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FALL

2017

A MAGAZINE FOR COLORADO’S ART EDUCATORS


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Collage Fall 2017

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Table of Contents

In This Issue 9. ArtSource Professional Development with Artist Claudia Roulier and Art Educator Gwen Ahlers CAEA 2017 Fall Conference by Gwen Ahlers 11. Explore and Create by Sam Mizwicki 19. Shining Bear Art Studios by Mike Carroll 23. A Window into Western Art by Kayla Green

In Every Issue

25. North Eastern Colorado Professional Development Day by Christina Martinez

5. President’s Message by Vanessa Hayes-Quintana

28. High School Level News by Justine Sawyer

7. Letter from the Editor by Alexandra Overby

30. 2017-18 Youth Art Month Flag Design Competition

58. CAEA Executive Board and Division Representatives Council Directory

32. Celebrating the 2017 Colorado Scholastic Awards by Pam Starck

59. CAEA Task Force Chairs and Publications Directory

34. ArtSource Summer Institute 2017 by Jody Chapel

59. Regional Representatives

37. Cherry Creek School District Visual Arts Workshops 2017-2018 by Lisa Adams 43. 2017 CAEA Fall Conference “It’s Always for Art”

Page 11: Explore and Create by Sam Mizwicki

COLLAGE is published by the Colorado Art Education Association Vanessa Hayes-Quintana – President Alexandra Overby – Editor Rosemary Reinhart & Elisabeth Reinhart – Copy Editors Janet McCauley – Layout Design & Production Please submit all materials to: COLLAGE Editor: Alexandra Overby, alexaoverby@gmail.com

Page 32: Celebrating the 2017 Colorado Scholastic Awards by Pam Starck Cover Photo: Artwork by Alyssa Brunner, Uzuri, Legend High School, Teacher Kalen Thornton

COLLAGE is published tri-annually. Submission deadlines for COLLAGE are: Spring Issue - February 1; Winter Issue - October 1; Fall Issue - July 1. Email all submissions to alexaoverby@gmail.com. Contributions of articles, photos, and artwork are encouraged. Submissions of text should be emailed as Word documents. Accompanying photographs of student work or students at work is encouraged. Do not include images within a Word document. Images should be in .jpg format and sent as separate attachments. Refer to the attachment and the file name in the body of the e-mail. Whenever possible, include captions and, in the case of photos of original student or teacher artwork, include names of artists. Submitted items may be edited for clarity, length, and format. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the authors and publication does not imply endorsement. Lesson plan submissions must include lesson objectives, appropriate assessments, procedures, standards applications, and materials.

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President’s Message

President’s Message by Vanessa Hayes-Quintana

Summer is in full swing, but the new school year calls me to reflections and the type of planning that is usually seen in January. This is my time of year to take inventory, assess, and plan my goals for the new year. Excitement surrounding CAEA goals has carried me through a couple of tough teaching years. Aside from my personal quest to engage in the most meaningful and fulfilling activities, my work as president has shed a light of positive anticipation on the upcoming school year, and hope of creations to come.

The NAHS Leadership Day will connect Colorado colleges with high school students and teachers through hands-on workshops and discussions of the colleges’ offerings and portfolio development. A big part of my summer is spent managing CAEA business. With our Fall conference as the biggest focus, our reps and I have envisioned ways to make CAEA relevant to more art teachers and members.

One way we’re doing this is strengthening CAEA’s connection to high school teachers and students, and building the connection high school students have to Colorado’s colleges and universities. For the conference this year, we have planned a strong track of high school studio workshops. Even more exciting is the introduction of our first National Arts Honor Society (NAHS) Leadership Day. With our High School Representative Justine Sawyer and our President-Elect DJ Osmack, we have planned the beginnings of what we envision to be a vital part of our Colorado art education community. NAHS Leadership Day will be held the week after our conference, on Saturday, November 11, 2017, at South High School in Denver. The NAHS Leadership Day will connect Colorado colleges with high school students and teachers through hands-on workshops and discussions of the colleges’ offerings and portfolio development. Students will have the opportunity to engage individually and with groups as they explore the arts beyond Grade 12. Creative industries are an overwhelming part of Colorado’s economy,

Our conference will be a tremendous event! 2017 marks CAEA’s 80th anniversary.

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and helping high school art students connect to Colorado’s colleges is an important part of CAEA’s Strategic Plan. Future plans for NAHS Leadership Day will include Junior NAHS participation. I look forward to the many good things to come from this new event, and from supporting the strength of our high school art programs. I hope you all make time to attend our annual Fall conference this year, “It’s Always Time for Art.” Our conference will be a tremendous event! 2017 marks CAEA’s 80th anniversary. This is something to be very proud of! CAEA has served countless art teachers and students throughout the years, and this very special milestone will be fully celebrated in November! Look forward to the usual array of workshops and Master Classes. This year we have 150 scheduled workshops and nine Master Classes. You can find Educator Effectiveness and High School workshop tracks online along with a full calendar of events. There is definitely something for everyone! Keynote speakers are Portia Munson, Michael Bell, and Leo Segedin. Mandy Hallenius of the DaVinci Initiative returns to present more workshops. There will also be the Vendor Reception, Art Auction, Karaoke, Awards Banquet, and the Saturday Night Bash. Many past presidents and board members are joining us as honored guests.

Creative industries are an overwhelming part of Colorado’s economy, and helping high school art students connect to Colorado’s colleges is an important part of CAEA’s Strategic Plan. Don’t forget to bring a piece of art for the auction. Auction funds support CAEA’s scholarship funds. Congratulations to Erica Richard for receiving the 2017 Teacher Scholarship! Following our Awards

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Banquet is the Saturday Night Bash. Denver band Wash Park will help us celebrate CAEA’s 80th anniversary and cap off a weekend of connections and great art making. “Full Steam Ahead” is the theme for the Saturday Night Bash, and everyone is invited to “costume up” in their favorite speakeasy/ steam punk/whatever-suits-your-fancy 1930s creation.

Our CAEA representative elections are coming at the end of this year. If you are interested in supporting art education work in Colorado, we’d love to have you join us! At the conference, we will also have registration open for the Summer 2018 DaVinci Initiative workshops to be held in Colorado Springs and at Adams State University in Alamosa. This is a fantastic opportunity for both teachers and students to refine their art skills. Amanda Hallenius will be teaching the classes and will be available for questions at the conference. Our CAEA representative elections are coming at the end of this year. If you are interested in supporting art education work in Colorado, we’d love to have you join us! You can contact me or any CAEA rep if you are interested. CAEA is a fantastic organization, full of serving, connecting, and learning. Member participation makes us vibrant, and you’ll find relevant, meaningful, fulfilling connections that further your work as an art educator. See you at the conference in Breckenridge in November!


Letter From the Editor

Letter Fr om the Editor

Setting the Stage for Another Great Year by Alexandra Overby, PhD Here we go again – another school year starting and we are all hitting the ground running. While we all will be mourning how quickly the summer flew by, I know all of us are working hard to make our classrooms ready for another set of students. Say goodbye to your flip-flops and the ability to go to the bathroom whenever you want and let’s make this year an exciting one!

Do you ever think about the big ideas first? This is my favorite way to design my year.

How do you develop curriculum for your classes? The obvious answer is to look at our Colorado State Visual Art Standards.¹ While they are great in their openness and focus on big concepts in our content, they can also be daunting and unhelpful for some of our teachers who want something more defined. You can also look to the national standards supported by NAEA. The national standards are much more defined and complex and they work in tandem with our Colorado standards. Using two sets of standards is a little more work, but they can set the overall academic expectations for your curriculum.

war/conflict; and nature.2 Working with big ideas allows you to focus the units on meaning and communication while teaching students the technical skills they need to be successful. Big ideas work well in both choice-based and traditional art classrooms and can be designed to meet the developmental needs of your students. Since I teach adolescents, I tend to use themes such as power and identity because I know they are interested in those topics. While I choose a new big idea for each unit, I have met teachers who are extremely creative and have used just one big idea to weave through their entire curriculum for the year!

Do you ever think about the big ideas first? This is my favorite way to design my year. Big ideas are essential, universal themes that run across the humanities such as family; identity; home;

I love working with the end in mind and use Backwards Design (McTighe & Wiggins)3 to develop my curriculum further. Having the end in mind helps me plan the steps it would take to get

¹The Colorado Visual Art Standards are getting a re-haul! The committee has been set and they are starting the work to refine and make our standards even stronger. Be on the lookout for the final results. 2A great book about using big ideas is Teaching Meaning in Artmaking by S. Walker (Davis Publications). 3 https://www.edutopia.org/pdfs/resources/wiggins-mctighe-backward-design-why-backward-is-best.pdf

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I have been collecting ideas from museum visits, the Cherry Creek Arts Festival, Pinterest, art websites, and talks with other teachers. I keep a notebook and jot down ideas as they come to me…. I have also found inspirations from my students. students prepared for the final expectation. This way of working forces me to think about how much time this unit would take; how many lessons are needed for students to learn the concepts; what resources and materials are needed; and what assessments need to be done to check for understanding. Sure, it takes time. But if I have a strong structure to the unit, it makes the day-today planning so much easier. So how do you get your ideas? Getting new ideas and developing them into lessons can be tiring. I am the first to admit that I have used worn-out lessons because I ran out of time or was at that point of the year where I was exhausted. This year, my goal is to collect ideas while I am rested from summer break. I have been collecting ideas from museum visits, the Cherry Creek Arts Festival, Pinterest, art websites, and talks with other teachers. I keep a notebook and jot down ideas as they come to me. When I am (finally) ready to prep for the school year, I will look at this notebook and choose the strongest ideas to develop as units. I have also found inspirations from my students. Let’s face it, our students have much more time to surf Instagram and the web to find things that interest them. They are usually more than willing to share their findings and introduce you to new

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artists and trends. It’s a great way for you to build relationships with them and helps you stay aware of what your students are being influenced by. With older students, you can open dialogue about appropriation and finding their own style (rather than copying exactly what they see). Younger students can share their favorite YouTube videos and pop-culture trends. Best wishes for productive and energizing planning that will set you up for an amazing school year! Share your ideas with us—send us your lesson plans, photos, and articles about what you do as an art teacher and artist! Collage is always looking for new voices to share with our CAEA community! Websites That Can Provide Inspiration: http://www.thisiscolossal.com http://mymodernmet.com https://www.theartofed.com https://www.arteducators.org (NAEA) http://www.caeaco.org (CAEA) http://denverartmuseum.org https://www.pinterest.com https://www.instagram.com https://www.behance.net


Artist Claudia Roulier

ArtSource Professional Development with Artist Claudia Roulier and Art Educator Gwen Ahlers CAEA 2017 Fall Conference by Gwen Ahlers

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Whether you are an ArtSource member or not, this workshop will be an amazing opportunity to meet new faces, interact with your art peers, and explore your artistic process. Come join ArtSource members and our special guest artist Claudia Roulier to create a work of art and find out what ArtSource is up to. This will be a truly fun and inspiring workshop! All are welcome and it’s free to all. Do you ever collect objects, art supplies, or paper that you plan to use in a work of art? Are you just drawn to certain things? Claudia has objects sitting in her studio to admire and look at for inspiration. Although she has some favorite things that she collects, she says that the “things she loves the most don’t always belong” and some never find their way into her work but they have a way of inspiring her or creating a bridge in other directions. Claudia will present her artistic vision and techniques, and her fun, whimsical, and surreal insights through combinations of collected found objects and natural material. Claudia loves working with themes such as urban decay and end times. She loves bones and is always collecting them, saying that they are a perfect metaphor for the life cycle. “I strive to draw new ideas and emotions from the solid, firm underpinnings of the past.” Whether you are an ArtSource member or not, this workshop will be an amazing opportunity to meet new faces, interact with your art peers, and explore your artistic process. It’s always time for art.

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What to bring: toys, collectables, jewelry, papers, string, etc. that could become a small 3-D work of art. What will be provided by ArtSource: glue, paint, collage papers, tins, and small wooden pieces. Want to know more about Claudia Roulier? You can find artist Claudia Roulier in all the right places throughout the Denver area. She has a working studio and teaches classes. I had so much fun finding Claudia this summer at the Art Students League and the Cherry Creek Arts Festival. Just looking at her work, you can see how much she enjoys creating drawings, paintings, mixed-media assemblage, installations, and sculpture. Like most artists, Claudia is a collector. She collects old photos, eclectic natural material, and objects that inspire her work. Visit Claudia’s studio at Prism Gallery, 999 Vallejo, Denver. Most days: M-W-F 10-3 http://www.claudiaroulier.com/index.html Want to know more about ArtSource? ArtSource is a wonderful state organization that supports art educators from all over the state of Colorado with professional development, art advocacy, and leadership training. Find our website on the CAEA resource bar and come join us at the conference to find out more: • Visit our ArtSource table across from the registration lobby. • Please join us for our annual ArtSource luncheon. It’s right after our professional development workshop. The luncheon is free to all.


Explore and Create

by Sam Mizwicki, Vail Mountain School CAEA Representative for Private/Independent/Charter Schools One of my professional goals during the 20162017 school year was to find ways to further support my students who had an interest in an art career. They are so talented and I wanted to try and expose them to a variety of possibilities. The Vail Mountain School (VMS) sets aside a whole week called Intraterm, which VMS’s website describes as: “A week-long ‘term between terms’ for upper school students and faculty. All other classes are put on hold, giving students the opportunity to participate in intensive explorations of subjects beyond the regular curriculum and, perhaps,

beyond their normal scope of interest and often with a travel component.” With this article, I hope to give you some ideas of local resources to try out with your students or even on your own. After much planning and preparation, we set out on our trip entitled “Professions in the Art World.” Ten students, Susanne (another art teacher), and I piled into our VMS van and headed to Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design (RMCAD). We basked in the sunshine as we toured around the campus. The tour was followed by a workshop

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geared towards artist collaboration. Many people think of being an artist as a “solo mission,” but RMCAD helped demonstrate that artist collaboration is a skill that is absolutely necessary in many creative industries. My students were electrified at seeing the studios and the artwork produced by artists not much older than them. For our second stop that day, we headed to one of my favorite workshop sites: The Ink Lounge in Denver. The Ink Lounge offers open studio, workshops, prints for sale, and commercial printmaking. Stu and Nicky have a tremendous amount of creativity flowing through them. They use printmaking as a platform to share their passion. I would call Nicky a “screen-printing workshop guru”

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After much planning and preparation, we set out on our trip entitled “Professions in the Art World.�

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who is always filled with loads of excitement for every workshop she leads. My students prepared drawings on their own the week prior, learned the screen-printing process, and printed their unique designs on shirts at the studio. This was the highlight of their trip and I know they would have been content being there for the whole week! I only wish I lived closer to participate in more of their offerings. Our second day was spent at everybody’s favorite: The Denver Art Museum (DAM). We toured the exhibition entitled Glory of Venice: Masterworks of the Renaissance. My students learned some typical characteristics of Renaissance Art while wandering

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in and out of the grand gallery spaces. One of their favorite areas of the museum was the hands-on fashion area. As they quickly scattered around to sketch and drape fabric on mannequins, we could immediately see it was second nature. The DAM is such a great resource and schools are lucky to be able to come free of charge to most exhibits. In February, the mountains are often hit with big snowstorms, so I hoped our next travels would not be canceled. Before our trip, I watched the weather all night long and into the early morning. Luckily, we got the green light to head over to another little gem: The Aspen Art Museum, which is incredible. The Education Department of the Aspen Art


A debrief with my students confirmed that the hands-on activities were their favorite parts. Museum is absolutely stellar. I teach there as a Summer Educator and get to see the magic happen firsthand. This day was special because Annie and Michelle, with the AAM Education team, designed a customized program just for us. I told them what I was hoping for and they hit it out of the park. The students were amazed when informed about the life of a curator. I think the students were the most intrigued with the travel component the job often offers. I could see the gears turning in their minds as they imagined what it could be like for them a few years down the road.

We toured the museum and ended the day meeting the hard-working installation team during the Jack Pierson install. Mr. Pierson was there watching it all and even said a quick hello to us! The Aspen Art Museum is also free of charge and provided us with a tasty and complimentary lunch! It is a must-see for all, but I definitely encourage you to bring your students if you are an educator. On our fourth day, we had already had quite a bit of windshield time and decided to stick close to home to see what our Vail Valley had to offer. The Alpine Arts Center in Edwards hosted us in their studio space. Lauren Merrill, the owner, talked about the business side and how she opened her own place years after teaching in a K-12 setting. She showed us projects from her college days to give a little taste of what post-high-school art could be for them. Lauren takes interns which is a great way for art lovers to see the inner workings before committing to a major in college.

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The second half of the day was spent with two amazing guest speakers who came to see us at VMS. Kevin Banker of Banker Cinefoto shared enthusiastically about what it takes to be a professional photographer. The students were especially interested in seeing the work that he did with drones. Victoria Jones of Worth Interiors gave us a roadmap of what it really takes to be in interior design. One big take-away was that “interior designers may decorate, but decorators do not design. There is a difference.” Although we are a small community here in the Vail Valley, there are many young creative types who have found success in their own way. Our last day was spent at BreckCreate, an interdisciplinary arts district in Breckenridge, Colorado. We toured the spaces including the live/work studios for travelling artists. I could not help but think that maybe one of my students will be creating art there one day! BreckCreate has numerous incredible offerings and we jumped at the opportunity to participate in a workshop about magazine transfers. Extraordinary art can be made with Citra Solv (a plant-based cleaning product) and National Geographic magazines, which art teachers always seem to have lying around. As anticipated, my students loved getting their hands dirty and creating again. A debrief with my students confirmed that the hands-on activities were their favorite parts. This made complete sense to me because, as artists, we are the ones who are drawn to making something with our hands instead of sitting and listening in a

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lecture hall. The desire to make flows through our veins as a true passion. It is refreshing to see these young adults excited for the arts since they hold such an important place in this world. I was extremely grateful to have this significant opportunity to spend five days outside of the classroom with my ten high-school art students and my co-leaders. After this Intraterm, I knew that I had exposed my students to things that I do not always teach about. They got to see and live it, instead of just hearing about it. They learned that the creative industries are growing rapidly and that there are countless options to pursue if they wish. As a result of this trip, they even started their own Instagram page featuring art from VMS students. I feel that my professional goal was met while developing strong relationships along the way. I can’t wait to start planning for Intraterm 2018! I am hoping to take a group to study art in Japan at some point in my time with VMS. Why not dream big? Get out there, explore, and create! Editor’s Note: Sam Mizwicki is one of the three art teachers at Vail Mountain School in Vail, Colorado. VMS is a K-12 Independent school. Sam is the CAEA representative for private/independent/charter schools. Contact her with any questions at smizwicki@vms.edu.

Places and Organization Mentioned in Article: http://www.rmcad.edu/ http://www.inklounge.com/ http://denverartmuseum.org/ https://www.aspenartmuseum.org http://www.alpineartscenter.org/ http://bankercinefoto.com/ https://worthinteriors.com/ http://www.breckcreate.org/


The students were amazed when informed about the life of a curator. I think they were the most intrigued with the travel component the job often offers.

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Shining Bear A rt Studio s by Mike Carroll Professional Educator Visual Arts Specialist Ryan Elementary

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I try to live by the thought that art only can come from two places – the heart or the mind. So when I don’t have to collect data on what my kids create to prove they are “showing growth,” I am truly free to facilitate the artist. And let them grow at their own rate, in their own time. So....I started Shining Bear Art Studios three years ago. I wanted to do more art with kids, but without the hassle of the “Learning Targets” or the worry of how an administrator would evaluate me. And that is coming from someone who has had many administrators who thought highly of me to begin with. I’ve been very lucky that way – for 18 years now.

a building to work in, but to be out in the fresh air with easels and paints and pastels (open air painting) and a picnic lunch is awesome. And, oh my goodness, three hours of activity without a screen, electronics, or even a phone. Forgive me, but I think kids need that. Wait, I don’t want your forgiveness – if you don’t agree with me, then you probably aren’t reading Collage.

I, however, am a teacher. I don’t really have any “extra” money. So, with two teenagers, a wife, two dogs, and a mortgage, I started a business without a building to work in. Shining Bear Art Studios was started in April of 2015 by me, Mike Carroll, public-school art teacher. I believe that an arts education is necessary for the development of the full potential of our brain. (I focus on the visual arts, but when I say “arts” I am referring to art, music, theater, dance and movement.) I have been an art teacher in the public school system since 2000 and have now expanded to create Shining Bear Art Studios so that I can reach more students. I am used to handling six to seven classes per day, with class sizes sometimes above 30 students. At Shining Bear, we try to keep our classes much smaller so the student-and-teacher interactions can be much more productive. We usually max out our class size at 15 students. This is so important. The one-on-one interaction is so essential for releasing the potential within a student. Shining Bear started small with huge support from my family. All of our first classes were outside for the “Art in the Park” kind of experience. What a great success! Some criticized me for not having

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This is a cool dream come true for me. I get to help kids be artists and learn some cool art concepts along the way. I go over a lesson, but make sure I don’t get on their case if their creative side takes over and has nothing to do with my lesson. I stay


detached from the need to know what the outcome will be. My students reinforce what I believe an artist should do...create! I try to live by the thought that art only can come from two places – the heart or the mind. So when I don’t have to collect data on what my kids create to prove they are “showing growth,” I am truly free to facilitate the artist. And let them grow at their own rate, in their own time. But wait. I am an educator. There is a difference between being an artist and being in an art education program. I do have to show growth in my students’ learning. The district is paying me to help these children become contributing members to our society. Why should they pay me if I’m not effective in doing so? Why should they trust me to do so?

Well, it is because I am the expert. I have had to educate some of my evaluators on what it is that I do. Not everyone understands what we do in art, music, P.E., dance, and theatre. Or the benefits that these things bring. Or the fact that I accomplish these things with about 42 hours of contact time per year. (I’m an elementary art teacher and, yes, 45-minute classes per day divided by art, music, and P.E. is about 42 hours per school year that I see the kids.) Although I am not truly unleashing the “Artist Within,” I like to believe that I am building the foundation to release the creativity within each of my students. Not everyone can be the next Picasso. But everyone can be a creative problem solver. A good arts curriculum can help develop creative problem solvers if the curriculum is implemented the correct way. I have found a little bit of Shining Bear has crept into my teaching strategies. I think it was always there but, in the past three years, it is definitely more prevalent. I take an approach of teaching concepts – not products – and seeing what happens. If for some reason I don’t see the concept in a student’s final product, then I have a discussion with that student to see if the concept registered. In the end, I get a lot of different “products” out of my students. My rubrics are based highly on conceptual understanding. I have a bit of leeway in the elementary arena because the differences in motor-skill levels are extreme in K-6. I refuse to “grade” motor skills. I’ve seen secondgrade skills exceed sixth-grade skills and I’ve seen sixth-grade skills that are equivalent to those of a typical first grader. Concept is everything. Motor skills are but a guide. The system has some problems, as I am sure many of you would agree. My philosophy is but one in a sea of many.

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I have been an art teacher in the public school system since 2000 and have now expanded to create Shining Bear Art Studios so that I can reach more students.

I don’t claim to have all the right answers, but I know what works for me and allows me to be at peace with how I teach – and live, for that matter. I know my students love me and I know that many of the parents of the students I teach appreciate what I do. It gets tricky sometimes to provide the “data” that the administrators want since we deal with such a subjective subject, but if you deal with the understanding of concepts and do not worry about how “pretty” the product is, you’ll find you can navigate those seas. Being an arts educator is hard. Many don’t understand it and many don’t appreciate it. Most likely, if you are reading this, you are an educator and you do understand. If you are an educator in any genre, you are understood and appreciated by me. Yours is a noble cause. It is for the betterment of our society. You are helping to facilitate the most instinctual way of learning for the human race. Art, music, theater, and movement were the ways we learned before there was a classroom with desks. Keep doing what you are doing. We are a better world because of you.

Clay

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A Window intoWestern Art by Kayla Green 2017-2018 Colorado Kids Create Intern

“Still Takes My Breath Away” by Jack Moss

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While attending the Windows to the West Art Show this summer, I got the opportunity to interview a plethora of unique artists. All had a different story to tell about their work. Most artists have the same overall goal: To express themselves and make us feel something, whether it’s happiness, sorrow, or a longing for completion. Artists use different mediums and tones that reflect their backgrounds, passions, and uniqueness. I am the 2017-2018 Colorado Kids Create Intern. This is exciting to me for a couple of reasons. Firstly, the program rewards kids’ passion for drawing and encourages self-expression and, being an artist myself, I find this compelling to represent. Secondly, I am excited to connect to the Colorado art community at large. While attending the Windows to the West Art Show this summer, I got the opportunity to interview a plethora of unique artists. All had a different story to tell about their work. Jack Moss, a watercolor painter, grew up in Texas and pulls his motivation from his inner, adventurous kid. He paints horses and cowboys to show the excitement of them and his love for both. (See watercolor painting on previous page.) He began with a how-to book on painting horses and made it a life goal. Jack is now a well-known artist who shows adventure through his paintings. Mia Delode, an oil painter, pulls motivation from what she sees. She paints the crude reality of life and uses a palette knife as opposed to a brush. She is attracted to subjects that have an affinity for standing tall in tough situations. For example, she paints bison because they are strong in harsh situations. Her dark color palette reflects this and the drama she views in life.

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Gail Jones, a sculptor, draws motivation from her desire to make stones come to life. She grew up with a father who owned a quarry. Having a surplus of stone, her father questioned how to use the excess. Jones discovered how. She went to live with a family member and learned to sculpt and manipulate stone into gorgeous images, developing her own techniques. Jones uses different texturing of stone to portray her messages and draw attention to them. She often represents her brother in her work. Thomas White (White Eagle), a model, desires to hold artists accountable to represent his culture properly. White comes from a Native American background and he and his two sons model for paintings and drawings. White massively enjoys learning about people through this experience along with riding horses. The most influential person he has come across is Tom Hansel, who also holds artists to a high standard of historical accuracy. Hansel introduced White to information he hadn’t known. The younger generation needs to be encouraged to continue showing their passions in life through art. Art is a way for all of us to connect on a deeper level along with a way of expressing ourselves outwardly. So, take the time and appreciate someone's art or create something yourself. It doesn’t have to be at a professional level for it to have meaning and heart.


North Eastern Colorado Professional Development Day by Christina Martinez CAEA North East Regional Representative

We got together and had a professional development day for the teachers of the North East Region of Colorado. It was a raving success and we learned tons and tons of printmaking techniques that we can use in the classroom with students. Collage Fall 2017

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We did it, we finally did it! We got together and had a professional development day for the teachers of the North East Region of Colorado. It was a raving success and we learned tons and tons of printmaking techniques that we can use in the classroom with students. Carrie Mann, who teaches K-12 in Merino, Colorado, was gracious enough to let us use her classroom. The classroom started out clean but, by the end of the day, it was covered in wonderful prints of all kinds, shapes, and sizes.

my students use different types of media all on the same screen because they will all come out a little different and then it is fun to talk about what worked well and what did not work well. After you draw on the screen, you fill your ink well with transparent base extender. I have used Speedball. Wet the screen and print as you would with a normal screen. The transparent base will lift the media off the screen and onto the paper. You can make one or more prints until the media is completely off the screen.

Here are the processes we covered:

Wash your screens out right away to keep the base extender from drying on the screen. The base extender will take more time to dry than your average ink, so please be aware of that.

1. Deconstructed Screen Printing 2. No-Print Print 3. Heliograph Print 4. Screen Printing Using Drawing Fluid and Screen Filler 5. Marbling 6. Glue-Line Print 7. Water-Soluble Media Printing

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I want to focus on water-soluble media printing. This print is super fun and very easy for kids of all ages to do.

Now I did say you could do this with all ages. I tried it out with my Kindergarten students this year. They had a blast! I rolled out some brown Kraft paper I brought from RAFT to have the students print on and then, in groups, I let them go to town printing on the paper. I set the big sheets aside. During the following class period, I explained how to label them and we cut out our prints and labeled them.

First, you start with a blank-screen printing screen. Next, you let your students draw on the screen with any kind of water-soluble media such as watercolor pencils, watercolor crayons, washable markers, or pretty much anything water soluble. I like to let

With my students, I really wanted them to see what screen printing is and how it is done. It was great! You can definitely adapt this one and make it your own. I hope this is something you might try in your rooms.


With my students, I really wanted them to see what screen printing is and how it is done. It was great!

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High School Level News by Justine Sawyer CAEA High School Rep I hope everyone had a restful and fun-packed summer break! CAEA is planning our first National Art Honor Society (NAHS) Leadership Day for Colorado. Please consider starting a NAHS chapter at your school or reinvigorating your current chapter by attending this opportunity. The all-day event will be held Saturday, November 11, 2017 at South High School in Denver. Leadership Day will occur the weekend after the CAEA Fall conference in Breckenridge so November will be an exciting month! See detailed information and registration information about the event on the flyer in this issue of Collage. Is Youth Art Month on your radar for the beginning of the school year? Elizabeth Stanbro, Youth Art Month Coordinator, will be sharing details as soon as she receives them from the national level. I encourage you to consider being a part of this year’s flag design competition and advocacy opportunity. Physical submissions will be due at

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the Fall conference in Breckenridge in November so this could be a great beginning-of-the-year lesson to ease back into school. Look for details to come out soon. Please do not hesitate to reach out with ideas you may have or concerns you would like me to address as your representative. Additionally, I encourage all of you to share art happenings at your school with me (justine_sawyer@yahoo.com) or directly with Collage editor Alexa Overby at any time throughout the year. You all do amazing things in your schools and we would love to showcase your lessons, community events, etc. with our constituents from across the state. I hope to see all of you at the Fall conference in Breckenridge where the high school opportunities are more plentiful than ever! All my best to you as you kick off the new school year!

•


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Current + Sensing Current Sensors ship with every KilnMaster Kiln. KilnLink is an optional upgrade.

www.skutt.com/kilnlink 503-774-6000

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2017-18 Youth Art Month Flag Design Competition

“Building Community Through Art” Start Off Your Year with YAM!

Be a part of our growing collection of stunning flags!

What: Assign your students the task of creating artwork to be used as a flag design submission in your choice of media following the guidelines below. All submissions will be displayed at the CAEA Fall Conference and included in the Spring 2018 Statewide Exhibition (details TBD). Who: Each current CAEA member teacher may submit up to 2 student artworks

When/Where: Physical submissions of artwork due:

10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Friday, November 3, 2017 in Breckenridge at CAEA Fall Conference *Not coming to the conference this year? Submit your work ahead of time by mailing it or dropping it off to Justine Sawyer, South High School, 1700 E. Louisiana, Denver, CO 80210 by October 27, 2017 OR send your artwork with a colleague who will be attending in Breckenridge.

How: 1. Notify the representative at conference registration that you will be participating 2. Submit physical work and fill out information sheet at the YAM table on Friday, November 3, before 4:00 p.m. *Jurying by the CAEA Executive Council and their designees will occur Friday, November 3, at 4:00 p.m. (no submissions accepted after this time). Winning works will be announced at the Art Auction Friday night at Fall Conference. All work will be held and transported by the YAM committee to be used in the Spring 2018 Show (details to follow). Works may be collected at the closing celebration of the Spring 2018 Show.

To be part of the competition and shows, all submissions must: • Be created by students of current CAEA members; • Represent visual art and the state of Colorado; • Include the Youth Art Month logo (Cut-outs of the logo will be available to add when checking in your work at the Fall Conference if you do not want your student to permanently have the logo as part of their work); • It may represent the 2018 national theme “Building Community Through Art” but this is not required; • Be matted/mounted using black or white mat board ready to hang on display panels; • Identifying information must be written on the back of the work: Student’s first and last name, Grade, School name, District name, Teacher name, Teacher email, Teacher phone number (cell phone preferred). The winning flag design: The winning design will be made into a 3’x5’ flag and flown at the annual 2018 NAEA Convention in Seattle, WA, so be mindful of this as you assign the size of artwork to create to your students. Some proportionally scaled-down sizes include: 12”x20” 9”x15” 6”x10” (Winning work not to scale will be digitally cropped at the discretion of the YAM chairperson.)

Additional Prize Structure information is still in the works. Visit the CAEA website www.caeaco.org and go to the Youth Art Month tab for details. Check these sites for past ideas: http://www.caeayamflags.weebly.com http://www.pinterest.com/justinesawyer/youth-art-month-ideas/

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http://www.pinterest.com/justinesawyer/youth-art-month-flags/ https://www.pinterest.com/youthartmonth/youth-artmonth-ideas/

Ways to get involved in Colorado’s Youth Art Month (REMEMBER: It’s Youth Art Month All Year Long—Not just March!) Everything you do throughout the year advocates for the arts and your program—please share your ideas and achievements. 1. Create flag designs: Have your students create flag designs for submission and submit the physical work Friday, November 3, 2017, at the CAEA Fall Conference

2. Consider planning an event or art show: Listed below are SUGGESTIONS, not requirements: • Consider doing an activity correlating to the current year YAM theme. The goal of participating in this activity is to advocate for the arts, so if your project can involve people outside the art education field, that is great! See the resource pages at www.caeaco.org for ideas. • Include “C.A.E.A. presents YOUTH ART MONTH 2018” (or something similar) on all advertising such as flyers, posters, and invitations to have a farther-reaching appeal. • YAM is nationally celebrated in March. Strive to have your exhibit in March. However, if that is not possible, it can be held at some other time. • Remember to invite local dignitaries to your celebration and reception. 3. Request a YAM Mayoral/Dignitary Proclamation/School Board Resolution: Contact your local congressional representative, mayor, school board or school district officials/ principals, superintendents, artists, businesses etc. Suggest they make a proclamation declaring March as Youth Art Month (sample form available at www.caeaco.org under the YAM tab). 1. Write a brief letter. Include the suggested proclamation and/or endorsement—IT IS ALREADY PREPARED FOR YOUR USE! Simple, yet powerful to do! 2. Your mayor/dignitary will read the information, approve the proclamation, and have it prepared for his/her signature. After you pick it up, duplicate it for distribution. 3. Include an appearance request. 4. The Board of Education will usually add the request to the agenda. Public officials are usually eager to participate in YAM, if you will just ask them!

4. Contact your local news media for event coverage and recognition: One goal of YAM is to make art education visible in our schools and community. (Press release form is available at www.caeaco.org)

5. Be a part of the State YAM Report: Please document all YAM activities and events and submit to caeayam@gmail by May 1st, 2018. Your submission will be included in a statewide report, which is sent to the National YAM chairperson.

Thank you for your participation!

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Celebrating the 2017 Colorado Scholastic Awards by Pam Starck Every year, select works receiving National Awards are included in a special exhibition in Washington, D.C. This year the exhibition Art.Write.Now.DC will be on display from September 2017 through July 2018. This exhibition is in partnership with the U.S. Department of Education, the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services, and has support from the National Endowment for the Arts. More than 100 works of art and The Best Teen Writing of 2017 will be displayed this year in these respected institutions. We are pleased to inform you that the following students from our region will have work on display in the Art.Write.Now.DC exhibition: • Alyssa Brunner, Uzuri, Legend High School, Teacher Kalen Thornton • Sydney Hoffa, Baby, Lakewood High School, Teacher Gwen Ahler • Emily Strock, Self Portrait, Golden High School, Teacher Lori Lacey This is an exciting opportunity for students in our region!

Sydney Hoffa, Baby, Lakewood High School, Teacher Gwen Ahler

In other Scholastic news, we’ll have our 2017-2018 Exhibition in March 2018 on the fourth floor of the History Colorado Center. Registration will open September 14th, 2017. Also, please attend our workshops at the CAEA conference on Friday, November 3, 2017. See you then!

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Emily Strock, Self Portrait, Golden High School, Teacher Lori Lacey

Alyssa Brunner, Uzuri, Legend High School, Teacher Kalen Thornton

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ArtSource Summer Institute 2017 A Mindful Odyssey

June 12-16

Estes Park, Colorado

Blind Sculpting r Salon guest: Janet FeDe

Making Bundles

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Explorations in sound


open studio

Group mandala Movement captured in clay

Look like fun?

Come to the ArtSource Luncheon at the CAEA Conference and Learn more about the summer Institute! Friday @ 11:30 pm And Join ArtSource For mixed Media Artist

Claudia Roulier

9:30-11:30 Friday in Peak 9

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First Annual National Art Honor Society Leadership Day Open to All Colorado High School Art Teachers and Students Saturday, November 11, 2017 8:00 am - 4:00 pm South High School, Denver, Colorado Registration: Teachers register student groups, $10 per student Registration is open through Tuesday, November 7, 2017 Highlights *Build Portfolios for the College Application Process *Hands-On Art Making Workshops *College Information Tables and Q&A Sessions More information to come!

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C herr y C reek S chool D istrict V isual A rts W orkshops 2017-2018 by Lisa Adams, Eaglecrest High School This year the Cherry Creek School District (CCSD) will be offering an ERO/Adams State course series of workshops specifically for Visual Arts teachers! This is an opportunity for us to educate, collaborate, develop, and participate in valid instructional and meaningful workshops that specifically tailor to Visual Arts pedagogy and needs and target professional, student, and personal growth. There are 12 offerings in 2017-2018 from August through April. Workshops take place on Mondays from 4:307:30 p.m. Locations vary depending on course. Registering for these opportunities is a two-step process: • Sign up for the credit in ERO • Select individual sessions through the 2017-18 Workshop Descriptions page. When choosing credit in ERO, you have three options: CCSD; Adams State University; and out–of-district participant. CCSD credit stays with you only while you are employed by the district. University credit stays with you wherever your career path leads. Ten attended courses fulfill the 2-credit hour requirements. Five attended classes earn 1 credit hour. You must sign up for the 1- or 2-credit option to receive CCSD or University credit. This is recommended for teachers who are looking for horizontal advancement. In a two-part course, you are required to take the first part as a prerequisite, but the second part is recommended, not required. If you want CEU/certification credit experience only, you can take as many workshops as you want. This would be for teachers who may be at salary cap but still need to recertify with CDE (which requires some university experience). Priority seating goes to credit-seeking teachers. If you want the studio and pedagogy experience only, you may take as many workshops as you want. (However, priority seating goes to credit-seeking teachers.) Search the 2017-18 Workshop Descriptions and sign up for individual sessions using this link. This course series of workshops is open to other district teachers as well. Please share the link. All classes are applicable in K-12 settings. Classes are taught by colleagues, other artists, and experts in the field – all geared to fit an art teacher’s needs.

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2017CAEA

fall conference

it's always

TIME for art

November 2-5 Breckenridge, Colorado Collage Fall 2017

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Keynote Highlights Michael Bell is a renowned American artist, most famous for his larger-than-life sized narrative series paintings and for his portrait clientele. In the field of education, Bell has been a pioneer of the Visual Journaling movement across the nation for over a decade. Bell is a National Board Certified, Maryland Public Schools Teacher of the Year and has received numerous accolades over his career, including: the 2013 NAHS National Sponsor of the Year. Purchase Michael’s new book: http://tinyurl.com/DualLives Learn more about Michael at http://www.mbellart.com/bio.html

keynote speaker

Michael Bell

Thursday, November 2 4:00-5:00pm

keynote speaker

Portia Munson

Portia Munson is a visual artist who works in a range of mediums including photography, painting, sculpture and installation and focuses primarily on environmental and cultural themes seen from a feminist perspective. She was born in Beverly, Massachusetts in 1961. She holds a BFA from Cooper Union (1983) and an MFA from Mason Gross School of Art, Rutgers, University (1990). She attended Showhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 1987. She has been awarded multiple residencies and has taught at New York University, Yale School of Art, Vassar College and SUNY Purchase. Learn more about Portia at http://www.portiamunson.com

Friday, November 3 4:30-5:30pm Leopold Segedin was born in Chicago in 1927, received his BFA (1948) and MFA (1950) from the University of Illinois. He has taught at the University of Illinois (assistantship, 1948-50), U.S. Army Engineers (drafting, 1952-54) and at Northeastern Illinois University (1955-87). He has also taught at the Horwich JCC and the Evanston Art Center. He is Art Professor Emeritus at Northeastern Illinois University. He retired in 1987 after teaching there for 32 years. Learn more about Leo at http://www.leopoldsegedin.com

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Art Advocacy Breakfast

Leo Segedin

Saturday, November 4 8:00-9:00am


Keynote Workshop Schedule

Keynote Workshop space is limited, please sign up when you register.

Friday, November 3 Still Life Painting

with Portia Munson 9:00am - 12:00pm

Oil Painting 1, Part 1 with Michael Bell 1:00 - 4:00pm 20 participants

Saturday, November 4 Oil Painting 2, Part 2 with Michael Bell 8:00 - 11:00am 20 participants

Scanner as Camera

with Portia Munson 12:00 - 4:000pm

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thursday november 2

sched

Peak 8 Peak 9

Peak 11 Peak 12 Peak 14 Peak 15 Peak 16 Peak 17 Coppertop 2

Coppertop 3

Imperial 1

Imperial 2

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Kris Fritzsche & Kayla Wheat

TBD

Look to Read: Through the Eyes of Women Artists

Hayley Holt

Building Clay Castles Ingrid King Soft Sculpture Stuffies Michelle Smalley Incorporating Zen in the Art Classroom Pamela Cogburn Build Your Own Time Machine Barth Quenzer Cubism Made Easy with Collage Ryan Talbot Titilating Textures in Clay Rui Haagen Drawing the Proportions of the Human Head Sieger Hartgers Friedensreich Reconstruct Your World to a Choice Based Classroom! Hundertwasser! Kari Pepper Leah Lowe In Spirit: Circles of Beyond Skill Peace Marilee Mason Diane Wright & Lisa Adams Master Class 9:00am - 12:00pm Oil Painting Mandy Theis

12:30 - 1:30pm Lunch

Peak 10

Found Object Assemblage Kris Heintz Nelson Workspace Aesthetics Delanie Holton Mindfullness and Art Elizabeth Standbro Humor in the Art Room! KayLee Parson Engaging ELL Through Arts Integration Donna Goodwin, Ph.D. Using 21st Century Art in the Classroom Erica Richard Celebrate Egyptian Paste! Brenda Jones Makey Makey Graphite Drawing Roxie Mitchell Join the Flock! Mindy McClusky TAB 101

9:00am - 12:00pm Bobble Heads! Laura Thompson Art in the Learning Landscape 10:30-11:30 10:30-11:30

Peak 6/7

10:30am - 12:30pm 11:45-12:45 11:45-12:45

9:00 - 10:00am


dule 1:30 - 3:30pm

4:00 - 5:00pm

Michael Bell Keynote Speaker Peak 17

2:45-3:45

Nicole Jones & Stephen McDowell

2:45-3:45

Art in the Cracks Roxie Mitchell Cindy Burkhart Arts Integration: Exploring Climate Change Through Art Laura Cronen and Patrick Fahey The Art of Fashion Illustration TBD

High School Photography Round Table

Jump Starting Creativity Dale Zalmstra Cathy Moore Surface Decoration Techniques for Ceramics Michael Lemke Versatility of Metal Embossing for All Ages Licia Rossetti Needle Felting Basics Shayna Tokheim & Lisa Cross Why Copy?

TAB Open Discussion

2:45-3:45

1:30-2:30

1:30-2:30

1:30-2:30

Michael Cellan’s Greatest Hits Michael Cellan

5:00 - 6:30pm

Vendor Reception Vendor Hall

Seesaw for Beginners

Mandy Theis Silk Batik Art for You! Kari Pepper

Jessi Walker & Kelly Beach

2:45-3:45

1:30-2:30

Introduction to Bargue Plates and Atelier Training

Seesaw for Advanced

Jessi Walker & Kelly Beach

Master Class 1:00 - 4:00pm Act of Painting Nancy Branca 1:00 - 4:00pm (outside) Raku You Can Do! Rocky Mountain Clay

9:00 - 10:30pm

Karaoke Party! Sing Your heART out! Base 9 Bar

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friday

november 3

sched

8:00 - 9:00am

Peak 12 Peak 14 Peak 15 Peak 16 Peak 17 Coppertop 2

Coppertop 3

Imperial 1

Imperial 2

Outside

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10:45-11:45 10:45-11:45

11:30 - 12:30pm Lunch

Peak 11

7:00 - 7:45 Yoga - Pool Area

Peak 10

9:30-10:30

Peak 8 Peak 9

9:00am - 12:00pm Layers Upon Layers Upon Layers Laura Thompson It’s Always Time for Assessment: What you need, Photographing Scholastics! but may not know. Art Pam Stark, Breezy Sanchez & Kris Heintz Nelson Miranda Ziegler Miranda Ziegler Empowering Art Source Presents: Paraprofessionals Artist Claudia Roulier and Gwen Ahlers Dr. Kelley DeCleene Gwen Ahlers & Claudia Roulier Cray-Pen Grid Drawing Workshop with Zentangle Embellishments Andrean Andrus Ryan Talbot Unified Standards Building a Body of Work: Arts Simply Put The Artistic Process as a Series Brenda Jones Anne Thulson Sarah Shay Museum of Contemporary Art Celebrating Communities: Denver Making Mosaics Alexandria Jimenez & Molly Nuanes Tina Murano & Micah Snider So...Ummm... Oil Paint in the Why did my pots blow up? Art Classroom? Are You Crazy? Michael Lemke Mandy Theis A Healing Plein & Machine Simple Arrilla Beatty Andrea Slusarski Addressing Social Justice Marbling Through Art Paper Amy Marsh & Julia Brown Sarah Mitchell 31 Reading Works of Art: Nights Visual Literacy as Text Michael Bell Lauren Lehmann & Ramona Lapsley Glaze, TECHout Your Two Ways TAB Classroom Kevin Beckstein Kelly Beach & Jessi Walker Carved Textured Alabaster Pendant Wrap Ring Pam Farris Leisa Austin Keynote Workshop 9:00am - 12:00pm Still Life Painting Portia Munson Master Class 9:00am - 12:00pm Drawing of Hands and Feet Sieger Hartgers 9:00am - 12:00pm Raku You Can Do! Rocky Mountain Clay 9:30-10:30

Peak 6/7

9:30 - 11:30am


dule 1:45-2:45

Help for the Hopeless Pot Ingrid King Asking the Providing Context Questions in a Visual World Dale Zalmstra Delane Ingalls Vanada Ph.D. Arts Integration: Exploring Climate Changes Through Art Lauren Cronen Photography Round-Table Alexandra Overby Love and Logic in the Art Classroom Pamela Cogburn Literacy in and TBD Through the Arts

3:00 - 4:00pm Textured Wrap Ring Leisa Austin Drawing Boundaries: Media, Marking, and Youth Identity Kris Heintz Nelson Artist-Inspired School Art Installations Hayley Holt The Art of Fashion Illustration Nicole Jones & Stephen McDowell

I Second That Emotion Anne Thulson Arts-Based Action Research Donna Goodwin, Ph.D. Janet Newman, Ph.D. Making a Trace Writing About and Monotype Through Art Sieger Hartgers Deb Rosenbaum Calligraphy... Africa Meets Africa: the Art of Lettering. Lessons for the U.S. Kari Pepper Patrick Fahey, Ph.D. Wet AP Art Felting Studio Prompts for Breadth Shayna Tokheim & Lisa Cross Paula Rowinski Dinosaur Body & Brain Drawing Yoga/Tai Chi Mandy Theis Joan Meister Teaching for Friedensreich Artistic Behavior Hundertwasser! Alissandra Seelaus & David Stallings Leah Lowe Art and the Making a Mosaic Learning Landscape with Acrylic Skins Kris Fritzsche Cindy Migliaccio Master Class 12:30 - 4:30pm Casting Fine Silver Dana Province Keynote Workshop 1:00 - 4:00pm Oil Painting 1, Part 1 Michael Bell 1:45-2:45

12:30-1:30

12:30-1:30

12:30 - 2:30pm

4:30 - 5:30pm

Portia Munson Keynote Speaker Peak 17

8:00 - 9:30pm

Art Auction Coppertop 3

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saturday november 4

sched

8:00 - 9:00am

9:30 - 11:30am I, Robot Mindy McClusky

Peak 12 Peak 14 Peak 15 Peak 16 Peak 17 Coppertop 2

Coppertop 3

Imperial 1

Imperial 2

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Art Advocacy Breakfast with Leopold Segedin Peak 17

9:30-10:30

Peak 11

10:45-11:45 10:45-11:45

Drawing Boundaries Kris Heintz Nelson Kris Heintz Nelson Bridging the Gap Time Justine Sawyer & Well Spent DJ Osmack Shell Acker Make a Mummy and Sarcophagus Carrie Mann Sculpture Basics Figure & Portrait Ali Alzobaede Developing a Series of Art: Elementary Concentration Workshop Tips & Tricks Heather Bertarelli Allison Comer Carved Alabaster Pendant Pam Farris Master Class 9:30-1:30 Working with Metal and Wire Sharon Jacobson Speedy Master Class 9:30-12:30 Nurturing Our Deep Desire to Create Kathy Beacmon & Cynthia Winter Dinosaur Drawing Mandy Theis Sixteen Watercolor Techniques Vanessa Scott Titilating Textures in Clay Rui Haagen Master Class 8:00am-12:00pm Entropy Chance and Digital Tools Michael Barnhart Keynote Workshop 8:00-11:00am Oil Painting 2, Part 2 Michael Bell Object Assemblage

11:30 - 12:30pm Lunch

Peak 10

7:00 - 7:45 Yoga - Pool Area

Peak 9

9:30-10:30

Peak 8

Rethinking the Use of Found

10:45-11:45

9:30-10:30

Peak 6/7


dule 1:45-2:45

Utilize Literature, Literacy, and Text in the Classrooms Lisa Adams The Edifying Creative Process Pamela Cogburn Art Time on Task Connects in the Art Class Dana Goodier Delane Ingalls Vanada, Ph.D. Develop an Action Pose of Favorite Animal Nancy Branca 54rd Venice Biennale and Philosophical Documentation 14 from Connects for CVAS Summer 2017 Connie Stewart, Ph.D.

1:45-2:45

12:30-1:30

12:30-1:30

12:30 - 2:30pm

Connie Stewart, Ph.D.

Creating Murals Carol Cooper Drawing the Proportions of the Human Head and Face Sieger Hartgers

3:00 - 4:00pm

5:00 - 7:00pm

Awards Banquet

Comic Book Lettering Kathy and Michael Appropriate Appropriation Marty Loftus Explore Kandinsky Anne Mechling

Peak 17

Quick, Easy, and Effective Tools for Teaching Art History Tracy Nichols Daily Noodle-Doodle Katy Mathes Rocks and Charms: Kids Culture in the Classroom Christine Loehr, Jesse Bott & Rachael Delaney Standards Simply Put Anne Thulson Student Engagement Through Art Andrea Slusarski & Dr. Samuel Helms

“This is Me” Mixed Media Canvasses Kim D’Arthenay 12:45-2:45 Art Collage Expressive Ink Drawing Prep/Art World Prep Kim Putnam Virginia Schick Oil Paint in the Art Classroom? Are You Crazy? Mandy Theis Master Class 1:00pm-4:00pm Creating Beautiful Landscape Rick Louie Versatility of Metal Embossing Art + Math for All Ages =Awesome! Licia Rossetti Andrean Andrus & Nanette Newman Keynote Workshop 12:00-4:00pm Master Class 12:00-4:00 Scanner as Camera Portia Munson Master Class 1:00-5:00pm Not Your Mother’s Tea Pot Sharon McCoy VENDOR HALL Got Gelli? Katy Irvin & Erica Wensmann Loppnow

7:30 - 11:00pm

Saturday Night Bash Peak 17

SUNDAY HIGHLIGHTS 9:00am-12pm AP Studio Art Master Class with Laura Thompson 8:00am-9:00am Breakfast with the President

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Master Class

Schedule Thursday, November 2 Mandy Hallenius Oil Painting “En Grisaille” Thursday, November 2 9:00am - 12:00pm

Historically, artists were trained to draw first, then paint in black and white (known as “grisaille”) and then with a full color palette. Learning how to paint in black and white is a criticial skill to transition students from the world of drawing to the world of painting. In this workshop, participants will discover the major principles that control how light reveals form, and then paint a grisaille sphere in oil paint. Safety, cleanup, and classroom management when using oil paint will be covered in depth. Although this class is targeted at teaching high school level oil painting theory concepts, all K-12 art teachers interested in learning how to manage oil painting lessons in their classrooms are encouraged to attend. Materials Provided: All supplies will be provided courtesy of the Da Vinci Initiative. Materials to Bring: Participants are encouraged to bring a sketchbook for note-taking. All other supplies will be provided courtesy of the Da Vinci Initiative. Materials fee is included in class registration fee.

Nancy Branca The Act of Painting Thursday, November 2 1:00 - 4:00pm

Using water-mixable oils, participants will paint at a fast-moving pace, producing representational yet expressive works. By taking risks, experimenting and not becoming so emotionally concerned with the product, the artist can enjoy the act of painting. Materials Provided: Canvas, Water Mixable Oils, Palette, Brushes, Water Cups, Rags and Still Life Materials. Materials to Bring: Paint Brushes Materials fee is included in class registration fee.

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Friday, November 3 Keynote Master Class Portia Munson

Observing the Object: A Workshop in Acrylic Still-Life Painting Friday, November 3 9:00am - 12:00pm A key part of my artistic process is to use the act of painting to consider the deeper meanings of the seemingly insignificant objects that I collect or otherwise feel drawn to. In this class, participants will choose an object from their immediate possessions and use it to create a small acrylic painting from observation. Composition, color, technique and content will all be considered as we work on our paintings. Materials Provided: Gessoed boards, brushes, paint (primary colors, black, white), water containers, palettes, rags/ paper towels for cleanup. Materials to Bring: Participants can bring their own brushes and paints if they like and a smock/work clothes. Materials fee is included in class registration fee.

Sieger Hartgers Drawing of Hands and Feet Friday, November 3 9:00am - 12:00pm

Drawing of Hands and Feet as shown to us by Durer, Leonardo, Bridgeman and Robert Beverly hale. Drawing through the form is a must for all who want to draw the hands and feet accurately. The hands and feet are misunderstood forms, this class can really help. Materials Provided: 2 pencils, 4 sheets of drawing paper, ruler, art eraser, handouts. Materials to Bring: All materials and tools are provided. Materials fee is included in class registration fee.

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Friday, November 3 Dana Province Casting Fine Silver Friday, November 3 1:00 - 4:00pm

Inspiration by Design - Learn and make a custom fine silver casting using the ancient cuttlebone technique, then fuse 24k gold accents to further highlight your creation. All are welcome, no prior experience is required. Materials Provided: Fine silver jewelry with 24k gold accents. Materials to Bring: Sketchbook and a pen or pencil. Materials fee is included in class registration fee.

Keynote Master Class Michael Bell

Oil Painting in the High School Classroom Part 1 Friday, November 3 1:00 - 4:00pm 20 Pariticipant Limit Return to the Renaissance (description): What begins with a tantalizing collage, starts out as a drawing, ends as an incredibly realistic oil painting in either the Grisaille or Verdaccio method. Grisaille is a monochromatic, grayscale style of painting often used for still life or landscapes, and other genres of art. Verdaccio is typically used for portraits (which is the only difference) and is used under fleshtones to add warmth and contrast to the earth tones applied over it. Day 1: Make collage. Gesso paper. Finish Drawing. Paint over drawing in black and white oils. Materials Provided: Gessoed watercolor paper, Paint, Liquin, Turpenoid, paper towels, fixative. Materials to Bring: Vine charcoal, and optional charcoal pencils (if you want for detail), an 8�x10� FULL COLOR collage (should be made in advance), BLACK and WHITE print of color collage, a coulple of small glass jars (baby food jars are great), rags, paint brush assortment to handle oils/acrylics. Materials fee is included in class registration fee.

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Saturday, November 4 Keynote Master Class Michael Bell

Oil Painting in the High School Classroom Part 2 Saturday, November 3 8:00 - 11:00am 20 Pariticipant Limit Return to the Renaissance (description): What begins with a tantalizing collage, starts out as a drawing, ends as an incredibly realistic oil painting in either the Grisaille or Verdaccio method. Grisaille is a monochromatic, grayscale style of painting often used for still life or landscapes, and other genres of art. Verdaccio is typically used for portraits (which is the only difference) and is used under fleshtones to add warmth and contrast to the earth tones applied over it. Day 2: Once black and white stage is dry on Day 2, we tint and tone using color and liquin, then cadmium stage to bring out full realism and finish. Materials Provided: Gessoed watercolor paper, Paint, Liquin, Turpenoid, paper towels, fixative. Materials to Bring: Vine charcoal, and optional charcoal pencils (if you want for detail), an 8�x10� FULL COLOR collage (should be made in advance), BLACK and WHITE print of color collage, a coulple of small glass jars (baby food jars are great), rags, paint brush assortment to handle oils/acrylics. Materials fee is included in class registration fee.

Michael Barnhart

Entropy, Chance, and Digital Tools: Let Machines Make Your Art

Saturday, November 4 8:00am - 12:00pm

Create art with digital and analog machines, including 3D modeling software, 3D printers, and low-tech DIY drawing devices. Concepts discussed include the importance of investing craft into your work when giving control over to a machine. Materials Provided: Inclusive of a piece of drawing paper, pen, and bailing wire for exploring chance with drawing, and access to 3D printer/filament and 3D modeling software as space and time allow. Materials to Bring: Students should bring a laptop if they have one, preferably loaded with a free trial version of Rhinoceros 3D or SketchUp. Instructor will demonstrate basic processes and provide limited access to laptops for interested students during work session regardless of personal computer access. Students should also bring a simple used and inexpensive machine or appliance for creating an automatic drawing machine (like a mechanical or electric eggbeater, electric drill, or small battery-powered motor) and art making supplies like pens, markers, brushes, and ink. Materials fee is included in class registration fee.

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Saturday, November 4 Kathy Beacmon and Cyncie Winter Nurturing Our Deep Desire to Create Saturday, November 4 9:30am-12:30pm

Do you find yourself distracted or overwhelmed? Unable to be creative, and simply reacting to events as they come along? This workshop will provide you with helpful insights and powerfully effective tools proven to keep you moving forward in your art world. Materials to Bring: Notebook and writing utensil. Materials fee is included in class registration fee.

Sharon Jacobson Speedy Working with Metal and Wire Saturday, November 4 9:30am - 1:30pm

Make beads with copper, brass and nickel silver. Different kinds of beads, different textures, different techniques and possibilities. Basic metalworking skills helpful, but you will learn, with help, and practice sawing, filing, sanding, cold and hot connections. As much as shared tools, materials and time allows. Materials Provided: Materials provided: all tools and necessary technique materials, metals, wire for 3-4 bead possibilities. Materials to Bring: Bring any accent beads, assorted chain, jump rings, rope, leather, cord. Will provide safety glasses but if you like yours bring them. Materials fee is included in class registration fee.

Sharon McCoy

Not Your Mother’s Tea Pot Saturday, November 4 1:00 - 5:00pm Exploring making whimsical figurative teapots. From figures to fantasy, we will explore creating a quasi functional teapot with a fanciful flare. The beginning form will be made in advance to give us more time to create with imaginative play. All skill levels invited. Practical for teaching junior high and above. your AP class, your AP syllabi, timelines, etc. Materials Provided: Materials to Bring: Materials fee is included in class registration fee.

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Rick Louis

Creating Beautiful Landscape Photography Saturday, November 4 1:00 - 4:00pm This class will teach you the keys and tools in creating a masterful landscape image. Learn how to select locations, understand and manipulate light, the tools and techniques to use with your camera to create your artistic masterpiece. Materials Provided: I’ll have a free PDF - Keys to Great Landscapes - available for download. Materials to Bring: There will be an optional photo walk(s)/excursion, bring a camera/smartphone to take pictures. Materials fee is included in class registration fee.

Sunday, November 5 Laura Thompson AP Master Class Sunday, November 4 9:00am - 12:00pm

Do you teach AP Studio Art? Would you like to? This master class is designed for high school teachers who answer yes to these questions! Even if you don’t teach AP now, or you might in the future, you will learn strategies to get better work from your students. I have been a reader for AP College Board for six years, jurying the portfolios with 125 other education professionals from around the country. I also teach workshops for College Board on AP Studio Art. That experience has helped me better understand how to help you improve your student work and get those coveted 4’s and 5’s on the exam! While we talk and share we will create a Breadth (range of approach) sample that you can use next week in your classroom. As we create we will talk about these subjects- (many are important in all your HS Art classes) pacing the class, plagiarism, critique, managing student work, what are “Breadth RA” “Concentration SI” and “Quality”, how is 2D different from drawing?, portfolio exam prep, preparing for digital submission, practice grading “reading” using AP rubric, internet site resources…. Spend some time with your AP peers, and improve your practice as an AP teacher! Materials to Bring: Flash drive, samples of your AP student artwork, rubrics and other handouts you use in your AP class, your AP syllabi, timelines, etc. Materials fee is included in class registration fee.

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CAEA TASK FORCE CHAIRS & PUBLICATIONS Title

Name

Email

Micheal Cellan Natalie Myers Pam Starck Elizabeth Stanbro Kelley DeCleene Kim Williams Robin Wolfe & Michael Cellan Kim Chlumsky Alexandra Overby Rosemary Reinhart & Elisabeth Reinhart Janet McCauley

medcellean@mac.com coloradokidscreate@gmail.com tplbstark@aol.com youngvisionarts@gmail.com kjdecleene@gmail.com caeaawards@gmail.com caearobin@gmail.com kmchlumsky@gmail.com alexaoverby@gmail.com rsrhart@gmail.com janetmccauley@comcast.net

Task Force Chairs Task Force Chair - CAEAE Commercial Scholastics Youth Art Month Arts Advocacy Awards Web Master Social Media Collage Editor Collage Copy Editor Collage Layout

CAEA EXECUTIVE BOARD & DIVISION REPRESENTATIVES Title

Name

Email

Executive Board 2016-2019 President President-Elect Vice President Interim Treasurer Secretary Past President

Vanessa Hayes-Quintana DJ Osmack Ben Quinn Alexis Quintana Rachael Delaney Elizabeth Licence

caeapresident@gmail.com dosmack@jeffco.k12.co.us bennyquinn@hotmail.com lexi.quintana@me.com taranpappas@yahoo.com elicence@comcast.net

Title

Name

Email

Division Representatives Elementary Multi-Level Middle School High School Private/Independent/Charter Private/Independent/Charter Museum/Gallery Supervision Higher Education Retired Student

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Amy Marsh Carrie Mann Chris Lager Justine Sawyer Jesse Diaz Sam Mizwicki Sarah Kate Baie Open Theresa Clowes Open Open

abeth127@yahoo.com carrieartmann@gmail.com clager@jeffco.k12.co.us justine_sawyer@yahoo.com JDiaz@cca-denver.org sam.mizwicki@gmail.com sarahb@mcadenver.org tclowes@rmcad.edu


CAEA REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVES Title

Name

Email

Regional Representatives North West North Central North East Metro Metro East Central South Central South East South West West Central

Open Sharon Jacobson-Speedy Open Kim Chlumsky Michael Carroll Lisa Cross Open Open Kari Pepper Open

speedywheat@aol.com kmchlumsky@gmail.com mcarroll@jeffco.k12.co.us lcross@d49.org

kpepper@bayfield.k12.co.us

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For CAEA details and event information: go to www.caeaco.org

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