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Headed ‘Due West’

Matt Lopez of the popular country group talks about songwriting, performing and being a small-town boy at heart. The Herald Journal

Oct. 29 - Nov. 4, 2010


Page 2 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, October 29, 2010

Cache The Herald Journal’s

Arts & Entertainment Calendar

What’s inside this week Distracted driving? What about distracted living?

Magazine

(Page 10)

On the cover:

A promotional photo of country band Due West. From left, Brad Hull, Tim Gates and Matt Lopez. The trio will be performing at Utah State University’s Kent Concert Hall on Nov. 2. Go to page 8 for a Q and A with Lopez.

From the editor NE OF THE COOLEST O things about working in media is getting to talk to all kind of interesting

people. Some of my favorite past interviews include former governor Jon Huntsman, 1980s icon Molly Ringwald and author Stephen Covey. This week, I had the pleasure of chatting with Matt Lopez of country band Due West for Cache Magazine’s center feature story. The Nashville-based artist was unfailingly polite and charming during a 30-minute phone interview that took place around dinner time at the end of a long day. Lopez never rushed or sounded bored, though I’m sure he’d heard all my questions many times before. While my musical tastes tend toward indie rock and techno, I am looking forward to seeing Lopez and band mates Tim Gates and Brad Hull take the stage

Slow Wave

kburgess@hjnews.com

on Nov. 2 at Kent Concert Hall — and you could be there with me. I mean that literally. On Monday, I will be giving away two tickets to see Due West, as well as two tickets to the Nashville Tribute Band’s Nov.1 show and CDs and posters from both groups. All of this could by yours!! (Sorry, couldn’t resist the excessive exclamation points.) To qualify, simply send me an e-mail telling why you want this gift pack. I’ll do my best to pick the biggest fan. On another note, thanks to everyone who provided input on my photo conundrum. The responses were pretty evenly divided among the four choices I posted here, so I guess that means it doesn’t really matter which I pick. I like this suggestion from Julie Hollist, director of the Cache Valley Visitors Bureau: “Maybe if you’re not sure, you could just rotate (the photos). Maybe you could do another one wearing a fake nose, mustache, and glasses.” Stay tuned.

— Kim Burgess Cache Magazine editor

A ‘howling’ good time at Utah State University

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(Page 11)

Books .......................p.13 Crossword.................p.14

(Page 4)

Aaron Peck helps you choose scary movies for any age

(Page 6) Shake it like a Polaroid picture

Cute

pet photo of the week

This cat is available for adoption! Pet: Josie From: Four Paws Why she’s so lovable: Josie is friendly, well-mannered and loyal. She is about 1 or 2 years old, so she is still young enough to be a very good playmate, but is old enough to not drive you crazy. She is very sweet, and just a great cat to have around. She is looking for a loving, forever, indoor-only home. If you would like to meet Josie or learn more about her, please call Sheri at 787-1751. The adoption fee for most Four Paws cats is $75, which includes spay/neuter and shots.

Slow Wave is created from real people’s dreams as drawn by Jesse Reklaw. Ask Jesse to draw your dream! Visit www.slowwave.com to find out how.


A magical Seussical carnival M

AGICIAN RICHARD Hatch, a master of sleight of hand, is performing at Utah State University’s Seussical Family Carnival, which runs through Nov. 6. The free family event is being held in USU’s Chase Fine Arts Center in conjunction with a production of “Seussical the Musical.” Dates and times for the Carnival are Oct. 29 from 9 to 10 p.m., Oct. 30 from noon to 2 p.m. and from 5 to 7 p.m., Nov. 5 from 5 to 7 p.m. and Nov. 6 from 5 to 7 p.m. “Seussical the Musical” will be performed Oct. 29 to 30 and Nov. 3 to 6 in the Morgan Theatre. Curtain time is 7:30 p.m., with a 2 p.m. matinee on Saturday, Oct. 30. Hatch’s appearance is sponsored by the Hatch Academy of Magic and Music, a performing arts conservatory offering lessons in sleight of hand and violin playing that is scheduled to open in Logan this January. A performer since 1983, Hatch won first place in the annual New England Close Up Competition in 1985. For several years he was one of the house magicians at the Magic Island Nightclub in Houston, Texas. Recently, Hatch has been focusing exclusively on private and corporate work, traveling everywhere from the Kingdom of Bahrain to Eddie Murphy’s New

Year’s Eve party. This past year he was a featured performer at the exhibit “Magic: The Science of Wonder” at the Houston Museum of Natural Science. Also appearing at the carnival is Hatch’s wife, Rosemary Kimura, a concert violinist who received her masters degree from the Yale School of Music. She has performed with the New Haven, Hartford, San Antonio and Houston Symphonies and with the Houston Grand Opera. As a teacher, she has been on the faculty of Music Schools in New Haven, Milwaukee and Houston. She has spent the past three summers on the faculty at the Interlochen Summer Arts Camp in Michigan. The couple, who offer ensemble performances combining classical music with classical theatrical magic, moved to Logan this fall to be closer to Richard’s parents, longtime Cache Valley residents Anne and Eastman Hatch. Although Richard graduated from Logan High School in 1973 and later returned for a year of graduate studies in physics at USU, he has not lived in Logan for more than 30 years and spent the last 25 years based in Houston, Texas. “Since my return to Logan,” Hatch said, “My father refers to me as the

prodigal prestidigitator. I prefer to think of myself now as the Cache Valley Conjurer!” For more information on the car-

nival, contact Courtney Lewis at the Caine College of the Arts at 797-9203 or e-mail her at courtney.lewis@usu. edu.

USU talk looks at addiction W

HETHER IT’S THE morning caffeine fix, the weekly trip to the mall or something as serious as drugs or alcohol, most people are faced with addiction on some level. Recent research using animals has provided important insight into this costly personal and societal issue. Join Utah State University psychologist Tim Shahan as he explores these topics at the Science Unwrapped presentation “Understanding Addictions: Animal Lessons for Human Health” at 7 p.m.

on Friday, Oct. 29, in the Emert Auditorium, Room 130, of the Eccles Science Learning Center on campus. Tim Shahan Admission is free and open to all ages. “Even after successful attempts to quit, people often relapse and return to the selfdestructive behavior,” says Shahan, associate professor in USU’s department of psychol-

ogy. “We’ll talk about studies of animal behavior that could help us find answers about human addiction.” A variety of hands-on activities for all ages follow Shahan’s talk. Exhibits will be provided by the USU Health and Wellness Center, Bear River Mental Health and other university and community groups. Free refreshments will be served. October’s presentation is part of Science Unwrapped’s fall “Science and Society” series. For more information, call

Mary-Ann Muffoletto in the College of Science at 7973517, visit www.usu.edu/sci-

ence/unwrapped or view Science Unwrapped at USU on Facebook.

Page 3 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, October 29, 2010

All mixed up


Page 4 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, October 29, 2010

All mixed up

A country tribute to LDS roots T HE NASHVILLE Tribute Band, featuring pianist Dan Truman of Diamond Rio and award-winning songwriter Jason Deere, will bring their unique style of religious music to Utah State University’s Kent Concert Hall at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 1. Tickets are $10 or $9 when five or more are purchased. Assigned seats will be sold online at www.arts.usu.edu or by calling 797-8022. The concert is sponsored by www. yourLDSradio.com. Paying tribute to the history and pioneer past of the A Nashville Tribute Band performance. From left, Tom McLellan, Jason Church of Jesus Christ of Lat- Deere, Matt Lopez and Tim Gates. ter-day Saints, the Nashville Tribute to the Prophet” and their pioneer journals, studying and Tribute Band takes listeners pondering the life of Mormon on a journey through the some second, “The Trek: A Nashville Tribute To The Pioneers,” conprophet Joseph Smith and being of the most poignant moments tain songs that were inspired by immersed in the struggles faced in the church’s history. Their Deere spending hours reading by those who were instrumental first CD, “Joseph: A Nashville

in establishing the LDS church. Nashville Tribute Band lead singer and songwriter Deere said he had no idea what the world would think of “redneck Mormon songs” but felt compelled to start writing them while serving an LDS mission in Las Vegas in 1989. The band’s work continues today as they prepare to release a third CD next spring titled “The Work: A Nashville Tribute To The Missionaries.” Besides Deere and Truman, other Nashville Tribute Band members include Ron Saltmarsh, Katherine Nelson, Tony McClellan and members of Due West – Tim Gates, Brad Hull and Matt Lopez. One of Deere’s current songs Love’s Lookin’ Good On You — written with two other artists — is now a super hit for the country group Lady Antebel-

lum, with roughly 1 million in CD sales. The Nashville Tribute Band has toured for six years and played over 400 shows. Deere has worked with acts like Jessica Simpson, Little Big Town, SHeDAISY, Lady Antebellum, Ryan Shupe & the Rubberband, Due West and Trace Adkins. Deere has won five Pearl Awards including Songwriter of the Year and Album of the Year and has been honored by the LDS Booksellers Association and Deseret Book for his music. Fans say that the music “brings the prophet to life” and provides deep religious inspiration. For more information on the Nashville Tribute Band, go to www.nashvilletributeband. com.

NPR war correspondent to speak Belly dance group presents final soirée at Utah State University series

S

HIMMERING SANDS Belly Dance will stage its final Shazadi’s Soirée show on Nov. 5, ending a nine-year tradition of hosting the most esteemed dancers in the U.S. as well as talented Utah dancers. The event will be held at 7:30 p.m. in Utah State University’s Taggart Student Center Auditorium. Tickets are available at the door for $15 or can be purchased at the Indian Oven, 130 N. Main St. For more information, e-mail shimmeringsandsbellydance@gmail.com. This year’s special guest performer is Talia of San Diego, who is known for intricate hip work,

precision and effortless grace. Talia is a second-generation dancer from the Pacific Northwest who began learning Middle Eastern dance at age 8. Her talents were quickly noticed by local teachers and dancers. In 2001, she was invited to join the dance company Jawaahir in Minnesota. She moved to San Diego in 2002 and began dancing with Raks el-Anwar under the direction of Morwenna Assaf. Talia has branched out on her own, teaching classes, performing across the country and directing her own group, Oriental Jewels.

A

NNE GARRELS, senior foreign correspondent for National Public Radio, will visit Utah State University as a guest of Utah Public Radio on Nov. 3 and 4. Garrels will be the special guest on Access Utah, UPR’s weekday call-in program on Wednesday, Nov. 3, from 9 to 10 a.m. She will give the Morris Media & Society lecture on Thursday, Nov. 4, from 2 to 3:15 p.m. in the Performance Hall on the USU campus. The lecture is free and open to everyone. Copies of Garrels’ book, “Naked in Baghdad,” will also be available for purchase. Garrels first joined public radio in 1988 after stints in television for NBC and ABC

news. She has worked as a diplomatic correspondent, a Moscow bureau chief and, for the past decade or so, as a roving correspondent covering conflicts and wars in

places like Chechnya, Beirut, Baghdad and China’s Tiananmen Square. Along the way, she has won numerous awards for outstanding journalism from Peabodys to du Ponts, Polks to Overseas Press Club awards. She is the 2010 recipient of the Los Angeles Press Club’s Daniel Pearl Award for Courage and Integrity in Journalism. Utah Public Radio programming can be heard in Cache Valley at 89.5 and 91.5 FM as well as on the station’s digital program streams HD1 and HD2. A third digital program stream, HD3, is Aggie Radio, Utah State University’s student station. For more information, go to www,.upr.org.


Utah State welcomes “Office” star B.J. Novak

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Nature Center event highlights painter S

TOKES NATURE Center’s annual fundraiser on Saturday, Nov. 6, will feature an original illustration from an awardwinning book by two Utah daughters: celebrated writer Terry Tempest Williams and artist Chloe Hedden. According to the Canyonlands Natural History Association, “‘The Illuminated Desert’ is a stunning dialogue between painting and prose ... an exquisite rendering of the red rock canyons of southern Utah and the natural history that evokes a poetry of place.” Chloe Hedden was born and raised in Utah. Although she now lives in San Francisco, she maintains strong roots in her native red desert lands. She donated an original painting from “The Illuminated Desert” to support Stokes Nature Center’s programs. The painting, which sells for

over $3,000 in a gallery, will be in a live auction and comes with highquality framing, the glass engraved with Terry Tempest’s words. This will be paired with a copy of the book signed by the author. The fundraiser is scheduled for 6 p.m. at the Copper Mill Restaurant, 55 N. Main St. Cost is $50 per person, $500

for a table of 10. Attendees should dress “green,” with costume prizes for “most green,” “luckiest,” “most sustainable,” “most self-powered” and “lucky lady.” Tickets are available at www.logannature.org or at Fuhriman’s Framing & Fine Art (75 S. Main St.), the College of Natural Resources dean’s office at Utah State University and Stokes Nature Center. For more information, call 755-3239. Located one mile up Logan Canyon, Stokes’s 3,000 square-foot lodge sits on U.S. Forest Service lands and operates under a lease agreement with the U.S. Forest Service. The organization’s mission is to provide opportunities for students of all ages to explore, learn about and develop appreciation and stewardship for our natural world.

CTOR, WRITER AND comedian B.J. Novak will give his first and only Utah performance at 8 p.m. on Nov. 6 at Utah State University’s Kent Concert Hall. Tickets are $10 for the first thousand students, $15 for other students in advance, $20 for students the day of the event or for community members in advance and $25 for community members the day of the event. Tickets are available through the Caine College of the Arts website at www.arts.usu.edu or by calling the box office at 797-8022. Novak is best known for his contributions to NBC’s Emmy Award-winning comedy, “The Office,” where he stars as Ryan. He is also the co-executive producer for the hit series and has written many of the show’s memorable episodes including “Diversity Day,” “Sexual Harassment,” “The Fire,” “Initiation” and “Local Ad.” Novak was discovered as a stand-up

comedian and has been called one of the most original and popular new voices in comedy. He has performed on various TV shows, including “Comedy Central” and “Late Night With Conon O’Brien,” as well as at sold-out live shows across the country.

Bioneers talk explores LDS ‘green’ buildings TAH BIONEERS WILL U hold its “Evening at the Tabernacle” lectures from 7 to 9 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 29. The free event will look at how the LDS Church is incorporating green building design and materials into structures worldwide. Two prominent individuals will speak at the event: Bill Williams, who leads the architectural and engineering team constructing the LDS commercial redevelopment project on 20 acres in the heart of Salt Lake City known as the City Creek Center; and Jared Doxey, director of architecture, engineering and construction for all LDS meetinghouses worldwide. Under construction, or completed, are five new church meetinghouses that

are aiming to be Silver LEED certified — a measure of environmental friendliness. Three of those meetinghouses are totally solar powered. Opening the event is a presentation on Logan city’s renewable energy programs. Jeff White, Logan City Light and Power director, and Emily Malik, the city environmental coordinator, will speak. Bioneers is a lecture series devoted to sustainability. Events take place across the country. The full Utah Bioneers program runs Friday, Nov. 5, and Saturday, Nov. 6 at Utah State University’s Eccles Conference Center. Costs range from $40 to $95. Sessions will be held on topics like climate change and algae-based biofuels. For registration and more information, go to http://bioneers.usu.edu.

Page 5 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, October 29, 2010

All mixed up


Summer has given way to the

chilliness of fall. Halloween is upon us now, and when it comes to entertainment during this holiday weekend you may be looking for something to scare you. Sure it may be cliché to watch horror movies around Halloween, but who cares right? Watching horror movies is just something that comes along with this season, and I’ve got a list of movies for every type of horror movie watcher out there. It doesn’t matter if you have kids and want to watch a wholesome scary movie with the family or if you’re a hardened horror fan who is only pleased with copious amounts of blood and guts — I’ve got you covered. Families with Young Kids

Halloween can be a tricky time of year if you’re sitting at home with young kids trying to find a wholesome, but slightly scary movie to show them what Halloween is all about. During this time TV channels, especially standard cable channels, seem to throw caution to the wind and air some pretty violent horror flicks without much editing when it comes to gore. This is fine for the adults who want to see it, but what about your kids? Accidentally coming across Freddy Kruger chasing down kids in their dreams on TV may scare your child for life. So, here are a few movie hints to keep your kids happy and not too scared during Halloween.

By Aaron Peck “Hocus Pocus” – My little sister, who is 8, absolutely adores this movie. Every time Halloween rolls around it’s like “Hocus Pocus” is on a constant loop in my parents’ living room. Even though the silliness may bore parents, “Hocus Pocus” is pretty tame and won’t scare your kids (unless they’re really sensitive).

“Nightmare Before Christmas” – Some may argue with me here, saying that “Nightmare Before Christmas” has some pretty scary scenes. It does, that’s for sure. You’re going to have to know your child’s tolerance for scariness before showing them this one. When Oogie Boogie unravels and all he’s made of is bugs, a lot of children may run and hide. The rest of the show, though, is fun, inventive, and full of great musical numbers. Give this movie a try if you know your kids can handle it. “Corpse Bride” – Yes, I know this is another Tim Burton stopmotion animated feature, but it’s great for this time of season and is less scary than “Nightmare.” If you know that your kids wouldn’t be able to handle Jack Skellington and his Christmas stealing shenanigans then stick in “Corpse Bride” and they should be just fine.

Teenagers There are so many movies that would work for this group I don’t even know if I should attempt this section. Teenagers are a finicky bunch — some of them may stick to more children oriented movies like those listed above (which is fine) and others may already be working their way into the ultragory horror movies like the “Saw” franchise. “The Simpsons: Treehouse of Horror” – Each new season of “The Simpsons” starts out with a “Treehouse of Horror” episode. These are perfect for the season, and if you own “The Simpsons,” on DVD then you can rifle through each “Treehouse of Horror” in order to get yourself prepped for the season. Low on gore, high on laughs. Great stuff! ©Disney

Page 6 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, October 29, 2010

Hauntingly good Halloween movies

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Still playing “Red� Rated PG-13 ★★ This spy caper admirably rejects the frenzy of many modern action thrillers, slowing things down to a digestible pace appropriate for vintagebordering-on-geriatric heroes Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Helen Mirren. Yet despite the impressive cast, which includes Mary-Louise Parker, Richard Dreyfuss and Ernest Borgnine, this latest adaptation of a hip graphic novel fails to fill in the spaces between the action with anything terribly interesting. Director Robert Schwentke aims for a mix of action and comedy but never quite delivers on either. The action is OK, though nothing you haven’t seen done better a hundred times before, while the laughs are slight and sporadic, the filmmakers unable to generate enough clever interplay among the story’s band of ex-CIA operatives targeted for elimination. It’s a missed opportunity, given Willis’ cool-underfire comic charms and the brilliant co-stars off whom he could have been bouncing better wisecracks. PG-13 for intense sequences of action violence and brief strong language. 111 minutes. “Secretariat� Rated PG ★★1⠄2 In a world of inspiring real-life sports stories, the tale of Secretariat is one of a kind. It’s too bad the Hollywood version about the racehorse is just another one of the pack. Director Randall Wallace and his team do what the horse and its caretakers never did on the way to Triple Crown glory in 1973. They play it safe, offer-

ing a classy but standard Disney-fication of the tale, whose thrilling race scenes are offset by some of the blandest “you can do it if you try� dialogue you’re likely to encounter on film. Cheery performances from Diane Lane as the housewife-turned-horseowner and John Malkovich as Secretariat’s oddball trainer help rein in some of the movie’s sentimental excesses. Still, the movie has exhilarating moments, especially the re-creation of Secretariat’s Belmont Stakes finale. PG for brief mild language. 116 minutes. “Paranormal Activity 2� Rated R ★1⠄2 If there was any lesson to draw from the first “Paranormal Activity,� it’s that men should take their girlfriends’ concerns seriously, especially when it comes to encounters with the demonic. The sequel follows similar gender lines, as a family of four (Sprague Grayden and Brian Bolden play the parents) wilt under the threat of a haunting demon in their house. The film is the slightly Hollywood-ized sequel to “Paranormal Activ-

ity,� which used a shoestring budget for a “Blair Witch�-like hit. Tod Williams (“The Door in the Floor�) has been brought in to direct the script by Michael R. Perry and Oren Peli, who wrote and directed the first film. Most everything we see is from surveillance cameras, a perspective that gives the film’s frights a naturalism, but most everything else a boringness. This is a subtle demon who likes to take its time, and express itself through haunted interior design. Beware of the kitchen cabinets. R for some language and brief violent material. 91 minutes “Jackass 3D� Rated R ★★ Three-D would seem tailor-made for the guys from “Jackass.� When the technology is used for its funniest and most entertaining purposes, as it was recently in “Piranha 3-D,� it’s all about the wild, gratuitous gimmicks. Johnny Knoxville and Co., who are constantly outdoing themselves with crazy and creative pranks and stunts, would seem to be just the right guys to do that sort of thing. But very little occurs in their latest movie, “Jackass 3D,� that

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wouldn’t have sufficed in 2-D. Sure, there’s an amusing and effective bit involving archery with a sex toy rather than an arrow. Steve-O and Dave England play tetherball with a beehive — dressed in nothing but furry bear hats and tighty-whities — and it feels as if the worked-up insects are swarming around us, too. But more often than not, this third installment in the franchise, directed as always by Jeff Tremaine, doesn’t take full advantage of its visual potential. A lot of what goes on here is the typical hit-and-miss, let’s-see-what-happens silliness. Bodily injury usually ensues. But “Jackass 3D� — and the group’s entire oeuvre, if you will — is at its best when it’s about these guys playing well-orchestrated tricks on each other and the world at large. R for male nudity, extremely crude and dangerous stunts, and for language. R for male nudity, extremely crude and dangerous stunts, and for language. 94 minutes. “The Town� Rated R ★★★ This may not have quite the emotional heft of “Gone Baby Gone,� Ben Affleck’s startlingly

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assured 2007 directing debut. What it has instead, though, is a greater technical complexity, a larger scope, and the promise of a director who’s well on his way to establishing a distinctive vision and voice. Affleck also has a way with his actors — unsurprising, having been one himself for so long and not always getting the credit he deserves — and he’s once again attracted some tremendous talent: Jeremy Renner, Rebecca Hall, Jon Hamm and Chris Cooper, who leaves his mark in just one powerful scene. Even Blake Lively is surprisingly good, playing against type as a damaged single mom. But besides directing and co-writing the script with Peter Craig and Aaron Stockard, Affleck himself is at the center of the action in front of the camera, starring as Doug

MacRay, the leader of a Boston bank-heist crew, and giving the best leading performance of his career. During the group’s latest crime, Doug’s volatile best friend (Renner) takes a hostage of the bank manager (Hall), but when they realize later that she lives just a few blocks away in insular Charlestown, they check up on her to determine whether she might have seen anything. Doug treats her with unexpected kindness, then ends up befriending her, then falls for her — and she falls for him, too, not knowing she’s getting involved with the thief who just turned her world upside-down. R for strong violence, pervasive language, some sexuality and drug use. 128 minutes. All reviews by The Associated Press

Page 7 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, October

Film


Headed ‘Due West’’

Matt Lopez of the popular country group talks about songwriting, performing and being a small-town boy at heart.

I

T’S ONE OF THOSE STORIES that everyone loves — a kid from Sheridan, Wyo., moves to Nashville and finds success as a songwriter and performer. Matt Lopez is living that dream, along with band mates Tim Gates and Brad Hull, who together make up the trio Due West. While all three are now residents of Tennessee’s music mecca, they got their starts in small Western towns. Gates is originally from Richfield, Utah; Hull grew up in Thatcher, Ariz. Reached by phone in Nashville, Lopez said that he and and the other Due West guys love returning to their home region, where they’ve found a solid fan base for their classic country sound. They’ll be back again on Nov. 2 to play at Utah State University. Q: I’m calling from Logan, Utah, which is pretty near to your hometown in Wyoming. I know you’ve been in Nashville for a while, but do you still have a place in your heart for the West? A: We love to get back to the West a lot. You know what’s funny about you calling from Logan, we played a show yesterday in Indianapolis at an FFA (Future Farmers of America) national convention, and we had a group of students who were there from Utah State.

And they came up and talked to us and were very excited to see us and meet us and were coming to the show at the Kent Concert Hall. That was pretty cool. Q: So talk about how this band got started. A: I’ll give you the nutshell timeline. I moved to Nashville at the very beginning of 2003. Shortly after that, I met Brad and Tim at a house party. They’d just moved out here not too long before themselves. We met at a house party where everyone hangs out and plays music. Tim started singing some Restless Heart, Diamond Rio tunes. Brad and I jumped in on harmony. Brad sings the high harmony, I sing low. There were people who arrived at the party late. By the time the party was over, people were coming up saying, ‘What’s the name of your group? Are you related? Are you brothers?’ We, of course, had literally met that night. It was an instant connection. We knew it and everybody at the party knew it. We just kept writing together and playing together for fun. It wasn’t until two or three years later that we really decided to get serious about it and came

up with the name Due West, which we got from a street here in north Nashville. When we saw the name Due West as a street, we thought that was perfect because we are all from the West. So we went with it. We’ve been working hard at it ever since. Last year we put out a single on our own record label that we created and ran ourselves. It was a lot of work and we learned a lot for sure. Just about two or three months ago, we signed a real legitimate record deal with Black River and like I said, we learned so much last year with the radio tour and promotion of a single out on radio that even though it’s been a lot of traveling and performances and interviews, it’s been spread out over a lot of time, so it wasn’t an overnight thing. Q: You guys are songwriters as well as performers. A: Yes, we’re songwriters first and foremost. We realized that the other day, all three of us own homes and can pay our mortgage and pay our bills and our car payments on the salary of a songwriter. As an artist, as Due West, we’re not that making that much right now. Trying to build the momentum and build the fan base, you don’t make very much at all. We hope that someday the Due West thing will pay us, but in

the meantime, we’ve been blessed for the last several years to be staff songwriters and get a paycheck every month to write song. I was lucky enough a couple of years ago to write a song that Lady Antebellum picked up with their debut album, which has since gone almost double platinum. I’m very honored and excited about that. It’s a pretty cool treat to have a platinum record with my name on it on the wall. Q: Would you say that you prefer performing more or songwriting more? A: That’s a great question. It’s funny because they are so different. They satisfy completely different parts of each of us. I would say for sure, there is great satisfaction in creating something that didn’t exist — before that day started, it was just a blank piece of paper and three minutes of silence and all of a sudden, there is a lyric sheet and three minutes of music that wasn’t there before. It’s a really cool feeling that comes from that and a sense of accomplishment when something you write affects other people and you see

someone cry or laugh or come up and say, ‘That’s my favorite song.’ One of the coolest things that happened to me was I saw Lady Antebellum play my song “Love’s Lookin Good On You” in a stadium and everyone was clapping along and singing to it. That’s a rush. On the other side of that coin is the performance thing. Again, I think I speak for all three of us in saying that if you took that away from us, there would be a big hole missing. Being Due West, we get to do both. We perform songs that we’ve written. Performing a song that you’ve created is like the best of both worlds put into one. Q: I am sure you are pretty connected to your songs. I imagine creating something like that, it becomes your baby. Is it ever hard to hand one over to another artist and have them bring their own interpretation? A: That’s a question that gets asked a lot and I have personally never had a problem with that. I am more of a business minded songwriter. I am not sure if that’s a good or bad thing, but the biggest satisfaction from a songwriting business perspective is getting a cut, getting somebody to record it and put it out on their label or on the radio. That’s at the forefront of my thought process, not necessarily while I’m writing a song, but when I’ve completed a song, I’ve got an idea of who I want to sing it. I could care less if they change lyrics or change melody or whatever, as long as they cut it. I’m excited about that. I have written songs that are that personal to me, that if those got picked up by somebody and they wanted to change stuff, it maybe would be weird and I might have a weird problem with it for some of those songs — but for the majority, probably 95 percent of the

Story by Kim Burgess songs I write, it’s all about getting the cut. It is one of your babies, but you’ve got to put your baby to work. It if means cutting his hair or changing his clothes or whatever, so be it. Q: An interesting part of your story is that you got going with music in New York. A: Yeah, I moved out to Manhattan to chase the dream of music. I wasn’t sure what genre I wanted to do, but I knew L.A., New York and Nashville were the three hubs of entertainment in general. I moved to New York, had an opportunity to move out there with a job at a restaurant waiting for me. Moved out there and went to the Garth Brooks concert in Central Park. I was in that sea of people watching Garth Brooks perform and it was that moment that I was like, I want to do this — this is the genre of music that I want to do. I met some people and made some contacts out there in New York and New Jersey. Their advice was to go to Nashville. So

I packed it up and kind of took the long way, but ended up in Nashville. That was definitely the move that needed to happen. I’m glad I made it. Q: You have experiences in all these different parts of the country. Do you think you get influences from all these areas? A: Absolutely. It kind of shaped the person that I am. We were hanging out with the FFA kids yesterday and they all come from small towns, a lot of them are the sons and daughter of ranchers and farmers. They have an appreciation for hard work and simple living. A lot of life lessons that you learn on a ranch or a farm, kids growing up in a big city never get an opportunity to learn. Those kids, you can see it in their eyes. That might sound cheesy or philosophical, but there is definitely a difference in upbringing when you grow up in a small town — not just a small town in the West. I grew up in a small community and

learned about those things and I feel like I am definitely a better person for it. Moving to New York, you learn about opportunities in a big city that you can never get in a small town. I met people who grew up going to performing arts schools where they were constantly around other musicians, singers and songwriters and performers. I was lucky to be in the local choir of a dozen kids who were mediocre at best. Of course, I’m not talking bad about those kids who were in my choirs, but you’d go to state competitions and see kids who were great, the best of the best. It felt really cool to be around other kids who shared those talents. Being from a big city, even from an adult perspective, there are life lessons of the streets, being street-wise, not being naive, being open to different cultures and different religions. There is all kinds of stuff you can be exposed to that you can’t get in a small town.

See LOPEZ on p. 11


Headed ‘Due West’’

Matt Lopez of the popular country group talks about songwriting, performing and being a small-town boy at heart.

I

T’S ONE OF THOSE STORIES that everyone loves — a kid from Sheridan, Wyo., moves to Nashville and finds success as a songwriter and performer. Matt Lopez is living that dream, along with band mates Tim Gates and Brad Hull, who together make up the trio Due West. While all three are now residents of Tennessee’s music mecca, they got their starts in small Western towns. Gates is originally from Richfield, Utah; Hull grew up in Thatcher, Ariz. Reached by phone in Nashville, Lopez said that he and and the other Due West guys love returning to their home region, where they’ve found a solid fan base for their classic country sound. They’ll be back again on Nov. 2 to play at Utah State University. Q: I’m calling from Logan, Utah, which is pretty near to your hometown in Wyoming. I know you’ve been in Nashville for a while, but do you still have a place in your heart for the West? A: We love to get back to the West a lot. You know what’s funny about you calling from Logan, we played a show yesterday in Indianapolis at an FFA (Future Farmers of America) national convention, and we had a group of students who were there from Utah State.

And they came up and talked to us and were very excited to see us and meet us and were coming to the show at the Kent Concert Hall. That was pretty cool. Q: So talk about how this band got started. A: I’ll give you the nutshell timeline. I moved to Nashville at the very beginning of 2003. Shortly after that, I met Brad and Tim at a house party. They’d just moved out here not too long before themselves. We met at a house party where everyone hangs out and plays music. Tim started singing some Restless Heart, Diamond Rio tunes. Brad and I jumped in on harmony. Brad sings the high harmony, I sing low. There were people who arrived at the party late. By the time the party was over, people were coming up saying, ‘What’s the name of your group? Are you related? Are you brothers?’ We, of course, had literally met that night. It was an instant connection. We knew it and everybody at the party knew it. We just kept writing together and playing together for fun. It wasn’t until two or three years later that we really decided to get serious about it and came

up with the name Due West, which we got from a street here in north Nashville. When we saw the name Due West as a street, we thought that was perfect because we are all from the West. So we went with it. We’ve been working hard at it ever since. Last year we put out a single on our own record label that we created and ran ourselves. It was a lot of work and we learned a lot for sure. Just about two or three months ago, we signed a real legitimate record deal with Black River and like I said, we learned so much last year with the radio tour and promotion of a single out on radio that even though it’s been a lot of traveling and performances and interviews, it’s been spread out over a lot of time, so it wasn’t an overnight thing. Q: You guys are songwriters as well as performers. A: Yes, we’re songwriters first and foremost. We realized that the other day, all three of us own homes and can pay our mortgage and pay our bills and our car payments on the salary of a songwriter. As an artist, as Due West, we’re not that making that much right now. Trying to build the momentum and build the fan base, you don’t make very much at all. We hope that someday the Due West thing will pay us, but in

the meantime, we’ve been blessed for the last several years to be staff songwriters and get a paycheck every month to write song. I was lucky enough a couple of years ago to write a song that Lady Antebellum picked up with their debut album, which has since gone almost double platinum. I’m very honored and excited about that. It’s a pretty cool treat to have a platinum record with my name on it on the wall. Q: Would you say that you prefer performing more or songwriting more? A: That’s a great question. It’s funny because they are so different. They satisfy completely different parts of each of us. I would say for sure, there is great satisfaction in creating something that didn’t exist — before that day started, it was just a blank piece of paper and three minutes of silence and all of a sudden, there is a lyric sheet and three minutes of music that wasn’t there before. It’s a really cool feeling that comes from that and a sense of accomplishment when something you write affects other people and you see

someone cry or laugh or come up and say, ‘That’s my favorite song.’ One of the coolest things that happened to me was I saw Lady Antebellum play my song “Love’s Lookin Good On You” in a stadium and everyone was clapping along and singing to it. That’s a rush. On the other side of that coin is the performance thing. Again, I think I speak for all three of us in saying that if you took that away from us, there would be a big hole missing. Being Due West, we get to do both. We perform songs that we’ve written. Performing a song that you’ve created is like the best of both worlds put into one. Q: I am sure you are pretty connected to your songs. I imagine creating something like that, it becomes your baby. Is it ever hard to hand one over to another artist and have them bring their own interpretation? A: That’s a question that gets asked a lot and I have personally never had a problem with that. I am more of a business minded songwriter. I am not sure if that’s a good or bad thing, but the biggest satisfaction from a songwriting business perspective is getting a cut, getting somebody to record it and put it out on their label or on the radio. That’s at the forefront of my thought process, not necessarily while I’m writing a song, but when I’ve completed a song, I’ve got an idea of who I want to sing it. I could care less if they change lyrics or change melody or whatever, as long as they cut it. I’m excited about that. I have written songs that are that personal to me, that if those got picked up by somebody and they wanted to change stuff, it maybe would be weird and I might have a weird problem with it for some of those songs — but for the majority, probably 95 percent of the

Story by Kim Burgess songs I write, it’s all about getting the cut. It is one of your babies, but you’ve got to put your baby to work. It if means cutting his hair or changing his clothes or whatever, so be it. Q: An interesting part of your story is that you got going with music in New York. A: Yeah, I moved out to Manhattan to chase the dream of music. I wasn’t sure what genre I wanted to do, but I knew L.A., New York and Nashville were the three hubs of entertainment in general. I moved to New York, had an opportunity to move out there with a job at a restaurant waiting for me. Moved out there and went to the Garth Brooks concert in Central Park. I was in that sea of people watching Garth Brooks perform and it was that moment that I was like, I want to do this — this is the genre of music that I want to do. I met some people and made some contacts out there in New York and New Jersey. Their advice was to go to Nashville. So

I packed it up and kind of took the long way, but ended up in Nashville. That was definitely the move that needed to happen. I’m glad I made it. Q: You have experiences in all these different parts of the country. Do you think you get influences from all these areas? A: Absolutely. It kind of shaped the person that I am. We were hanging out with the FFA kids yesterday and they all come from small towns, a lot of them are the sons and daughter of ranchers and farmers. They have an appreciation for hard work and simple living. A lot of life lessons that you learn on a ranch or a farm, kids growing up in a big city never get an opportunity to learn. Those kids, you can see it in their eyes. That might sound cheesy or philosophical, but there is definitely a difference in upbringing when you grow up in a small town — not just a small town in the West. I grew up in a small community and

learned about those things and I feel like I am definitely a better person for it. Moving to New York, you learn about opportunities in a big city that you can never get in a small town. I met people who grew up going to performing arts schools where they were constantly around other musicians, singers and songwriters and performers. I was lucky to be in the local choir of a dozen kids who were mediocre at best. Of course, I’m not talking bad about those kids who were in my choirs, but you’d go to state competitions and see kids who were great, the best of the best. It felt really cool to be around other kids who shared those talents. Being from a big city, even from an adult perspective, there are life lessons of the streets, being street-wise, not being naive, being open to different cultures and different religions. There is all kinds of stuff you can be exposed to that you can’t get in a small town.

See LOPEZ on p. 11


Page 10 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, October 29, 2010

Howl going strong for 31 years F OR 31 YEARS THE Howl has served as Utah’s de facto “all-college” party, attracting thousands of revelers from across the Wasatch Front. The event started in 1978 as a free dance and costume contest, but quickly evolved into an enormous gathering, perhaps reaching its peak in the early ’90s before tickets were capped at 6,500 in about 1993. The party got so out of hand for a few years that organizers considered axing the event. People tell stories about the

Eli Lucero/Herald Journal

A reveler at the 2009 Howl at Utah State University.

Howl’s licentious past, saying that it’s the one night each year when USU police make more arrests than any other; that some revelers meet beforehand for pre-Howl alchohol fuelups; that it’s the BYU coeds who show up wearing the most risqué costumes; that 10,000 people showed up at the 1992 party, packing so tightly into the Taggart Student Center that it felt like “a can of sardines.” USU police will tell about the guy dressed as Sesame Street’s Elmo “puking in the garbage can”; having to “take Santa Claus to jail”; or the time they “had to scale the stall walls of the women’s bathroom to rescue a girl who had been passed out for an hour.” And who hasn’t heard the story about the guy who showed up in the Saran Wrap undershorts? Though it’s these tales that both attract and repel partygoers, USU Police Capt. Steve Milne says the party has calmed down in recent years, evolving from USU’s version of “Animal House” into a bit more of a tame event. “In the old days they, just kept selling tickets,” Milne said. “A lot of people wanted to buy. Then the fire marshal

Eli Lucero/Herald Journal

Revelers at the 2009 Howl at Utah State University.

stepped down and said, ‘Wait a minute, we can’t have this.’ So that helps somewhat as far as, you know, getting rid of a couple thousand students, but it still becomes packed.” This year, Milne said, 23 officers from USU, Logan City and North Park police departments will be working the event. Depending on the year, Milne said, USU students are usually not the ones to blame for bad behavior (except for that year when every arrest but two were females). “The majority of our arrests are non-students — people that are not from the area here,” he

said. “For the most part I think students behave themselves. It’s the people that come from out of town — they’re the ones that cause the fight and crash the place and things like that.” Chase Casillas, who is directing the entertainment at this year’s event, said he’s bringing in two popular bands to make the Howl more than a “generic costume party.” He remembers seeing two really good bands at his first Howl as a freshman. This year the bands “We the Kings” and “The Higher” will play in the Fieldhouse. “I wanted to switch it up a bit and give students a chance

to see their favorite acts like I did,” Cassillas said. “I remember getting super excited about it at the time.” Casillas said the programming board “played with the budget” this year to help pay for the larger performing acts. “We have the money to do it, but nobody’s ever played with the idea of actually getting bigger things.” Casillas said he sees USU as being large enough to draw bigname acts, like it used to do. In any case, this year’s Howl will be the place to see and be seen, and even though the party has cooled off a bit in recent years, it’s probably a given that this year’s event will sell out, and that the costume watching will be as exciting as it’s ever been. As Captain Milne puts it: “The costumes seem to have gone more from scary-creative to ... more uh, revealing and ... uh I don’t know what the word is ...” This year’s Howl is scheduled for 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 30. Ticket prices range from $10 to $25. For more information, go to www. usu.edu.

— Brendon Butler

A ‘green’ week at USU C

ELEBRATE UTAH State University’s Natural Resources and Sustainability Week from Nov. 1-6. The theme for the week is “Bringing People and Ideas Together for a Sustainable Environment.” Highlights includes a free showing of the documentary “No Impact Man” at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 2 in the atrium of the Natural Resources building and a Natural Resources and Sustainability Fair from

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 2, in the Taggart Student Center. Michael Sutton, vice president of California’s Monterey Bay Aquarium and director of the Center for the Future of the Oceans, will deliver a lecture titled “The Future of Seafood” at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 3, in the Taggart Student Center Ballroom. USU’s annual Reduce, Reuse and Rock Concert will be held at 7 p.m. on

Friday, Nov. 5, in the Taggart Student Center International Lounge. Featured artists include the band Battle School and singer Julia Mecham. The week concludes Saturday, Nov. 6, with a service project on the Logan River. Advance registration for the project is required. For information, call 797-4022. To see a complete schedule of events, go to the College of Natural Resources website at www.cnr.usu.


I

AM PRETTY SURE I lost my mind a long time ago but only noticed it was missing today. I ping-pong between ignorance and bliss most the time anyway, so this is nothing new. My other recent revelation was that, other than sleep, I can’t remember the last time I did any one thing uninterrupted for more than 53 minutes. This isn’t because I have six kids, belong to numerous committees or operate a telemarketing business out of my home. I create my own stress by being a chronic multitasker. You say short attention span, I say adept juggler; you say scatter-brained, I say efficient use of time. No, I was not a Ritalin kid, but I concede that I probably need to get a grip. I do take time to smell the roses but that only takes about 40 seconds. Likewise I can enjoy a good sunrise or sunset but only by planning to be there 20 minutes before the actual event. Even though I can’t recall the last time I was really bored, boredom is my number one irrational fear. It’s not as common as the fear of heights, snakes or political incumbents but debilitating nonetheless. It drives me to take magazines to movies so I have something to do while waiting that five minutes for the movie previews and concessions ads to start. I have taken along 10 hours of reading material and 20 hours worth of music and audio books for a two-hour flight. Because, well, what if we get stuck on the runway or I have to spend the night in the airport because of a delayed flight? I know it doesn’t make a lot of sense; that’s why it’s irrational. It’s also hypocritical. I tend to get self-righteous about not talking or texting on the phone while driving. However, I do listen to books, drink coffee and eat bagels. Though I seldom speed, I daydream of being where I’m headed and yell at people poking along in the middle lane. I and many others are not just distracted drivers, we’re distracted livers.

Slightly Off Center By Dennis Hinkamp

I check my email while I’m walking the dog. I put off going to movies because the standard seems to be approaching two hours now and I wish happy hours were only 30 minutes long. I try to avoid camping trips were there is no Wi-Fi available. If I take the time to watch a sunset, I always have my cameras within arm’s reach. Even my sports are multitasking; I do triathlons because I might get bored just riding, swimming or running. Writing on deadline is one of the few things I do that limit my multitasking. I can listen to music but not radio news. I can drink coffee or alcohol but only in a delicate balance. That said, the thought of writing anything longer than about 550 words brings back my own fear of boring not only myself but readers to death. To that end, I must now end. Dennis Hinkamp would like to apologize for not being to come up with more than 500word thoughts all these years. He is among a number of freelance writers whose columns appear in The Herald Journal as part of an effort to expose readers to a variety of community voices. He is not an employee of the newspaper. Feedback at dhinkamp@msn. com.

MOVIES from p. 6 Get your hands on the DVDs for this fantastic old show and don’t look back. “The Fourth Kind” – This is sort of a guilty pleasure of mine. I know that the premise behind the movie is silly and that the gimmick they use — “This is all real, we swear” — is completely bogus, but this movie still scared me. It’s one of those movies that just sticks there in your head. Even after seeing it, you won’t be able to get it out of your mind. This is a great creepy movie for those looking for a good scare. Adults Let’s face it, there’s a lot of horror movies out there that are just made for the over 18 crowd. Usually this means more blood, guts and creepiness. Those aspects don’t normally make for a better movie, but as we get older we become harder and harder to scare. Here are a few movies that still scare me.

LOPEZ from p. 9 Q: Now you’re in the South, which is totally different. A: The South is cool because there is this Southern hospitality that they talk about. It’s a real thing. For the most part, it’s 100 percent genuine. I don’t know, these people are just very proud to support each other. I have neighbors who would do anything for me. Q: This is very much a job interview-type question, but I want to wrap up by asking you where you’d like to be in five years. What would you want to see happening with Due West and your career? A: It’s funny, as slow as this business works, if you’d have asked us that five years

“The Changeling” – From 1980, this is probably one of the scarier movies that belong to the “haunted house” genre. This is always a fun movie to revisit even if it did scare the pants off of you when you were a kid. When that ball comes bouncing down the stairs, that’s about where I lose it. “28 Days Later” – Zombies are cool now. They’re like the ninjas and pirates of years past. Everyone is doing zombies. Movies, parties, even TV shows. Director Danny Boyle introduced us to a new kind of zombie in his low-budget film “28 Days Later.” Before Boyle’s film, we were used to zombies being slow-moving, witless creatures that only served as targets in a shooting gallery. Here they are fast-moving, rage-filled creatures that don’t slow down for anything. Adding speed to zombies made them infinitely cooler and more exciting to watch. “Let the Right One In” or “Let Me In” – Essentially ago we probably would have had some huge grand dream of where we wanted to be. Now five years later having learned how slow the business can be, it’s probably more realistic to answer that we hope to have had a couple of albums out by then, two maybe three albums maybe more. That’s the thing, it can speed it or it can remain at this pace. We’d like to have some albums out, hopefully have some success with radio. Now we have a fan base that we can sell records to and get out and perform in front of. I think if we were at that stage, we’d be happy. Would we love to have a platinum record, number one songs and win CMAs and even Grammys — sure, we’d love that. I’d love to see that happen. But at the same time,

they’re both the same film. “Let the Right One In” is the Swedish original, while “Let Me In” is the American remake that just came out not too long ago. Just like zombies, vampires are the “in” thing right now. These two movies show a very different vampire than the ones shown in the “Twilight Saga.” Here a small girl is a vampire, but she must have a caretaker who goes out and retrieves her “food.” In “Twilight” it’s amazingly cool to be a vampire. Really, there seems to be no downside. These movies show being a vampire in a more realistic, brutal way. These are a couple movies to see if you want to get a creepy ominous feeling while following a fantastic story and great characters. Halloween is just around the corner, and getting your movie choices ready is a must. These are but a few suggestions for different age groups and hopefully this list helps lead you in a good direction to finding horror movies that fit your lifestyle.

Page 11 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, October 29, 2010

The time of your life

if it doesn’t come, if we don’t get to that level, if in five years from now we’re just at the level of a Josh Turner or a Gary Allan, we’d be fine with that, just traveling around and definitely having a bus for comfort reasons. We’d love to have it to the point where we could take our families with us and constantly have them with us. We’ve had shows before where the families get to come and the kids are running around playing, wives are there and everything. It makes it cool because it’s the best of both worlds. You’ve got your families and you can play music and hang out. That would be my number one goal in five years — to get to the point where we can bring our families with us whenever we want.


Page 12 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, October 29, 2010

Culture

New exhibit looks at Katrina

By The Associated Press

T

HE ROOM IS LIT by flashlights, an escape hole chopped in the roof with an ax lying nearby. Steps away, rising floodwaters seep down a levee wall; across the way, a storm diary written in black felt marker on a housing project wall bears testimony to the hellish days after Katrina hit. Those items and more from the monster hurricane that battered New Orleans and the Mississippi Gulf Coast, killing more than 1,600 people, are part of a stunning new exhibit opening Oct. 26 at the Louisiana State Museum — “Living with Hurricanes, Katrina & Beyond.” The $7.5 million exhibit at New Orleans’ French Quarter museum recounts tales of the 2005 hurricane, its chaotic aftermath and recovery. It also explores lessons Katrina taught, and the science and technology arising since to counter future storms. “We see this as a gamechanger for the museum,” said its director, Sam Rykels, who came up with the idea for the show days after Katrina hit on Aug. 29, 2005. “We had

AP photo

Fats Domino’s Hurricane Katrina-damaged piano and a Mardi Gras costume made from FEMA tarps on display at the Louisiana State Museum.

become a somewhat staid museum, but no more.” Galleries and connecting areas move visitors through four major presentations: New Orleans’ relationship to storms; firsthand accounts of people and predicaments of survival they found themselves in; a forensics gallery exploring the paths Katrina and Hurricane Rita took that year and the science of how the levees failed; and a final section on recovery and the technologies emerging since to combat the destructive

forces of nature. “We knew we wanted to do more than just show the storm’s destruction,” said Larissa Hansen-Hallgren of Experience Design in Boston, which helped prepare the show. “We wanted it to celebrate the city’s rebirth and the resilience of the people.” Museum officials returned days after Hurricane Katrina and began salvaging many of the items now found throughout the exhibits. “We had people who were

dealing with damage to their own homes and yet saw the need to record the history around us,” said Rykels, who recalled how preserving items from the floodwaters was like “collecting from Atlantis.” The collection ranges from a ruined baby grand piano dragged from the flooded home of Fats Domino to a muddy teddy bear and the blue jeans that survivor Claudio Hemb wore the day after the storm hit. The jeans are inscribed with Hemb’s name, his wife’s name and telephone number at the Houston hotel she was evacuated to — in the event he was killed. Then there’s the exhibit of the ax in the attic. The brand new ax was bought by a woman living near New Orleans just in case she and her daughter should need escape from their attic from rising floodwaters — exactly the fate that befell them. The Mabry Wall — a daily account written with marker on the walls of an apartment where Thomas Elton Mabry rode out the storm and over a month afterward — was saved just in time, said Jane Irvin, the museum curator of special projects.

“We were one step ahead of the wrecking ball,” Irvin said. “But we knew we had to have that journal.” Working with the Art Conservation Center in Williamstown, Mass., the paint was removed from the cinderblock wall and preserved. Video exhibits display footage of the storm, oral histories and the work residents and a huge group of volunteers have done assisting recovery. The exhibits reflect the museum’s mission to collect and preserve the state’s history, said Karen Leathem, museum historian. A big part of the program is the educational programs that will follow it, she said. Scientists and academics at the Office of Marine Programs at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography are building websites tailored for students and the public to help understand scientific and technological advances in hurricane tracking and preparation for such storms. There will also be content on environmental issues, flooding, coastal restoration and emergency management.

Manuscripts reveal Austen struggled with spelling By The Associated Press

S

HE’S RENOWNED for her precise, exquisite prose, but new research shows Jane Austen was a poor speller and erratic grammarian who got a big helping hand from her editor. Oxford University English professor Kathryn Sutherland studied 1,100 handwritten pages of unpublished work from the author of incisive social comedies such as “Pride and

Prejudice.” She said Saturday that they contradicted the claim by Austen’s brother Henry that “everything came finished from her pen.” “In reading the manuscripts, it quickly becomes clear that this delicate precision is missing,” Sutherland said. She said the papers show “blots, crossings out, messiness,” and a writer who “broke most of the rules for writing good English.” “In particular, the high degree

of polished punctuation and epigrammatic style we see in ‘Emma’ and ‘Persuasion’ is simply not there,” Sutherland said. Sutherland said letters from Austen’s publisher reveal that editor William Gifford was heavily involved in making sense of Austen’s sensibility, honing the style of her late novels “Emma” and “Persuasion.” Gifford did not edit earlier books such as “Sense and Sensibility” and “Pride and Preju-

dice,” whose inconsistencies have sometimes been blamed on bad printing. “In fact, the style in these novels is much closer to Austen’s manuscript hand,” Sutherland said. Sutherland said the revelations shouldn’t damage the reputation of Austen, who was little known when she died in 1817 at the age of 41 but has since become one of Britain’s most beloved authors. Sutherland said the docu-

ments reveal an experimental writer who was “even better at writing dialogue and conversation than the edited style of her published novels suggest.” “The manuscript evidence offers a different face for Jane Austen, one smoothed out in the famous printed novels,” she said. Austen’s handwritten manuscripts have been online since Monday at www.janeausten. ac.uk, the result of a three-year project to digitize the author’s unpublished work.


Love, death in Holocaust era By The Associate Press

W

HEN DANIEL Lichtmann’s wife jumps from a building to her death with an artist Lichtmann helped make famous, the critic becomes obsessed with uncovering the details of their affair and what led to the suicide pact. Lichtmann initially believes he might have been responsible for the affair, having taken his wife to a private preview of what would turn out to be Benjamin Wind’s last show. He is stunned when he finds a photograph that makes it clear

the affair had started years earlier. He begins delving into the artist’s past, uncovering a string of family secrets. Lichtmann’s search eventually leads him back two generations to Wind’s grandfather, a brilliant artist who made a living painting Jewish marriage contracts in Vienna before World War II. Winer skillfully weaves the two men’s stories together so that it becomes clear that what initially appears to be two distinctly separate plots is one tale told over more than six decades. Lichtmann’s story becomes the epilogue to the

romance between Wind’s grandparents in a great demonstration of Winer’s skill in structuring a story. The idea of exploring how the acts of one generation affect those who come later

isn’t new or unique, but Winer expands on it, considering whether perspective and personality also might be passed on, perhaps even to those who never met their forebears. Implicit in Winer’s story is the idea that Wind inherited not only his grandfather’s talent, but also his struggle to balance love and the intimacy it involves with a sense of disenchantment and the need to distance himself from the ugliness often seen in the modern world. Winer creates complex characters by sketching compelling portraits but leaving space for the reader to fill in

shades of gray with his or her own interpretation. The result is a story that is engrossing and haunting. It raises questions about whether it’s possible to truly love someone you know well or whether in becoming close to them, you destroy the mystery that once surrounded them. Winer takes an unflinching look at the pain that lovers can inflict on each other and yet still leaves the reader with the sense that it is better to love and hurt than to be alone. The isolation of love unreturned, as embodied in one of the novel’s main characters, is perhaps the saddest thing.

Book explores end of Churchill’s career By The Associated Press

D

URING FOUR YEARS of World War II, Winston Churchill stood at the peak of his power: prime minister of Britain and one of the Big Three, with President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Soviet leader Josef Stalin. Then, two months after Germany’s surrender, in the midst of a victors’ summit, British voters threw him out of office. Churchill had effectively lost his top status in the final weeks of the war. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, the American commander of Western forces marching on Berlin, gave up the race against Soviet troops advancing on the city from the other direction. Churchill had begged Roosevelt to make Eisenhower capture Berlin, pleading in vain that a Soviet victory would give Stalin

too much influence in postwar Europe. Out of power for six years after his election defeat, he kept urging a settlement with the Soviets while the U.S. still had a monopoly on the atomic bomb. His 1946 “Iron Curtain” speech warned against Soviet expansionism and urged the special relationship between Britain and America. Though the Soviets accused him of warmongering and there was controversy over the speech, his views on the Soviets were much like those of America’s leaders. President Harry S. Truman — who had invited him to speak — applauded and wrote his mother that he wouldn’t endorse the speech but it might do some good. “...(T)here was perhaps little room to quarrel with Churchill’s blunt review of unpleasant facts,” biographer Barbara Leaming writes in “Churchill Defiant.” It’s

a sympathetic and highly readable account of his last decade as an active politician. Leaming takes the reader on an intimate cruise of British politics:

the intrigues of cabinet government and the importance of the royal prerogative. The book also explores the special relationship with Washington,

including the disquiet among British leaders over suggestions that Eisenhower might use nuclear weapons against China in the Korean War.

* This week’s New York Times Bestseller List * HARDCOVER FICTION 1. American Assassin by Vince Flynn 2. Fall of Giants by Ken Follett 3. The Girl...The Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson 4. The Reversal by Michael Connelly 5. Safe Haven by Nicholas Sparks PAPERBACK (TRADE) FICTION 1. The Girl...The Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson 2. The Girl...Played With Fire by Stieg Larsson 3. Unlocked by Karen Kingsbury 4. Little Bee by Chris Cleave 5. Cutting For Stone by Abraham Verghese HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. Earth (The Book) by Jon Stewart and others 2. Trickkle Up Poverty by Michael Savage 3. Obama’s Wars by Bob Woodward 4. The Last Boy by Jane Leavy 5. At Home by Bill Bryson HARDCOVER ADVICE 1. Guinness World Records edited by Craig Glenday 2. Delivering Happiness by Tony Hsieh 3. The Power by Rhonda Byrne 4. Power Thoughts by Joyce Meyer 5. You Already Know How To Be Great by Alan Fine

Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/

Page 13 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, October 29, 2010

Books


Page 14 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, October 29, 2010

Answers from last week

Halloween events calendar Friday Tim Holwig will provide entertainment us at the Pioneer Valley Lodge’s Halloween Harvest Howl at 2:30 p.m. Friday at 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. Please come and join us for wonderful music and refreshments at this free event. For more information, call 792-0353. Utah State University’s College of Humanities and Social Sciences presents its Distinguished Alumni Speaker Series featuring attorney Marcus Mumford at 12:30 p.m. on Friday at the David B. Haight Alumni Center. Mumford presents “A Stuttering Lawyer and the Philosophy of Science,” which will emphasize how his philosophy courses helped his law career and life in general. The Cache Valley Pet Hotel and Day Camp is hosting a free “Howl-O-Ween”

party for families (and especially their dogs), from 5 to 8 p.m. on Friday at the pet hotel, 160 S. 600 West. Dogs must be leashed and wearing a current rabies tag. There will be treats, prizes, activities for kids, costume contests (kids, adults, and dogs) and a dog talent show. For more information, go to www.cachevalleypethotel.com

you to pick a ball and they will hold it for delivery. Drop-off deadline is Nov. 4. For more information, call 760-1347 or e-mail patricia.canning@edwardjones.com

All ages are invited to celebrate Halloween in Logan Canyon at Stokes Nature Center (SNC) from 5 to 8 p.m. on Friday. There will be fireside storytellers with frightful tales from the Logan area, Operation Give is collecting Christ- mad scientific experiments, and creepy crafts for kids. Participants can also learn mas gifts for our troops and the about bats, owls and other creatures of children in Iraq and Afghanistan. the night. Suggested donation is $3 per Drop off donations on Friday at Lee’s Marketplace, 555 E. 1400 North. Items person, $10 per family. Costumes are encouraged. Activities are ongoing, so on the wish list include CDs, DVDs, drop by anytime. For more info, call 755baby wipes, hand sanitizer, athletic socks, peanut butter, candy, small toys 3239 or visit www.logannature.org. SNC and balls. New and gently used items is located about 1 mile into Logan Canare appreciated. Unwrapped gifts may yon. also be dropped off at any of the five Utah State University psychologist Tim Edward Jones Investment offices in Shahan presents a lecture titled “UnderCache Valley. Al’s Sporting Goods, standing Addictions: Animal Lessons 1617 N. Main St., makes it easy for

Crossword 87

www.ThemeCrosswords.com

By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Not of the cloth 7. Newly hatched insects 13. Knitted blanket 19. It stands for something 21. Iroquoian language 22. Comfort 23. Henry Miller offering 25. Demonstrates 26. Coop group 27. Needle holder 28. Mother Teresa, for one 29. Rafters 30. Milldam 31. Night of poetry 32. City on the Brazos 33. Corn dish 36. American car 43. Food in Exodus 16 44. Piano piece 45. Safety device 46. “A little more than kin, and less than kind,” e.g. 47. Republic in the Eastern Pyrenees 50. Light yellow 53. Shopaholic’s delight 54. Astrological era 56. Came of age? 59. “Beetle Bailey” creator Walker 60. Sticker 61. Stain 63. Informer 64. Betrothed 67. Canine’s coat 69. Mix up 73. Attack, with “into” 75. Pastoral setting 76. Eurasia’s ___ Mountains 80. Put up in a different

residence 82. NASA’s second human spaceflight program 86. Western blue flag, e.g. 87. Plot device in “Citizen Kane” 89. Geometric figure 90. Flax plant 92. ___-Wan Kenobi 93. Filmmaker Spike 95. Author Zola 96. He drew the “Vitruvian Man” 101. Depend (on) 102. Butter 103. Jane or John 104. Bewildered 106. Nathan and Pearl 110. L-1011, e.g. 111. Crown 112. Defraud 116. Measure 117. Well-known cruise ship 120. Pants measure 121. Emcees’ lines 122. Evening receptions 123. Line of clothing 124. Baby 125. Most judicious Down 1. Plaster base 2. Big plot 3. It’s pumped in a gym 4. Police 5. Black cuckoo 6. Secondary school in France 7. Places 8. “___ Ng” (They Might

Be Giants song) 9. Milk curdler 10. Llama relative 11. Yemeni city 12. Musical ability 13. Jellies 14. Taiwan, once 15. Clump 16. Keep 17. Super server 18. Famed loch 20. Theme 24. Commotion 29. Less slack 30. Slip 31. First name in mystery 32. Warbler 33. Chutney fruit 34. Hypnotized 35. High-hat 37. Indian royal 38. Accord 39. Big Bertha’s birthplace 40. 1957 #1 song 41. Freud contemporary 42. Hard up 43. Hat-tipper’s word 48. Hydrophobia 49. Blue shade 51. Kinsman 52. Stubborn beast 55. Coffee holders 57. Cooling-off period? 58. Lassie portrayer 62. Soft mineral 64. Bird ___ 65. Variety of leaf bug 66. Hibernia 68. ___ lab 69. Give the third degree 70. Eagle’s nest

71. Zoo heavyweight 72. Petty officer on a merchant ship 74. Court ploy 76. Japanese taste type 77. Inflexible 78. New World lizard 79. Field of work 81. Wears down 83. Andrews or Powell 84. First place? 85. Wield, as influence

88. Communication “O” 91. Purplish red 94. Pizzazz 97. Beat 98. Experts 99. Electorate 100. Specks 105. Goat antelope 106. Indonesian island 107. Last word? 108. They have their pluses and minuses

109. Olympic sled 110. Daughter of Saturn 111. “Over here!” 112. Lancelot and Mix-aLot, for two 113. Algonquian Indian 114. Many moons 115. Lion’s share 117. Not a mistake! 118. Fish eggs 119. Seven, in ancient Rome


run at 9 a.m. Saturday at Ryan’s Place Park in River Heights.

In its next Saturdays at the Museum series, Utah State University’s Museum of Anthropology features a lecture by visiting scholar Richard Hughes. Hughes presents “What’s New in California and Great Basin Obsidian Studies?” at 1 p.m. on Saturday at the museum in Old Main. The lecture will cover Common Ground Outdoor Adventures, an early obsidian sourcing studies in California organization that assists people with disabilities, will have a Halloween party at 6 p.m. on and the Great Basin and discuss how the Friday at 335 N. 100 East. Prizes will be given results were used to reconstruct prehistory. to those with the scariest costume. For more Scott Olsen will be performing live music information, call 713-0288. from 6 to 8 p.m. on Saturday at Pier 49 San Enjoy puppet shows and ghoulish good- Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza in Proviies from 4 to 5 p.m. on Friday at the Fine Arts dence. Scott is a member of the classic rock band The Fender Benders and also the Center, 58 S. 100 West, Brigham City. The acoustic oldies band Relic. No cover charge, event is planned for 5-to 10-year-olds and their families.  Puppets shows featuring mari- although tips are encouraged. onettes and hand puppets will be followed The Bridgerland Band Invitational will be by light refreshments featuring spider cider. held on Saturday at Utah State University’s Costumes are optional. There will be a costume contest and decorated pumpkin contest. Romney Stadium. The Mountain Crest High Suggested donation is $2 per person or $5 per School Band will host 29 bands from Utah and Idaho. 1A bands start at 10 a.m.; 5A bands will family. begin at 5 p.m. Mountain Crest will perform Spooks of all ages are invited to a Bewitch- their 2010 field show entitled EXODUS at 6 ing Tea Party on Friday at the American West p.m. Sky View performs at 6:15 p.m. Tickets are $5 for adults, $3 for students, $25 for a Heritage Center. Tea parties will be held at 4 family. Mountain Crest High School students p.m., 5 p.m., 6 p.m., and 7 p.m. free with ID. For more information, e-mail Come to the Opera House to celebrate Halmcmarchingband@gmail.com. loween with treats and games. Guests who wear their Halloween best will have a chance to win a prize in the costume contest. Call 245-6050 to make reservations. Cost is $3.50/ person, with AWHC Gold members admitted for $2.50/person.

Enjoy daytime Trick or Treating in Historic Downtown Logan from 1 to 4 p.m. on Saturday. Shops along Main Street between 200 South and 300 North and on 100 South, Center Street, 100 North, 200 North, Federal and Church Streets will be open. For more information, contact the Logan Downtown Alliance at 554-8696 or e-mail logandowntown@gmail. com

Crumb Brothers invites our friends to donate a case of canned or dry goods for CAPSA. The store will match that donation in money for the CAPSA food pantry. Bring your donation at noon on Friday to Crumb Brother’s The Whittier Community Center will host a back door (west side of building on the shipHalloween Carnival from 2 to 4 p.m. on Satping dock). urday at the center, 290 N. 400 East. Activity tickets are 10 cents each. Activities include a Easy listening jazz artists Linden Olson cup cake walk, fish pond, rat toss, fortune teller, and John Wyllie will perform live from 6 to 8 duck pond, treat-on-a-string, crossbows, and p.m. on Friday at Pier 49 San Francisco Style more. No need to RSVP. Call 753-9008 for Sourdough Pizza by Macey’s in Providence. more information or to volunteer. No cover charge, tips are encouraged. The TSA Halloween Show will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday and Saturday at USU’s Black Box Theatre, 4030 Old Main Hill. Tickets are $5 and are available at www.arts.usu.edu. The event includes skits, songs and dancing pumpkins. All are invited to U.S. Senate candidate Scott Bradley’s “Freedom Forum” at 7 p.m. on Friday in the Richmond Civic Center, 6 West Main St. Jeremy Threlfall will present patriotic music and Bradley will speak on his platform on Constitutional principles, followed by a question and answer period. Refreshments will be served.

Saturday Families Supporting Adoption will host a fun

Laura Berg will sing and play guitar, performing music from the ‘20s, ‘30s and ‘40s at 3 p.m. on Saturday at Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East, North Logan. The concert is free and open to the public. The Western Singing Duo Tumbleweeds will perform at the Cracker Barrel Cafe in Paradise from 6 pm to closing on Saturday. Sunday Rehearsal for the 12th annual benefit Christmas concert continue at 6 p.m. on Sunday at the Dansante Building, 59 S. 100 West. Scores will be provided. The concert is in support of the Food Pantry. Also at 7 p.m. on Sunday are rehearsals for Handel’s “Messiah” at the Dansante Building. Adult singers welcome. Please bring Shirmer Edition scores.

Monday The Cache Valley Retired School Employees Association will meet at 1 p.m. on Monday at the Copper Mill Restaurant. The program will be presented by members of the Executive Board of the Utah Retired School Employees Association. All retired school employees in the valley are invited to attend. Reservations are necessary. Call Diane Esplin at 563-6412.

Megan Stettler will share her tips on making the best ginger bread ever, then teach how to put it together for a holiday gingerbread house that’s almost too good to eat. The event is scheduled for 7 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday in the little theatre at the Macey’s grocery store in Providence. Limited seating. For more information or to make a reservation, call 753-3301.

A jazz combo concert will be held at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday at USU’s performance hall. Tickets are $8 are are available at the Caine College of the Arts website, www.arts.usu.edu. Dr. Keith Hammond and Dr. Celeste Mortenson want to send candy to our troops A Quarterly Arts Summit will be held Wed. Nov 3 at noon in the Bullen Center, 43 S. Main overseas. Bring your candy to their office at 290 N. 200 East from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mon- St. In this forum those who plan arts events meet to coordinate their calendars, share best day or 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday. You will get practices and discuss issues of common con$1 per pound of candy. For more information, cern. All are invited to attend. For more informacall 753-0505. tion, contact Tricia at 753-6518 x 11.

Tuesday

The Eccles Ice Center’s next sessions of Learn to Skate begin Nov. 2, 4, and 6. These are five-week sessions; cost is $40 including skates with a family discount available. Classes for all ages and abilities. The Eccles Ice Center is located at 2825 N. 200 East in North Logan. A late-night comedy show will be held at 9 p.m. on Tuesday at the USU Performance Hall, 4030 Old Main Hill. Tickets are $3 and $5 and are available through the Caine College of the Arts at www.arts.usu.edu or in person at room 139-B in the Chase Fine Arts Center. For more information, call 797-8022. A diverse religious panel will discuss same-sex marriage at Utah State University‘s Taggart Student Center from 1 to 3 p.m. on Tuesday as part of the Center for Women and Gender lecture series. Cache Carvers Club will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Logan Senior Citizens Center, 236 N. 100 East in Logan. Guests are invited to attend and learn about wood carving. For more information, call Roger Lincoln at 563-6032.

Wednesday Michael Sutton, vice president of California’s Montery Bay Aquarium and director of the Center for the Future of the Oceans, will deliver a lecture titled “The Future of Seafood” at 10 a.m. on Wednesday in Utah State University’s Taggart Student Center Stevenson Ballroom. The event is part of USU natural resources and sustainability week and is free and open to all. For information, visit www.cnr. usu.edu or call 797-2448.

Thursday Bridgerland Audubon’s fall quarterly event be held at 4:40 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 4, will in the Sunburst Lounge at Utah State University’s Taggart Student Center. Titled “Sulfur Skies and Fake Trees: Can We Geoengineer Our Way Out of the Greenhouse?” the talk features Tom Wigley, climate scientist with the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Free and open to all.the evening will be Halloween masks. For more information, call 7130288. A Waffle Buffet with all the fixings will be served at 12:30 p.m. on Thursday at Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. The buffet is followed by a flag ceremony presented by Veterans of the Pioneer Valley Lodge and a presentation by New Millennium regarding the Veterans Benefits program at 2 p.m. The Buffet and Program are free and open to the public. For more information call 792-0353.

Coming Up The Cache County Cooks Association will hold a pan sale from 2 to 6 p.m. on Nov. 4 and 5 at the Cache County School District office, 2063 N. 1200 East. Macey’s will hold a free tailgate party from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 6, in the Romney Stadium parking lot. USU vs. New Mexico game starts at 1 p.m. For more information, call Macey’s at 753-3301.

Stork Landing is having its first free Mommy Fair from, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 6 at the store, 99 West Center St. Stokes Nature Center will host Wild The event includes a free baby registry and Wednesday from 5 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday. All are invited for some family friendly nature fun gift bags that have information about health as SNC keeps its doors open late and provides during pregnancy, infant care, local doctors, magazines, coupons and samples. Two free stories, activities, and a chance to explore. classes are scheduled — learn about strollers, November’s theme is Snakes & Spiders. Wild Wednesday is held the first Wednesday of every car seats and other baby gear at 11 a.m.; pick up skills in infant massage at 4 p.m. Particimonth. For more information, call 755-3239 or pates will receive a free gift and there will be visit www.logannature.org. drawings through the day.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, October 29, 2010

for Human Health” at 7 p.m. on Friday in USU’s Emert Auditorium, Room 130, of the Eccles Science Learning Center. The talk is part of the USU College of Science’s “Science Unwrapped” series and is free and open to all ages. A variety of hands-on activities follow the talk. For more information, call 797-3517 or visit www.usu.edu/science/unwrapped.


Page 16 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, October 29, 2010

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