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THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SCIENCES

FALL 2019

PROVIDING TRAINING, RESEARCH AND ASSISTANCE

CITIZEN SCIENCE WATERSHED LAB

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

HURRICANE DORIAN ASSISTANCE

CAFS INTERNATIONAL FOOT PRINT

STUDENT SUCCESS

TECHNOLOGY

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

PROVIDING HELP IN A TIME OF NEED

GLOBAL

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

OUTREACH

RACHEL FERNANDEZ

STUDENT’S PASSION NEW FUNDING WINS SCHOLARSHIP APPROVED CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

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dean

message from the

Robert W. Taylor, Ph.D.

Greetings, As another semester comes to an end, we reflect on all the achievements and challenges, and express profound appreciation and gratitude. During this time of the year, we look back and reflect on what we have accomplished and look forward to what we must do in the new year and beyond. I am truly grateful for the privilege to represent more than 100 faculty and staff members who serve our college dedicatedly through teaching, research, extension and outreach, recruitment and retention, alumni affairs and student support services. During my seven years as dean of the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences (CAFS), it has been a pleasure to oversee the collaboration and team effort of our faculty, researchers, staff and community partners, which has led to grant funding, impactful research, publications, and most of all the training and graduating of quality students into society.

youtube/famu_cafs

CAFS Magazine Fall 2019

instagram/famu_cafs

DEANS OFFICE Dean and Director of Land-grant Progrms, College of Agriculture and Food Sciences: Robert W. Taylor, Ph.D. Editor: Andrine Stanhope, Ph.D. Sr. Admin. Assistant: Phyllis Moore Assoc. Dir. Research: Wayne Walker Asst. Dir. Research: Jenaya Anderson-Hayes Coord. Admin. Services: Courtnay Pilcher CREATIVE Layout & Design: azure77.com COPY EDITING Sabrina Thompson STAFF WRITERS Andrine Stanhope Cynthia Portalatin

CAFS had a lot of activities to report this year, especially in the area of student success. This year-in-review special edition magazine, highlights some of our students in leadership positions and other outstanding students who represents what the Florida A&M University (FAMU), College of Agriculture and Food Sciences is all about—a college where “Future Leaders Are Grown.” Our students are leaders in the FAMU Student Government Association and national professional organizations. They have been recognized for outstanding leadership by professional clubs and organizations at both the local and national levels; award winners at professional meetings and conferences, and awardees of internships.

Vonda Richardson

None of this, however, would be possible were it not for a team of dedicated faculty and staff who worked profusely, during and outside of normal working hours on various academic and professional development programs with our students.

PHOTOGRAPHY CONTRIBUTORS www.azure77.com Joshua Lynsen Harriett Paul

To our students who walked across the stage a few weeks ago, on behalf of the student body, faculty and staff, I say congratulations! We wish you much success as you begin a new phase of your life. To the entire FAMU family, alumni and friends, I wish you and your family have an enjoyable yuletide season, and wish for you more prosperity in 2020.

Robert W. Taylor, Ph.D. Dean

Latasha Tanner CONTRIBUTING AUTHORS Rod Carter Veronique George

Byron Dobson Heather Johnson

Karena Mahung

Aaliyah Wilkerson

OFFICE Assoc. Dean, Research: Stephen Leong, Ph.D. Assoc. Dean, Academic Programs: Neil James, Ph.D. Director, Center for Biological Control: Lambert Kanga, Ph.D. Director, Center for Viticulture and Small Fruit Research: Violeta Tsolova, Ph.D. Director, Center for Water Resources: Odemari Mbuya, Ph.D. Director, Cooperative Extension and Outreach: Vonda Richardson


#10

Col. Hoffman

featured must read in this issue

NAVAL ROTC NEW COMMANDING OFFICER PG.

more...

Aggie

LAWRENCE CARTER

LAST-LIVING BUFFALO SOLIDIER It's a day etched into the memory of 97-yearold STEVE LEWIS. He was in high school at the time. "I was in 12th grade. It was on a Sunday. At that time, we didn't have TV. We had radio." Lewis remembers it well. That day would change his life, like so many others, forever.

Keiondra

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THE IMPACT FROM HIS MILES

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32

MISS 1963 FOR THE FAMU CHAPTER OF COLLEGIATE 100

inside 24 >>> Mikela Pryor My CAFS Experience

One important thing that can be taken for granted, that I like about CAFS, is the one-on-one attention that students receive from faculty. Also, there are many opportunities for students to collaborate with professors, if we so wish. The faculty and staff care about the students' academic progress and success.

featured Students WHERE FUTURE LEADERS ARE GROWN The Colle of Agriculture and Food Sciences (CAFS) has been known to produce leaders in the industry. With less than 300 students enrolled in the college, the department has found itself at the forefront of campus news and their students take over campus leadership. From winning national Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Sciences (MANRRS) research competitions to winning campus elections as student body president, Mr. FAMU and class senators, CAFS and its faculty have invested into developing quality leaders of this generation.

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26 >>> Student’s Passion for Global Food Safety Results in Scholarship 28 >>> CAFS Scholar One of 10 Selected for Conservation Leadership Program 30 >>> A Caring Journey Through CAFS: A College that Believes in its Students 36 >>> Kome's 33 Years of Service! 38 >>> CAFS International Foot Print 40 >>> FAMU CAFS Students Bayer Award 41 >>> Extension News 42 >>> FAMU-CAFS MANRRS Students Brought Home Top Awards 43 >>> Providing Help in a Time of Need 44 >>> Citizen Science Watershed Lab 45 >>> FAMU Represented at United Nations Civil Society Conference 46 >>>Alumni Spotlight 48 >>>CAFS Notes


Aggie Last-Living Buffalo Solidier

A

by Rod Carter

fter the Japanese bombed

care of animals led me to take animal

Steve Lewis grew up in Palmetto,

1941, President Franklin D.

Florida, a small Manatee County town,

of the times we were not given the

with a population in 1940 of just

opportunity to do much research

under 3,500.

and all that we wanted to do,” Lewis

Roosevelt issued an address that reverberated across the nation, declaring it “a date,

After he graduated from high

husbandry at FAMU, but because

remembered.

which will live in infamy.” He went on

school, he moved to Tallahassee in

to say “the United States of America

February 1942 to attend Florida A&M

history, “shortly after its founding,

was suddenly and deliberately

College, what was then called Florida

the school became the beneficiary

attacked by naval and air forces of the

Agricultural and Mechanical College

of educational provisions for African

Empire of Japan.”

for Negroes. He decided to attend

Americans made possible through the

Florida A&M namely for one reason—

passage of the Second Morrill Act of

to study agriculture.

1890. Through this important federal

It’s a day etched into the memory of 97-year-old STEVE LEWIS. He was in high school at the time. “I was in

According to published FAMU

“I wanted to study agriculture as all

legislation, FAMU, formerly known as

12th grade. It was on a Sunday. At

my teachers, and most of my contacts

the “State Normal College for Colored

that time, we didn't have TV. We had

had graduated from Florida A&M,” he

Students,” was designated to receive

radio.” Lewis remembers it well. That

said.

a land grant to support learning as

day would change his life, like so

4

many others, forever.

Pearl Harbor on December 7,

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY

“My love for breeding and taking

related to agriculture and mechanic


I wanted to study agriculture as all my teachers, and most of my contacts had graduated from Florida A&M... - STEVE LEWIS

he had envisioned it. The bombing of Pearl Harbor while in college, changed the course

returned to Florida A&M and in 1947, earned a Bachelor of Science degree in

had to be in the Enlisted Reserve

Agriculture. He later earned a master’s

Corps and they would march like

degree from the University of Northern

soldiers all during the week and

Colorado. He maintained ties with

practice. That went on for two

Manatee County, taught in the Manatee

years,” Lewis said.

School System and helped to desegregate

student was cut short. He enlisted

support of branches of learning as related to agriculture and mechanic arts, including military tactics.” However, unlike the 1862 predominantly white counterpart institutions, FAMU and 16 other 1890 historically Black colleges were not given any resources to carry out the research and development areas of the land-grant tripartite system until 1966. As a result, the school was relegated to teaching without the benefits of research and extension funds from either the federal or state governments. Reading it is one thing. Living it is something different. Lewis lived and learned under those conditions. He never really got to live out his passion the way

After military service, Steve Lewis

of his life. “Every man in college

Eventually, his time as a college

arts, including “to the endowment and

and then ‘you’ go eat.”

as a youngster. He taught agriculture for one year, then spent the rest of his career

in the U.S. Army and was assigned to

as an elementary teacher. Lewis spent

the U.S. 9th Cavalry, one of two all-Black

more than 30 years working in Manatee

cavalry units better known as the “Buffalo

County communities as a teacher,

Soldiers.” He was trained to ride, shoot

volunteer and community leader.

and fight as part of a horse-mounted

One of his greatest memories as a

military unit, training that has long since

young student, decades ago at Florida

been replaced by mechanized units. Mr.

A&M, is joining the Alpha Xi Chapter of

Lewis was retrained in the modern tactics

Kappa Alpha Psi.

common to World War II.

“It was good. It was a good school and

The all African-American cavalries,

it is still one of the best schools,” he said.

known as “Buffalo Soldiers,” started during

Lewis also added, his service and that of

the Civil War and lasted until 1948 when

others who served our country, needs to

President Harry S. Truman integrated the

be remembered. “They don't give it the

military. By the early 1950s, they were

publicity it needs.”

gone. “We didn't know a thing about

He has great advice for people who

Buffalo Soldiers when we were in the army.

want to go into agriculture now. Do it.

We never heard of it,” he said.

“Agriculture now is terrific—you now get

Lewis may be the last living Buffalo

to do scientific research and so much

Soldier around. He remembers his duties

more. I would recommend that anyone

well. “Each man was assigned a horse and

wanting to study agriculture or any of

you had to ride the horse, bring him in,

its branches, to do so.... agriculture is

wash him down, clean him up, feed him

scientific now.”

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

5


COLONEL RANDALL S. HOFFMAN enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1984 and attended recruit training at MCRD, San Diego, California graduating Company Honorman, “H” Co, 2d Recruit Training Battalion. He was meritoriously promoted to the rank of Private First Class. He served from 1985 to 1989 with 2d Force Reconnaissance Company, Camp Lejeune, N.C., participating in combat operations “Earnest Will” and “Praying Mantis.” He departed the active duty Marine Corps as a Sergeant on 5 August 1989 to pursue a commission as a Marine Corps Officer.

6

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


FAMU Naval ROTC New Commanding Officer

COL. RANDALL HOFFMAN In May of 1994, he graduated from

National Army (ANA) and the Iraqi

Kansas and subsequently served as

Indiana University with a Bachelor of

Special Forces (ISF). In both theaters, he

a faculty member at the U.S. Army’s

Arts degree in History. While attending

participated in Operations “Enduring

School of Advanced Military Studies. He

college, he served as a Platoon Sergeant

Freedom” and “Iraqi Freedom.” In July

recently served as the III MEF, G35 Future

with Co K, 3d Battalion, 24th Marines,

of 2005, Col. Hoffman reported to Terre

Operations Officer in Okinawa Japan. Col.

USMCR, in Danville, Illinois. Also, during

Haute, Indiana as the Inspector-Instructor

Hoffman recently transferred from his

that year he was commissioned a Second

of Co K, 3d Battalion, 24th Marines.

last command assignment, serving as the

Lieutenant from the Platoon Leaders

During his tour with 24th Marines, he

Weapons and Field Training Commanding

Course. Upon completion of the Infantry

supported 1/24’s deployment to OIF with

Officer at MCRD, Parris Island, South

Officer Course in Quantico, Virginia,

the augmentation of 90 Marines from Co K

Carolina.

Hoffman was transferred to 2d Light

while also supervising the training of the

Armored Reconnaissance Battalion,

24th Marines Military Transition Teams.

2d Marine Division and was assigned

Hoffman’s awards include the Bronze Star with combat V and gold star, the

Hoffman is a distinguished graduate

Defense Meritorious Service Medal,

Platoon Commander, Company A,

of the Marine Corps Command and Staff

the Meritorious Service Medal with

Third Platoon, participating overseas in

College, graduating with a Masters in

three stars, the Navy and Marine Corps

“Operation Assured Response,” “Operation

Military Studies and also a graduate of the

Commendation Medal, the Navy Marine

Guardian Retrieval” and “Operation

School of Advanced Warfighting receiving

Corps Achievement Medal, and the

Noble Obelisk.” After returning to Camp

a Masters of Operational Studies. From

Combat Action Ribbon with gold star.

Lejeune, Hoffman served as the Executive

2010 – 2012, he served as the Deputy

Colonel Hoffman is a Marine Combat

Officer, of Company D, 2d Light Armored

Director, School of Advanced Warfighting,

Diver, Parachute Rigger, Jumpmaster, and

Reconnaissance Battalion. In April 1998,

Marine Corps University. Hoffman served

HALO Jumpmaster.

upon completion of his tour at Camp

as the Commanding Officer of Instructor

Lejeune, he reported for duty as the

Battalion - The Basic School, from June

on July 17, 2019 as the Commanding

Officer in Charge (OIC) of the Amphibious

2012 to November of 2013; after which

Officer and Professor of Naval Science at

Raids and Ground Reconnaissance

he was assigned to HQ International

Florida A&M University.

Section, Marine Corps Systems Command,

Security Assistance Force (ISAF), in Kabul,

Quantico, Virginia.

Afghanistan where he served on the

Marie Smith. They have two daughters;

COM ISAF’s Commander’s Action Group

Caroline, twenty-one and Emma, fifteen

Amphibious Warfare School. Upon

as an Operational Planner and Senior

and a son Shawn who is twenty-two.

Graduation, Hoffman was deployed to

Military Advisor. Hoffman attended Top

South West Asia where he served as the

Level School at the U.S. Army’s Advanced

Senior Battalion advisor to the Afghan

Strategic Leaders Program, Ft Leavenworth

In July of 2001, he reported to

Col. Hoffman relieved Col. Bradley Close

Hoffman is married to the former Dawn

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

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am KEIONDRA MARSHAL a senior, animal science/

unlimited opportunities, because of the various networking and

pre-vet scholar from West Palm Beach, Florida. My

professional development activities at the local, regional and

journey to the “Hill” is a bit different from most of

national levels. At our local chapter, our co-advisors Thomas and

my classmates. In spite of the fact that I was raised

Timmons ensure that there are workshops that focus on career

by a family full of Rattlers, I thought that Florida

development, such as Résumé Building, Behavioral Interviewing

A&M University (FAMU) was not the place for me.

Tips, and soft skills such as, Teamwork, Problem-solving, and

Although I rejected the idea of attending FAMU,

Work Ethics. These are on-going activities. MANRRS also opened

my family never pressured me to follow in their

doors to regional and national conferences that are opportunities

footsteps. However, they always instilled in me the

for students, advisors, business professionals, graduate schools,

importance of seizing every opportunity for my

and companies to come together in one central location. This

academic and personal growth. When I realized that my growth

allowed them to exchange professional development advice,

was not being maximized, I took a leap of faith and transferred

attend workshops, and most importantly, provided them

from Florida Gulf Coast University to FAMU in my third year of

with opportunities to compete in oral and poster research

college. This spur-of-the-moment decision changed my life

competitions, speech and other professional competitions.

drastically; not only academically, but professionally and socially as well. During my first semester at FAMU, I was enrolled as a biology

Derrick Coble, Ph.D., assistant professor has also played a vital role in my growth, as a student. I had the privilege to accompany Dr. Coble to North Carolina A&T University, his alma

student with a concentration in professional science. One day

mater, where I participated in an animal confinement workshop,

while sitting in my chemistry class, I came across a young lady,

and collaborated with students from other schools to present a

who spoke about being a pre-vet student in the College of

PowerPoint presentation on the information we learned while

Agriculture and Food Sciences (CAFS). She introduced me to one

there. Before coming to FAMU, I had never had this type of

of her academic advisors, and from there I knew that CAFS was

opportunity to attend conferences and workshops.

where I belonged. One important thing that can be taken for granted, that I like

Being involved in organizations at the college level has encouraged me and expanded my love for volunteering and

about CAFS, is the one-on-one attention that students receive

getting involved in campus-wide and community activities. At

from faculty. Also, there are many opportunities for students to

the college level, I serve as the secretary of MANRRS, a CAFS AG

collaborate with professors, if we so wish. The faculty and staff

Ambassador, and as an active member of the Animal Science

care about the students’ academic progress and success.

Club. At the university level, I am Miss 1963 for the FAMU Chapter

Verian Thomas, Ph.D., professor and associate dean for Student

of Collegiate 100, an active member of Phi Sigma Theta National

Support and Tommeron Timmons, coordinator of Research

Honor Society, and the Golden Key International Honor Society.

Programs in CAFS are examples of a faculty and staff, respectively,

Also, I have served as a member of the National Council of Negro

who mentored and played a pivotal role in my growth as a

Women, the Entertainment Committee Chair for the Class of 2019

student. They both encouraged me to join the FAMU Chapter of

FAMU Campus Activities Board, and as a YMCA Reading Tutor and

Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences

Mentor at Ruediger Elementary School for 2018-2019.

(MANRRS). As stated on their website, MANRRS is a professional

After college, my short-term goal is to explore the

society with a mission to “promote academic and professional

opportunities available to me within my major, and acquire more

advancement by empowering minorities in agriculture, natural

hands-on animal experience. My long-term goal is to attend

resources, and related sciences.” It offers students the opportunity

veterinarian school with a concentration in aquatic animal health.

to enhance their leadership, organizational and public speaking

I am forever grateful for the opportunities I have received within

skills, and to experience professional critique of scholarly work in

the College of Agriculture and Food sciences, and I eagerly look

a “user friendly” environment.

forward to the opportunities yet to come. CAFS is indeed a place

Being involved with MANRRS has opened the door of

where future leaders are grown!

Keiondra is an honor student, and was the recipient of a CAFS Undergraduate Scholarship. This scholarship was established to recognize outstanding full-time students enrolled in a CAFS major. She is on track to graduate in spring 2020.

8

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


r Ke nd a Meet

MISS 1963 FOR THE FAMU CHAPTER OF COLLEGIATE 100

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

9


SMALL COLLEGE BUT COMMANDING IMPACT:

CAFS

10

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY

WHERE FUTURE LEADERS ARE GROWN by Aaliyah W. Wilkerson


T

he College of Agriculture and Food Sciences (CAFS) has been known to produce leaders in the industry. With less than 300 students enrolled in the college, the department has found itself at the forefront of campus news and their students take over campus leadership. From winning national Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Sciences (MANRRS) research competitions to winning campus elections as student body president, Mr. FAMU and class senators, CAFS and its faculty have invested into developing quality leaders of this generation. According to Robert Taylor, Ph.D., dean of CAFS, it is a fantastic time to be a part of

the CAFS family. “I have worked in other places, to be honest [with you], and I have never seen the kind of leadership from students that I’ve seen in our college here at FAMU. It shows that we are enhancing their talents and giving them the type of confidence that they need to go out and become a leader within the University,” exclaimed Dean Taylor. "CAFS is continuing to invest in its students so they can become, not just campus leaders but leaders worldwide."

But who are these All-Star Leaders? And

how exactly did they come into leadership? For many of them, their journey began in MANRRS. MANRRS is a national society for Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences. According to Verian Thomas, Ph.D., former national president of MANRRS and current associate dean of Recruitment, Student Support and Alumni Affairs, most campus leaders get their start

What happens is the professionals come back, and they create a real safe zone to prepare these students for job interviews and graduate school. They learn things like leadership skills - VERIAN THOMAS

in the FAMU Chapter of MANRRS.

“You find hundreds of minority students from historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs), but the majority of the students are diverse,” Dr. Thomas explained. The regional clusters hosted by the national organization are where students get an introduction to leadership development. “What happens is the professionals come back, and they create a real safe zone to prepare these students for job interviews and graduate school. They learn things like leadership skills,” Dr. Thomas continued, referring to the MANRRS student experience. A wise man once said, “leadership is not defined by a title, but in one’s ability to have influence and be impactful.” This saying can be echoed throughout the lives of CAFS’ student leaders Rochard Moricette, Crenel “CJ” Francis, Theresa Jean Louis, Kayla Braggs, DeAundr'e Newsome and Joshua Clements. Encompassing a spectrum of experience, these scholars found themselves on a journey of excellence and substantial influence. But managing their leadership positions and classes is no easy feat. CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

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R

ecognized by the Tallahassee Urban League as a “Rising Star,” ROCHARD

Moricette explained. “CAFS provided a lot

position. In this capacity Moricette’s job

of support for me personally, the friends

will be to help create awareness of the

that I’ve been able to make within this

various opportunities available to FAMU’s

MORICETTE forged his way to student

college and the mentors and people that

students, in the Tallahassee business

leadership before arriving at FAMU. "I

believed in me and helped me to develop

community

followed campaigns while I was in high

my leadership skills through expectations,"

school, even though I didn't know what it

said Moricette.

was," Moricette explained. The now, student body president had

Dr. Thomas, a former professor of

His ability to lead and conquer, stems from the drive instilled in him by his family. Born in Port-de-Paix, Haiti, Moricette and

Moricette, recalls their initial encounter.

his family immigrated to the United States

one goal in mind upon his arrival to the

“One of the assignments that I gave to

for a better future. With the constant

“Hill.” “I wanted to get involved so that

them was ‘Tell Me About Yourself.’ I read

support from his loved ones, Moricette has

I could make a big impact on campus,

Rochard’s paper and after reading it,

found himself raising the bar even for his

and students could look to me to solve

I looked at him and I told him that he

younger siblings.

their issues and help fight for some of

needed to run for Senate. He then looked

the things that they are going through.

at me, and said ‘yeah you’re right,’ I had

far as pushing me to excel in ways that I

We all have a voice, but it's all about

heard the day before that there was an

didn't think I could. They have such high

directing and projecting that voice to the

opening on the senate and he ran. And he

standards for my siblings and me. We're

appropriate party at the right time and in

won.”

in college right now, and it's really just

the right manner," Moricette said. Moricette’s quest to make a change

According to Moricette, the support CAFS has offered him throughout his

“[My family] has been supportive as

been a blessing to have them in my life, honestly."

landed him a position as Freshman

campus leadership opportunities is how

Senator in 2016, Activities Service

he continues to develop as a student.

focuses on the politics of the University,

Fee Liaison in 2017 and Student Body

“[CAFS] provided me with the means

he has no plans on going into the political

President fall of 2019. While managing

to get that accomplished, not as SGA

arena. Instead, his passion for agribusiness

Student Government Association (SGA)

president, but as a student in college. You

continues to call him. “I feel like this is a

budgets, Moricette has had to find a way

have the resources to figure out what your

realm that I could dabble in and really

to manage his academics, which often

needs are and how to generate solutions

develop some leadership skills, which

came as a challenge. But with the support

for those needs,” enlightened Moricette.

would prepare me for corporate America

of the CAFS advisors and professors,

Moricette is also the student

Moricette always finds his way on top.

representative for the Tallahassee

“Our professors always remind us of

Chamber of Commerce. He is the

that and hold us to a different standard,”

Though Moricette’s campus career

while serving a greater cause, which is the student body,” Moricette concluded.

second student to be appointed to the

ROCHARD

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MORICET F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


TTE

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

13


T

HERESA JEAN LOUIS has come

I was supposed to major in political

to work with different personalities —

to make a name for herself,

science, but when I realized the many

especially being a Senator. People may

not just in CAFS, but nationally in the

opportunities that were being offered

have different opinions on a bill, however,

agriculture industry. As the National

in agribusiness, it really sparked my

we must learn how to compromise. Being

MANRRS Parliamentarian and Junior

interest,” explained Jean Louis. “Majoring

in SGA has taught me to be more resilient

Student Senator, Jean Louis has come

in agribusiness was one of the best

and professional. Because at the end of

to redevelop the definition of a driven

decisions I could have made.

the day the job isn't about me, it's about

leader. Jean Louis’ student involvement

Fleeing from Haiti after the devastating

the students.”

doesn't stop there. She also holds a

earthquake in 2010, Jean Louis had to

position on the public relations team of

leave school in Port-au-Prince and live on

definition of FAMUly that has kept her

the FAMU Chapter of MANRRS, serves

her family’s farm, where she learned the

driven throughout her journey. “I am

as an AG ambassador and the director

core of agriculture. “My aunt use to wake

trying to find a word that truly explains

of Education for AG Ambassadors, and a

us up early in the morning and say, ‘Get

– but there is no one word that truly

former Marching 100 member. Jean Louis

up, we got to go feed the goat we have

explains how beneficial CAFS is to my

also serves on the collegiate ministry

to go do this.’ And I use to be like ‘Come

personal and professional life. They have

for Advantage Christian Fellowship as a

on, man’ but I would have never thought

poured into me and accepted me as

controller.

of studying that. I would have never

their own family.” When asked how she

thought of doing that professionally. And

manages all of her positions and classes,

look where I am,” Jean Louis recalled.

Jean Louis explains that overcoming fear

According to Timmons, Jean Louis “has a lot of zeal. She is a very ambitious and zealous young lady. Definitely a leader

While she holds many leadership

According to Jean Louis, CAFS is the

can be a beast to master. But students

in her own right. She is one of those

positions, the skillset she believes CAFS

should keep striving for greatness and

students who says she is following in

has offered her isn’t like any other. “Dr.

get involved in CAFS and the campus.

Rorchard’s footsteps.” Jean Louis found

Verian Thomas always pushed me to

her love for CAFS when the department

be my best self, professional, and dress

did a visit to her home town of Broward

and act accordingly. This is something

county.

that I had to use in my leadership roles.

“I just liked the way Ms. Taquasha

Honestly, everyone has poured into me

Freeman spoke about the number of

to help me to become the woman that I

opportunities that CAFS had when I

am today,” Jean Louis explained eagerly.

was a student in high school. Originally,

“Being in SGA has taught me how

THERESA

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JEAN LOU F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


UIS

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

15


C

RENEL “CJ” FRANCIS is

take my place. With all that, it kind of just

the other hand, is a little shy. We worked

known for his passionate

fitted me, so I just kept on going,” Francis

on him – ‘pulling him up, pulling him

continued.

up, pulling him up,’ and then one day,

approach to leadership. Also named as the Tallahassee Urban League Rising

As Mister FAMU, president of MANRRS

he came in and said I am running for Mr.

Star, Francis is determined to continue

and past president of the Collegiate

FAMU and I was like ‘Oh.’ I gave him his

his family’s legacy by becoming an

100, Francis has developed a skillset

first donation,” Dr. Thomas smiled. “So,

agriculturalist while leaving an impact on

from CAFS that has challenged the

it really makes you feel good to see that

campus.

development of his leadership skills.

they have grown up and become more

According to Francis, he has learned

mature."

“Of all the colleges and schools on campus, CAFS stood out to me because

how to use the power of his influence

As an agribusiness student with a

it offered the right mix of courses, plus

to make a change. “CAFS has definitely

minor in public relations, Francis wants

the many opportunities for professional

contributed to my journey as a student

to focus on communications as it relates

development that I believe that I would

leader. I remember being in Dr. Verian

to agriculture and continue to pass the

not have gotten in any other college,”

Thomas’ first-class learning about time

torch his father gave to him. “My dad

said Francis. “The opportunities that have

management and scheduling,” Francis

has been practicing agriculture for 30

been afforded to me has helped me to

recalled. “And then I've always had the

plus years, so this is something that I've

excel academically and professionally.”

support of Tommeron Timmons, co-

seen throughout my lifetime. And now

advisor for MANRRS and advisor for the

I’m sitting here as a graduating senior,

Collegiate 100.”

also majoring in public relations, which

For Francis, leadership didn’t call him as soon as he arrived on the “Hill.” After observing and learning the ropes, Francis

Tommeron Timmons remembers

is very different,” Francis explained. “I am

felt that it was time to begin leadership.

Francis beginning as an introvert and

trying to put journalism and agriculture

“But when I first came as a freshman, I

is proud to see that he has developed

together. I don’t know if I am going to

never thought I would be where I am

into a passionate student leader and

go into politics or not, but I see myself

today by a long shot. I was just a student.

advocate. “Crenel gives you that passive

out there dealing with communications

I mean, I was literally just a student,”

caring leader who is sympathetic as well

as it pertains to agriculture,” Francis

recalled Francis. “I started realizing

as empathetic,” Timmons described. “He is

concluded.

campaigns and CAFS – and being the

definitely a leader in his own right.”

president of MANRRS, well first being

According to Dr. Thomas, Crenel has

the vice president and a member of the

had a drive since his first-class with her.

Collegiate 100, like I said I waited my turn

With support and coaching, Francis was

and knew when it was the right time to

able to come out of his shell. “Crenel, on

CRENEL "CJ"

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FRANCIS F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


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L

ovingly referred to as a

learned from CAFS. “CAFS gave me

my class schedule while still making

Georgia Peach, KAYLA

the first clubs and organizations that

time for my friends and taking care

BRAGGS is a second-year food

allowed me to have leadership roles,”

of myself.

science student with a concentration

Braggs explained.

in business and industry. Holding

According to Timmons, Braggs can

in you. They care about your well-

many leadership positions such as

conquer anything she puts her mind

being and want to encourage you

Sophomore Senator, vice chair of

to. “Kayla is the boss. Kayla is going

to be the best in your area. That is

the Student Relations Committee,

places. She is doing a lot, but she is

why programs like MANRRS are so

Miss College of Agriculture and Food

doing it well," Timmons said. “She is

important,” said Braggs. “Because of

Sciences, Orange and Green Guide,

definitely success and idea-driven.

how they have watched me develop

and a Girl Scout, to say the least

She’s going places and she is going to

in CAFS, my parents even see the

Braggs is the definition of a leader.

be doing some great things.”

future of agriculture and what it has

Initially, she considered majoring

Braggs stated that maintaining a

to offer. They have been supportive,

in pharmacy, but later decided that

presence in leadership has taught her

especially through guidance and

CAFS was the place for her.

a plethora of life lessons.

the opportunities that I have had

“I was looking for something that

“Leadership has taught

the pleasure of getting in the short

was stem-based, but still offered her

me accountability and time

time of me being on campus,” Braggs

an opportunity to be creative ¬—

management,” mentioned Braggs.

concluded.

food science was kind of the perfect

Though she is in a leadership role,

Braggs plans on progressing in

mix of both worlds. Science is still the

Braggs never forgets that she is a

her leadership skills and grades by

base, but you have the flexibility of

student first, and her ultimate goal is

monopolizing from the opportunities

different careers,” Braggs explained.

to graduate.

the CAFS has to offer.

With a long to-do-list, Braggs

“Even though I am in these

has managed to maintain it all.

leadership roles, maintaining my

According to Braggs, what keeps

GPA is important to me. I have had

her grounded is the lessons she has

to learn how to effectively manage

KAYLA

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“CAFS professors actually invest

BRAGGS F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


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S

imilar to his peers, DeAUNDR’E NEWSOME came to FAMU with a plan to study agriculture. “My sixth-grade dean taught me everything I needed to know about FAMU. From the first time

I met him, he said to me, ‘Son, you are going to be a Rattler,’ and it just stuck with me ever since,” Newsome recalled.

After guidance from his high school mentor, Newsome decided to travel thousands of miles from

Nevada to one of the highest of seven hills. But according to Newsome, CAFS professors and staff have made Tallahassee feel like home. “I addition to our professors, with staff members like Ms. Taquasha Freeman and Ms. Shanteva Leonard, I have been able to be steered in the right direction. Some of the professors and staff are like my second mom, they are so supportive and always there when you need them to be,” mentioned Newsome. As a member of MANRRS, Sophomore Student Senator, Treasurer of the Collegiate 100 and president of the FAMU First-Year Experience Peer Mentor Program, Newsome has had his share of wins and losses. “When I first came on campus, and I ran for a position, and I didn't win, it really put things into perspective for me. I realized that sometimes your personality can get in the way of possibilities. So after that, I decided to commit to what I wanted to go after fully,” said Newsome. According to Timmons, watching DeAundr’e develop into the leader that he is today, has been a rewarding process. "Behind the scenes, he is a straight 100 percent leader. You may not hear him at all times, but when it comes down to work, it gets done,” Timmons exclaimed. With his array of experience, Newsome enjoys reminding his classmates of their ability to induce a change in the classrooms and the world. The biggest lesson he has learned is to Go for it! “You can’t live life in your shell and reluctant to do things. You don't want to look back on your life, wishing,” Newsome said. “As student leaders, we aren't just leading. We are learning as well. Don't be reluctant or scared. Just take the bull by the horns and ride it.” According to Newsome, this is only the beginning of his quest for greatness. He looks forward to more opportunities for him to lead and encourage his peers.

DeAUNDR'E

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NEWSOME F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


E

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

21


A

second-year agribusiness

how diverse the agriculture industry was,

leadership skills, but also his leadership

student from Atlanta,

he felt like the college's mission and goals

positions have taught him a lot about his

Georgia, manages and allocates funding

aligned with his. “My passion aligned with

experience in the classroom.

for campus organizations as the 2019 SGA

service and helping others. Becoming a

Activities and Services (A&S) Liaison while

part of CAFS felt more natural than going

more vocal in my classroom. I am always

maintaining a superior academic standing

with the typical business administration

trying to help out my peers and asking

with CAFS – that is JOSHUA CLEMENTS.

route,” Clements mentioned.

them their perspectives on new ideas.

“I’ve always seen myself in a leadership

Clements found that the power of

I have also gotten better at receiving

role. I have always seen myself advancing

professor mentorship with CAFS has made

feedback and being able to deliver it

more towards politics, so I figured the first

his experience even better than he could

as well,” Clements continues. His “get it

step would be, becoming a part of the

have predicted. According to Timmons,

done” attitude is echoed in his ability to

Student Government Association (SGA),

one of Clements’ mentors, Clements is

lead his peers. By continually encouraging

where we meet with officials on a day-to-

leaving a mark on CAFS and the student

his classmates to get involved, Clements

day basis, host Senate meetings and apply

body. “Joshua is a very impressive student.

typically leaves them with one message:

Roberts Rule of order. These are all real

He is a straight-A student with lots of

“The only way you are left by yourself is

practices. They are reflected in courtrooms

promise, with drive and ambition to see

if you never ask for help. You don’t know

and political realms today,” Clements said.

things through. Once you get to know

if you don’t try. Do something that you

Known to be a leader outside of the

him, you definitely see a leader in his own

genuinely have a purpose behind, have

classroom, Clements has dreams of

right and an impressive student,” Timmons

goals set in mind and go for it.,” Clements

becoming a corporate lawyer for a Fortune

explained.

concluded.

500 company. “After attending a couple of

“CAFS has definitely taught me the

Clements has plans on changing the

Senate meetings and after really deciding

value in professional development,

world with his debating skills and to

on what I wanted to do, that’s where I

networking and time management. A lot

become a corporate lawyer, and he feels

sought out leadership opportunities,” said

of these professors take their course work

like CAFS will give him the skills to be

Clements.

really seriously because they have been in

successful.

Shadowing and talking with Pepsi

the industry, and they want us to put our

representatives led Clements to make

best foot forward.” Clements claims that

CAFS his area of study. After evaluating

CAFS has had a significant impact on his

JOSHUA

22

“Being a student leader has made me

CLEMENT F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


TS

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

23


Mikela Pryor

My CAFS Experience

“Through my future work and research, I would like to make sure that engineering regulations at the local, state and national levels are based on sound, scientific research, especially when it comes to environmental regulation. Given the fact that climate change is accelerating, it is imperative that we work as diligently as possible to ensure that our planet is in a condition to service itself and the growing population that will be upon it in the decades and centuries to come. Nutrient pollution in storm water treatment is only a small portion of that work, but it leads to something bigger. If proper implementation of storm water treatment systems is applied at the local scale, it will have a great effect on its larger hydrologic system.� Mikela was the 2019 recipient of the Pharos of Alexandria Global Learning Award. This award recognizes a junior or senior undergraduate, or graduate student who has excelled and demonstrated leadership on the local, national and /or international levels as shown by their activities and offices held at each level. Mikela will be graduating fall 2019, after which she will be attending graduate school at Texas A&M University to further her studies in biological and agricultural engineering.

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F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


am MIKELA PRYOR, a fourth-

focused on the effect of septic facilities

Engagement Destination garden on

year Biological Systems

waste water on soil and water quality.

FAMU’s campus, and have participated

Engineering student in the

These research experiences have solidified

in community service events with the

College of Agriculture and

my dedication to advance the knowledge

FAMU Green Coalition and FAMU’s

Food Sciences at Florida

and understanding of the environmental

Chapter of the ASABE. During the 2018-

A&M University (FAMU). I

field.

2019 academic year, I was selected as a

was drawn to the field of

Like many of my peers in the college,

Student Fellow of the FAMU Sustainability

Biological and Agricultural

as part of our professional development,

Institute, where I worked on a project to

Engineering because of its take

I had several opportunities to attend and

implement reusable food containers in

on protecting water resources.

participate at professional conferences

the FAMU Food Court. I have also served

I have always been interested

and meetings such as the Association of

as president of the FAMU ASABE Chapter

in protecting the environment,

1890 Research Directors and the American

during the 2017-2018 academic year and

even as a child, but my passion

Society of Agricultural and Biological

the secretary of the FAMU Green Coalition

Engineers (ASABE).

in 2018-2019. I was also a USDA 1890

for it didn’t peak until I began researching about

I decided to complement my academic

Scholar.

the issue of the global water crisis in

background by gaining experience

my teenage years. I realized that I have

outside of the classroom, working for the

Sciences (CAFS) has helped to shape

always been so fortunate to have clean,

USDA–Natural Resources Conservation

me into the student, researcher and

accessible water, but with climate change

Service (NRCS) in Ohio during the summer

professional that I am and will continue

accelerating and an increasing population,

of 2018. My main duty was to assist civil

to be. I joined CAFS as a sophomore after

water resources are growing scarce. Again,

engineer technicians implement various

transferring into the Biological Systems

my interest in water resources led me to

conservation practices. I prepared soil

Engineering Department from pre-

study Biological Systems Engineering (BSE)

and contour maps, conducted watershed

pharmacy. I was looking for a field that I

at FAMU.

delineations and performed a variety

could help change the world and make it

Throughout my undergraduate studies,

The College of Agriculture and Food

of survey work where I developed

a better place. I found that in CAFS. From

I have excelled beyond what I thought I

topographic, cross section and profile

the moment I joined the department, the

was capable of, inside and outside of the

data. The work experience with the

BSE family welcomed me with open arms

classroom. As a research assistant, under

NRCS gave me hands-on experience in

and I quickly learned that agriculture and

the supervision of Aavudai Anandhi, Ph.D.,

conservation engineering practices used

natural resources was the avenue through

assistant professor in the BSE program,

in stream restoration, flooding and storm

which I would leave my mark on the world.

I developed a strong technical and

water management. I also developed

research background. Under her tutelage

Geographic Information System software

have decided to continue research at the

I participated in research and experiential

and other computer-aided designs and

graduate level. I would also like to express

projects, geared towards finding

software used for surveying and data

special thanks to Charles Magee, Ph.D.,

solutions to many of our agricultural and

analysis.

who helped me to see the many avenues

environmental problems. I have assisted

Academics and maintaining good

Due to Dr. Anandhi’s mentorship, I

in which I could use a degree in BSE;

with projects such as using models to

grades are important, but I also believe

determine cotton growth stages in Florida,

that one of the best and rewarding things

Ivanka Anguelova, ASABE student advisor, who helped me cultivate my leadership

bioremediation potential in the Savannah

any college student can be engaged

skills; Dev Satyanarayan, Ph.D., advisor

River Basin in South Carolina to analyzing

in, is volunteerism. The end result for

for my senior design, who helped hone

water quality in the Ochlocknee River

use of your time and talents does not

my problem-solving skills and let me see

Basin, in northwest Florida. My research

always have to come with a monetary

myself as an engineer; Nathaniel Bailey,

experience extended beyond the campus

reward, but should be about service for

Ph.D., BSE program director, who provided

of FAMU. During one of my summer

the greater good of the community. For

guidance on my journey each step of the

internships, I was an undergraduate

the past three years I have been involved

way; and Betty Hudson, administrative

researcher at the Texas A&M University

in several community projects and

assistant who helped me to navigate the

Biological and Agricultural Engineering

professional organizations. I volunteer

administrative processes throughout my

Department. I worked on research, which

at the Sustainability Education and

matriculation at FAMU. CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

25


by Cynthia Portalatin

RACHEL FERNANDEZ, a junior animal science major, says being a part of global agriculture at Florida A&M University (FAMU) has made her time in college extraordinary. “The college has provided me with many exceptional opportunities since my enrollment at FAMU. I have been able to travel abroad and domestically more than I ever imagined this past year, and I can only imagine the opportunities to come,” said Fernandez. Fernandez was recently awarded a $1,000 scholarship by the Florida Association for Food Protection (FAFP) for demonstrating a passion and an interest in food safety. She credits her international agriculture experience to the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences (CAFS) as a key part of her success in earning the award. “Rachel’s participation in the CAFS AGG 4952 Service Learning in International Agriculture course, with a service experience in the Dominican Republic, was key in her being invited to the FAFP’s Annual Educators Conference to present a paper and poster on her service experience. Rachel and the other global agriculture minor students in the course, assisted our food safety content specialists in carrying out one of the first Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) assessments in the Dominican Republic during summer 2018,” said Harriett Paul, director of FAMU CAFS Center for International Agricultural Trade Development Research and Training, and the Service Learning course instructor. “I was so appreciative to have the opportunity to present to the association on the study that I supported in the Dominican Republic, which happens to be the home country of my family,” says Fernandez. Her presentation, “Building Food Safety Modernization Act Capacity in Dominican Packinghouses,” detailed the FSMA assessment conducted by the CIATDRT during the summer of 2018 in collaboration with the Universidad ISA and the International Executive Service Corps. The assessment helped to determine the readiness of nine pack houses selected to participate in the study for FSMA compliance, as may be required by their U.S. importers. Fernandez took on a leadership role by serving as a Spanish translator during the on-site technical team interviews with pack house management. Last summer, she also completed a “Train the Trainer” course on produce safety provided by the University of Florida’s Southern Regional Center’s FSMA training program. “Being able to travel to different countries and U.S. cities and states this past year, has opened my eyes to the possibilities for me as a professional. I have come to learn that as an animal scientist, I am preparing myself for a career on the global stage. The value that my minor in global agriculture adds through the international exposures, is that I can clearly see that I am building my capacity to work globally, to include having a career with the U.S. Department of Agriculture as a foreign service officer,” said Fernandez.

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F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


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27


by Karena Mahung, Consultant, Indufor North America Photos courtesy of the Land Trust Alliance

P

APA GUEYE, a senior agribusiness major, is one

conference provided them with an opportunity to participate

of 10 students selected for the newly launched,

in several educational trainings and workshops where they

Scholars for Conservation Leadership Program. The 2019 pilot program, which is a joint initiative

between the Land Trust Alliance and the USDA Forest

“One practical skill that I have come away with from this opportunity is a greater level of confidence and comfortability

Service, selected its initial cohort of undergraduates from Central

to network. I was timid at first, but the professionals at the

State University, Colorado State University, Florida A&M University

conference encouraged me to express myself.”

(FAMU), North Carolina State University, Tuskegee University and University of Massachusetts. “The Alliance is incredibly proud of this work of building

The program is a career and leadership development program. Its goal is to expand opportunities for students from underrepresented minority groups in the land conservation

platforms for young, bright students interested in conservation

fields and to strengthen career opportunities in natural resource

and natural resource management to connect with practitioners

management and conservation.

and opportunities for career development. We hope to expand

“The educational training workshops with teams of

this program in future years,” shared Wendy Jackson, executive

professional panelists provided great insight on the next steps

vice president, Land Trust Alliance.

going forward in our chosen fields and the wide range of career

The program provided an opportunity for the students to attend the National Land Conservation Conference in Raleigh, North Carolina. In addition, they attended a one-day professional development experience where they heard from leaders in the areas of conservation and natural resource management, which helped to bolster and support their career development. The

28

connected with professionals from across the nation.

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY

paths that one might take,” said Gueye. Papa, is also an undergraduate research assistant at the FAMU Center for Viticulture and Small Fruit Research.


CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

29


A Caring Journey Through CAFS A College that Believes in its Students A dream to be a successful plant

in CAFS, including my research activities

scientist led me to Florida A&M University

be one of the best plant scientist there

at the Center for Viticulture, I can truly say

(FAMU) College of Agriculture and

is. This meant that I had to be involved

there were a lot of opportunities provided

Food Sciences (CAFS). I am PATRICIA

in research. Although I was skeptical

that I took advantage of that helped to

AKINGBOYE from Ondo State, Nigeria.

and nervous about doing research, my

prepare me to successfully complete

I was privileged to be among the few

confidence grew and my dream fueled

both programs. I had opportunities to

students selected under a Memorandum

further after meeting with Violeta Tsolova,

attend and present my research findings

of Understanding (MoU) between FAMU

Ph.D., professor and director for the Center

at professional meetings and conferences

and the Federal University of Technology,

of Viticulture and Small Fruit Research and

that aided my public speaking skills and

Akure, (FUTA) Ondo State in Nigeria.

Anthony, Ananga, Ph.D., assistant professor

confidence. I had the opportunity to meet

Under the MoU students complete the

and junior researcher at the center.

scientists and professionals in my area of

first-three years of undergraduate studies

I joined the team at the center during

interest, volunteer and give back to the

at a university in their country and the final

the summer of my final year as an

school and community, and a chance

year at FAMU, then onto graduate school.

undergraduate researcher. I was a novice

to interact and establish long-lasting

and thought I would not be a great

friendships.

When I got the news that I was selected to attend the College of Agriculture and

researcher, which were the thoughts that

Food Sciences at FAMU, I was excited

went through my mind. However, Dr.

as it will be in life, but I was fortunate to

and overwhelmed with joy. The idea of

Ananga saw my potential and motivated

have an entire college of faculty and staff

what I considered a once in a life time

me to not give up on my dreams. He

that really cared about their students’

opportunity to study plant science and

would often talk to me about the many

progress, success and wellbeing.

biotechnology given all the new and

benefits of doing research, the exposure

improved technology that were not at my

and opportunities, but most importantly

Ananga, I wish to express special thanks

disposal in my country, was truly amazing.

that to be the successful plant scientist

to Oghenekome Onokpise, Ph.D., one of

From my first day of classes, I realized

The road was rocky and rough at times,

In addition to Drs. Tsolova and

meant doing research. This bolstered my

the pioneers of the FUTA-FAMU scholar

that I had a lot to learn and a lot to catch

confidence to a whole new level. As an

program; Alfredo Lorenzo, Ph.D.; Edwin

up on in just one year. Something as

undergraduate researcher, I got to work on

Duke, Ph.D.; James Muchovej, Ph.D.;

simple as becoming proficient with the

the regulation of gene expression involved

and Verian Thomas, Ph.D. They simply

computer to familiarizing myself with the

in flavonol and anthocyanin biosynthesis

understood where I was coming from.

proper use of basic laboratory equipment.

during the flowering and blooming stages

They took their time to help, support and

One would believe that after completing

of Muscadine grapes.

encourage me in order for me to succeed

three years of undergraduate coursework,

At the master’s level I had the

in the program. I am forever indebted to

that I would have known how to fully

opportunity to work under the guidance

master the use of a pipette, well I did

and caring mentorship of Dr. Tsolova,

not until I came to FAMU. Thanks to the

where for the next two years I studied

everything that has been instilled in me

patient and caring professors in CAFS who

genotypic variation in vinification

including my hands-on experiences in

understood where I was coming from and

qualities and the antioxidant properties of

CAFS has prepared me to rise over difficult

saw that I was eager to learn, took their

muscadine wines in Florida.

times.

time to help, support and encourage me.

30

As I have stated before, my dream is to

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY

Looking back at my academic journey

them. Overall, I am super confident that


Patricia is one of the best examples for the exceptional quality of our students with an infectious smile, remarkable work ethics and perseverance for academic excellence and career development.

- V I O L E TA T S O LO VA , P H . D.

5 Graduate student Patricia Akingboye, performing sterile prep of grape cell cultures for antioxidant analysis.

Patricia maintained a 4.0 GPA throughout her studies at FAMU. She graduated with her master’s degree in summer 2019 and has been accepted in the bioenvironmental science doctoral program at Morgan State University. She was a member of the Agricultural Science Club, the Baptist Collegiate Ministry and a member of the Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society. CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

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F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


The Impact from His Miles

45 Years of Service to FAMU! by Andrine Stanhope

If asked to prologue Lawrence Carter’s autobiography with a

recent two successors Ray Mobley, DVM and Vonda Richardson

song, poem, or a statement from great writers like Shakespeare, I

the current director for CEP, who were both employed by him.

would have to choose the song, “My Way” by Frank Sinatra.

Several of his other protégés have gone on to be leaders at other

Having obtained a doctor of philosophy in higher education from Florida State University, Carter knew he could become a

academic institutions, government agencies and industries. “Although I am an extension administrator, I lend my support

professor at an institution of higher education. Becoming an

in all areas of the college voluntarily or when called upon,” said

administrator in the field of agriculture however, was not in the

Carter. “I served on five doctoral and10 master’s committees,

stars. “Never thought of landing a career in agriculture extension,”

and was a mentor to numerous students and colleagues in the

Carter said. However, my early participation in 4-H clubs and

college.”

other agricultural programs in high school, unconsciously at the time, helped to prepare me for a career in agriculture.”

His service on college, university and statewide committees extended to more than 60. He also served on the Southern

Carter’s 45 years of career at Florida A&M University (FAMU),

Regional Rural Development Center Board of Directors where he

saw his human odometer racked up more miles than any vehicle

represented 1890 extension directors for 12 years; and served a

possibly can. “If I were to trace my career miles on land and in the

two-year term as the chairman of the Association of Extension

air for the past 45 years, it would be more than three million by air

Administrators, and 21 years as its treasurer.

and more than four million on land,” said Carter. My travels have

In 1993, he and his team established the first meat goat

taken me to Canada, several countries on the continents of Africa

program in Florida, and hosted two of the four National Goat

and Asia, and several islands in the Caribbean.

and Small Ruminant conferences in 1991 and 2008. Under

He began his career as a program specialist and after six years, rose to the rank of associate dean and administrator of the Cooperative Extension Program (CEP) at FAMU. Under his

his guidance they also hosted the first National Small Farms Conference in 1981. Throughout his tenure, Carter was passionate and responsive

leadership the CEP brought in excess of $28 million through

about helping to better the 1890 system. “One of my most

federally mandated and completive funding, which immensely

notable services was on the 1995 Farm Bill Committee that saw

helped to transform and improve the quality of life, especially for

an increase in funding to support 1890 land-grant research,

limited resources and disenfranchised citizens throughout the

teaching and extension programs,” said Carter.

state and especially north and west Florida. Carter helped to build job security on and off FAMU’s campus.

“His collaboration, persistent interaction and established beneficial contacts with the state and national USDA resulted in

On campus, he employed an integrated team of more than

increased funding to the University,” said Sunil Pancholy, Ph.D.,

100 professionals including extension agents, program leaders,

retired associate dean for Research in the College of Agriculture

specialists, faculty and staff, who assisted and conducted practical

and Food Sciences.

programs, designed to solve real life problems, which helped to economically transform lives and improve communities. He has helped to create tomorrow’s leaders as is evident by his

“Lawrence was always inspiring, however, he was stern whenever the conversation was about the challenges the 1890 institutions withstood during the early stages,” said Delbert

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

33


Foster, executive director of the 1890

purchase of the 267-acre farm that is now

Programs and, dean and 1890 extension

the FAMU Research and Extension Center”

administrator at South Carolina State

said Pancholy. “He was able to establish

recognition for his outstanding service

University. “His personal reflections as a

the center’s buildings, the Veterinary

and contribution to include: Certificate

young extension professional were always

Technology Program and several other

of Meritorious Service by Epsilon Sigma

motivational to me, and every time he and

small animal research and extension

Phi State Distinguished Service Award,

I spoke about the way it was, I became

programs facilities.”

State Mid-Career Award, Enshrinement

more and more determined to perfect my

Carter received numerous awards and

in the Florida A&M University College of

craft as an extension professional,” Foster

Quincy includes an equine facility, which

Agriculture Gallery of Distinction, recipient

said.

is utilized for student teaching and horse

of the FAMU Millennium Award, recipient

management, a youth pavilion including

of Excellence in Entrepreneurship, AEA/

voice for equity and fairness within the

an outdoor classroom and nature trail;

ARD Exemplary Leadership Award,

Land-Grant System, and persistence in

a veterinary technology complex; an

AEA Distinguished Service Award, and

being a strong and powerful voice for the

aquaculture program and an agroforestry

AEA Pioneer Award. Due to exemplary

underserved communities we endeavor to

system. The complex is home to the

service, he was recognized with three

serve, is a testament to the commitment

annual summer “Farm Fest,” which drew

proclamations for outstanding service

he showed to the 1890 system.

people from all over the state and the

from the Leadership of Tallahassee, the

neighboring state of Georgia.

U.S. House of Representatives and the

His hunger for excellence, resilient

His vision about serving the needs of limited resource families, empowering

34

The research and extension complex in

Agronomy, Oghenekome Onokpise, Ph.D.

Things were not always smooth

Association of Extension Administrators

his workforce and ensuring FAMU had a

and rosy, but Carter knew how to deal

at his retirement celebration on June 29,

major impact in the state, led to major

with situations professionally and with

2019.

infrastructure development on campus

decorum. “At times we disagreed on a

and in communities. He executed the

number of issues, but over the years

construction of two major teleconference

I knew without a doubt that I could

centers, one on the main campus of FAMU

count on Lawrence’s support, and that

and the other a research and extension

is why I believed he had a great and

facility at their Quincy, Florida location.

very successful career, locally, regionally

“Lawrence was instrumental in the

and nationally,” said retired professor of

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


FAMU Among Three Universities Selected for Student Opportunity

Cooling Vest Patent Awarded to CAFS Professor

by Andrine Stanhope

designed to benefit those individuals who recreate and

by Justus Reed and Byron Dobson With seven approved patents and five pending, Florida A&M University (FAMU) College of Agriculture and Food Science (CAFS) professor, Charles Magee is no newcomer to creating products to better society. His latest invention a “Solar Adiabatic Cooling Apparatus,” is work in high temperatures. The patent for the device that Magee refers to as a

Florida A&M University is among three

solar evaporative cooling vest was awarded earlier this

universities selected by Agriculture Future

year. It is the first patent award received in the Biological

of America (AFA) for its University Growth

Systems Engineering Program in the college.

Initiative. The other two universities were

After envisioning a device that could relieve heat-induced discomfort in various

Fort Valley State University and Prairie View

environments, Magee approached FAMU’s Office of Technology Transfer more than

A&M University. The Initiative will fund three

three years ago and got the go-ahead to move forward. “I envisioned users such as

students and a faculty member from each

soldiers, football teams, fans at outdoor sporting events, hikers, forest firefighters,

university to attend the 2019 AFA Leaders

landscapers and fieldworkers would benefit from my product; because it will allow

Conference, which will be held in Kansas City,

them to stay cool and more comfortable while they work in the sun,” said Magee.

Missouri in November. As part of the application process each

A critical factor in Magee’s motivation to invent a personal cooling system is the recorded instances of football players collapsing and even dying as a result of

university identified ways their students would

overheating and heat strokes. He felt that his product could put an end to such

benefit from the opportunity.

happenings.

“AFA will help provide our students

“There is an abundance of high school, college and professional football teams

with much needed soft skills that include

that could take advantage of this cooling system to prevent heat exhaustion during

leadership and communication skills to better

games and practices. There have been cases where players have collapsed due to

prepare them for the workforce and graduate

heat exhaustion, and some have lost their lives due to heat strokes, which is one of

professional schools,” said Verian Thomas,

my reasons for developing this creation. This invention could be a lifesaver.”

Ph.D., professor and associate dean in the

Magee explained that evaporative cooling systems have been used in

College of Agriculture and Food Sciences. In

greenhouses for more than 60 years with the goal of lowering air temperature.

addition, the internship opportunities that we

However, he said these systems only work well in hot dry climates. “In general terms,

hope our students will secure through AFA will

what makes this unique is that this solar evaporative cooling vest can operate in

give them a more competitive edge. AFA has

high humidity or low humidity and it’s also portable,” Magee said, adding with a

been providing scholarships and leadership

chuckle. “I call it the poor man’s portable air conditioning system."

training to college students pursuing careers in agriculture since 1996. As described on its website, the AFA Leaders Conference is a four-track program designed to offer college students four different personal

“It’s always a good feeling when you get awarded a U.S. patent, especially when it’s a result of your intellectual knowledge,” said Magee. Magee currently is working on developing a prototype to test the functionality of his invention. The next step for FAMU is to partner with a company that can produce actual

and professional development opportunities

prototypes, so that the cooling vest can be tested to see how well it works, and what

matched to their year in college. The program

needs to be modified.

bridges the gap between academic, leadership

Magee received his bachelor’s degree in general agriculture from Alcorn State

and work experiences while helping students

University and was the first African American to have received a Doctorate in

understand the impact of their decisions.

Agricultural and Biological Engineering from Cornell University. CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

35


by Andrine Stanhope

GHENEKOME ONOKPISE, PH.D., affectionately known as “Kome,”

rain forest ecosystems to name a few. From these researches he has authored and co-authored a combination of 150

began his career at Florida A&M

publications in the form of refereed, workshops, conference

University on June 23, 1986. He

and symposium scientific papers. He received U.S. Patent

started as an assistant professor in

No. 8,278,248 for his research on cogongrass, a culmination

the Center for Viticulture Science

of 15 years of research on an invasive species in Florida and

and Small now called the Center

Gulf Coast States. He received the Distinguished Researcher

for Viticulture and Small Fruit

Award from FAMU in 2013 and numerous other awards at the

Research. Kome’s 33 years of service in the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences spans the full gamut of our 1890 mandate to include teaching, research and extension, in addition to administrative and international program activities. His tenure saw

professional level to include the Stephen Spurr Award from the Florida Division of the Society of American Foresters. Kome’s extension and outreach activities focused mainly in North Florida, South Georgia and Southeast Alabama. In this regards, he worked with small vineyard owners and hobby growers teaching them how to cultivate and improve

the current CAFS undergo two name changes, from College of

their grape production. He also conducted training programs

Engineering Sciences, Technology and Agriculture (CESTA) to

in agroforestry systems especially silvopasture systems

College of Agriculture Sciences to its current name.

with small ruminants and forage legumes. He developed

His administrative appointments included associate dean

the Forestry and Conservation Education (FACE) summer

for which he served under several deans and interim deans

program for middle and high school students, which is now

from 2008 - 2012 and interim associate dean in 2013. He led

in its 21st year, and has been a recruitment pipeline for the

the efforts in CESTA during the university-wide accreditation

college. Kome was also actively involved in international

exercise in 2010 and university restructuring in 2011, hence

agricultural, capacity building, and farmer-to-farmer programs

the names CESTA, CAS and CAFS. Kome served as the

in Cameroon, Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal, Germany, Austria and

coordinator for graduate programs in CESTA from 2004 - 2008,

Haiti.

and coordinator for the agronomy program from 1990 - 2008

He is a member of several professional organizations such

and natural resources conservation program, which was

as the Society of American Foresters; American Association

implemented in 1992.

for the Advancement of Science; American Association for

Over the length of his career Kome taught more than 20

Industrial Crops; and Society of Economic Botany. He served

different courses at both the undergraduate and graduate

as the vice chairman of the 1890 Agroforestry Consortium

levels. He served as chair for 25 master’s and five doctoral

from its inception in 2005 until 2015. He is also a member of

graduates, and served on more than 50 master’s and doctoral

the Tallahassee Writers Association and member of several

thesis and dissertation committees. Kome received the Best

other social and civic organizations.

Agricultural Instructor Award from the student Agricultural Science Club in 1998; the University Teacher of the Year Award

“Dr. Kome lived up to FAMU’s motto ‘Excellence With

in 1993 and 2006; the Teacher Incentive Program Award in

Caring.’ He delivered his lectures with clarity and ease

1994 and the Advance Teacher of the Year Award in 1996.

of understanding, which inspired me to learn and made

Kome has generated nearly $10 million in extramural

a difference in the way I approached my academic work.

funds from public and private agencies for research teaching,

He made learning enjoyable, which motivated me as an

extension and international program activities.

undergraduate at the time to enroll in one of his graduate

His research activities spanned many areas including plant

overall well-being. Best wishes on the next phase of your

on silvopasture and small ruminants; biofuel research; and

life.” – Andrine Stanhope, Ph.D.

ecological restoration of mahogany tree species in tropical

36

courses. He really had a passion for his students and their

breeding and genetics; agroforestry systems with emphasis

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


KOME'S

33

YEARS OF SERVICE! DOWN THROUGH THE YEARS

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

37


5 ISA-IESC-FAMU teams meet to kick off partnership activities in Santiago ISA campus.

by Cynthia Portalatin

T

he Florida A&M University (FAMU)

center’s initiatives that have changed

handling of fruits and vegetables, food

Center for International Agricultural

lives for the better in many underserved

safety, and integrated pest management.

Trade Development Research and

regions of the world,” Harriett Paul, director

The program expanded the knowledge

Training (CIADRT) is dedicated to

CIADRT said. “We take a multifaceted –

and skills of more than 3,000 Dominican

stimulating economic growth in

value chain approach to promoting rural

Republic producers, pack house staff,

emerging and developing world

development in the countries where

agricultural service delivery personnel

markets. Since its establishment

we work. We work with input suppliers,

and University faculty. This was done to

in 2001, the CIADRT has aggressively

producers, processors, wholesalers and

meet international market food safety

pursued its mission, to provide training,

exporters to ensure that safer, more

and quality standards related to the

research, and development assistance to

improved quality agricultural products

production, post-harvest handling, and

international agricultural organizations in

are available for the local host country

processing of five horticultural products

the areas of sustainable agriculture, small

markets; as well as foreign markets in the

being exported to the U.S., E.U. and

enterprise development, international

U.S., E.U. and Canada,” Paul said.

Canada (Asian vegetables, pineapple,

trade enhancement, organizational

avocado, greenhouse vegetables and

portfolio is a recently completed four-

Many people in the world’s poorest areas

year program, which was undertaken in

derive their livelihoods from agricultural

the Dominican Republic (2016 - 2019).

development program and our Dominican

related activities. The transformation of

The project titled, “Exporting Quality

Republic clients achieved many positive

agriculture and food systems is therefore

and Safety Program,” was funded by

outcomes as a result of the work

an essential aspect of broad-based

the U.S. Department of Agriculture and

completed by FAMU and our partner IESC,”

economic growth.

in partnership with the International

Paul said.

“More than $6 million in competitive funding from a variety of national and international donors have fueled the

38

One such project in the CIATDRT

capacity building, and entrepreneurship.

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY

Executive Services Corps (IESC). The CIATDRT provided technical interventions in the areas of post-harvest

cocoa). “This was a highly complex

Some of the more notable outcomes reported, based on FAMU’s contribution, included the reduction in pest loads and


5 Pack house employees at work on the sorting, grading, and packing line.

6 Halimah Wynn, agronomy major junior and global agriculture minor collecting water sample.

5 Elva Estevez, Ph.D., FAMU Plant Pathologist giving hands on scouting demonstrations to pineapple farmers.

For more information about the CIATDRT programs, contact Harriett A. Paul, director at harriett.paul@ illegal pesticide residues on exported

Foreign Supplier

famu.edu or (850) 599-8867. You may also stop by the

fresh produce, based on the use of

Verification

office at FAMU, 204 South Perry-Paige Building.

integrated pest management methods;

Program (FSVP)

the introduction and adoption of

requirements.

sustainable and environmentally safe

An interdisciplinary team of food safety

FAMU successfully completed its

fruit and vegetable production practices

experts, a videographer and five CAFS

contract with IESC-USDA in July, with

(Good Agricultural Practices) among client

global agriculture minor students were

all project goals and deliverables

producers; the enhanced competitiveness

recruited and organized to carry out the

accomplished. “As a result of the combined

of Dominican Republic pineapple and

assessment. The students were enrolled

efforts of both the interdisciplinary

oriental vegetables in the world market

in the CAFS AGG 4952 Service Learning in

and inter-institutional alliances, the

as a result of the adoption of improved

International Agriculture course, taught by

development efforts from the project

practices; and increased net income for

Paul. The team successfully carried out the

achieved a very broad impact that not

producers and rural communities due to a

14-day study, in cooperation with the IESC,

only resulted in positive outcomes for

reduction in the shipment refusal rate.

and the Institute Superior in Agriculture

our Dominican Republic clients, but also

(ISA) a private agricultural university

supported FAMU students’ international

project included an assessment of nine

based in Santiago. The outcome of the

service learning and our faculty’s

packing houses in La Vega Province to

assessment indicated that the pack houses

professional development. These internal

determine the pack houses’ produce

are knowledgeable of the requirements of

and external benefits are what we strive

safety practices and their readiness

the FSVP, however, none are appropriately

to achieve with all of our international

for compliance with the new U.S.

prepared for compliance of the foreign

agriculture programs,” Paul said.

Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA)

human food suppliers.

Other notable achievements of the

The interdisciplinary team consisted of faculty, staff and students from FAMU to include: Lambert Kanga, Ph.D., Neil James, Ph.D., Ernest Jones, Cynthia Portalatin, Penny Malone, Joseph Jones, Rachel Fernandez, Jorge Del’Angel, Johnesha Jackson, Halimah Wynn and Gregory McNealy; Consultants from the University of Puerto Rico, Fernando Gallardo-Covas, Ph.D., and Elva Estevez, Ph.D.; Private Consultants, John Warren, Ph.D., and Kamal Hyder, Ph.D.; Lead ISA partner, Anabel Then; and the Pack House Assessment Team Laurel Dunn, Ph.D., Lynette E. Orellana, Ph.D., and Quintin Gray. CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

39


BAYER AWARDS $20,000 TO FAMU CAFS STUDENTS by Veronique George

The College of Agriculture and Food Sciences (CAFS) students

me for what I can do in the future, they are willing to give me the

Kayla Braggs (Atlanta, Ga.), Gueye Papa (Tallahassee, Fla.), Meghan

resources needed to reach that full potential,” said Braggs. “More

Campbell (Orlando, Fla.), Raymond Hernandez (Palm Beach, Fla.),

and more we are beginning to see large-scale companies pushing

and Amonra Garrett-Mills (Denver, Colo.) were recipients of the

hard to invest in the potential and growth of young adults as they

Bayer Fund for the 1890s Scholarships. The students who are

will be the next generation of employees to take their brand to

members of the Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and

the next level—Bayer being one of the front runners. It is one

Related Sciences (MANRRS) were awarded a total of $20,000.

thing to speak of aiding growth, but cutting-edge companies like

Bayer is a life science company with more than 150 years of history with core competencies in the areas of healthcare and

The Bayer Fund 1890s Student Scholarship is part of the

agriculture. Their innovative products contribute to finding

company’s broader focus in their commitment to recognizing

solutions to some of the major challenges of our time, such as

high achieving underrepresented students pursuing degrees

adequate food supply and improved medical care for a growing

in agriculture and Science Technology Engineering and

and aging population.

Mathematics (STEM) related fields. The key to meeting the

“I am extremely grateful and honored to be a recipient of the

challenges the world faces in feeding nine billion people by 2050,

1890 Bayer Scholarship Fund,” said Hernandez. “Having my books

is investing in future leaders pursuing STEM careers in food and

and classroom materials covered during my junior year is a major

agriculture. The next generation of innovators will be the ones to

relief. The amount of stress that accumulates from finances can be

ascend and meet the challenges of global food security.

stressful for me and my family, and having the support of CAFS

According to their website Bayer’s mission is to improve quality

investing and rooting for my success is extremely rewarding.

of life for a growing population by focusing their research and

Knowing that people are there for me is very comforting.”

development activities on preventing, alleviating and treating

“Being awarded the scholarship is more than just a financial gain, it shows me that not only does Bayer see the potential in

40

Bayer are speaking louder with action.”

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY

diseases and providing a reliable supply of high-quality food, feed and plant-based raw materials.


EXTENSION NEWS by Vonda Richardson

Florida A&M University (FAMU) COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM was among seven project and program teams that were awarded $5,000 grants. The grants will assist with their program development and implementation at the Impact Collaborative Summit, which was held in Atlanta, Georgia. Twenty-eight project and program teams across the Cooperative Extension System represented 36 institutions. 5 Florida A&M University Extension Agents Sabrina Hayes (L), and Conchita Newman (r), pitching their STEM mobile module to a participant at the Summit.

Dreamal Worthen, Ph.D., Sandra Thompson, Ed.D., and Kenya Washington-Johnson (Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice) were grant awardees for the southern region. The project titled “Community Voices, Informed Choices” or CIVIC, in collaboration with the University of Florida, fosters civil and inclusive dialogue to cultivate a climate of sustained community conversation around complex and pressing local issues. These technical resources and professional development trainings enabled cooperative extension agents to effectively serve as conveners, moderators and coordinators. The University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences team included

5 Florida A&M University Cooperative Extension faculty Dreamal Worthen, Ph.D. (l) and Sandra Thompson Ed.D. (r), discussing their “Community Voices Informed Choices” theme with their University of Florida partners.

Martha Monroe, Lara Milligan and Carol Alberts. Jennifer Taylor, Ph.D., and Kimberly Davis also received a $5,000 grant award for the top scorer in the national project category at the summit. They were a part of the National Sustainable Summit team, which represented the University of Florida, Washington State University, North Dakota State University and Florida A&M University. Each team had the opportunity to pitch their project and program to a panel of cooperative extension leaders and external partners. The National Sustainability Summit brings leading sustainability and energy educators, and practitioners together to showcase land-grant university extension and research

5 Representatives from Florida A&M University Cooperative Extension and collaborating partner University of Florida discussing their “Community Voices Informed Choices” project at the summit.

program successes, share challenges, and identify opportunities to strengthen their collective impacts. It also provided conference hosts with opportunities to build a strong, supportive local community of extension supporters and partners. Other members of the team included Jennison Kipp Searcy, Ramona Madhosingh Hector, Linda Seals, Patricia Townsend and David Ripplinger.

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

41


FAMU-CAFS MANRRS STUDENTS BROUGHT HOME TOP AWARDS by Andrine Stanhope & Heather Johnson

5 FAMU MANRRS Chapter participants in attendance at the 34th Annual Career Fair and Training Conference.

The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU) College of Agriculture and Food Sciences (CAFS) Chapter of Minorities in Agriculture Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS) brought home top awards for case study presentations and impromptu speaking contests, from the 34th Annual Career Fair and Training Conference in April and the Regional Cluster held in September. More than 1,200 participants and 80 companies participated in the conference, which included workshops, competitions and a career fair. Kayla Braggs, a food science freshman won first place in the undergraduate public speaking contest and was also one of the freshmen recipients of the John Deere Scholarship. First place winners for the Land O’Lakes Case Study went to the team consisting of Jacob Long and Xavier Miranda-Colon, agribusiness juniors; Zaida Kidane, animal science senior; and Shieriney Murphy, food science senior. Kierra Goosby, a plant science graduate student, was awarded second place in the National Research Discussion Contest, and Jacob Long and Xavier Miranda-Colon were awarded second place in the Annual Bunge Case Competition. The duo, competed against teams of undergraduate and graduate students from the University of Kentucky, Iowa State University, Oklahoma State University, Purdue University, Cal Poly State University, Illinois State University, Louisiana State University, Alcorn State University, Kentucky State University and Ohio State University. Third place award for the Lincoln Douglas Debate went to Zaida Kidane. Sixteen students from the college were able to attend the Regional Cluster Conference courtesy of Land O’Lakes (LOL) full funding. •

Keiondra Marshall, animal science pre-vet senior, winner of the LOL Case Study

E'Lan Miles, agronomy junior, winner of the LOL Sprint Case Study

Juancarlos Simmonds, freshman, 1st Place Impromptu Speaking Contest, and winner of the LOL Case Study

Hanna Triplett, pre-engineering freshman, winner of the Dinner Contest

Micala Jones, biological systems engineering freshman awarded 3rd place in the Impromptu Speaking Contest

CAFS students have been performing exceptionally well over the past few years. “In addition to support from the college’s administration, I believe that the advisors and faculty who challenge students to operate outside of their comfort zone are contributing factors to their success,” said Tommeron Timmons, co-advisor of the FAMU Chapter. He went on to state that “the mission of MANRRS is unique and serves a vital role in helping to provide professional development to students, which helps to foster and enhance the leadership, organizational and public speaking skills – needed for future careers.” As described on its website, MANRRS serves its members by “encouraging diversity and pluralism, and promoting the development of leadership skills that will prepare members for a thriving future in the agricultural, natural resources and related sciences.”

42

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


PROVIDING

HELP IN A TIME OF NEED

by Heather Johnson

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University's (FAMU) College of Agriculture and Food Sciences (CAFS) has been a

provide aid to Bahamians affected by the

in Agriculture, Natural Resources

storm.

and Related Sciences (MANRRS), the

"I was shocked to learn of the utter

Veterinary Technology Club and the AG

favored choice for higher education for

devastation that Hurricane Dorian

Ambassadors also helped to acquire the

many Bahamians. Therefore, after seeing

brought to some of the Bahama islands,

supplies.

the devastation of Hurricane Dorian,

and I believed that our college had

The items were transported to Miami

CAFS knew their help would be needed.

no choice but to try to respond in a

for shipment to Freeport, Grand Bahamas,

meaningful way," Thomas said.

to meet FAMU College of Agriculture and

Hurricane Dorian slammed into the northwestern part of the Bahamas as a

Almost 700 pounds of food, toiletries,

Food Sciences alumni Tamico Nelson

Category 5 hurricane with wind gusts of

clothing and other essential items

and Roscoe Kemp who will distribute the

up to 220 miles per hour, making it the

were donated by students, faculty,

items to those in need.

strongest hurricane on record to affect

staff and friends. Student clubs and

The College of Agriculture and Food

the Bahamas.

organizations such as the American

Sciences Dean Robert Taylor, Ph.D., who

Society of Agricultural and Biological

grew up and worked in the Bahamas, and

Ph.D., initiated the Hurricane Dorian

Engineers (ASABE), the Animal Science

his wife donated the funds to ship the

relief fund and coordinated the effort to

Club, the Food Science Club, Minorities

items to the Bahamas.

Brittney Clark and Verian Thomas,

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

43


FAMU TO GET CITIZEN SCIENCE WATERSHED LAB by Latasha Tanner

The U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA-NIFA) has approved funding under its 1890 Institution Teaching, Research and Extension Capacity Building Grant for the establishment of a Citizen Science Watershed Lab at Florida A&M University (FAMU). The initiative is in collaboration with FAMU’s College of Agriculture and Food Sciences (CAFS) Center for Water Resources (CWR) and Cooperative Extension Program, along with the University of Florida (UF) Institute of Food and 5 (L-R) Latasha Tanner, Kimberly Davis, Katherine Milla, Ph.D., Maia McGuire research and extension team for the FAMU citizen science watershed lab.

Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) Sea Grant Program. “When fully developed, the lab will be housed at FAMU and will serve FAMU’s clientele as an Interdisciplinary Citizen Science Learning and Research

Center that collaborates across academic, government and private sectors,” said Dr. Katherine Milla, professor and project principal investigator. “The new facility will be established around an initial effort to develop a microplastic awareness project in Leon County.” There is mounting evidence that microplastics, which are plastic fragments less than 5mm in length, pose a serious threat to aquatic organisms and ecosystems, and may also pose as a threat to humans. Because plastics degrade very slowly, over hundreds to thousands of years, they continue to accumulate and have become pervasive in all elements of the environment, including water, land and air. They are consumed by aquatic organisms. Research on the effects of plastic consumption in animals, including humans is still in its infancy. Maia Mcguire, Ph.D., who developed and manages the Florida microplastic awareness project, in Flagler County, Florida, demonstrated to a team of FAMU personnel the collection of miroplastic samples from along sections of the beach in Flagler County and the collection, filtration and analysis of water samples for various types of microplastic fibers. “The team at FAMU is currently in the process of establishing a microplastic sampling and analysis facility at FAMU. When the initial phase of the Watershed Lab is completed, it will have the capability to educate community stakeholders about microplastics, and train students and citizen volunteers to collect microplastics data,” said Milla. Other Co-PIs on the project are Amita Jain, Ph.D., research associate, Odemari Mbuya, Ph.D., professor and CWR director at FAMU and Maia McGuire, Ph.D., extension agent IV, UF/IFAS. For more information about this project, contact Katherine Milla at katherine.milla@famu.edu.

44

F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY


5 Odemari Mbuya, Ph.D., Director for the Center for Water Resources at Florida A&M University in attendance at the 68th United Nations Civil Society Conference.

FAMU REPRESENTED AT UNITED NATIONS CIVIL SOCIETY CONFERENCE Florida A&M University was represented at the National Council for Climate Change, Sustainable Development and Public Leadership at the 68th United Nations Civil Society Conference. Odemari Mbuya, Ph.D., professor and director of the Center for Water Resources in the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences attended the conference in Salt Lake City, Utah. The theme for the conference was “Building Inclusive and Sustainable Cities and Communities. “Although many countries are in the implementation phase to achieve Sustainable Development Goals, governments cannot achieve these goals by themselves, but by working together with the Civil Society such as non-governmental organizations, community groups, labor unions, charitable organizations, faith-based organizations, professional organizations and foundations,” said Mbuya. The FAMU-India Collaboration was hailed as a model of “working together to achieve integrated solutions for complex challenges.” The collaboration of FAMU, Anand Agricultural University, Junagadh Agricultural University, Vivekanand Research & Training Institute and the Government of India, are working together to promote and implement Climate Smart Agriculture 5 Latasha Tanner research associate collecting plastic fragments from Flagler Beach.

and rural development in India.

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

45


I

PATRICK EVERETT

knew Florida A&M University would be

the historic halls of Florida A&M University. And your

the institution I would attend after leaving

mother says, “Why not agribusiness?”

high school. What I wanted to study, that I

was not sure about. So imagine hearing your

mother ask, “why not agribusiness?” I began my

academic career in the halls of Perry-Paige in

1998.

Imagine yourself as a young high school student, trying to decide which academic discipline you would undergo as you matriculated through

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F LO R I DA A & M UNIV E R S ITY

The first day of college can be a bit stressful for some, others might find it exciting and thrilling. “My first day at FAMU was fresh and interesting, knowing that many other students from across the U.S. and the world were there for one goal, and that was to matriculate and graduate with their degree,” said Everett. Like with anything else in life, Everett’s academic career had its fair share of ups and downs, however, he


MY FIRST DAY AT FAMU WAS FRESH AND INTERESTING, KNOWING THAT MANY OTHER STUDENTS FROM ACROSS THE U.S. AND THE WORLD WERE THERE FOR ONE GOAL, AND THAT WAS TO MATRICULATE AND GRADUATE WITH THEIR DEGREE had a team of student friends and professors who ensured

Companies both large and small came from around the

that his academic priorities remained at the top. “The

world to pitch ideas and food concepts to large companies

culture diversity on the campus is rich and it made it easy

with the hopes of entering the market place,” said Everett.

for me to find people who I felt most comfortable with. In

“There were many ‘barriers to entry,’ but most of the people I

addition, the small class sizes in the former College and

met were determined to showcase why the food product they

Engineering Science, Technology and Agriculture (CESTA)

branded would be the next global commodity.”

now College of Agriculture and Food Sciences (CAFS) were

Everett graduated from CESTA in fall 2000 with a

small, which made it comfortable to talk with professors on

bachelor’s in agribusiness, with an offer of two fully-paid

a personal level,” said Everett. While at FAMU, Everett had

scholarships from WSU and UGA to pursue his master’s

internship opportunities to explore careers in the field of

degree. He chose WSU, located in Pullman, Washington.

agribusiness at other higher educational institutions and

Everett recounts that although the resources at WSU were

within the public sectors, both in the U.S. and abroad.

by far greater than that at FAMU, the quality of education

His first two internships were at Washington State

received at WSU was the same. After graduating with his

University (WSU) and the University of Georgia (UGA).

master’s degree in the spring of 2002, he went on to work

“These internships helped me learn more academics, that

with the USDA as an agricultural statistician for seven

I had not yet covered in my courses at FAMU, and the role

years where he kept track of the nation’s food supply, both

agribusiness plays in the U.S. economic activity,” said

domestically and internationally.

Everett. His overseas internship opportunity took him to the State

He then went on to work for the Department of Treasury, as an economist, where he handled large companies who

Department in Brussels, Belgium. There he got his dabble in

had off-shore accounts. It was in this position that he was

U.S. foreign relations¬—witnessing discussions on economic

able to fully see the effects of micro and macroeconomics

and political factors that affects the relationship between

on the gross domestic product. He now serves as a

the U.S. and the European Union. “The experience taught me

research operations analyst with the Department of Treasury

how U.S. delegates interact with the rest of the world and the

conducting process improvement and awareness of different

economic factors that were important to both domestic and

segments within the organization.

foreign parties at the time,” said Everett. Another internship experience that helped him to explore

“As I reflect on my undergraduate years, I thank God for giving me the opportunity to study at FAMU-CESTA in an

his field of study was with the U.S. Department of Agriculture

environment that was friendly and receptive to all students

(USDA) Food and Trade Industry. “This internship allowed

who were willing to learn…the foundation built there still

me to see competition and marketing at the base level.

stands solid as a rock”

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

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Student Corner >>>>>>>>>>>>>> (Awards and Appointments) JERMAINE PERIER Entomology master’s student won 1st place in the graduate student competitive poster presentation for outstanding achievement in plant health and production, and plant products at the 2019 Association of Research Directors Symposium, which was held in Jacksonville, Florida. ALEX ORFINGER Agricultural science graduate student was awarded the Ernst Mayr travel grant in the amount of $1,000 from the Harvard University Museum of Comparative Zoology to help fund further academic training at Clemson University. He also won 1st place at the annual Florida Association of Aquatic Biologist Meeting, which was held in East Point, Florida. Presentation titled “Systematics of the Eastern North American Polycentropus sensustricto (Trichoptera: Polycentropodidae): A Proposal.” XAVIER MIRANDA-COLÓN Agribusiness senior was awarded the 2019 Florida Fertilizer & Agrichemical Association scholarship for academic achievements. JENIVA ST. PHAR Biological systems engineering senior received the FASABE 2019 Outstanding Student Award. Recognition was made at the Florida Section of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers 2019 Conference. RACHEL FERNANDEZ Animal science junior was awarded a $1,000 scholarship by the Florida Association for Food Protection for demonstrating passion and interest for food safety. DEEPA RAVEEBDRANPILLAI AND MIKELA PRYOR Agricultural science master’s student and biological systems engineering senior were awarded travel scholarships to attend the National Technical Association 91st Annual Conference, which was held in Baltimore, Maryland. MIKELA PRYOR Won 1st place in the undergraduate oral competition for her presentation titled “Meta-Analysis of Ochlocknee River Basin.” She also won 1st place for her oral presentation at the annual American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Meeting, which was held in Boston, Massachusetts.

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faculty & Staff Corner

Conchita Newman >>>>>>>>>>>>>> Conchita Newman, extension agent received the 2019 Association of Extension Administrators (AEA) Award for Excellence in Extension in the Area of 4-H Youth Development. The award was presented at the Southern Region Program Leadership Network Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana. She also received the 2nd place award in the IGNITE presentation Competition. The title of her presentation was “AgriStem: Germinating Future Leaders.”

Jennifer Taylor, Ph.D. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Jennifer Taylor, Ph.D., associate professor was one of four recipients recognized and honored in September by the Rodale Institute for her contribution to the organic farming industry. She was also named 2019 “Woman of the Year in Agriculture,” for her service as an educator; development of a statewide small farm program with a focus on food systems and sustainable agriculture; and the hands-on-training and technical assistance she provided in alternative ag systems, organic farming systems, alternative market/food systems development and sustainable living for underserved farming communities.

Muhammad Haseeb, Ph.D. >>>>>>>>>>> Muhammad Haseeb, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Entomology Program received FAMU's 2019 Research Excellence Award. He also received the 2019 Achievement Award for Teaching, from the Florida Entomological Society. The award was presented at the 102nd Annual Meeting of the Society, which was held in Jupiter, Florida.

Kimberly Davis >>>>>>>>>>>>

Robert W. Taylor, Ph.D. >>>>>

Kimberly Davis, extension agent received 1st place at

Robert W. Taylor, Ph.D., dean of the College of Agriculture

the 2019 Southern Region Program Leadership Network

and Food Sciences was appointed to serve as a member

Meeting IGNITE Presentation Competition. The title of

of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer

her presentation was “Extension’s Role from Pre-Disaster

Services Innovation Advisory Workgroup. The term of

Planning to Long Term Recovery: Engaging with At-risk

appointment will expire June 30, 2022.

Communities in the face of Disaster.”

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

49


faculty & Staff Corner cont'd

Michee Lachaud, Ph.D. >>>>>

Dreamal Worthen, Ph.D. >>>

Assistant professor in the Agri-Business Program was awarded

Professor in the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences

the 2019 Outstanding Young Professional Award in recognition

was elected president of the Rural Sociology Society. She

of early career contributions to teaching, research and service

will be the first African-American female to ever serve in this

in the agricultural economics and agri-business. The award was

capacity.

presented by the Committee on the Opportunities and Status of Blacks in Agricultural Economics and Committee on Women in Agricultural Economics (COSBAE-CWAE) Mentoring Initiative: Engaging Students and Young Professions to Build the Next Generation of Agricultural Economists. The award was presented at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association in Atlanta, Georgia.

Jenelle Robinson, Ph.D. >>>>> Assistant professor in the Food Science Program was selected as the recipient of the 2019 FAMU Sustainability Fellowship Award.

Anandhi Swamy, Ph.D. >>>>>> Assistant professor in the Biological Systems Engineering Program, in collaboration with Ohio State University developed and documented two novel methods that they use in the classroom to teach the concept of “Green Space.�

Odemari Mbuya, Ph.D. >>>>> Professor and director for the Center for Water Resources was selected as an International Scientific Advisor Board Member

Jesusa Legaspi, Ph.D. >>>>>>>> Co-director for the Center for Biological Control received the 2019 Achievement Award for Extension. The award was presented at the 102nd Annual Meeting of Florida Entomology Society, which was held in Jupiter, Florida.

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for the Africa Center of Excellence for Mycotoxin and Food Safety based at the Federal University of Technology-Minna (Nigeria). The Center is funded by the World Bank.


Grant Awards >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> AMITA JAIN, PH.D.

KATHERINE MILLA, PH.D.

Research associate, along with CO-PIs, Odemari Mbuya, Ph.D.,

Assistant professor was awarded USDA-ARS grant in the amount

professor, Katherine Milla, Ph.D., professor, Ashvini Chauhan,

of $103,588. The funding will enable Dr. Ananga to conduct

Ph.D., professor and J.M. Grace, III, Ph.D., research engineer were

research through the 1890s Faculty Research Sabbatical Program

awarded a USDA-NIFA grant in the amount of $299,948. The

to identify southern leaf blight resistance genes in maize. The

funding will be used to study the effect of reclaimed wastewater

duration of the grant is September 2019 – August 2021.

irrigation on soil health and the environment. The duration of the grant is February 2019 – February 2022.

DANIEL SOLIS, PH.D. Assistant professor was awarded the USDA Forest Service Grant in

ANTHONY ANANGA, PH.D.

the amount of $10,000 for “Undergraduate Experiential Learning.”

Assistant professor was awarded USDA-ARS grant in the amount

The duration of the grant is January – June 2019.

of $103,588. The funding will enable Dr. Ananga to conduct research through the 1890s Faculty Research Sabbatical Program

DANIEL SOLIS, PH.D.

to identify southern leaf blight resistance genes in maize. The

Assistant professor was awarded the “Career Pathways for

duration of the grant is September 2019 – August 2021.

Agribusiness Students to the Produce and Floral Industry” by Center for Growing Talent, Produce Marketing Association. The

MOHAMMAD RAHMAN, PH.D. AND MEHBOOB SHEIKH,

grant is for $10,000 and has a duration of July – November 2019.

PH.D. Awarded the Viticulture Advisory Council, FDACS Grant to

MICHEE LACHAUD, PH.D.

develop sugar rich muscadine grapes using CRIPR-Cas9

Assistant professor was awarded the USDA, McIntire-Stennis

technology. The duration of the grant is July 2019 – June 2020.

Program Grant in the amount of $31,000. The grant will be used to study the economic and financial analysis of increasing cattle

ISLAM EL SHARKAWY, PH.D.

beef production and profitability in Indian River County in Florida

Assistant professor was awarded the following grants:

through silvopasture practices. The duration of the grant is

USDA-NIFA 1890 Capacity Building Program grant in the

September 2019 – September 2020.

amount of $461,832 to study Bioactivity-guided Discover

of Effective Anticancer and Antioxidant Compounds in

MOHAMMAD RAHMAN, PH.D.

Muscadine Grapes. The duration of the grant is February 2020

Research associate and Mehboob Sheikh, Ph.D., professor were

– January 2023.

awarded the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer

USDA – NIFA 1890 capacity Building Program in the amount of

Services (FDACS), Viticulture Advisory Council (VAC) grants

$500,000. The funding will be used to study Next Generation

program in the amount of $40,000 to develop sugar rich

Grape Breeding: Integrated Approach to Empower the Quality

muscadine grapes using CRIPR-Cas9 technology. The duration of

of Research and Training at Florida A&M University. The

the grant is July 2019 – June 2020.

duration of the grant is March 2020 – 202 February 2022. •

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS), Viticulture Advisory Council (VAC) grants program in the amount of $40,000. The focus of study is Breeding High Quality Southern Grape Cultivars for Meeting Industry Demands in Florida. The duration of the grant is June 2019 – May 2020.

CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

51


faculty & Staff Corner

cont'd

Publications >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> AGAR, J., SHIVLANI, M., FLEMING, C., SOLIS, D.

DARWISH, A.G., MENDONCA, P., SOLIMAN K.F.A., EL

2019. Small-scale Fishers’ Perceptions About the Performance of

SHARKAWY, I.

Seasonal Closures in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. Ocean

2019. The Anticancer and Antioxidant effects of Muscadine Grape

and Coastal Management 175:33-42.

Extracts on Racially Different Triple-negative Breast Cancer Cells. Anticancer Research 39: 4043 – 4053.

ALVAREZ, S., BAMPASIDOU, M., SOLIS, D. 2019. Evaluating the Impact of Employing Local Tax Collectors

HOTTEL, B., PEREIRA, R., GEZAN S., KOEHLER, P.

to Improve State-Level Licensing Program Outcomes in Florida.

2019. Sticky Trap Design Considerations for Entrapping Bed Bugs.

Evaluation Review. https://doi.org/10.1177/0193841X19865353

Insects. https://www.mdpi.com/2075-4450/10/6/177

ALVAREZ, S., SOLIS, D., HWANG, J.

KAMBIRANDA, D.M, BASHA S.M., STRINGER, S.J., OBUYA, J.O.,

2019. Modeling Shellfish Harvest Policies for Food Safety: Wild

SNOWDEN, J.J.

Oyster Harvest Restrictions to Prevent Foodborne Vibrio Vulnificus.

2019. Multi-year Quantitative Evaluation of Stilbenoids Levels

Food Policy 83:219-230.

Among Selected Muscadine Grape Cultivars. Molecules. 11;24(5). pii: E981. doi:10.3390/molecules24050981

ALVAREZ, S., LUPI, F., SOLIS, D., THOMAS, M. 2019. Valuing Provision Scenarios of Coastal Ecosystem Services:

KANGA, L.H.B., SIEBERT, S.C., SHEIKH, M., LEGASPI J.C.

The Case of Boat Ramp Closures Due to Harmful Algae Blooms in

2019. Pesticide Residues in Conventionally and Organically

Florida. Water 11(6), 1250.

Managed Apiaries in South and North Florida. Current Investigations in Agriculture and Current Research 7(3). doi.10.32474/

ANANDHI A., PIERSON, D.C., FREI, A.

CAICR.2019.07.000262

2019. Evaluation of Climate Model Performance Over the New York City Water Supply Basins Using Probability-based Skill Scores.

LI R., IBEANUSI, V., HOYLE-GARDNER, J., CRANDALL, C., JAGOE,

Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management (accepted).

C., SEAMAN, J., ANANDHI, A., CHEN, G. 2019. Bacterial-facilitated uranium transport in the presence of

ANANDHI A., SRINIVAS, V.V., NANJUNDIAH, R.S., KUMAR D.N.

phytate at Savannah River Site. Chemosphere. 223:351-7.

2019. Downscaling and Disaggregation of Wind Speed to River Basin in India for IPCC SRES Scenarios. International Journal of

LI S., HARRIS, S., ANANDHI A., CHEN G.

Energy Water Food Nexus. 1: 29-41.

2019. Predicting biochar properties and functions based on feedstock and pyrolysis temperature: A review and data syntheses.

BOURASSA, M., MEISSNER, T., CEROVECKI, I., CHANG, P.,

Journal of Cleaner Production. 215:890-902.

DONG, X., DE CHIARA, G., DONLON, C., DUKHOVSKOY, D., ELYA, J., FORE, A., FEWINGS, M., FOSTER, R., GILLE, S.,

NAYAK, J.J., GAJJAR, P.D., BASHA, S.M., NAIK, K.S.S.

HAUS, B., HRISTOVA-VELEVA, S., HOLBACH, H., JELENAK, Z.,

Interrelationship between stilbene producing ability and Aspergillus

KNAFF, J., KRANZ, S., MANASTER, A., MAZLOFF, M., MEARS,

colonization on selected peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) genotypes.

C., MOUCHE, A., PORTABELLA, M., REUL, N., RICCIARDULLI,

Peanut Science. 2019 46: (accepted)

L., RODRIGUEZ, E., SAMPSON, C., SOLIS, D., STOFFELEN, A., STUKEL, M., STILES, B., WEISSMAN D., AND WENTZ F.

WU, P., HASEEB, M., ZHANG, R., KANGA, L.H.B., LEGASPI, J.C.

2019. Remotely Sensed Winds and Wind Stresses for Marine

2019. In vitro Consumption Patterns of Pepper Weevil, Anthonomus

Forecasting and Ocean Modeling. Frontier in Marine Science 6:443.

eugenii (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on two Commercial Pepper

https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2019.00443.

Cultivars in Florida. Applied Entomology and Zoology. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13355-019-00645-x

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Alumni Corner >>>>>>>>>>>>>> NANDKUMAR DIVATE Agri-business alumnus, has been

Congratulations 2019 Graduates! >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS SPRING 2019 Darius Batten

B.S., Food Science

Veronica Burse

B.S., Animal Science

Tamia Campbell

B.S., Animal Science

Aytron Canahualpa

B.S., Agricultural Science

Dorian Clark

B.S., Food Science

Imani Cooper**

B.S., Biological Systems Engineering

Recently appointed as a bank analyst

Cierra Edwards

B.S., Food Science

at the Farm Credit Administration.

Jeremy Greene**

B.S., Agri-Business

McNealy earned a master’s degree

Ahotep Holder**

B.S., Animal Science

from the College of Agriculture

Sharise James*

B.S., Animal Science

and Food Sciences agri-business

Zaida Kidane

B.S., Animal Science

program in 2018.

Shayla Mason***

B.S., Food Science

promoted to director of Workforce Education Data Systems at the Florida Department of Education. GREG MCNEALY

Briana Orsborn**

B.S., Food Science

CHRISTOPHER DAVIS, PH.D.

Janeesa Pagan

B.S., Biological Systems Engineering

Elected chair of the Committee on

Ryan Peltonen

B.S., Agronomy

Opportunities and Status of Blacks

Vanessa Pitts

B.S., Animal Science

in Agricultural Economics. Davis

Esi Sawyer*

B.S., Food Science

earned a master’s degree from the

Meghan Spencer*

B.S., Food Science

College of Agriculture and Food

Jeniva St. Phar

B.S., Biological Systems Engineering

Sciences agri-business program in

Sarah Verges

B.S., Animal Science

1995.

Riann White***

B.S., Food Science

SUMMER 2019 Joshua Darby

B.S., Animal Science

Telisa Evans

B.S., Agri-Business

Colby Gay***

B.S., Animal Science

FALL 2019 Demani Blatch

B.S., Animal Science

Danielle Coney

B.S., Agricultural Science

Janae Cooke

B.S., Food Science

Papa Gueye

B.S., Agronomy

Johnesha Jackson

B.S., Animal Science

Jahlita Janeau

B.S., Food Science

Nyah Martin

B.S., Food Science

Aubrey McCarty

B.S., Agri-Business

Xavier Miranda-Colon

B.S., Agri-Business

Jenisis Moreland

B.S., Agri-Business

Oswald Pacheco-Laboy

B.S., Agronomy

Raena Patterson

B.S., Food Science

Lourdes Perez Cordero

B.S., Agronomy

of Water Resources in the College

Jenae Powell

B.S., Animal Science

of Agriculture and Food Science.

Mikela Pryor

B.S., Biological Systems Engineering

Mbuya is also a co-author of “Building

Cameron Singleton

B.S., Agri-Business

Book Chapter Publication >>>>>>> Strategies for Doubling Farmers’ Income: A Gujurat Perspective, is the title of the book of which Odemari Mbuya Ph.D., is a co-author. Mbuya is a professor and director for the Center

Climate Smart Farmers,” *** Summa Cum Laude | ** Magna Cum Laude | * Cum Laude CO L L EG E O F AG RICULTURE A ND FO O D S C IE N C E S

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Internships >>>>>>>>>>>>

graduates cont'd GRADUATE STUDENTS SPRING 2019 Josie Danielle Toliver

Kayla Braggs

University of Georgia Cooperative Extension

Skylar Broome

Purdue University College of Veterinary Science

Degree: M.S., Agricultural Sciences Major: Plant Science SUMMER 2019 Patricia Odun Akingboye

Godfred Gakeptor

Degree: M.S., Agricultural Sciences

Degree: M.S., Agricultural Sciences

Major: Plant Science

Major: Agri-Business

Thesis: Genotypic Variation in

Thesis: The Cost Effectiveness of

Vinification Qualities and Antioxidant

Biological Control of Air Potato Vine

Properties of Muscadine Wines in

Using Air Potato Beetle (liloceris

Florida.

cheni): A Biocontrol Agent in Florida.

Thesis Chair: Violeta Tsolova, Ph.D.

Thesis Chair: Michael Thomas, Ph.D.

Donna Arnold

Walker Marechal

Degree: M.S., Agricultural Sciences

Degree: M.S., Agricultural Sciences

Major: Entomology

Major: Entomology

Thesis: Examining The Prevalence of

Thesis: Management of the Small

Solenopsis Invicta Virus 3 (SINV-3) In

Hive Beetle, Aethina Tumida Murray

Solenopsis Invicta

(coleopteran: Nitidulidae) in Honey

(Hymenoptera: Formicidae) Alates

Bee, Apis Mellifera L., (Hymenoptera

Collected in Rural and urban Areas of

Apidae) Colonies.

North and Central Florida.

Thesis Chair: Lambert Kanga, Ph.D.

Thesis Chair: Benjamin Hottel, Ph.D. Jermaine Perier Kartik Joshi

Degree: M.S., Agricultural Sciences

Degree: M.S., Agricultural Sciences

Major: Entomology

Major: Agri-Business

Thesis: Integration of Two Predaceous

Thesis: Impacts of Climatic Variability

Stinkbugs and A Larval Parasitoid

on Partial Technical Efficiency and

to Manage Armyworm Spodoptera

Agricultural Total Factor Productivity

Frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae),

Across the Southern States in the

an ecologically Important Pest Insect

United States.

of Corn in Florida.

Thesis Chair: Michee Lachaud, Ph.D.

Thesis Chair: Muhammad Haseeb, Ph.D.

Meghan Campbell

Iowa State University

Janae Cooke

JBS USA Holdings, Inc. – Pilgrim’s Pride

Olivia Gilstrap

University of Georgia

Kierra Goosby

BASF

Kendahl Heckstall

Washington State University

Jaylin Jacobs

Amazon Association

Kayla Keith

U.S. Department of Agriculture – Natural Resources Conservation Service

Jacob Long

John Deere

Ajiona Lunsford:

Cheetah Conservation Fund, South Africa

E’lan Miles

Pineapple with a Purpose LLC

Xavier Miranda-Colon Cargill Jenisis Moreland

University of Georgia

Rochard Moricette

Elanco

Shierney Murphy

Wayne Farms

Deaundr’e Newsome

John Deere

Mikela Pryor

U.S. Department of Agriculture – Natural Resources Conservation Service

FALL 2019 Jacenta Hinton

Andrew Rhone

Walmart

Zachary Scarlett

Frito Lay – Pepsico

William Walter

U.S. Department of Agriculture – Natural

Degree: M.S., Agricultural Sciences Major: Plant Science Thesis: Effects of growth Yield and Seed Quality Components of Brassica Carinata: Avanza G41. Thesis Chair: Violeta Tsolova, Ph.D.

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Resources Conservation Service


Profile for CAFS MAGAZINE

Florida A&M University College of Agriculture and Food Sciences 2019 Magazine  

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