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A new place

for fine art

Gene Needham’s new gallery showcases local artwork

The Herald Journal

JANUARY 6-12, 2012


contents

January 6-12, 2012

Movies 6-7 See what’s playing this week

theater 3 Celtic Nights coming to Ellen Eccles Theatre

MISC. 4 Valley Dance Ensemble starts up at Bullen Center

5 CVCA broadcast and media classes begin Monday

BOOKS 12 See reviews and best sellers

COLUMN 11 Dennis Hinkamp

shares his 2012 hopes

YOUR STUFF 10 Winter shots of Logan in ‘Photos by You’

13 Two poems are featured by locals

CROSSWORD 14 Try completing this week’s puzzle

CALENDAR 15 See what’s happening this week

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“A Place of Peace” by Mike Malm hangs on display at the Logan Fine Art Gallery. On the cover: Gene Needham talks about paintings on display at the Logan Fine Art Gallery, Monday afternoon. (Eli Lucero/Herald Journal)

FROM THE EDITOR

I

f January felt like spring every year I’d take it. The weather the last week has definitely made me happy even though I know snow would be good for Utah. Since I can’t do anything about it though, I’ll enjoy the sun. I even broke out the flip flops once this week. I’ve always been a summer girl. I love swimming, hiking, camping and 90-degree days; when winter hits I’m always a little bummed. Last year I made the vow I would try to enjoy the cold months. Since I did choose to live here, I may as well make

the best of it. So, I attempted to pick up a winter hobby: snowshoeing. For Christmas I got snow pants and boots and looked for opportunities to use them. I’d been snowshoeing a couple times before and loved being in the mountains with fresh snow and new flakes falling around me. I was also able to get a little above the inversion where the sun was shining. Last January I decided to go with a group on a full moon snowshoe hike. I was excited, but then everything seemed to go wrong. We took two vehicles and got a van stuck in the snow in Logan Canyon for an hour and a half. When we finally got out, our group had to help a stranger with his car and our attempts were unsuccessful. So, one person shut-

tled him out of the canyon so he could call friends or family to help. This didn’t leave a lot of time for snowshoeing, but we went for a little while. Then, just as we were about to leave, the van key broke in the door. Once again we were shuttling people to get more cars. On the way out of the canyon a deer ran in front of one of the vehicles, and one of the drivers was pulled over for a burned-out brake light. Perhaps the only good thing about this adventure was the way the clouds looked mysteriously beautiful over the moon, and they way we couldn’t stop laughing at our bad luck. I haven’t snowshoed this year, but maybe I’m not meant to. Let this January spring continue. — Manette Newbold


The Cache Valley Center for the Arts (CVCA) 20112012 season returns Jan. 24 and 25 at 7:30 p.m. in the Ellen Eccles Theatre with a special international performance from Ireland. Celtic Nights – Journey of Hope expertly weaves together the lilting melodies and plaintive lyrics of Celtic heritage to tell the story of Ireland’s people. The audience is invited to travel along a journey of hope and through traditional ballads, vivid choreography and expert musicianship. In this production, six prominent vocal talents are complimented by six accomplished step dancers, creating an exhilarating picture of a proud people who dared to dream big and carve out a home in the New World. In Celtic Nights, their story is told through the power and majesty of music and the hypnotic fury of dancing feet. “We all are immigrants on some level, making this a wonderful show for both young and old” said Wally Bloss, executive director for the Cache Valley Center for the Arts. “Though for many, the journey may have been before their time and under different circumstances, we all can celebrate our past and future through the power of music, song, dance and storytelling.” Drawn from the history and folklore of Ireland and her Celtic cousins, Celtic Nights-Journey of Hope will take the audience on a journey of a people leaving and arriving, their lives spent in a world of ships, trains and planes, coaches and horses and on foot. During the show, audience members will be transported

– Dennis Hinkamp, page 11

PET OF THE WEEK

to a different place every eight minutes. There will be foot-tapping percussive sounds of jigs and reels, hornpipes and polkas. Tickets for Celtic NightsJourney of Hope are $19 to $29, with a wide variety of discounts. Families can pur-

chase up to four child tickets (ages 5-18) at 50 percent off with the purchase of one regular-priced adult ticket. Order by calling the CVCA Ticket office or purchase online anytime without any additional fees at www.EllenEcclesTheatre.org. The Cache Valley

Center for the Arts Ticket Office is located in the Bullen Center at 43 S. Main. This tour is made possible through the CVCA and the generous support from Box Elder News Journal, Conservice, Lewiston State Bank, Watkins Printing and Zion’s Bank. The 2011-2012 CVCA Season is made possible in part by funds from the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation, Marie Eccles Caine Foundation – Russell Family, Cache County Restaurant/RAPZ Tax Funds, Logan City Cultural Arts Grant, Utah Division of Arts & Museums and the National Endowment for the Arts and Wasatch Logan Arts Foundation. For more information about the CVCA visit www. CacheArts.org. The center is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and one hour prior to all show times.

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The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 6, 2012

Celtic Nights returns to Logan

“We’re still here even though the world was supposed to end a couple times last year. This year it really, really is supposed to end according to the Mayan calendar, though it is possible they were just shrewd, rather than apocalyptic.”

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ALL MIXED UP

Quotable


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 6, 2012

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all mixed up Artists invited to apply for teaching roster The Utah Division of Arts & Museums (UDAM) is seeking artists in the literary arts, dance, film/ video, folk and traditional arts, theater, music, storytelling and visual arts. to apply to be on the Teaching Artist Roster. Jean Irwin, arts education manager of the Utah Division of Arts & Museums, will walk artists through the teaching roster application process and show examples of work by artists in schools and community settings throughout Utah on Jan. 10 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. at the Eccles Conference Center on

USU campus. This talk is part of the lifelong-learning seminar series hosted by the University Inn & Conference Center, focused on the commitment to lifelong learning. After applying to the teaching artist roster a review panel will come to Logan to meet and interview artists Jan. 26 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Bullen Center, 43 S. Main, Logan. To set up a time for an interview contact Cache County School District’s arts coordinator Aurora Hughes Villa at aurora. villa@ccsdut.org or call 435-7523925 ext. 2067.

Once accepted into the roster, artists may be selected to work in residencies and on projects and events in Cache County or throughout Utah. Get on the roster and art partnerships in Cache County can begin. Artist profiles are available on NowPlayingUtah. com. UDAM artists are designated by the red flag next to their name. To learn more about the teaching artist roster go to http://arts.utah. gov/. If you need assistance with your application, please contact Irwin at jirwin@utah.gov or 801533-5760.

Valley Dance Ensemble will offer spring classes Children and adults are invited to participate in dance classes by Valley Dance Ensemble. VDE offers community dance classes year-round for all ages and levels of experience. The spring session begins Monday, Jan. 9, and lasts through April 27. Visit CVCA online at www. CacheArts.org to register or to see the full spring schedule. Dance classes at the Center include creative movement for children ages 3 and 4, ages 5 and 6, and ages 7 through 9. In addition, VDE offers creative movement/ modern dance for tweens ages 10 through 12 and modern dance for teens ages 13 through 17. VDE’s primary goal is to teach dancers how to enjoy movement and expression by finding new and interesting ways to communicate through the art. The classes offered for children and young adults are a huge part of the community dance school but VDE also hosts a handful of adult classes. Whether adults have danced their entire

lives, or they are looking for a way to get into shape, VDE has a class for every level. Adult classes include African and mixed-level modern dance. All adult classes are

focused on technique, choreography and strengthening. For those who are not sure about their level of interest or their schedule, VDE offers a variety of punch

pass options. Participants can purchase a punch pass for five ($35), 10 ($60) or 15 ($80) sessions. Punch passes never expire. Each session runs for 15 weeks; sign up

for the full session for $80 or drop in anytime for $8 dollars a class. The spring session will also feature VDE’s annual spring concert, "Amplify," on Friday, April 20 and 21. The concert will highlight the adult performing company and showcase the community dance school. Classes will include new choreography to be performed as part of the spring concert. Students are not required to perform, but it’s a great opportunity to introduce children to the Ellen Eccles Theatre stage. All students planning on taking a VDE class must register at the beginning of each session to ensure a spot in the class whether using an old card or purchasing a new one. You may register online at www.CacheArts.org or at the CVCA Ticket Office between 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday starting Tuesday, Jan. 3. All children’s dance classes are capped at eight students per class on a first-come-firstserved basis.


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 6, 2012

Across the United States young people are using media production to speak out about their lives and communities. The Cache Valley Center for the Arts is launching a new arts program to help encourage new voices. Starting in January CVCA will offer Broadcast Arts & Media (BAM!) classes for youth and adults. Classes will begin Monday, Jan. 9, and run for 8 or 12 weeks depending on the class. “CVCA is thrilled to participate in this social digital movement,” said Marianne Sidwell, arts education coordinator for the CVCA. “We are glad to offer youth and adults the opportunity to express themselves through the digital arts.”  The classes will be dedicated to teaching documentary video and audio production to youth and educators as a means to develop the artistic, critical literacy and career skills of young people. This social form of expression has become a vital part of our day-to-day lives but the opportunity to learn these care about the students’ vision skills is limited. CVCA and its and how they want to voice Board of Directors saw a need it. In class, students will be for these skills in Cache Valley surrounded by other students and decided to move forward who love the same things and with the BAM! Studio concept. look for the same opportuniThe upcoming class session ties to share their ideas, engage will include Photoshop CS5 for their minds and imagine all Photographers, Filmmaking the possibilities. The creative 1, BAM! Youth Radio, Digital process and hands-on learning Audio, Finale Music Notation will create lifelong mentors and and recording workshops. The friendships. goal of these courses is to give   all participants a creative voice Photoshop CS5 for through digital expression. Photographers Whether it’s through film, radio, 8-week course, Mondays music, photography, or audio Winter session: Jan. 9 to engineering, it’s all about letMarch 5 ting people find their voice.  Spring session: March 5 to In partnership with Utah April 30 Public Radio, the new BAM! Explore the photo finishing Studios are located in UPR’s aspects of Photoshop under the Downtown Studio found in the direction of industry profesBullen Center at 43 S. Main Street in Logan. The studio pro- sional Levi Sim. This class has two sessions: 3 to 5 p.m. for vides an atmosphere with proages 16 to 25 or 5 to 7 p.m. for fessional equipment and a live age 26 and older. broadcast studio. The classes   are taught by industry profesFilmmaking 1 sionals who not only work in 12-week course, Tuesdays the field they teach, but also

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CVCA will offer broadcast and media classes

Winter session: Jan. 10 to March 27 Express yourself through filmmaking from script writing through post production and learn iMovie and Final Cut Pro. The class will be taught by industry professional Eric Bateman. This class has three sessions: 3 to 5 p.m. for ages 14 and 15, 5 to 7 p.m. for ages 16 and 17, and 7 to 9 p.m. for students 18 and older.

BAM! Youth Radio

12-week course, Thursdays Winter session: Jan. 12 to March 29 Learn from the radio pros at Utah Public Radio. Find a story, write it, record it and maybe even have it broadcast on the radio. The class will be taught by Erik Bateman and special guests from Utah Public Radio: Kerry Bringhurst, Friend Weller and Shalayne Smith Needham. This class will be offered from 3 to 5 p.m. for youth ages 15 to 18.

Digital Audio 1 12-week course, Wednesdays Winter session: Jan. 11 to March 28 Hands-on digital recording and editing from Garageband through Pro Tools. Record your song, arrange and edit it. The class will be taught by industry professional John Carter. This class has three sessions: 3 to 5 p.m. for ages 14 and 15, 5 to 7 p.m. for youth ages 16 and 17, and 7 to 9 p.m. for students 18 and older.  

Finale Music Notation for Educators

12-week course, Mondays Winter session: Jan. 9 to April 9 This class is geared for music teachers and others who want to learn to notate their musical arrangements or songs. The class will be taught by industry professional John Carter. This class will be held from 10 a.m. to noon for ages 18 and older.

Finale Music Notation 12-week course, Thursdays Winter session: Jan. 12 to March 29 Learn to notate your musical arrangements of songs. This class will be taught by industry professional John Carter. The class will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. for ages 16 and older.  

Recording Workshop

Thursday, Jan. 19 Learn music recording basics, from microphone placement to instruments to software from 7 to 9 p.m. The class is geared for ages 14 and older. All classes are held in the first floor Utah Public Radio Studio inside the Bullen Center, 43 S. Main, Logan. Register at the CVCA ticket office or online at www.CacheArts.org. The ticket office is open from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Make all checks payable to CVCA.


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 6, 2012

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movies

To put it bluntly, this movie kicks butt. Director David Fincher orchestrates a stark but enthralling adaptation of the first novel in late author Stieg Larsson’s trilogy. Its harsh emotional terrain could have wound up softened and sweetened, yet this was an ideal match of filmmaker and material. Fincher is one of the least sentimental directors in Hollywood. If anything, his “Dragon Tattoo” is even bleaker than the 2009 Swedish-language hit. Rooney Mara, who had a small role in Fincher’s “The Social Network,” gives a controlled detonation of a performance as traumatized victim-turned-avenger Lisbeth Salander. Mara’s the breakout star of the year, a cold, detached waif in form, a fearsome, merciless zealot in spirit. How strange it is to say that the nice guy here is Daniel Craig — who, of all the big-screen James Bonds, comes closest to the nasty, tortured soul Ian Fleming created. Mara and disgraced journalist This is the second in a remarkably shallow series of holiday-themed, celebrity-stuffed confections, following “Valentine’s Day.” Garry Marshall again directs a script by Katherine Fugate that weaves together a dozen or so plotlines that crisscross a holiday prone to sentimentalizing. If there is some kind of world record for schmaltz, this may have set it. Included here are first kisses, midnight rendezvous, dying fathers, newborn babies, husbands at war and trapped strangers. It’s narcotic mawkishness, with notes played on heartstrings like a 12-string guitar. Though it’s pure, rosy fantasy on screen, this is cynical, paint-by-the-numbers entertain-

★★★

This is about a family that buys a zoo. It's as high-concept as you can get, and it's equally straightforward in wearing its heart on its sleeve. We know to expect this because "We Bought a Zoo" comes from Cameron Crowe, the writer-director of "Say Anything ...," ''Jerry Maguire," ''Almost Famous" and, more recently, the 2005 flop "Elizabethtown." We know there will be some poignantly phrased life lessons in store for this family as they struggle to reconnect after the mother's death. The whole exercise could have been agonizingly mawkish, and/or filled with cheap, lazy animal-poop jokes. And yet, it's not. It's actually surprisingly charming and more emotionally understated than the material would suggest, and a lot of that has to do with Matt Damon's performance. He is an actor incapable of faking it, so he brings great authenticity and gravitas to the role of Benjamin Mee, a widower and father of two. Six months after his wife died of can-

★★ ‘We Bought a Zoo’ Director // Cameron Crowe Starring // Matt Damon, Scarlett Johansson and Thomas Haden Church Rated // PG for language and some thematic elements cer, Benjamin is struggling to move on. He's having trouble dedicating himself to his career as a Los Angeles newspaper columnist and finds himself squabbling with his troublemaking teenage son, Dylan (Colin Ford). Benjamin thinks a change of scenery might help, so he quits his job and moves the family to a rustic, rambling house on 18 acres outside the city. Seems perfect — except for the fact that the land includes an animal park that has fallen into disrepair. 123 minutes.

‘The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo’ Director // David Fincher Starring // Daniel Craig, Rooney Mara and Christopher Plummer Rated // R for brutal violent content including rape and torture, strong sexuality and graphic nudity Craig make an indomitable screen pair, he nominally leading their search into decades-old serial killings, she surging ahead, plowing through obstacles with flashes of phenomenal intellect and eruptions of physical fury. Larsson left behind two other novels loaded with more dark doings for the duo. We haven’t seen the last of this tattooed girl. 158 minutes.

★ ‘New Year’s Eve’ Director // Garry Marshall Starring // Sarah Jessica Parker, Jessica Biel, Ashton Kutcher and more Rated // PG-13 for language, including some sexual references ment, sold with a gaggle of stars spread across its movie poster like a telethon lineup. Maybe the really good stuff will come once they get to “Columbus Day,” or maybe, just maybe, “Ash Wednesday.” 117 minutes.

★ ‘Alvin and the Chipmunks 3: Chipwrecked’ Director // Mike Mitchell Starring // Justin Long, Matthew Gray Gubler and Jesse McCartney Rated // G Puns like these would be unforgivable coming from a human. From high-pitched rodents, they prompt calls for an exterminator. It starts with the title: “Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked,” the third in the noxiously contemporary series of new Chipmunks

films. Following 2009’s “Squeakquel,” “Chipwrecked,” as a title, is actually rather subtle and demure. This latest Chipmunks film, directed by Mike Mitchell (“Shrek Forever After”) is aimed at a slightly younger demographic than the prior movies. In “Chipwrecked,” the Chipmunks’ father figure, Dave Seville (Jason Lee, looking vaguely hostagelike), is taking his diminutive computergenerated friends on a vacation cruise en route to the Grammy-esque International Music Awards. If you haven’t followed the two earlier films, the Chipmunks, that 1950s novelty creation by Ross Bagdasarian Sr., have been restyled as tiny pop stars who burst into song-and-dance routines like a sped-up, annoying version of “Glee.” 87 minutes.


Director // Brad Bird Starring // Tom Cruise, Jeremy Renner and Simon Pegg Rated // PG-13 for sequences of intense action and violence Luckily for Tom Cruise, this is one of his finest action flicks, just what he needs to restore his box-office bankability. For director Brad Bird, though, the fourth "Mission," rock

★★

★ ‘Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows’ Director // Guy Ritchie Starring // Robert Downey Jr., Jude Law and Jared Harris Rated // PG-13 for intense sequences of violence and action, and some drug material Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law bicker and banter and bob and weave with diminishing returns in this sequel to the 2009 smash hit “Sherlock Holmes.” Director Guy Ritchie once again applies his revisionist approach to Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic literary character, infusing the film with his trademark, hyperkinetic aesthetic and turning the renowned detective into a wisecracking butt-kicker. But what seemed clever and novel the first time around now feels stale and tired; a lot of that has to do with the bleak, gray color scheme, which smothers everything in a dreary, suffocating sameness and saps the film of any real tension or thrills. “Game of Shadows” finds Downey’s Holmes facing off against brilliant supervillain Professor Moriarty (Jared Harris), who’s cooked up a scheme to pit European nations against each other in hopes of benefiting from the demand for arms. Holmes must stop him with the help of his trusty sidekick, Dr. Watson

solid as it is, ranks only as his second-best action movie, after the animated smash "The Incredibles." It's the best of the "Mission: Impossible" movies, Bird making a remarkable

(Law), who’s newly married and not nearly so gung-ho about such wild adventures anymore. And it shows in the script as well as the performances; Law gets little to do beyond functioning as the skeptical straight man, and the chemistry just isn’t there this time. Noomi Rapace tags along for some reason as a gypsy fortuneteller looking for her missing brother. 129 minutes.

‘War Horse’ Director // Steven Spielberg Starring // Jeremy Irvine, Emily Watson and David Thewlis Rated // PG-13 for intense sequences of war violence Just in time for family friendly holiday feelgoodery is Steven Spielberg's sweeping, historical epic. The story began life as a children's book by Michael Morpurgo, then made its way to the London and New York stages to great acclaim featuring inventive puppetry, and now arrives in theaters with all the grandeur a master filmmaker can conjure. "War Horse" features a strong cast and the sort of impeccable production values

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you would expect — that trademark Spielbergian lighting, the work of his longtime collaborator, Oscar-winning cinematographer Janusz Kaminski. And yet it's overlong, painfully earnest and sometimes even hokey. Clearly, Spielberg intended "War Horse" as a throwback, an homage to good, oldfashioned, heart-rending storytelling, full of recognizable types and uplifting themes. Yet the dialogue is so frequently on-thenose and repetitive, it

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war. Cruise is pretty much doing the same-old, playing the stone-face who's not very interesting when standing still and talking. That work ethic of Cruise, though, shows in every one of the spectacular action moments. If you have the slightest fear of heights, grip the armrests tightly during Cruise's climb up the world's tallest building; even safe in your seat, an unnerving feeling of vertigo is bound to result as you stare down from the 130th floor. 132 minutes.

might just make you cringe. Yes, the horse is remarkable — of course he is — that's why they made a movie about him. That should have been obvious to us through the action alone, yet the script feels the need to remind us repeatedly that he's "remarkable." The majestic Joey comes into the lives of a struggling British fam-

ily just before World War I. The father (Peter Mullan) buys him at auction, even though he knows he cannot afford him; the mother (Emily Watson) insists he return him and get the family's money back. But plucky teenager Albert (good-looking newcomer Jeremy Irvine) begs to keep him and promises to train him. 146 minutes.

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 6, 2012

‘Mission: Impossible — Ghost Protocol’

transition with his first live-action film after three animated ones, among them "Ratatouille." Bird applies the anything-canhappen limitlessness of cartoons and just goes for it, creating thrilling, dizzying, amazing action sequences. This time, Cruise and his team (Jeremy Renner, Paula Patton and Simon Pegg) are blamed for bombing the Kremlin, so they go rogue trying to clear their names and stop a madman (Michael Nyqvist) from starting a nuclear

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★★★


A new place for fine art lot of people know about the art hub Cache Valley is becoming. But where is the hub’s hub? Gene Needham is hoping his gallery, Logan Fine Art, will be the place. The gallery has existed in one form or another for several years, but the new building that houses Logan Fine Art has undergone extensive renovations. Needham even had to take out a loan to finish everything. The effort looks to have been worth it. The place boasts a large, open gallery space, a nice lobby and classrooms. Needham says one of the core goals of the place is to showcase local artists not only in the Cache market, but even at the state and national level. To that end, he has taken out full-page ads in a few publications highlighting artists at the gallery.

“We would like to keep bubbling and festering here until a lot of people in Utah know that we’re around. And the advertising there will maybe help,” he muses. Another core goal of Logan Fine Art is to teach other people to become artists in their own right. “Part of our mission,” Needham states, “is to encourage people to go forward with their art.” In that spirit, the gallery holds model sessions where people can come and sketch, paint, or otherwise create a depiction of the model posing that day. Needham’s also working to find more local artists to teach classes for both adults and children. He also likes to do workshops, where recognized non-valley artists come and teach classes at the gallery. Needham believes anyone can make art and it’s never too late to start, it just takes practice.

“It seems like most people, when they go through grade school, they like art, they love it — fingerpainting on up. Then they look left and right and go ‘oh, what I’m doing isn’t very good.’ ... By high school 95 percent of everybody says ‘Gad no. I run’ or ‘I play football’ or ‘I dance’ or ‘No, I don’t do art. I can’t do art. All I can do are stick figures,’ as if they can’t learn it. And I tell people, ‘look, art is like playing the piano. What does it take, six to eight years to play well? ... To do art it takes about that same amount of time.’” Needham himself is a testament to that belief. Although he took art classes and even got a master’s degree in art in 1980, creating art didn’t continue to be a part of his life. “In 1980 when I had finished that master’s I just stopped all art until about 2007 [when] I started up again. I had just a little bit of sculp-

Gene Needham’s new gallery showcases local artwork ture (experience) and mainly drawing and painting, but ... now I’m doing more sculpture and painting.” Currently he has a number of art pieces in various mediums under his belt, some showcased in his gallery. Despite the work he has completed, Needham is humble. “I consider myself an advanced amateur,” he says. So far, the success of the gallery’s new location, which opened in October, remains to be seen. Although the art is good, Needham admits it can be hard to get people excited when much of it is by relatively unknown people. In a possible sign of good things to come though, he recently sold several pieces of art. “We had our best December that we’ve had in some while,” Needham says. — By Casey Rock

About Logan Fine Art 60 W. 100 North, Logan 435-753-0333 www.loganfineart.com Hours:  Monday-Saturday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday model sessions: • Draped model (9 a.m. to noon): Long, multi-session pose, oil painting, watercolor, drawing • Draped or undraped model (1 to 4 p.m.): Long, multi-session pose, sculpture, oil painting, watercolor, drawing • Undraped model (5 to 7 p.m.): Short to long poses, pencil, watercolor, charcoal Classes: $95 a month. Call for topics and times. Photos by Eli Lucero/Herald Journal

Far left: “Shades” by Kim Whitesides is displayed at Logan Fine Art. Above: Steve Gudmunson builds a wall at the Logan Fine Art Gallery on Monday afternoon. Left: Gene Needham talks about paintings on display at the Logan Fine Art Gallery on Monday afternoon.


A new place for fine art lot of people know about the art hub Cache Valley is becoming. But where is the hub’s hub? Gene Needham is hoping his gallery, Logan Fine Art, will be the place. The gallery has existed in one form or another for several years, but the new building that houses Logan Fine Art has undergone extensive renovations. Needham even had to take out a loan to finish everything. The effort looks to have been worth it. The place boasts a large, open gallery space, a nice lobby and classrooms. Needham says one of the core goals of the place is to showcase local artists not only in the Cache market, but even at the state and national level. To that end, he has taken out full-page ads in a few publications highlighting artists at the gallery.

“We would like to keep bubbling and festering here until a lot of people in Utah know that we’re around. And the advertising there will maybe help,” he muses. Another core goal of Logan Fine Art is to teach other people to become artists in their own right. “Part of our mission,” Needham states, “is to encourage people to go forward with their art.” In that spirit, the gallery holds model sessions where people can come and sketch, paint, or otherwise create a depiction of the model posing that day. Needham’s also working to find more local artists to teach classes for both adults and children. He also likes to do workshops, where recognized non-valley artists come and teach classes at the gallery. Needham believes anyone can make art and it’s never too late to start, it just takes practice.

“It seems like most people, when they go through grade school, they like art, they love it — fingerpainting on up. Then they look left and right and go ‘oh, what I’m doing isn’t very good.’ ... By high school 95 percent of everybody says ‘Gad no. I run’ or ‘I play football’ or ‘I dance’ or ‘No, I don’t do art. I can’t do art. All I can do are stick figures,’ as if they can’t learn it. And I tell people, ‘look, art is like playing the piano. What does it take, six to eight years to play well? ... To do art it takes about that same amount of time.’” Needham himself is a testament to that belief. Although he took art classes and even got a master’s degree in art in 1980, creating art didn’t continue to be a part of his life. “In 1980 when I had finished that master’s I just stopped all art until about 2007 [when] I started up again. I had just a little bit of sculp-

Gene Needham’s new gallery showcases local artwork ture (experience) and mainly drawing and painting, but ... now I’m doing more sculpture and painting.” Currently he has a number of art pieces in various mediums under his belt, some showcased in his gallery. Despite the work he has completed, Needham is humble. “I consider myself an advanced amateur,” he says. So far, the success of the gallery’s new location, which opened in October, remains to be seen. Although the art is good, Needham admits it can be hard to get people excited when much of it is by relatively unknown people. In a possible sign of good things to come though, he recently sold several pieces of art. “We had our best December that we’ve had in some while,” Needham says. — By Casey Rock

About Logan Fine Art 60 W. 100 North, Logan 435-753-0333 www.loganfineart.com Hours:  Monday-Saturday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday model sessions: • Draped model (9 a.m. to noon): Long, multi-session pose, oil painting, watercolor, drawing • Draped or undraped model (1 to 4 p.m.): Long, multi-session pose, sculpture, oil painting, watercolor, drawing • Undraped model (5 to 7 p.m.): Short to long poses, pencil, watercolor, charcoal Classes: $95 a month. Call for topics and times. Photos by Eli Lucero/Herald Journal

Far left: “Shades” by Kim Whitesides is displayed at Logan Fine Art. Above: Steve Gudmunson builds a wall at the Logan Fine Art Gallery on Monday afternoon. Left: Gene Needham talks about paintings on display at the Logan Fine Art Gallery on Monday afternoon.


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 6, 2012

Page 10 -

CULTURE

Photos by you

U.S. album sales rise for the first time since 2004

LOS ANGELES (AP) — U.S. album sales rose more than 3 percent last year for the first gain since 2004 — a sign that rising digital sales are finally stemming the decade-long decline of compact discs. The uptick to 458 million album sales was helped by the hugely popular sophomore album “21” from British singer Adele, which sold 5.8 million, according to Nielsen SoundScan. Huge interest in Adele also led to the sales of 856,000 copies of “19,” her debut album from 2008. Michael Buble’s “Christmas,” which was released in late October, racked up 2.5 million album sales. Lady Gaga’s “Born This Way” sold 2.1 million, boosted by a massive sale at Amazon.com earlier in the year for a heavily discounted 99 cents. Digital album sales rose nearly 20 percent to 103 million, while CDs fell nearly 6 percent to 225 million. The rest of the total is made up largely of digital single tracks, where 10 tracks are counted as one album.

Digital singles sales rose nearly 9 percent to 1.27 billion. The digital sales gains are likely here to stay, said Dave Bakula, senior vice president of analytics at Nielsen. He noted more consumers are using high-end mobile devices, and Google Inc. has launched its online music store, giving it a way to sell music to users of smartphones on its Android platform. “It shows there’s still a lot of growth potential in digital,” he said. “That’s something I don’t see falling down.” Sales of older albums rose nearly 9 percent to 151 million, thanks a to heavy discounting, including Father’s Day promotion at some big box retailers and iTunes that touted Journey’s greatest hits and the work of other older rock bands. The Nielsen tally does not include growing subscriptions to all-you-can listen music plans, which have been rising thanks in part to the entry of Swedish service Spotify to the U.S. market in July.

Photo taken in Logan on Dec. 30, 2011 by Ryan Neeley of Logan.

Call for Singers! Cache Children’s Choir

Hugh Jackman plans a return to Broadway

NEW YORK (AP) — Hugh Jackman liked his record-setting Broadway run so much this winter that he’s handcuffing himself to a future musical about Harry Houdini. Producers said Wednesday that Jackman, best known as the hairy Wolverine in “The X-Men” franchise, will star as the famed illusionist in “Houdini.” It’s scheduled to reach Broadway during the 2013-14 season. AP photo Academy Award and six-time Hugh Jackman appears onstage in Emmy Award winner Aaron Sorkin “Hugh Jackman, Back on Broadway,” in of “West Wing” fame will write New York on Nov. 10, 2011. the story, and three-time Academy Award and four-time Grammy Award having earned more than $2 million in its final week. It was the highest winner Stephen Schwartz of “Wicked” fame will write music and lyrics. weekly gross recorded by the Shubert Organization, which owns the Jackman’s one-man, 10-week Broadhurst and 16 other Broadway Broadway concert show closed Suntheaters. day at the Broadhurst Theatre after

Do you like to sing? Do you like to make new friends? Do you want to become a better singer? Do you like to travel? Placement Auditions for touring choir •

Cantate ages 11-16 ~ Jan. 9–23 ~ call for audition time

Rehearsal Open Houses • • • •

Concert Grades 4-8 ~ Jan. 11 & 18, 4:30 pm, USU–FA 222 Cadet Grades 2-3 ~ Jan. 16 & 23, 4:30 pm, USU-FA 222 Caprice Grades K-1 ~ Jan. 16 & 23, 4:30 & 5:15 pm, USU-FA 116 Cadenza Ages 3-5 ~ Jan. 13 & 20, 9:30 & 10:15 am, Bullen Center

Spring Highlights • • •

Concert with Los Angeles Children’s Choir April 20 Tour to Idaho April 27-29 (Cantate, ages 11-16) Cache Valley Choirfest May 12 – new work by internationally acclaimed Rollo Dilworth who will come to Logan to conduct the premiere

www.cachechildrenschoir.org or call 435.938.8824


Will the world end or will 2012 just get ridiculous? Slightly Off Center DENNIS HINKAMP

The new year of 2012 seems to lack luster since it’s not yet a teen and is far from a milestone decade. I came up with 20Dozen as a clever moniker, but all it makes me think of is donuts. What is there to look forward to? Elections, or at least campaigns, have become a more annoying version of reality TV that take almost a year to kick anyone off the island. I used to look forward to Summer Olympics years, but the increasing number of silly sports and the end of a viable meanspirited cold war rivalry leaves me a little hollow. On a positive note, we’re still here even though the world was supposed to end a couple times last year. This year it really, really is supposed to end according to the Mayan calendar, though it is possible they were just shrewd, rather than apocalyptic. “No, no, that didn’t mean the world was going to end, we just wanted people to buy new calendars,” I imagine them saying. “It’s all about repeat business.” I’m not much for resolutions or predictions, let me just say I hope these things happen this year: Noted economists admit they have no idea why the stock market goes up or down on a given day but advise people to keep throwing monetary darts at the stocks because you can

only earn about a penny per $100 annually in a savings account. It turns out home sales are going down because more people hate lawn care and shoveling snow. Sales of almost everything else are down because the country has run out of closet space. I work the word effete into writing and conversation more this year and also have an epic meltdown where I slap several teens or 20-somethings who works the word “epic” into every description of mundane activities. The two-party system and electoral college is replaced by something simpler such as the equation used to figure out what Sunday Easter falls on. At least a few professional athletes blame God for their fumble, missed shot or strike out. Along with solar and wind energy, tattoo removal becomes the

next growth industry. Social media experts admit they are getting paid to just fool around on the Internet like the rest of us. Some new diet craze involves a parasite discovered in the Amazon jungle. A new exercise craze involves big rubber balls, tap dancing and sword play. Just like Yogi Berra predicted, Facebook becomes so popular nobody uses it anymore. Next year every college football team has their very own bowl game. One or more major league sports go on strike and are replaced by computer simulation and nobody notices. Utah liquor laws drastically change but people still complain and make fun of them. The relative success of Huntsman and Romney leads to a flood of Mormon-themed reality shows such as Extreme Food Storage and The Real Housewives of Bear River. Dennis Hinkamp wishes his effete readers an epic 20Dozen. He is among a number of freelance writers whose columns appear in The Herald Journal as part of an effort to expose readers to a variety of community voices. He is not an employee of the newspaper. Feedback can be sent to dennis.hinkamp@usu.edu.

Vision 20/20 • Save Our Sight • A Dollar Well Spent With your $1 donation to Prevent Blindness, you can give the gift of sight to thousands of Utahns. A $1 donation when you renew your driver’s license and license plate tag will help fund vision screening for children and adults, and Driver’s Education students. Prevent Blindness Utah • www.users.qwest.net/~preventblindness 661 South 200 East • Salt Lake City • Utah 84111 • 801-524-2020

babes of 2011 DEAr PArEnTS & GrAnDPArEnTS, Congratulations on the new addition to your family! The Herald Journal will be publishing its fourteenth “Babes” edition. This year’s special, featuring photographs

of babies born during 2011, will be published on Sunday, January 29, 2012. A random drawing for several prizes donated by area businesses will be held after all entries are received.

win a prize from one of our sponsors! enter onlin

news.hjnew e at s.co babes_of_20 m/ 11

enter online at news.hjnews.com/babes_of_2011

JUST FILL OUT THIS FORM

baby’s full name ________________________________________________________ Date of birth ______/______/______ (birth must be between 1/1/11 and 12/31/11) length _________________________________ weight _____________________________

parents' names ___________________________________________________________ siblings' names __________________________________________________________ Grandparents' names _____________________________________________________ Your name ______________________________ Day phone ______________________________ amount of check/money order $ __________ signature ______________________ entries paying by credit card must go online to new.hjnews.com/babes_of_2011

Mail complete entry form with a clear picture of baby plus your $15 payment to Babes of 2011, The Herald Journal, PO BOX 487, Logan, UT 84323. Entries must be received by Jan. 23, 2012. If you wish to have your picture returned, please send a SASE along with your photo.


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 6, 2012

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Books Author struggles to accept daughter’s death By Ann Levin Associated Press

A year after his only daughter died at age 38 of an asymptomatic heart condition, Roger Rosenblatt wrote an essay in The New Yorker titled, “Making Toast.” He describes how he and his wife moved into Amy’s house in Bethesda, Md., to help their son-in-law care for the couple’s three small children, and how the myriad, mundane activities of child-rearing provided a measure of solace for his inconsolable grief. His latest book, “Kayak Morning: Reflections on Love, Grief, and Small Boats,” was written after the essay was turned into a bestselling book. What he has discovered in the more than two and a half years since her death is that just getting on with life — captured

in the closing image of the essay when his 23-month-old grandson asks for toast — hasn’t worked. “What I failed to calculate is the pain that increases even as one gets on with it,” he writes. Rosenblatt has taken up kayaking, spending hours

exploring the shoreline and eddies of the inlet near his other home in Quogue, a resort town on the south shore of Long Island, where his two sons, son-in-law and their families still gather every summer. The book reads as an exploration of his eddying consciousness as he sets out one June morning on Penniman Creek while the rest of the family is asleep. He thinks about his highflying career as a journalist, when he traveled the world writing about other people’s sadness. He meditates on the nature of water, wildlife and boats; recalls sorrowful passages of literature and poetry; and recounts conversations with a therapist friend trying to lift him out of his depression. In one poignant passage, he simply imagines what it would have been like to be

Financial conspiracy at heart of thriller By Jeff Ayers Associated Press

James Grippando’s new stand-alone novel, “Need You Now,” shines the spotlight on Wall Street and Ponzi schemes. Abe Cushman runs a Ponzi scheme that has netted billions of dollars. When the pyramid begins to fall, Cushman takes his own life. Patrick Lloyd, a financial adviser on Wall Street, learns that his girlfriend, Lilly, is directly involved in how the funds were funneled, and they break up. Lilly becomes scared for her life. Some of the investors are demanding their money back and will kill to make sure it happens. Soon

after talking to Lilly, someone puts a gun to Patrick’s head. Patrick and Lilly, who aren’t sure if they can truly trust each other, must use their skills at handling financial transactions to find the lost funds and the people who are trying to kill them. At first glance, Grippando seems to have written a thriller that reflects the public’s distrust of Wall Street. But once the twists start flying, the narrative becomes something altogether different. Readers looking for a great thriller will see a master at the top of his game in “Need You Now.” Folks looking for an in-depth look at the machinations of

someone else, less lettered, less obviously successful, perhaps a high school teacher from a working-class town. Elsewhere, he converses with his daughter — “See here, Amy,” he writes — and with God. He conjures her from memory and photos: on her wedding day; when she was 5 years old and danced on his shoes.

Eventually, he drifts and paddles his way toward a resolution of his anguish, a perspective that offers some peace of mind and lets him, again, get on with life. I won’t reveal the epiphany that releases him from his torment. Suffice it to say, it won’t come as a big surprise to anyone who has lost a loved one.

new york times best sellers COMBINED PRINT & E-BOOK FICTION 1. “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” by Stieg Larsson 2. “The Help,” by Kathryn Stockett 3. “11/22/63,” by Stephen King 4. “The Litigators,” by John Grisham 5. “Kill Alex Cross,” by James Patterson COMBINED PRINT & E-BOOK NONFICTION 1. “Steve Jobs,” by Walter Isaacson 2. “Killing Lincoln,” by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard 3. “Heaven is for Real,” by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent 4. “Unbroken,” by Laura Hillenbrand 5. “Through My Eyes,” by Tim Tebow with Nathan Whitaker HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “Steve Jobs,” by Walter Isaacson 2. “Killing Lincoln,” by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard 3. “Unbroken,” by Laura Hillenbrand 4. “Through My Eyes,” by Tim Tebow with Nathan Whitaker 5. “Jack Kennedy,” by Chris Matthews

Wall Street mixed with suspense will be disappointed, since little of that world is revealed.

Paperback Mass-Market Fiction 1. “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” by Stieg Larsson 2. “The Girl Who Played with Fire,” by Stieg Larsson 3. “A Game of Thrones,” by George R. R. Martin 4. “Toys,” by James Patterson and Neil McMahon 5. “Smokin’ Seventeen,” by Janet Evanovich Paperback Nonfiction 1. “Heaven is for Real,” by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent 2. “The Zombie Survival Guide,” by Max Brooks 3. “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,” by Rebecca Skloot 4. “Unlikely Friendships,” by Jennifer S. Holland 5. “Outliers,” by Malcolm Gladwell Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/


In his new book, “Solving the Communion Enigma: What Is to Come,” author Whitley Strieber tries to explain the strange happenings surrounding his life since he wrote “Communion” 25 years ago. “Communion” chronicled what Strieber claimed was his abduction by alien beings and the events that followed. He wrote two more books about his experiences and received thousands of letters from people who said similar events occurred in their lives. He also became a laughingstock among his friends and lost his financial stability. His wife, Anne, supported him, though it was difficult for her to understand what

he was experiencing. Strieber reveals that brushes with the paranormal haven’t lessened over the years. He uses his personal connections and in-

depth research to rationalize his experiences. The UFO culture is hard to grasp, but Strieber tries his best to tie together diverse subjects such as cattle mutilations, crop circles, strange implants and the afterlife. He even questions whether the aliens he claims abducted him were from outer space or another dimension. What it boils down to is whether the reader believes Strieber. Are his experiences real? Strieber doesn’t resolve the issue conclusively, and the majority of the stories in “Solving the Communion Enigma” have been told on his radio show, “Dreamland.” Still, there’s enough compelling material to make even the rigid skeptic ask questions.

Book reveals forgotten countries By Carl Hartman Associated Press

You may never have heard of the “Kingdom of the Rock,” though for half a millennium it dominated a sizable piece of Scotland. It centered on two fortified hills that overlook the River Clyde at Dumbarton (“Camp of the Britons”), near today’s Glasgow. In his new book, “Vanished Kingdoms: The Rise and Fall of States and Nations,” British historian Norman Davies names “Kingdom of the Rock” among 15 Eurasian countries he cites by unfamiliar titles such as “Litva” and “Rusyn.” They illustrate the alist silliness. dedication of his book to “those The 15 countries vary in whom historians tend to forget.” importance. His theme: All governments Ukraine eventually absorbed disappear or lose power in time. “Rusyn,” better known as History buffs will find much Carpatho-Ukraine. Its indepento admire in the book’s 830 dence lasted just one March day pages. Davies includes 74 during the upheaval of Hitler’s maps, direct quotations and invasion of Czechoslovakia in poems. Some of the verse is 1939. patriotic doggerel in a variety of Poland was tied to Lithuania languages, with translations in for centuries, a European force English that mock supernationthat Davies calls “Litva.” Its

neighbors separated them and devoured Poland three times in the 1700s. Contradicting Davies’ theme of countries’ disappearance, Poland was resurrected twice, after World Wars I and II. Occasionally, Davies misses a chance to exploit the light touch. King Dagobert made Paris the capital of “Neustria” after the Roman empire fell. He inspired a satirical song that may have been written more than a thousand years after his reign. Roughly translated, it begins: “Good King Dagobert (the lout!) Put his pants on inside out ...” The king’s spiritual adviser responds, starting a ridiculous dialogue about proper royal dress. Davies doesn’t quote further. Some writers think the satirist wrote at the time of the French Revolution in the 1790s, ridiculing monarchs and priests. If so, the satirical point has changed. The words have a catchy tune and the political song has become a nursery rhyme. Almost any French child can sing it for you.

“Daddy” By Glenda Grindeland My father was old when I was born. This is not a line of corn. He was 56 when to an orphan’s home we went. At 60 he died in an accident. There was no one left for me to love. I turned to God above. I often wondered about my father and me. As a child I didn’t know what to believe. It wasn’t a question if my father loved me. The question as a child: Did I love my father? As I grew old I found out it didn’t matter. My father never broke my trust He really loved all of us. I passed his love for me to my family. God never let go of me. His love is what I see, When I wake and see; This new day he has given me.

“Dark Moon” By William Humphrey Dark moon the future to predict, Lost souls the gloom cannot evict. Fate sealed too late for man, No escape is in the plan. A day of sorrow hell on earth, Mankind shall have no mirth. Blood fire and smoke everywhere, The best of men shall have despair. Red Dragon sitting on a throne, Followers of Christ standing alone. Sons of sin against all that’s right, Christian followers dying in the light. The Great God of Heaven watching from above, Christian spirits received with love. Red Dragon warring against the lamb, Christ shall win, it’s in the plan. Send your poems and stories to mnewbold@hjnews.com.

THERE’S NO EXCUSE

FOR ABUSE

Call 1-435-753-2500 For Free Confidential help with domestic violence.

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 6, 2012

By Jeff Ayers Associated Press

Your Stuff

Page 13 -

Strieber says his brushes with paranormal continue


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 6, 2012

Page 14 -

CrossworD By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Level connectors 6. Cheese in a ball 10. Figure ___ 15. Deadly biters 19. Dart 20. Goggle 21. ___ Beach, Fla. 22. Canaanite deity 23. Frank 27. Without mercy 28. Hidden means of support 29. Wallace of “E.T.” 30. Endocarp 31. Top ___ Club, Beatles venue in Hamburg 32. Grayish browns 35. Type of ranked score, in statistics 37. Vulgarian 40. Wedding cake feature 43. Rechargeable battery 45. Unite 46. Frank 51. Category of arachnids 52. Peak near Taormina 53. Exhaust 54. Parting words 56. Barge ___ 59. Swiss canton 64. Color ___ 67. Potential lifesaver 71. John, abroad 72. Frank 78. Religious image: Var. 79. Red ocher pigment 80. Ring-tailed animal 81. Family subdivisions 83. Long haul 85. Home run hitter, for one 90. Indigo-yielding shrubs 94. Mythology anthology 97. ___ Durance (Canadian actress) 98. Frank 104. Super server

105. It’s catching 106. Sacred Hindu writings 107. Corrodes 108. Trust 111. ___ Crown 113. Cacophony 115. Christian ___ 116. Monopolize 118. Maiden name indicator 119. Ultimate 124. Frank 129. To be, to Brutus 130. Cereal killer 131. Iranian money 132. Free radicals 133. No longer secret 134. Crackers 135. Institution since 1701 136. First word in an Austen title Down 1. Party acronym 2. Healthful berry 3. Drop down? 4. Red body? 5. Commemorative marker 6. Vandalizes, in a way 7. Ambo 8. When D.S.T. begins 9. A Moore 10. Sheep disease 11. Colorful carp 12. Routine 13. Struck with the outer end of the head of a golf club 14. Like cornstalks 15. Fabric woven from goat hair 16. More mawkish 17. Tongue protuberance 18. Scheduled 24. “Fiddler on the Roof” role 25. Twisted, as a wet towel 26. Tappan ___ Bridge

32. West Indies island 33. Neutral color 34. Cheek 36. Quintal 37. Mineral springs 38. Nuts or crackers 39. Girasol, e.g. 41. Dander 42. Guinness Book suffix 44. It’s spotted in casinos 47. Water chestnuts 48. Bread served with korma 49. Gold bits 50. Barbary beast 55. Paraguayan monetary unit 57. Horse opera 58. Fed. agency 60. Bird’s beak 61. Twelfth Night, vis-àvis Epiphany 62. Dictionary abbr. 63. Social worker? 65. Gray 66. Circle meas. 68. Euro pigeon 69. “My man!” 70. Recognition response 72. Like a bunch 73. Arthur Godfrey played it 74. Oui’s opposite 75. Pilothouse abbr. 76. Last: Abbr. 77. Kitchen aid 82. Fan sound 84. Unagi, at a sushi bar 86. Adjust to a situation 87. Baltic capital 88. Genuine 89. Ship abandoners? 91. Start of a wonderful life? 92. Time to give up? 93. Melee memento 95. ___ job 96. Throw in 98. Needle-shaped 99. Backslide

100. ___ wolf 101. Terzetto 102. Persona non grata 103. Spoonbill, for one 104. Mountain spurs 109. “So there you are!” 110. Romance, e.g. 112. Circumspect 114. Pizarro’s conquest 117. Auto___: the original helicopter 119. Bibliographic abbr. 120. Mouselike animal 121. Straddling 122. Treaty subject 123. Emit coherent light 125. Word with milk or line 126. Maniac leader? 127. Slip on 128. It has moles: Abbr.

answers from last week

Herald Journal one to two days prior to the event. Calendar items can be submitted Deadlines inbyThe email at hjhappen@hjnews.com. Any press releases or photos for events listed in the Cache Magazine calendar items are due Wednesday by 5 p.m. They will also run for free

first half of Cache Magazine can be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com. Poems and photos can also by sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com and run on a space-available basis if selected.

www.ThemeCrosswords.com


Cache Singles 31 and older will hold a dance Friday, Jan. 6, at 8 p.m. at the Willow Park Church, 340 W. 700 South, Logan. Cost is $3. Dance instruction will be held until 9, with the dance following until midnight. An art reception by Johnny and Heaven Lopez will be held Friday, Jan. 6, from 5 to 7 p.m. at Caffe Ibis. Music will be provided by Linden Olsen with Mary Jacobson.

SATURDAY Cache Pilates Studio will have spring registration Jan. 7 from 10 to 11 a.m. with a free new client class from 11 a.m. to noon at the Whittier Community Center, 290 N. 400 East in Logan, Studio #4. A 15-week semester is $150 starting Monday, Jan. 9. All classes are taught by certified instructors. For class times and availability call Tora at 787-8442. Cache Pilates Studio is a taxable activity of the Cache Valley Ballet Association. The Cache Valley Folk Dancers and Bridger Folk Music Society are hosting their monthly “first Saturday” contra dance Jan. 7. The dance will be held at the Whittier Community Center, 290 N. 400 East in Logan, and begins at 7:30 p.m. This month live music will be provided by contra musicians Leaping Lulu and called by Will Aoki. A $6 donation is suggested at the door, $3 for children under 12. Beginners and families are welcome and all dances are taught. For more information about contra dancing call 753-2480 or 753-5987 or visit www.bridgerfolk.org. Stokes Nature Center will hold a snowshoeing activity Saturday, Jan. 7, from 1 to 4 p.m. Meet at the Logan U.S. Forest Service District Office. Cost is a suggested $5 donation. Participants will learn how to snowshoe, find and identify animal tracks and discover the natural history of the

Cache National Forest. Cocoa, treats and snowshoes will be provided. Registration required. For details or to register, call 435-755-3239 or email nature@ logannature.org.

SUNDAY The Post-Mormon Community is a non-sectarian organization of individuals and families who have left Mormonism. The Cache Valley chapter meets for dinner and socializing at a local restaurant every Sunday at 6:30 p.m. For more information call Jeff at 770-4263 or go to our website at www.postmormon.org/logan. The Old Ephraim String Band will perform at Caffe Ibis on Sunday, Jan. 8, from noon to 2 p.m. Free.

MONDAY USU choir auditions will be held Monday, Jan. 9. Email michael.huff@usu.edu to schedule an appointment. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will hold an art project activity Monday, Jan. 9, at 4 p.m. Cost is $3. Common Ground is a non-profit organization that provides outdoor recreation opportunities for people with disabilities. Call 713-0288 for more information.

TUESDAY USTAR at Utah State University invites students to learn about “Cool Science” on Tuesday, Jan. 10, from 5 to 6 p.m. at the Space Dynamics Laboratory Calibration Building, 489 E. 1650 North, Logan. The event is geared toward a high school a college-age audience. USTAR conversations aim to tackle big questions for the next generation of star researchers. Because Martin Luther King Jr. day of service occurs near tax filing season, the Business Expansion and Retention Program (BEAR), in conjunction with the Bear River Association of Gov-

ernments (BRAG), will be handing out information Tuesday, Jan. 10, to local residents to raise awareness about the earned income (EITC) and free tax preparation services through Volunteer Tax Assistance (VITA). The BEAR Outreach Specialists will be at the Cache Department of Workforce Services at 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and the Cache Community Food Pantry at 1:15 to 3:13 p.m. Alissa Weller will teach how to make leftovers into great meals at a free cooking and community class at Macey’s Little Theater on Tuesday, Jan. 10, from 7 to 8 p.m. Music for the Small and Tall winter sessions begin Tuesday, Jan. 10 at the Thatcher-Young Mansion in Logan. The focus of the classes is for parents to have some happy musical time with their children. Call Ewa at 435755-0853 for details. The Cache Valley Watercolor Society will hold its January general membership meeting Tuesday, Jan. 10. Critique will begin at 6:30 p.m. with the meeting following at 7. Meet at the Logan City Library, 255 N. Main, in the Jim Bridger Room. Guest artist will be G. Russell Case, a lifelong painter in both watercolor and oil paints. Anger management classes for children will be held at the Child and Family Support Center beginning Tuesday, Jan. 10. The classes are for children ages 5 through 12. Cost is $30 for the eight-week course. Parents are invited to attend three of the class sessions. Call 752-8880 to register. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will have volunteer orientation Tuesday, Jan. 10, at 6 p.m. Come learn how to get involved with the community by participating in Common Ground’s daily activities or destination trips. Common Ground is a non-profit organization that provides outdoor recreation

opportunities for people with disabilities. Call 713-0288 for more information.

WEDNESDAY Peer to Peer Support Group is open to people with all kinds of disabilities. Share personal challenges and exchange ideas to assist with living with a disability and learn from others. Meetings will be held at OPTIONS for Independence on Jan. 11 from 6 to 8 P.M. and every second Wednesday after. RSVP at least one week in advance for transportation costs. Contact Anna at 435753-5353 for more information. Quilters English group will meet Jan. 11 at OPTIONS for Independence, 1095 N. Main, Logan, from 10 a.m. to noon. Contact Royella at 435-753-5353 for more information. The American Festival Chorus will be auditioning men only Wednesday, Jan. 11, by appointment. Contact Elaine Olson, choir secretary, at 435797-7942 or elaine.olson@usu. edu to schedule your appointment. Sarah Parslow, Macey’s floral manager, will teach basic floral design all month at Macey’s Little Theater. Week one begins Wednesday, Jan. 11, with basic flower arranging. Cost is $25 per person and will include takehomes. Class will be held from 7 to 8 p.m. Seating is limited. Call 753-3301 for more details. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will hold a skiing activity Wednesday, Jan. 11 at Beaver Mountain. Cost is $25. Adaptive equipment and transportation will be available. Call Bryce at 435-713-0288 for details. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will hold a snowshoeing activity Jan. 11 from 2 to 3 p.m. Equipment will be provided. Cost is $3. Call Bryce at 435-713-0288 for details. A healthy home seminar will

be held Wednesday, Jan. 11, at 7 p.m. at 2540 N. 1600 East, North Logan. Participants will discuss the importance of living in a healthy environment (air, water, sleep, nutrition, energy). Learn how toxic homes can be and how to make them healthier to live in. Financial Planning for Women will hold “Small Steps to Health and Wealth” on Jan. 11 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in the USU TSC and from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the USU Family Life Center. This is a free program designed to motivate consumers to implement behavior change strategies that simultaneously improve their health and personal finances. Contact Jean Lown at 435-7971569 or jean.lown@usu.edu for more information.

THURSDAY OPTIONS for Independence announces a new class, Living Well with a Chronic Disability. The class is for anyone with ongoing conditions. Learn skills to improve quality of life. Classes will be on the second Thursday of each month from 6 to 8 p.m. Class size is limited. Please call Anna at 435-753-5353 or Deanna at 435-723-2171 for more information. Free storytime for babies 18 months and older will be held Jan. 12 at 10:30 a.m. for 15 minutes at Stork Landing, 99 W. Center Street, Logan. Call 435-79CHILD for details or go to our website at www.shopstorklanding.com. The Utah Commission on Marriage and the USU Extension Office in Cache County will offer a workshop to help parents and grandparents learn how to build their children’s and grandchildren’s self-esteem Thursday, Jan. 12, at 11 a.m. in the Cache County Administration Building Multipurpose Room at 179 N. Main, Logan. Cost is $3 per person or $2 if paid for 24 hours prior to the class. A light lunch will be catered by The Bluebird restaurant. Seating is limited. Call 752-6263 to register.

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 6, 2012

Friday

Page 15 -

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The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 6, 2012

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Happy New Year

Cache Magazine  

January 6-12, 2012

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