and mission. Thank you students, faculty, staff, alumni and families for all that you do to make Florida A&M University - CAFS a thriving community, and in positioning us to becoming a premier 21st Century world-class land-grant college.

Robert Taylor Robert W. Taylor, Ph.D. Dean

2

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY

PHOTOGRAPHY CONTRIBUTORS Andrine Stanhope, Ph.D. Armani Humbert - amoneyphotography Cynthia Portalatin Office of International Agricultural Programs Southern Wine Trails OFFICE Assoc. Dean, Research: Stephen Leong, Ph.D. Assoc. Dean, Academic Programs: Neil James, Ph.D. Director, Center for Biological Control: Lambert Kanga, Ph.D. Director, Center for Viticulture and Small Fruit Research: Violeta Tsolova, Ph.D. Director, Center for Water Resources: Odemari Mbuya, Ph.D. Director, Cooperative Extension and Outreach: Vonda Richardson


#18

Muscadine PG. Grape

featured must read in this issue

FIRST COMPLETE SEQUENCING

more...

The Muscadine FAMU CENTER BOOSTS FLORIDA VITICULTURE INDUSTRY Growers in the southeast have the ability to grow muscadines, a grape that is native to the United States. “I feel like the southeast has a niche in the opportunity to grow muscadines, and I believe growers should take full advantage of that."

Navy ROTC

Imani Cooper A BLACK WOMAN IN STEM

04

24

RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS UNIT

inside

The Navy ROTC Program is available at more than 160 colleges and universities that either host Navy ROTC units or have cross-town enrollment agreements with a host university. Selected applicants for the program are awarded scholarships through a highly competitive national selection process, and receive full tuition and other financial benefits at many of the country's leading colleges and universities.

featured 3D Printing in Ag HOW FAR AWAY ARE WE?

08

18

14 >>> Volunteers Help Farmers in India Grow Drought, Saline Tolerant Crops

10

17 >>> FAMU Signs MOU with Anand Agricultural University 22 >>> Queendom 25 >>>CAFS Professor Receives USDANIFA Grant Award 26 >>>FAMU Student Leader Hosts Food Assistance and Nutrition Expo and Roundtable 28 >>> FAMU’s Programs Help Tomato and Pepper Growers in Florida 30 >>> Teaching Watershed Concepts Using Plant Leaf as an Analogy 32 >>> Kenyan Governor Visits FAMU 34 >>> Outreach Agent Trevor Hylton 36 >>>International agriculture careers 38 >>>Alumni Spotlight 42 >>>CAFS Notes

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

3


by Jaci Schreckengost | VSC News

FAMU Center Boosts Florida Viticulture Industry “When the grapes are out, we are out,� said Violeta Tsolova, professor and director of the Center for Viticulture and Small Fruit Research at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU). She was referring to the researchers and students at the Center working to help grape growers be successful in the southeast viticulture industry.

4

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

5


5Photos by Southern Wine Trails

NATIVE GRAPES Growers in the southeast have

BREEDING

OUTREACH

Tsolova said in addition to the

According to Tsolova, the

the ability to grow muscadines,

growth of muscadines, growers are

Center was opened in 1978 to

a grape that is native to the

interested in producing European

create possibilities for growers

United States. Frank Humphries,

variety grapes for the traits that

who wanted to be a part of

an enology research associate

are successful in the market, such

the viticulture industry in the

at the Center, said, “I feel like

as flavor and size. These varieties,

southeast.

the southeast has a niche in the

however, are highly susceptible

opportunity to grow muscadines,

to PD. Therefore, the Center’s

the Center allow researchers

and I believe growers should take

breeding program works to create

to accumulate information and

full advantage of that.”

new varieties that have the traits

share it with growers. Many

growers want in addition to the PD

Florida vineyards are small in

resistance.

size and may not have access

Humphries said these grapes have unique qualities, including health benefits, which give

Other U.S. universities have

Projects and programs from

to the same information that

growers a valuable marketing tool

been testing these varieties as

large producers in other parts

for muscadines.

well. Tsolova said while these

of the world may have. To fix

varieties did grow and survive in

this, an online database is being

Pierce’s disease (PD), a bacterial

Muscadine grapes can tolerate

the southeast, there was still a

created at the Center to provide

disease that invades and

high level of disease pressure that

information on topics such as

eventually kills the non-native

reduces the quality of the grapes.

vinification and healthy qualities

European grape varieties. This

While PD is the main disease, there

of the commercial muscadine

tolerance makes it easier for

are other fungal pathogens and

grape varieties. This database

southeast growers to produce the

diseases that cause issues for

will provide growers with

native grapes.

growers.

information on issues they may

In addition to traditional breeding methods, FAMU is working to sequence the entire genome of the

face when it comes to grape and wine production. The Center provides growers

muscadine grape. This would make

with information and resources

breeding easier and more efficient

to help them be successful in the

by allowing researchers to “mark”

viticulture industry, fulfilling the

a specific trait and come back to

mission and the original purpose

it in the new breeding selections.

for opening the Center 40 years

Examples of these traits are the

ago.

color or size and shape of the fruit. Tsolova said researchers

vscnews.com/famu-center-boosts-florida-

have the initial version of the

viticulture-industry/

genome sequence completed and are working to create a second, improved version.

6

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


by Southern Wine Trails

FROM VINEYARD DEVELOPMENT TO TASTING CHAMPAGNE:

Winemakers Learn Through the Grape Vine at Annual FWGGA Conference

F

or 95 years, grape growers and wine makers in Florida have had a unique resource to help with honing their skills. The Florida Wine and Grape Growers Association (FWGGA)

provides year-round information and assistance to those creative people who choose to grow grapes and make wine. Whether they are pursuing their passion as a career or enjoying a hobby, wine makers can call on the FWGGA to answer a variety of questions both in the vineyard and in the winery. Each year in January, members of the organization gather to exchange ideas, share their

wines and hear from viticulture experts from universities around the country. This year’s conference, held at Crystal Cove Riverfront Resort in Palatka, covered a variety of topics from vines to wines and included speakers from Cornell University, Florida A&M University, University of Florida, and University of Central Florida. Seminars included a morning boot camp with an overview of vineyard development, winemaking and wine-making equipment, and making wines from kits. Detailed discussions of yeast and sulphur, sessions on wine tourism and using social media, and hands-on workshops on detecting wine flaws and determining the differences between champagne and sparkling wines rounded out the weekend. Time was also set aside for members and speakers alike to gather socially and talk about their favorite subject, “making wine.” Roundtables and Q&A discussions allowed for the exchange of ideas, and a wine tasting before the Saturday evening dinner and keynote address provided the opportunity for conference-goers to sample everything from experimental wines to some old favorites. Of particular note for Southern Wine Trails followers was a discussion on the challenges and opportunities for Wine Tourism in Florida. Led by Drs. Rob Back and Asli Tasci from the Rosen College of Hospitality Management at UCF, the session was centered on research being done to determine the potential for experiential wine travel and wine tourism in Florida. Members were asked to weigh in and complete a survey that will help gather the research. The 2019 FWGGA Conference is tentatively scheduled to be held in Deland, Florida. The annual conference is open to FWGGA members as well as non-members. Members will receive a discount on conference registration. For conference and membership information, contact the Florida Wine and Grape Growers Association at P.O. Box 840256, St. Augustine, FL 32080. You may also call 904-471-1063 or email: admin@fgga.org. bit.ly/2BDCQX2

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

7


FIRST COMPLETE SEQUENCING OF

MUSCADINE GRAPE WHOLE–GENOME 8

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


T

he American native Muscadinia grape (commonly known as the "First American Grape," "Southern Bullace," "Scuppernong," "muscadine") holds distinctive traits. It is a dream source of valuable germplasm allowing us to understand the molecular dialogues underlying diverse economically important traits, including resistance to most of the diseases and pests that limit the worldwide production of grapes and wine. Muscadinia carry adaptive traits of tolerance to heat and humidity, adoption to poor soil, broad spectrum of beneficial bioactive phytochemicals, original nutritional and aroma characteristics, and pleasant fruit/vinification qualities. Thanks to the research grant-funding awarded to Florida A&M University by the USDA/NIFA 1890 Capacity Building Program, a team of scientists from the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences, Center for Viticulture and Small Fruit Research - Islam El-Sharkawy, Ph.D.; Violeta Tsolova, Ph.D., director for the Center; Southern University, Devaiah Kambiranda, Ph.D., assistant professor at Florida State University; and Daniel Vera, Ph.D., director of the Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine, has completed the major research milestone: the first Muscadinia grape whole–genome sequence. The research has yielded a high-quality diploid draft genome sequence for the commercially important red-wine American native muscadine cultivar “Noble.” The estimated whole genome of 414 Mb size has been sequenced and assembled. The assembled scaffolds have been aligned and oriented to their corresponding 20 chromosomes (Muscadinia carry 20 x 2 chromosomes vs. 19 x 2 chromosomes for all Vitis grapes). Lead scientists El-Sharkawy and Tsolova, stated “the complete sequencing of the muscadine genome provides a new knowledge foundation for scientists and grape breeders to explore the inheritance and complex genetic characteristics underlying economically important traits with tremendous impact in grape biology.” Moreover, the genomic sequence provides an invaluable new resource for tracing muscadines and commercial grape evolutionary history. “The completion of the genome sequencing is a major step forward to understand the muscadine grape as a unique healthy food source and increase the economic value of the southern grape and wine industry. In order to provide the best genome reference quality, more research is underway and new important collaboration will be fostered to generate Muscadinia transcriptome for genome annotation, pathways classification, predicted genes function and chromatin structure." Results of this important discovery will be presented to the international scientific audience in July at the 12th International Conference on Grapevine Breeding and Genetics in Bordeaux, France and new peer reviewed publications. The muscadine whole–genome sequence will be released soon on the phytozome website: phytozome.jgi.doe.gov/pz/portal.html.

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

9


3Col Bradley Close, USMC

10

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


by Lt. Ryan Corridan

FAMU’S NAVY RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS UNIT

T

he Navy Reserve Officers Training

scholarships through a highly

and women have taken the official

Corps (NROTC) was established

competitive national selection

“oath of office” and commissioned

to develop midshipmen mentally,

process, and receive full tuition and

as officers in the United States

morally and physically and to

other financial benefits at many of

Navy and Marine Corps through

imbue them with the highest

the country's leading colleges and

this successful program.

ideals of duty, loyalty and with

universities.

the core values of honor, courage

Today, you will see (and

The NROTC Unit at Florida A&M

probably hear) our 55 midshipmen

and commitment in order to

University (FAMU) was established

participating in physical training

commission college graduates

on August 1, 1972, and was the

in the early morning hours,

as naval officers who possess a

fourth of six NROTC units to be

attending naval science classes

basic professional background, are

established at a historically Black

and leadership labs under the

motivated toward careers in the

college or university. On January

CAFS umbrella in the Perry-Page

naval service, and have a potential

1, 1983, the Unit created a cross-

Building. It is not uncommon

for future development in mind

town enrollment program with

to see navy and marine corps

and character so as to assume

Florida State University (FSU) and

midshipmen walking across

the highest responsibilities

Tallahassee Community College

campus in uniform, working the

of command, citizenship and

(TCC). At FAMU, the Department

gates at Rattler football games,

government.

of Naval Science falls within the

volunteering during campus

College of Agriculture and Food

and local events and supporting

Sciences (CAFS).

the annual CAFS Grape Harvest

Currently, there are 63 Navy ROTC units/consortiums hosted at 77 schools throughout the United

Commander Benjamin T. Hacker

Festival. Midshipmen often

States. The Navy ROTC Program is

was the first commanding officer

support formal events with a color

available at more than 160 colleges

of the NROTC Unit at FAMU in

guard, a sword arch at FAMU

and universities that either host

1972 and in March of 1975, Ensign

Homecoming, a formation for

Navy ROTC units or have cross-

Robert Hill became the first naval

local and campus parades and

town enrollment agreements with a

officer commissioned through the

FAMU sporting events. The Rattler

host university. Selected applicants

NROTC program at FAMU. Since

Battalion leads by example and

for the program are awarded

that time, hundreds of young men

regularly supports community

4

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

11


5The NROTC Unit at FAMU, is responsible for training and mentoring future Naval and Marine Corps Officers. Col Bradley C. Close, USMC, Commanding Officer for NROTC Unit FAMU (4th from left) and his staff (L-R), ENS Katherine Estrella, USN; LT Michael Cox, USN; Maj Rodney Daniels, USMC; CDR Roger Hartman, USN; LT Ryan Corridan, USN; GySgt Brett Steele, USMC; and SSgt Christopher Thompson, USMC.

and veterans events, military appreciation activities and the

academic advisors: Major Rodney Daniels, USMC; Lieutenant

Tallahassee Toys for Tots program.

Ryan Corridan, USN; Lieutenant Michael Cox, USN;

During the summer school break, training continues as midshipmen from FAMU, FSU and TCC travel the United

Brett Steele, USMC. The military staff not only teaches NSC

States and the world to gain valuable training and experience

courses, but also provides the requisite military training

from active duty sailors and marines while visiting U.S.

that the midshipmen need to be ready to commission upon

military bases and air stations, and riding on aircrafts, ships

graduation.

and submarines. Personnel in the NROTC includes: Col. Bradley Close,

The NROTC Unit is also supported by two Federal Government employees, Michael Elder and Calvin Robinson

USMC, commanding officer and professor of Naval Science.

who support the human resources unit and supply

As a marine officer and naval flight officer, he spent much

requirements. The FAMU College of Agriculture and Food

of his flying time in the EA-6B Prowler. Prior to coming to

Sciences’ employee also supports the NROTC Unit as the

FAMU-NROTC, Col. Close served as a U.S. Marine Forces

administrative assistant to the commanding officer, and

Central Command chief of staff under Lieutenant General

assist staff and midshipmen with all FAMU and academic

William Beydler.

support matters.

Commander Roger Hartman, USN, is the executive officer

The FAMU NROTC program is always looking for young

and assistant naval science professor. As a naval aviator

men and women who are ready for an exciting challenge,

in the SH-60B Seahawk, he was previously the liaison

interested in serving their country, pursuing an exciting

officer between the commander, U.S. Sixth Fleet and the

career and leadership opportunity.

commander-in-chief of the French Mediterranean Naval Forces. There are five additional active duty staff members at the NROTC Unit at FAMU who also perform as naval science (NSC) instructors, leadership and professional mentors, and

12

Lieutenant Steven DiGiannurio, USN; and Gunnery Sergeant

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY

For more information about being one of us and receiving an NROTC scholarship, contact one of our staff officers at 850-599-8412.


CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

13


FAMU USAID FARMER-TO-FARMER SMART AGRICULTURE PROJECT, VOLUNTEERS HELP FARMERS IN INDIA GROW DROUGHT, SALINE TOLERANT CROPS Florida A&M University's (FAMU) Office of International Agriculture Programs (OIAP) is actively engaged in an institutional partnership with the National Council for Climate Change Sustainable Development and Public Leadership (NCCSD) and the Vivekananda Research and Training Institute (VRTI) in Gujarat, India to help establish a Model Demonstration Farm for drought and saline tolerant crop trials. The demonstration project at VRTI is designed to create a hands-on learning environment for farmers to show them how new or improved crop varieties perform under the environmental and climatic conditions of the Kutch district. It is anticipated that the transfer and adoption of the more climate smart technologies will achieve a higher adoption rate among the local farmers through their engagement in the hands-on demonstrations and seeing first-hand the outcomes achieved from the demonstration trials.

14

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


by Cynthia Portalatín and Harriett Paul

3Ribbon cutting event for the Exhibition of Innovative Agricultural Technologies during the 52nd Annual Convention of the Indian Society of Agricultural Engineers (ISAE) and the National Symposium on Doubling Farmers’ Income through Technological Interventions at the Anand Agricultural University (AAU), India. Parshottam Rupala, India’s National Minister of Agriculture (fourth from left) is assisted by Harriett Paul, Director - Office of International Agriculture Programs at Florida A&M University (second from right).

“In Gujarat, the increase in soil salinity on agricultural

extension agents and researchers, trainers of agricultural

lands and drought conditions have caused a huge negative

non-governmental organizations (NGO) and the State of

impact on crop productivity and decreased the income

Gujarat Agricultural Ministry, as well as progressive farmers

and food security of local farmers,” says Harriett Paul,

in Anand, Junagadh and Kutch districts to encourage

FAMU’s director of the OIAP and Center for International

improved practices. Soil salinity has different characteristics

Agricultural Trade Development Research and Training

across these three districts and requires a more location

(CIATDRT). As the grant’s author and project’s director, Paul

specific approach to mitigate it,” said Paul. A total of 4,778

has brought capacity building training to Indian agricultural

persons were trained by FAMU’s F2F volunteers in classroom

organizations, university partners and individual farmers to

settings during the first project’s period of performance.

stimulate a change in Indian farmers’ production methods to promote more climate-smart practices.

“With the new 2017-2018 award, we are concentrating our efforts on Kutch district farmers to provide opportunities for

“Over the past two years, my staff and I have worked very

both identifying improved more resilient crop varieties for

hard to engage some of the best scientists in our U.S. Land

the Kutch district, as well as building on the knowledge and

Grant Universities with Indian counter-parts in the work of

adoption of improved agricultural practices,” Paul advises.

this project. Under the first project (2016-2017), a team

Ten U.S. experts have been recruited for this project and

of 13 U.S. agricultural experts were recruited and sent to

eight have completed their assignments as of March 30,

the Gujarat State. These experts worked with university

2018.

Paul traveled to India in January

of Implementation Strategy for

In February and early March, the

2018 to initiate the second project’s

Model /Demonstration Farm”

following assignments were completed:

activities and put in place the new

assignment. This assignment

project’s administrative procedures.

also included exploration and

Three volunteer technical experts

selection of alternative salinity and

associate at FAMU – “Establishing

travelled with Ms. Paul, to conduct the

drought resistant crop varieties and

Standards for Plant Sample

following assignments:

demonstration plot experimental

Collection, Preparation, Storage,

design.

Data Analysis and Interpretation.”

• Anne del Castillo, M.S., retired

• Gilbert Queeley, Ph.D., research

• Brian Meese, Ph.D., international

• Trevor Hylton, M.S., multi-county

USAID agricultural economist,

agronomy research consultant,

extension agent at FAMU – “Soil

conducted the “Value-Added

trained farmers on “Methods for

Organic Matter Improvement and

Agriculture Methods/Marketing and

Agricultural Extension Technology

Good Agricultural Practices.”

Branding/Alternative Use Products”

Transfer – Transferring Improved

assignment.

Practices from the Model Farm to

• Mehboob Sheikh, Ph.D., professor of Plant Biotechnology at FAMU’s

Beneficiary Farm Sites.”

• Rita Duncan, M.S., senior biologist at University of Florida – “Integrated Pest Management.” • Anthony Ananga, Ph.D., assistant

Center for Viticulture and Small Fruit

professor in Food Biotechnology at

Research conducted the “Needs

FAMU – “Improved Post-Harvest

Assessment and Development

Practices for Horticultural Crops.”

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

15


Combined, these volunteers trained and assisted farmers, scientists, agriculture leaders, and agricultural extension agents by providing training in their respective specialties during their 14-day assignments in India. As of March 30, a total of approximately 1,151 project beneficiaries were trained in a classroom setting, and 1,409 other persons were directly assisted by the FAMU F2F volunteer team. An

5Pomegranate Farm in India.

increase is anticipated by several hundred more persons directly impacted by this project for the late March through May assignments.

6Needs assessment and development of implementation strategy for model demonstration farms and methods for agricultural extension, were the assigned tasks for F2F volunteers Mehboob Sheikh, Ph.D., (left) and Brian Meese, Ph.D., (right).

The additional 14-day assignments programmed for late March through May 2018 are: • Krishnakumar V. Nedunuri, Ph.D., chairperson, Department of Water Resources Management, and director, International Center for Water Resources, at Central State University – “Needs Assessment for Soil & Water Testing Facility.” • Rishi Prasad, Ph.D., assistant professor and Animal Systems Environmental Specialist at Auburn University – “Integrated Soil Nutrient Management Strategies.” • Ram Ray, Ph.D., research scientist at Prairie View A&M University – “Best Irrigation Practices for Saline Soils.” The assistance provided by these volunteers includes recommendations shared with the host country beneficiaries, FAMU and USAID – some of which are already being adopted by VRTI and farmers. For example, while on his volunteer assignment, Dr. Queeley provided training to a VRTI data analyst on data entry, analysis and interpretation of the results. The data analyst was also introduced to optional statistical software that performs data analytic tasks. A free version of the software for R® for windows was downloaded, training manuals for the software were provided, and training videos for software were suggested. The analyst was then able to train other VRTI staff on data analysis and interpretation to help them derive needed scientific, evidence based information which will improve VRTI’s ability to analyze and interpret data. Through this assignment, the VRTI has gained access to and staff training on modern statistical software not previously in use by VRTI as part of their research protocols. Dr. Queeley has also agreed to continue to provide data analytics support which has requirements beyond their current capacity. “We are very appreciative to the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) F2F Program, implemented through the Volunteers for Economic Growth Alliance (VEGA), for their support of our work in India to date. Approximately $285,000 has been awarded by VEGA in support of the FAMU CIATDRT’s work addressing climate challenges in Indian agriculture from 2016-2018,” states Paul.

16

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY

5F2F program offers training for farmers to learn proper research designs, data collection and analysis. Gilbert Queeley, Ph.D., and VRTI Research Scientist on tour of medicinal plant plots in Gujarat, India.


6The F2F program provides training sessions for farmers to learn and understand the importance of soil organic matter and good agricultural practices as key components for sustainable and increased crop yields. FAMU’s F2F volunteers Gilbert Queeley, Ph.D., (center) and Trevor Hylton (right) at a pomegranate farm in Gujarat, India.

FAMU SIGNS MOU WITH ANAND AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY Florida A&M University (FAMU) has a long history of partnering with international institutions of higher education. One such institution is with Anand Agricultural University (AAU), located in Gujarat, India. The FAMU-India Initiative started in 2015 as part of the University’s footprint on global issues. Areas of mutual interest include international collaborative research, faculty exchange program, student exchange program, online course offerings, courtesy faculty appointment, joint degrees, technology transfer and capacity building. FAMU signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Anand Agricultural University (AAU) on January 10, 2018 at Anand in Gujarat, India. Signing on behalf of FAMU’s President Larry Robinson, Ph.D., was Odeari Mbuya, Ph.D., who also represented the president at the Annual Convention of the Indian Society of Agricultural. A team of five to eight deans from AAU visited FAMU in March for the next course of action to explore specific areas of collaboration with the various colleges at FAMU. Mbuya also attended the book launch event of “Building Climate Smart Farmers: Doubling Income of Farmers in Arena of Climate Change.” Prior to signing the MoU with AAU, FAMU had signed an MoU with India’s National Council for Climate Change, Sustainable Development & Public Leadership (NCCSD) (http://www.nccsdindia.org) with emphasis on Climate Smart Agriculture, environmental stewardship, international research collaboration and technology transfer. As a part of the MoU with NCCSD, the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences, through Harriett Paul, was able to secure a United States Agency for International Development (USAID) grant to initiate a “Farmer-to-Farmer” program in India. This book presents part of the global food security initiative with FAMU as part of the solution providing training and technology transfer.

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

17


by Satyanarayan Dev, Ph.D.

18

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


It is an indisputable fact that the future of food determines the future of mankind. Agriculture is truly a complex system. In order to control plant growth in the field, or to breed new cultivars, we need enormous time series data such as air temperature, soil moisture, soil temperature, and plant growth rate.

w

ithin the next three decades, it is predicted by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization that the quantity of food, fiber, and fuel that will need to be produced, to

meet global demands, will have to be doubled. In addition, growing seasons are predicted

to become more volatile, and arable lands (80% is already being used) are expected to

significantly decrease, due to climate change. In the past few years, the field of phenomics

has provided key insight about how different organisms can be optimized under certain

environmental conditions. These observations have uncovered the possibility of creating “climate recipes” for specific organisms where a certain trait (e.g., volume, taste, chemical concentration, etc.) is maximized. The creation and optimization of such “recipes” can increase the production of valuable compounds as well as improve crop yield, which still represents a state-of-the-art problem in the field of modern agriculture. 3D printing has become talk of the town these days. 3D printing provides an easy means to involve more people in the building process, and involve more in the prototyping and dreaming process. 3D printing technology has been used in the agriculture industry in various applications, to help create small-scale organic farms in developing countries, make cost-effective tools, plant crops, and set up urban gardens. 3D printing allows us to take advantage of technologies from various spaces to automate and optimize all the various things a plant needs to grow, providing the right amount of sunlight, nutrients, water, airflow to develop the fastest growing most efficient plant possible. Recently, there has been great focus on making smallscale urban farming equipment such as 3D desktop models for efficient food production. Conventional methods of manufacturing the components for this small scale urban agriculture is expensive, and can easily throw an entire project off. 3D Printing

4

5Fig. 1: Portable food computer. Photo at www.giardinaggioindoor.it/openagricolture-initiative-lagricoltura-digitale-e-il-futuro-del-cibo/

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

19


has enabled the development of

industry, government and academia

processes to design editable pathways

autonomous systems, complete with

in a research to create collaborative

to achieve the goal of zero urban

custom 3D printed parts, that makes

tools and open technology platforms

waste.

it possible for individuals, restaurants,

for the exploration of future food

and residential communities to do so

systems, such as the open source

College of Agriculture and Food

on-site. For example, one could grow

platform, OpenAg™. The OpenAg

Sciences (CAFS) - Biological Systems

a head of lettuce within twenty-one to

systems seen in figs 1 and 2, uses food

Engineering, the Center for Viticulture

twenty-five days, whereas in the field

computers that help to control and

and Small Fruit Research and Plant

it would typically take sixty to eighty

monitor the conditions such as climate,

Science are doing research on the

days. One of the recent successful

energy, and plant growth, creating

precision control and monitoring of

advancement using 3D printing is the

specific environmental conditions in

climate variables to create climate

production of bell pepper from seed to

the growing chamber, that will allow

recipes that yield various phenotypic

first fruiting in two weeks as compared

for the optimal growth of a specific

expressions in plants. The climate

to growing in the field, which would

plant. Urban waste is being looked

variables including carbon dioxide,

take eight to 10 weeks. This is made

at as a source of nutrient supply for

air temperature, humidity, dissolved

possible by providing exactly what the

these systems. However, ongoing

oxygen, potential hydrogen,

plants need, right when they need it.

research is being carried out in-terms

electrical conductivity, and root-

Massachusetts Institute of

20

Scientists and faculty from the

of developing real time characterization

zone temperature can be precisely

Technology (MIT) Media-Labs has

techniques for the urban waste as well

monitored and controlled within the

brought together partners from

as understanding of the metabolic

growing chamber using inexpensive off

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


5Fig 2: OpenAg team in their Commercial Scale/Food Server controlled growth chamber. Photo at blog.agroknow.com/?p=4330

the shelf electronics (like the Raspberry

growing organisms, they would

to prototyping and production of

Pi - computer on a chip and Arduino

need to quickly and cost-effectively

functioning, plant-ready prototypes.

processors) and 3D printed parts. This

manufacture, then test, plenty of

Without the advances in affordable

is accomplished by essentially using the

customized tools, like mounting

3D Printing technology, the design

classical feedback control loop, which

brackets and plant hangings, which

iteration process would be much

is extensively used in robotics research.

would also meet the engineering

slower, since they would have to

The 3D printed parts include plant pods,

requirements for the various

wait for weeks, and possibly even

airflow parts, vents, and other parts that

components and subsystems. In

months, for new custom parts when

go onto everything from nutrient dosing

order to create custom parts for

following the conventional design

system, to fixed wavelength efficient

testing, as well as refine its hardware

and manufacturing processes.

light-emitting diode (LED) lighting

and software platform, this emerging

Thanks to 3D printing, small

systems.

industry turns to 3D printers. The

engineering teams have access to

3D printers give them the freedom,

an efficient, cost-effective product

make it easy for anyone to grow their

and the budget, to develop and

expansion process and are able to

own food in an urban setting. The end

produce multiple design iterations

install, and exhibit, several models

goal in mind for many of these startups

for its large system, as well as the

of their innovative product at various

involved in manufacturing urban

custom, modular parts that went

public sites.

farming equipment would be difficult to

into it. 3D Printing can be used in

see it come to fruition. In order to set

every stage of production, from

up autonomous processes involving

design and laboratory research

Several startup companies want to

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

21


by Amaya Mann

Biological systems engineering student Imani Cooper is the founder of Florida A&M University’s very first Women’s Student Union, a peer mentor and the first student from the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences to be elected Miss Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University. Hailing from Charlotte, North Carolina, Cooper says she and her family moved often, but it gave her a skill

think that running for Miss FAMU was a position

she believes aided in her victory of becoming Miss

that Cooper jumped at. That was not the case. The

FAMU. “Growing up I was very introverted and shy, but

first time a friend recommended she run for Miss

moving all the time taught me how to talk to anybody

FAMU during her Sophomore year, Cooper was not

regardless of their background.”

convinced. “I felt like I didn’t fit the mold of what Miss

Cooper’s warm personality paired with intellect and

FAMU looked or acted like, but I prayed about it my

determination has helped her gain many positions

entire sophomore year,” said Cooper. The summer of

on campus —seven to be exact. From peer mentor

her Junior year she received a recommendation she

to orientation leader to becoming a member of

simply could not deny.

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated, Cooper is definitely an involved student. When Imani Cooper started her journey on the “Hill,”

“One day I was at church and I sat next to a lady that I had never met before until that day. We were instructed by the pastor to pray over each other,” said

she was a chemical engineering major; however,

Cooper, “I will never forget the words she said, “You

Charles Magee, Ph.D., a professor in the College of

are going to be powerful on your campus. You are

Agriculture and Food Sciences (CAFS) and one of

going to be Miss FAMU!” I believe God was molding

Cooper’s mentors, convinced her to switch her major

me for this position all along, and I thought I wasn’t fit

to biological systems engineering (BSE).

for it.”

“Imani has the knowledge, ability and skill naturally

Faith in her heart, Cooper placed her fears aside and

to go places and be whoever she wants to be,” said

decided to run the race; however, she encountered

Magee. “She appears to be committed to doing

what she thought was a road block when she lacked

anything and I believe she will.”

the funding needed to maintain a campaign of that

A BSE scholarship and White House HBCU AllStar Ambassadorship later, Cooper is grateful and humbled. “From advice to my scholarship, I wouldn’t be where

22

With such an extensive background, one would

caliber. “Campaigns at FAMU cost thousands of dollars for t-shirts, posters, events and outfits. I had a few hundred dollars, my friends and campaign team. Not

I am today without the support of my CAFS family.

having that money really discouraged me, but God

They’ve supported me in so many ways.”

made a way for it to work.”

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


Imani Cooper was able to run for Miss FAMU with all of the resources she needed. T-shirts, posters and outfits were either bought or donated by her campaign team and loved ones. Cooper was even able to get a sponsor for one of her campaign events. Percy Henry III, a political science student from Brooklyn, New York, was Cooper’s campaign manager and a close friend. “If I ever needed a reminder of what faith, perseverance and determination looked like, I would look at Imani.” Another student, Castillo Mitchell, also spoke highly of Cooper’s character. “She’s so well-rounded and she’s always willing to help anybody,” said Mitchell, “That’s one of her best traits.” Mitchell was full of enthusiasm when asked if he is looking forward to seeing Cooper’s initiatives as Miss FAMU come to life in the fall. “As Miss FAMU, my number one goal is to be the voice for students that are often overlooked. I will ensure that students in all areas are represented and heard,” said Cooper, “I want to restore the FAMU spirit that I know our student body has.” After graduation Cooper plans to attend graduate school and attain her dream job of working with the United States Department of Agriculture as a biological systems engineer. Her passion lies within helping African American and underrepresented populations receive fresh foods and various resources that promote self-sustainability. “For young women like myself who often doubt themselves in reaching a certain goal, never think your way out of anything. When it comes to accomplishing your goals, allow your thoughts to be constructive. What’s for you is for you,” said Cooper, “I didn’t think a regular girl like me fit the stigma of Miss FAMU, but I learned that Queendom comes in all shapes and sizes, and beauty comes in all forms.” With dreams and skills like that, Imani Cooper is far from regular. She is the 112th Miss Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University.

AS MISS FAMU, MY NUMBER ONE GOAL IS TO BE THE VOICE FOR STUDENTS T H AT A R E O F T E N OVERLOOKED. I WILL ENSURE T H AT S T U D E N T S IN ALL AREAS ARE REPRESENTED AND HEARD... IMANI COOPER, MISS FAMU 2018/19

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

23


As

a young middle school student, I was always intrigued by math and

science. I often performed at the top of my class in every math or

science course, and was even promoted to advanced level courses in my high school years. My mother recognized my skill in the STEM field and motivated me to pursue the field in college. I began becoming more and more involved in the STEM programs offered at my high school, and even went on to attend a summer engineering program at North Carolina State University the summer

A Black Woman IN ST EM by Imani Cooper5

leading into my senior year of high school. The exposure that I had to the STEM field, at a young age, allowed me to confidently decide on a major within the field upon my tenure at a university. As a double minority (African American and a female), I was often discouraged at the number of students that I saw like myself in these fields throughout my primary school years. This discrepancy, along with years of discrimination from my peers and teachers, prompted me to seek a more inclusive and supportive learning experience for my years in higher education. Thus, instead of attending a Predominantly-White Institution (PWI), I decided to seek a Historically-Black institution. Florida A&M University caught my attention, and after applying and being accepted I began my journey on the “Hill” with a major in biological systems engineering, in the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences (CAFS) I love to share my story on why I chose STEM as an African-American woman because I often find that there are many little girls out here who desire to do the same thing, but have no one to look up to or motivate them to pursue that dream. For the young girls that are out there and wish to pursue a career in the field of STEM, I say to go forth aggressively! Never let others place limitations on you that would hinder your drive to reach your goals! We as women, and especially minority women, in STEM are so essential in maintaining diversity and inclusiveness in the field. Many great women have made amazing strides in this very field that have affected millions and millions of people in the world. Women like Alexa Canady (the first Black female neurosurgeon), and the “Hidden Figures” of aerospace and engineering (Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson), truly represent what it means to be a Black woman in STEM, and why it is so essential that we populate this field. I want to pay homage to the many great women in my life that have continuously motivated me to pursue my dreams within the STEM field. Women like my mother who never allowed me to quit when others told me it was impossible. Women like my mentors who pushed me to see through the difficulties and remember the ultimate outcome. I honor these women with much gratitude and owe it to them for the impact that I am able to have for those young women coming behind me. I want to say thank you all for believing in me and seeing the potential in me to be a successful woman in STEM! I honor you all, not only during Women’s History month, but forever to come!

24

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


CAFS PROFESSOR RECEIVES USDA-NIFA GRANT AWARD CASSEL S. GARDNER, PH.D., professor of agronomy in the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences, received grant funding of approximately $500,000 from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)¬¬–Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI). The proposal entitled, “Medicinal Plants: An alternative crop enterprise to improve profitability of small and medium size farms and socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers (SMSSDFRs),” will integrate research and extension project initiatives in CAFS, by providing information that will be used to develop an extension module to train small farmers and others about growing and marketing medicinal plants. The project will focus on the establishment of medicinal plants production as an income generating enterprise that will financially benefit small and medium size farms and socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers in the United States. Initially the project will identify and select plants, which are adaptable to the region, then develop management strategies for their production. On-station research will be conducted at the FAMU farm in Quincy followed by on-farm demonstration studies conducted at the county level with farmer participants as stakeholders. “In addition,” said Gardner, “the project will provide the basis for development of academic courses in areas such as ethnobotany and pharmacology; and further develop the course curriculum for inclusion in the Plant Science Program, which are appropriate and relevant teaching areas to enhance the education of future health professionals.” The project will also provide an opportunity to collaborate with scientists in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (COPPS) who will extract medicinal compounds from respective biomass of the plants to be evaluated for efficacy, health and market value. Co-principal investigator and statistical analyst on the project, is Gilbert Queeley, Ph.D., research associate and extension educator. Other persons who will lend support to the project include: Oghenekome Onokpise, Ph.D., professor of forest genetics; Lawrence Carter, Ph.D., director – Special Outreach Activities; Trevor Hylton, extension agent; and Linda Sapp, education coordinator for Extension, all in the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences. Collaborators on the project will be Srinivasa Mentreddy Ph.D., professor of Horticulture at Alabama A&M University (AAMU), who will serve as Technical consultant; and two stakeholder farmer participants.

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

25


by Kalen Johnson

FAMU Student Leader Hosts Food Assistance and Nutrition Expo and Roundtable 01

02 After continuously hearing about students not being able to afford meal plans and not knowing how to access food assistance programs, Imani

Florida A&M University. The lobby of Perry-Paige Auditorium almost

Cooper, HBCU All-star Ambassador for White

resembled a career fair, the way it was filled

House Initiatives, took matters into her own

with representatives posted by tables full

hands.

of information on nutrition, food assistance

“I’m a part of the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences and food disparity is an issue we

programs, and agriculture. Marrissa McFarland, a junior criminal justice

address often within my major. It was hard to

student said, “In addition to being able to

ignore, and I knew I had to do something about

receive informative pamphlets about healthy

it,” Cooper said.

food choices, I was also able to network with

Cooper deemed it fit to use her platform as a HBCU All-star Ambassador, which holds her responsible for creating an initiative that

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) representatives.” The event offered a panel discussion that left

addresses a local communal issue, as an

attendees well aware of the impact agriculture

approiate way to carry out her desire to take

has on food supply. Included in the roundtable

action.

discussion panel were representatives from the

On February 23, 2018, Cooper pioneered and hosted the Food Assistance and Nutrition Expo

26

and Roundtable in Perry-Paige Auditorium at

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY

USDA Farm Service Agency, Green Coalition, Second Harvest and Sowing Seeds Sewing


03 05

04 Comfort Ministry. These representatives provided an informative synopsis

01. Imani Cooper (center), shares information on USDA food assistance programs.

of how their respective programs aided to address the need for food in our communities.

02. L-R Jeff Norville, Area Conservationist, USDA-NRCS; Milton Martinez, MLRA Leader, USDA-NRCS; and Fure Muhammad, CAFS-BSE student

Charles Magee, Ph.D., biological systems engineer professor said, “Students need to be aware of the farm bill discussed by USDA

03. Citrus fruits such as kumquats are packed with vitamin C, natural organic compounds, antioxidants, and minerals. Participants giving their feedback after sampling the fruit.

Representative David Sweeny during the panel. The majority of the farm bill is about nutrition to help low income citizens and I encourage faculty and students to attend congressional hearings to oppose the proposal to cut more than $200 billion dollars in funds from the Supplemental Nutrition

04. Representatives from industry, academia, and government, outlines the various food, nutrition and assistance programs offered to the community by their entities.

Assistance Program (SNAP). SNAP deals with food stamps, school lunch programs, and the Woman, Infants and Children (WIC) program.” Cooper, a junior biological systems major and newly elected Miss FAMU

05. Jennifer Dillard (right), USDA Area Specialist, Outlines USDA nutrition assistance programs to CAFS Associate Dean, Neil James, Ph.D.

for the 2018-2019 school year, was extremely pleased with the outcome of the event and looks forward to providing more opportunities for FAMU’s student body to be informed about the variety of programs that provide food assistance in our communities. “Due to the vast amount of viable information that was provided, I would like for this to be a continuous event at the University,” said Cooper.

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

27


28

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


by Jaci Schreckengost | VSC News

FAMU’S PROGRAMS HELP TOMATO AND PEPPER GROWERS IN FLORIDA Researchers at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU) are working to give growers hands-on help for pest and disease management. The Center for Biological Control in the College of

Haseeb and his team regularly organize seasonal field

Agriculture and Food Sciences at FAMU provides effective

days and workshops for growers and other interested

integrated pest management (IPM), said Muhammad

parties. He said these events usually focus on pest

Haseeb, Ph.D., assistant professor at the Center. The

identification and diagnosis, monitoring and effective

Center’s program gives solutions to help growers tackle

management strategies.

issues they may face with disease and pest management for

Haseeb’s team is also part of the national program known

vegetable crops. The Center’s main goal of implementation

as Integrated Pest Information Platform for Extension and

of IPM is to provide the necessary knowledge and skills to

Education (iPiPE). The specific goal of this initiative in Florida

increase vegetable growers’ success at their farms.

is to train vegetable growers and FAMU undergraduates to

Haseeb said his team currently is focusing on western

accurately identify, monitor and manage tomato and pepper

flower thrips, silverleaf whiteflies and pepper weevils. The

pest insects and diseases. Haseeb is the coordinator of this

program includes effective IPM practices to help growers

project in Florida.

successfully protect their crops against these serious pests.

“The major goals of [the] iPiPE program nationwide

According to Haseeb, cultural practices such as UV

are to contribute to our nation’s infrastructure for food

reflective mulches and resistant or tolerant cultivars, for

security, build local and regional capacity to respond to

example, of tomato are being recommended for western

food security problems involving crop pests, reduce adverse

flower thrips and whitefly management. These practices

environmental effects from pest management practices and

reduce the incidence of viral diseases that these two pests

enhance farm profitability,” Haseeb said.

vector in Florida. In the case of pepper weevils, movement of infested

The lead institution for this grant program is Pennsylvania State University. FAMU has a sub-grant of the main grant,

nursery plants to the growers’ fields can cause problems

according to Haseeb. The grant is funded by the U.S.

for pepper growers. Removal of pepper crop residues

Department of Agriculture’s Agriculture and Food Research

and application of crop rotation practices can prevent

Initiative through the National Institute of Food and

population build-up of this serious pest. These are part of

Agriculture.

the IPM strategies that can be adopted to sustain food crop production. vscnews.com/famus-programs-help-tomato-pepper-growers-florida CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

29


Teaching Watershed Concepts Using Plant Leaf as an Analogy

30

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


S

cientist and educators at the Florida A&M University College of Agriculture and Food Sciences (CAFS) have been conducting educational research whereby they are examining the effects of using plant leaves as an analogy for the concepts of watersheds. The ultimate goal is to increase students’ understanding of hydrology principles and watershed concepts, which in turn may facilitate better watershed management, through increased public awareness and adoption of appropriate best management practices, and improved policy decisions.

Watersheds are important because they provide many of us with our drinking water

supply, support habitat for plants and animals, and provide recreational opportunities

and aesthetic beauty to enjoy nature.

Engineering and science courses dealing with watershed concepts can pose a challenge for

students to grasp for several reasons: (1) a watershed is generally conceived on a large spatial scale, which makes it difficult for people to grasp; (2) the dynamic and stochastic nature of watershed challenges both teachers to teach and students to understand the concepts, and the uncertainties in the watersheds. This requires showing and understanding, that what happens at one location in the watershed can influence what we see in other parts; (3) students are often challenged by the landscape heterogeneity in watersheds, which require an interdisciplinary understanding between hydrology, biogeochemistry, pedology, geomorphology, and ecology to understand catchment evolution and functioning. Predictions are highly uncertain due to the heterogeneity of the land surface and subsurface; and (4) a purely theoretical coverage of

watershed topics can be uninteresting to today’s engineering students who are better inspired by hands-on teaching methods. Comprehending this level of complexity and ways to conceptualize watersheds, requires higher-order, reflective, metacognitive and critical thinking skills. Due to these challenges, engineering and science students struggle with the initial idea of watersheds, which in turn, make subsequent lessons dependent on the watershed concept more difficult.

Aavudai Anandhi Swamy, Ph.D., assistant professor of Biological Systems Engineering (BSE) in CAFS developed the analogy and the research that has developed modules, which have allowed students to: • Define and draw diagrams of the important elements of a watershed including watershed divide (watershed boundary), stream network, outlet and direction of flow • Describe the influence of geology and topography on the shape of the watershed divide and the pattern of the drainage network • Describe the watershed shape and size

• Determine the topographic division of watershed (boundary) to delineate a watershed and describe the effect of topography on them • Estimate and describe the distinguishing properties (characteristics) of the watershed • Determine the relative size of a stream (stream ordering) and differentiate first, second and third order streams

schematically

For information on this research, contact Aavudai Anandhi Swamy, Ph.D., assistant professor of Biological Systems Engineering at (850) 412-5000 or anandhi.swamy@famu.edu. CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

31


5(L-R) Robert Taylor, Ph.D., Dean, College of Agriculture and Food Sciences; William Hyndman III, Ed.D., Assistant Vice President, International Education and Development, FAMU; Rose Okwany, President, International Health Operations Patient Education and Empowerment (IHOPEE) Organization; Charles Ogado, Minister of Agriculture, Siaya County, Kenya; and HE Governor Cornell Rasanga, Siaya County, Kenya.

32

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


Kenyan Governor Visits FAMU A delegation from Siaya County in Kenya visited Florida A&M University March 31 to April 2. The 10-member team headed up by His Excellency, GOVERNOR CORNEL AMOTH RASANGA were hosted by President Larry Robinson, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences (CAFS), Robert W. Taylor, Ph.D., and the Assistant Vice President for International Education and Development, William Hyndman, Ed.D. The visit, at the invitation of FAMU, which is centered around a previously signed Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between FAMU and the University of Nairobi, and on-going discussions for a couple of

5Walter Okello (left), Chief of Staff, Siaya County Government, Kenya and Pauline Odongo, Personal Assistant to the Governor.

other MoUs with Siaya County and Barack Obama University is scheduled to be constructed in the near future. The current MoU and the others being developed will be used to: 1) increase student enrollment at FAMU specifically in CAFS, the College of

DURING HIS VISIT, THE GOVERNOR HAS PLEDGED TO:

Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (COPPS) and FAMU-FSU College of Engineering; 2) establish new collaborations with Kenyan universities;

• Provide a Governor’s scholarship to

3) increase FAMU’s presence abroad and global competiveness through

Kenyan students to undertake studies

e-learning platforms; 4) facilitate research exchange programs for faculty

at FAMU on a 2+2 program. Students

and students; and 5) increase FAMU’s access to their natural resources

would complete their first two years at

for research purposes.

Maseno or Barack Obama University

The current MoU and the others being the main objective is to have an educational and research exchange program for students and faculty in CAFS, the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (COPPS) and FAMU-FSU College of Engineering. The Kenyan government and FAMU intends to forge a partnership that will have mutual benefits in research, technology, extension and

in Kenya and complete their final two years at FAMU • Create a research program in the Governor’s office that will enhance student and faculty exchange • Provide the necessary resources to

educational training opportunities, specifically meant to enhance

facilitate the strengthening of their

educational training opportunities between FAMU and Siaya County as

extension programs with the aid of

well as provide a roadmap for further expansion by FAMU in Kenya and

FAMU

East Africa.

• Provide funding for research scientist

The Bureau of Education and Cultural Affairs documents that 10

from CAFS to provide expertise on the

percent of the world’s international students come from the Continent

establishment and operations of a soil

of Africa, with Nigeria and Kenya being the only two African Countries

and water testing lab in Siaya County

that ranks in the top 25 places of origin for international students in the

• Work with the FAMU Office of

United States. Increased emphasis by FAMU will be placed on attracting

International Programs to host

students and forging collaborative efforts with universities in these

educational expos for a regional block

countries. This initiative with Siaya county will put FAMU at the forefront

of 14 counties in Kenya to market FAMU

of land-grant institutions in-terms of fostering collaborative ventures

as a choice destination for international

with African nations.

students CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

33


D

o you have crops or plants that need the protection of a greenhouse, but cannot afford commercial grade greenhouses? Do not be dismayed, the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences’ (CAFS) Extension Agent Trevor Hylton can teach you how to build a simple inexpensive greenhouse to protect your ‘greens’ from the

elements. A household name in Leon County, Florida, in addition to teaching how to

construct a simple greenhouse, Hylton plays a crucial role in promoting agricultural productivity,

increasing food security, improving rural lives, and promoting agriculture as an engine of pro—poor economic growth. A native of Jamaica, his roots in agriculture started as an extension agent. After working for the

Jamaican government in that capacity for five years, he migrated to the U.S. He attended Florida A&M University where he earned a bachelor’s degree from the College of Engineering Science, Technology and Agriculture, now known as the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences. He then went on to earn an MBA from Florida State University, College of Business. After graduation, Trevor went on to work in the business industry, however, his love for agriculture took him back to his roots. In 2000, he joined the team at CAFS Cooperative Extension and Outreach program as an outreach agent and later became a county extension agent, a position which he currently holds.

34

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


MEET YOUR LEON COUNTY OUTREACH AGENT

Trevor Hylton As a county agent, his clientele is every citizen of Leon

the students,” says Hylton. “I know I am planting a

County, Florida, where he focuses on urban and community

seed that will be fruitful for many generations.” His

agriculture and, to some extent, 4H and the youth. “I am best

work with schools extends beyond gardening. He has

known for my expertise in fruit and vegetable production as

mentored students for science fairs and for several

it relates to small-scale producers and homeowners,” said

years served as one of the judges.

Hylton. “A lot of the assistance I provide is borne out of citizens

He has facilitated the start of more than 10 new

wanting to grow their own food, my duty therefore, is to provide

community gardens in Tallahassee, while managing

a service that is needed to meet the new challenges agriculture

the daily activities of the FAMU Community Garden,

is confronted with and bring about a change to help improve the lives of my clientele.” He does so by using information gathered through research and education and bringing it to hundreds of growers through regular workshops, seminars and hands-on activities. One hands-on activity is demonstrating how to build a simple and inexpensive greenhouse, for which he has developed a model, a video of which can be viewed at: wfsu.org/dimensions/ viewvideo.php?num=337. The model has been used and viewed by growers all over the U.S. and other countries. The model (Prototype) was featured in the fall 2017 edition of Hobby Greenhouse, a national magazine for indoor gardeners. “His expertise has taken him beyond the borders of the U.S. through the CAFS Office of International Agriculture Programs (IAP) Farmer-to-Farmer program,” said Hylton. “I’ve traveled to countries such as South Africa, India, Haiti and Guyana as a volunteer teaching, demonstrating and helping small-

Hylton also disseminates his information using the local newspaper as a platform. Over the past five years, his articles covering a wide range of topics on food production has been published in the Tallahassee Democrat. Several of his creative works including short videos have been aired on WFSU-TV. They include and can be viewed using the following links: In the Garden – Tomatoes:

wfsu.org/dimensions/viewvideo.php?num=331 In the Garden – Fall Veggies:

wfsu.org/dimensions/viewvideo.php?num=323 In the Garden – Spring Veggies:

scale growers acquire skills, to increase their food production

wfsu.org/dimensions/viewvideo.php?num=329

capacity through agricultural best practices and farm

In the Garden – Preparing for Fall:

management.”

wfsu.org/dimensions/viewvideo.php?num=334

Like most county agents, a percentage of his time is dedicated to working with kids in elementary, middle and high schools. With his assistance more than 60 percent of the schools in Leon County boasts a food garden. “One of my greatest feeling of fulfilment is the gratitude and thank you from

In the Garden – Community Gardens:

wfsu.org/dimensions/viewvideo.php?num=340 In the Garden – Winter Veggies:

wfsu.org/dimensions/viewvideo.php?num=402

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

35


famu, usda engage students in exposure to international agriculture careers by Cynthia Portalatín

36

The Office of International Agricultural

USDA to increase the participation

development. Through the broader

Programs (OIAP) invites Florida

of our agriculture graduates from

USDA APHIS-IS and FAS initiative, we

A&M University (FAMU) students to

historically Black colleges and

hope to establish collaborative, multi-

participate in its 1890 USDA Center of

universities (HBCU) into Foreign

campus programing that will enhance

Excellence in International Engagement

Service career tracks with the USDA,”

curricular and teaching to produce

and Development, Global Agriculture

says Harriett Paul, director of FAMU’s

competitive graduates for careers in

Program (GAP). The Program provides

OIAP and Center for International

international agricultural trade, affairs

highly motivated juniors, seniors and

Agricultural Trade Development

and development,” says Paul.

graduate students in good academic

Research and Training.

The USDA has provided funding

standing with opportunities to

“USDA’s partnership with the 1890

through the 1890 Universities

prepare for Foreign Service careers

System is designed to ensure that

Foundation, Inc. to create a small

with the United States Department of

our curricula and teaching methods

grants program to advance the goal

Agriculture (USDA) through the Animal

increase our graduates’ eligibility

of increasing the diversity of USDA

Plant Health Inspection Service –

for entry-level positions with the

employees in the Foreign Service. The

International Services (APHIS-IS) and

USDA Foreign Service and cultivate

consortium of FAMU and Virginia State

the Foreign Agriculture Services (FAS).

participation in international

University (VSU) is one of the three

“We are excited to partner with the

agricultural affairs, trade and

groups that received an award.

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


5Rachel Fernandez, junior Animal Science major, participating in the inaugural 1890 Universities Foundation Study Tour for Agricultural Diplomats, in Washington, D.C.

Through a second opportunity, seven CAFS students participated in a twoweek international service learning experience in the Dominican Republic, working with APHIS-IS, FAS, and local public and private sector organizations on improving the quality and safety of horticultural products exported to Europe and the U.S. This activity is the experiential component of the team-taught course, AGG 4952 Service Learning in International Agriculture, which will be offered summer 2018 as 5 FAMU students meet with Harriett Paul, Director of FAMU’s OIAP and Center for International Agricultural Trade Development Research and Training. and Joseph Jones, Office of International Agriculture Programs Coordinator, for a briefing before travelling to Washington D.C. as part of the Center of Excellence Program with APHIS-IS and FAS.

The 1890-USDA Center of Excellence Program at FAMU is designed to empower students to achieve the following: 1. Receive a minor in global agriculture as part of their undergraduate program (15 semester hours) focused on preparing students to enter Foreign Service careers in APHIS-IS and FAS 2. Participate in International Agriculture Service Learning Programs as part of the minor

part of the GAP student and faculty engagement. A third opportunity will be offered during summer 2018 to engage students to participate in the online courses and webinar workshops through Virginia State University (VSU) focused on the MexFly and Screw worm sterile fly release techniques. As part of this activity, students will visit the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) to experience the

3. Eligible to participate in semester study abroad programs in Europe

Pest Quarantine and Trade and Export

4. Receive exposure to the world of diplomacy in agriculture 5. Become eligible for Internships with FAS, APHIS, and the Department of State 6. Prepare for the Foreign Service Exam or related Foreign Service Assessments 7. Participate in study experiences with USDA's FAS or APHIS that lead to

Centers in Sacramento, California. In Mexico, students will be exposed to the biological factors (food and livestock pests) that can influence the quality

promising careers

and safety of crops and livestock

The Center will engage four College of Agriculture and Food Sciences (CAFS) students in the inaugural 1890 Universities Foundation Washington, D.C., Study Tour for Agricultural Diplomats. The following selected students traveled to Washington, D.C., with the program director from April 8 - 11, 2018 to learn first-

products relevant to the commodities of interest to FAS, thereby evaluating their effect on the Global Food Security and Biosecurity.

hand about the work of the APHIS-IS, FAS, and the State Department: •

Rachel Fernandez, a junior animal science majoro

Johnesha Jackson, a junior animal science major

Greg McNealy, a senior graduate studies agribusiness major

Halima Wynn a junior agronomy major

For more information on the 1890-USDA Center of Excellence Program and the Global Agriculture Minor at FAMU, contact Harriett A. Paul at (850) 599-8867 or harriett.paul@famu.edu.

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

37


I IT WAS ON ONE OF THE HIGHEST OF SEVEN HILLS, AT FAMU, THAT I DECIDED THAT I WANTED TO PURSUE A CAREER IN AGRI-BUSINESS, BUT HOW? I ASKED MYSELF. 38

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


I

The Journey to my Passion

I admittedly stumbled into my passion after years of following the dreams of my youth. A sermon I heard at the age

of six inspired me to pursue a career in law. I remained focused on that career aspiration from the age of six and

progressed through school with a singular focus, that of becoming a lawyer. My path was not straight. I was raised in

Paducah, Kentucky, where opportunities for exposure to post-secondary education was limited. I knew I wanted to go to

college, but had no idea where I wanted to attend. The summer before my freshman year in high school, I was accepted

to the Research Extension and Apprenticeship Program (REAP) at Kentucky State University. The program focused

mainly on agriculture, which I knew very little about except for 4-H, was six-weeks long, away from home and it paid $10 per hour. In my eyes, it could not get any better than that, I was sold and I was in! During that summer, I worked as a procurement intern at the APHIS office in Lexington, Kentucky. Through my first experience with agriculture in a

business context, I understood that agriculture was bigger than farming. For the next two summers, I attended agriculturerelated summer programs at Kentucky State University and Florida A&M University (FAMU). It was on one of the highest of seven hills, at FAMU, that I decided that I wanted to pursue a career in agri-business, but

how? I asked myself. I was an out-of-state student from a working class family. My parents could not afford to send me to college in state, and out-of-state tuition was out of the question. I was determined to attend FAMU and during my summer RATLR program there, I wasted no time making an impression on the faculty and administrators in the College of Engineering Sciences Technology and Agriculture (CESTA), now known as the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences. I worked hard during the RATLR program to demonstrate my academic prowess and good character. I would schedule and meet with some of the faculty in the college, with one goal in mind – and that was finding the financial support I needed to make my dream of

attending FAMU a reality. It was not until the end of the RATLR program, on a trip to Washington D.C., that I heard of the 1890 Land-Grant Scholarship. It was a full scholarship for students with strong academic and civic performance and a desire to pursue a major in agricultural sciences. Although, I knew I wanted to ultimately be an attorney, my exposure to agri-business had taught me that an agricultural business major would serve me well as a stepping stone toward a career in law. I applied and was selected

Alumni Spotlight

to become an 1890 Land-Grant Scholar. I had earned a full scholarship,

guaranteed internships with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) – Office of Rural Housing, and guaranteed employment upon graduation.

When I stepped on to the campus of Florida A&M University in the fall of 2000, I knew I was where God had destined for me to be. FAMU provided a rigorous academic environment, exposure to Black excellence, an inherent sense of accountability and community. The support I experienced while matriculating at FAMU was unparalleled. However, my

4

ASHLEY M. RIDGEWAY-WASHINGTON

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

39


undergraduate matriculation was not without adversity. I found myself unwed and pregnant during my sophomore year. My CESTA family rallied around me and refused to allow me to quit the program that could probably destroy my future. My professors did not accept motherhood as an excuse for failing to achieve excellence. They helped me to find an on-campus job and the necessary assistance that I needed watching my daughter so that I could attend classes and study for my exams. In the fall of 2003, I graduated Cum Laude with a bachelor’s degree in agri-business from the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University. I could not have realized my goals without the help of the faculty, administrators and staff including but not limited to: Betty Hudson, Rozier Crew, Phyllis Moore, Verian Thomas, Ph.D., Dreamel Worthen, Ph.D., Daniel Wims, Ph.D., Zacch Olorunnipa, Ph.D. and Michael Thomas, Ph.D. After graduation, I went on to pursue a career in agri-business working for the USDA Rural Housing Administration and Southwest Georgia Farm Credit before setting my sights on my next goal of attending law school. In 2006, although accepted to other institutions, I enrolled in Florida A&M University College of Law in Orlando, Florida. I chose FAMU College of Law, because I strongly believed it was where I would flourish the most, and I was right. Although I was excelling in my classes, during my second semester of my 1L year, I realized that I was no longer as passionate about the practice of law as before. However, not unwilling to be dissuaded, I continued down the legal path and completed law school in the top 20 percent of my class and passed the Florida bar exam in 2009. I then went on to practice along with iconic plaintiff’s attorney Willie Gary as an associate at the Gary Firm in Orlando. Over the next five years, I sharpened my skills as a litigator, but continued to feel uninspired by the work I was doing. Then, it happened. I turned 30 and realized I was miserable. Although, I loved the field of law, I loathed the practice of it. After some time of reflection, I realized I was happiest during the two years I spent working in human resource compliance for a university. Then came the Aha! moment. If I could utilize my legal skill set and marry it with my passion for people, I could be impactful. In 2013, I decided to go back to school and earn my master’s in human resource (HR) management and tool my blooming practice toward HR compliance and consultation for small businesses who lacked HR support. In 2014, just as I was finishing HR school, a former colleague approached me about a great opportunity with CHRISTUS health in Irving, Texas, who was looking for an HR professional with my skillsets. Living in Florida at the time, I wondered if I wanted to move out west. It didn’t take much to convince me, and after one conversation, with CHRISTUS leaders, I was convinced that CHRISTUS was the place for me. Over my tenure at CHRISTUS my responsibilities have grown, but my passion still remains at the core of what I am charged to do, which is empowering associates to be their best selves so that they can further the mission of helping to heal the sick.

40

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY

ASHLEY RIDGWAY-WASHINGTON, ESQ., MHR, PHR, SHRM-CP, a professional with experience leading successful strategic human resources initiatives, is the system executive director, Human Resources Strategy at CHRISTUS health. She is, also an adjunct faculty at the University of Texas – Arlington, in the College of Management at University of Texas – Arlington. She sits on the board of directors of the YMCA of Coppell, Texas, and serves as a member of the American Heart Association North Texas Health Alliance, and enjoys volunteering as a member of the North Suburban Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated. She also holds membership in the Florida Bar (duly authorized to practice), the Society for Human Resource Management, Dallas Society for Human Resource Management, Dallas Fort-Worth Healthcare Human Resources Association, American Society for Healthcare Human Resources Administration and the American College of Healthcare Executives. Ridgeway-Washington earned a Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Business and Juris Doctor from Florida A&M University in 2003 and 2009, respectively and a Master of Human Resources Strategy from Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida, 2014. She has two children, Aniyah and Robert.


CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

41


Student Corner >>>>>>>>>>>>>> (Awards and Appointments)

TASHANI BROWN AND CHINEMENMA OKOROJI Entomology majors, obtained awards of excellence for their poster presentations in the iPiPE (Integrated Pest Information Platform for Extension and Education) annual meeting held in North Carolina State University. The title of their presentations are “Identification and Diagnosis of Serious Pest Insects and Diseases of Tomatoes in Florida: Commoditybased Pest Information for Stakeholders and Clientele,” and “Commodity-based Pest Information on the Pepper Weevil, Anthonomus eugenii (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a Serious Pest of Peppers in Florida,” respectively. DANIEL STANALAND Entomology graduate student, was the 2nd place award winner in the graduate section poster competition at the Southeastern Branch Meeting of the Entomological Society of America, which was held in Orlando, Florida. GREGORY MCNEALY Agri-business graduate student, was awarded the National Black Farmers Association Scholarship ($5,000) and the 2018 Florida Fertilizer and Agrichemical Association Scholarship ($2,000). KEIYANA JOHNSON Veterinary technology senior, was the recipient of the 2018 Florida Veterinary Technician Association (FVTA) student award. TY’SHEONA COOK Animal science senior, has been accepted to Tuskegee University College of Veterinary Medicine. CIERRA MILLER Animal science sophomore, has been accepted in the VetLead Feeder Program at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine. ORNELLA HARE Biological systems engineering graduating senior, won the 2018 Col. Bernard D. Hendricks Top Rattler Award in the outstanding senior category. This award recognizes students who have demonstrated outstanding involvement and initiative, and promise of leadership on campus.

42

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


Robert W. Taylor, Ph.D. >>>>>>>>>>>>>> Robert W. Taylor, Ph.D., dean of the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences, was presented with the 1890 Leadership Award at the

faculty & Staff Corner

Professional Agricultural Workers Conference, which was held at Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, Alabama.

Vonda Richardson >>>>>>>>>>>>>> Vonda Richardson, director of the Cooperative Extension and Outreach Program, was awarded the 2018 Thomas Monroe Campbell Award by Tuskegee University. Monroe a protégé of fame scientist George Washington Carver, was a pioneer in the fields of agriculture education and extension work.

Aavudai Anandhi, Ph.D. >>>>>>>>>>> Aavudai Anandhi, Ph.D., assistant professor, in the

• Was appointed one of two guest

Biological Systems Engineering (BSE) Program

editors for the Water – Open Access

and Center for Water Resources, Mikela Pryor

Journal Special Issue “Water

and Jeniva St Phar, BSE students, were invited

Management for Sustainable Food

by the USDA-NIFA to celebrate and participate

Production.” Water is an open

in Black History month. Via video conference

access journal on water science

Anandhi and her students presented on their USDA

and technology, including the

project impact during the NIFA Lunch and Learn

ecology and management of water

Brown-bag on 1890 institutions. The project titled

resources, which is published online

“B-Curtains – Building Capacity in the Natural

monthly.

Resources Engineering Research and Teaching

• Won the 2017-2018 FAMU Emerging

Using Innovative Strategies,” objectives are to

Researcher Award. Nominees for

(a) increase retention and graduation rates of

this award are outstanding young

undergraduates and (b) develop new faculty and

faculty members who has served

student research capacity in adaptation of water

the university for less than six years;

resources. Ultimately the goal is to increase

engaged in all areas of research and

capacity of Natural Resources Conservation Engineering students in the BSE Program.

demonstrates research excellence in their field of expertise.

Ray Mobley, DVM >>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Betty Hudson >>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Ray Mobley, DVM, professor emeritus, was recognized

Betty Hudson, administrative assistant, in the Biological

as Man of the Year by 100 Black Men of America, Inc.

Systems Engineering Program was named University

Tallahassee Area Chapter.

Employee of the year.

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

43


faculty & Staff Corner cont'd

Michee Lachaud, Ph.D. >>>>>>>>>>>>>> Michee Lachaud, Ph.D., assistant professor, in Agri-Business, was named as one of the board members of “Building Leaders Using Music Education – Haiti” (BLUME). BLUME is an NGO with a mission to work with Haitian and international partners to develop leadership skills, awaken individual potential and create opportunities for civic collaboration and economic development through the pursuit of musical excellence. Lachaud, also served as a panel reviewer for the USDA 2017-2018 Specialty Crop Multi-State Program competitive grants.

Publications >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Grant Awards >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

LACHAUD, M.A., B.E. BRAVO-URETA AND C.E. LUDENA

VERIAN THOMAS

Agricultural productivity in Latin America and the Caribbean

Professor, awarded USDA-NIFA Capacity Building grant

in the presence of unobserved heterogeneity and climatic

in the amount of $149,821 to strengthen 9 - 12th grade

effects. Climatic Change 143: 445. 2017.

partnerships with area high schools through a bridge program in food and agricultural sciences. The duration of

JARA-ROJAS, R., B. E. BRAVO-URETA, D. SOLÍS

the grant is April 2018 - March 2020.

AND D. MARTÍNEZ Technical efficiency and marketing channels among small-

CONCHITA NEWMAN

scale farmers: Evidence for raspberry production in Chile.

Extension agent, was awarded USDA-NIFA Capacity Building

International Food and Agribusiness Management Review.

grant in the amount of $249,273. The project will focus

FORTHCOMING

on Agri-STEM in middle schools, which is a new multidisciplinary approach to promoting food and agricultural

AGAR, J., M. SHIVLANI AND D. SOLÍS.

sciences. The duration of the grant is October 2017 - July

The Commercial Trap Fishery in the Commonwealth of

2018 and February 2018 - February 2020.

Puerto Rico: An Economic, Social and Technological Profile. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 37: 778-

DANIEL SOLIS, PH.D.,

788. 2017.

Assistant professor, was awarded a NOAA fisheries grant in the amount of $19,000 to study resource allocation under

WILLIAMS, S.K., N. DJERI, AND K.C. SARJEANT

Alternative Access Arrangements. The duration of the grant

Evaluation of goat meat product treated with apple cider

is October 2017 - July 2018.

vinegar alone and in combination with natural spices, cooked, vacuum packaged and stored at 4 ± 1oC for 42 days. Direct Research Journal of Agriculture and Food Science; Vol. 6(2) pp. 40 – 48. 2018. directresearchpublisher.org/wp-content/ uploads/2018/01/Williams-et-al.pdf

44

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


Alumni Corner >>>>>>>>>>>>>> J’QUE JONES, PE Appointed as the Acting State Conservation Engineer of the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in North Carolina. In the 89-year history of the NRCS only six African Americans have become state conservation engineers, of the six, three are from FAMU and one each from the University of New Mexico, North Carolina A&T and University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Congratulations Spring 2018 Graduates! >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS Aaliyah Barrington-Johnson

B.S., Agri-Business

Tashani Brown** B.S., Entomology Boones Champa**

B.S., Agri-Business

Tysheona Cook*

B.S., Animal Science

Michelle Driver

B.S., Animal Science

Shakara Herron

B.S., Food Science

Addison Johnson B.S., Agri-Business Raven Mims

B.S., Animal Science

Kassidy Sharpe**

B.S., Food Science

Taylor Strauss

B.S., Animal Science

Rian Tellis

B.S., Animal Science

*** Summa Cum Laude | ** Magna Cum Laude | * Cum Laude

KAMILLIAH MILLER AND HARLEM MOTLEY Graduated with their Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from Tuskegee University College of Veterinary Medicine. Miranda Shaw and Danielle Lewin, graduated with their Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine. NATASHA BURTON Agricultural statistician, at the U.S. Department of Agriculture – National Agriculture Statistic Service in the Environmental (USDA-NASS) and Demographics Section was awarded the USDANASS administrator’s award. This award is given to individuals who have made valuable contributions and commitment in support of the USDA-NASS objectives. Burton earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree from CAFS agribusiness program in 1998 and

GRADUATE STUDENTS Jazmine R. Alexander Degree: M.S., Agricultural Sciences: Major: Plant Science Thesis: Assessment of the impact of the egg parasitoid, Paratelenoumus saccharalis (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) on populations of the kudzu bug, Megacopta cribraria (Hemiptera: Plataspidae) Thesis Chair: Lambert Kanga, Ph.D. Worrel A. Diedrick Degree: M.S., Agricultural Sciences: Major: Entomology Thesis: Assessment of the Impact of the Egg Parasitoid Paratelenomus saccharalis (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) on Populations of the Kudzu Bug Megacopta cribraria (Hemiptera: Plataspidae) in Florida Thesis Chair: Lambert Kanga, Ph.D. Gabriella J. Louis Degree: M.S., Agricultural Sciences: Major: Entomology Thesis: Developing of pest detection and management strategy for the Redbay Ambrosia beetle and the laurel wilt disease Thesis Chair: Lambert Kanga, Ph.D. Jwalit Nayak Degree: M.S., Agricultural Sciences: Major: Plant Science Thesis: Impact of drought and Aflatoxin production on the phytochemical content of different peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) genotypes Thesis Chair: Mehboob Sheikh, Ph.D.

2001 respectively.

Graduate Students cont'd pg 46 4 CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

45


graduate students cont'd Gregory McNealy Degree: M.S., Agricultural Sciences; Major: Agri-Business Thesis: Assessing the Effect of Canopy Roads on Tallahassee Property Values Using the Hedonic Pricing Model Thesis Chair: Daniel Solis, Ph.D. and Michael Thomas, Ph.D. Shakirat J. Jinadu Degree: M.S., Agricultural Sciences: Major:

Congratulations Honor Roll Students! >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Entomology

PRESIDENT’S LIST (STUDENTS WHO EARNED SEMESTER GPA OF 4.0

Thesis: Non-Thesis Option

AND HAVE MAINTAINED A CUMULATIVE GPA OF 3.5 OR ABOVE): Jorge DelAngel

Biological Systems Engineering

Colby Gay

Animal Science

Olivia Gilstrap

Food Science

Sierra Johnson

Food Science

Ariel Kent

Animal Science

Julianne Lindsay

Entomology

Jacob Long

Agri-Business

Shayla Mason

Food Science

Xavier Miranda-Colon Agri-Business Andrew Rhone IV Agri-Business

DEAN’S LIST (STUDENTS WHO EARNED A SEMESTER GPA OF 3.5 OR ABOVE AND MAINTAINED A CUMULATIVE GPA OF 3.0 OR ABOVE):

Retirement >>>>>>>>>>>>> Lee Anderson, the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences would like to wish you a very happy retirement. You will always be remembered for your exemplar service and accomplishments. Thanks for your more than 36 years of commitment and dedication, which has greatly benefited our college. Retirement will surely offer you many new opportunities, which we know you will embrace wholeheartedly. We are wishing you the best in your future endeavors and this next phase of your life.

46

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY

Kristen Adkins

Entomology

Akilah Austin

Agricultural Science

Tashani Brown

Entomology

Nubia Campbell

Animal Science

Joshua Darby

Animal Science

Rachel Fernandez

Animal Science

Amonra Garrett-Mills

Biological Systems Engineering

Jeremy Greene

Agri-Business

Theresa Jean Louis Agri-Business Jenisis Moreland

Agri-Business

Rochard Moricette Agri-Business Fure Muhammad

Biological Systems Engineering

Emily Nolen

Veterinary Technology

Yusuf, Olorunfemi Agri-Business Kassidy Sharpe

Food Science

Riann White

Food Science

Halimah Wynn

Agronomy


Florida A&M University CAFS magazine summer 2018 online  

The Official Magazine of the Florida A&M University College of Agriculture and Food Sciences

Florida A&M University CAFS magazine summer 2018 online  

The Official Magazine of the Florida A&M University College of Agriculture and Food Sciences

Advertisement