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Cache

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Octogenarian artist Beverly Byington has no plans to put down her brushes The Herald Journal

Dec. 17-23, 2010


Page 2 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, December 17, 2010

Cache The Herald Journal’s

Arts & Entertainment Calendar

Magazine

On the cover: Artwork by Beverly Byington of Wellsville. Byington is in her 80s and shows no signs of slowing down. Read more about her on page 8. Photo by Jennifer Meyers/Herald Journal

From the editor N TUESDAY, I GOT AN O e-mail that made me feel all warm and fuzzy inside. Sheri, an

amazing volunteer with Four Paws Rescue, told me that a cat I recently featured as the Cute Pet of the Week had been adopted. The new owners saw the kitty here and decided to meet her. Everybody hit it off and the rest is history. To me, this story is like an early Christmas present. My favorite part of being a journalist has always been making a difference in the community, and I am particularly happy to help a nonprofit organization like Four Paws Rescue. Both they and the staff of Cache Humane Society are some of the nicest people I’ve met — tireless advocates for animals who give their all with no thought of reward. I

What’s inside this week

kburgess@hjnews.com

have heard of volunteers staying up all night to feed abandoned kittens or tend injured dogs. Even when resources are stretched to the limit, they always seem to fit in one more homeless pet. While animals and the groups that support them are my passion, there are many other Valley organizations that are doing good works in a variety of fields. With the giving season upon us, I encourage everyone to find a way to support them, whether with money or time. Of course, I struggle as much as anyone to find the willpower to put aside hard-earned cash for charity, but I have always found that the old cliché is true: helping others feels good. All of this brings to mind a few lines from my favorite holiday story, “How the Grinch Stole Christmas”: “‘Maybe Christmas,’ he thought, ‘doesn’t come from a store. Maybe Christmas… perhaps… means a little bit more.’” Happy holidays!

— Kim Burgess Cache Magazine editor

Get arty at Brigham City Museum show

(Page 5) A gleeful night out

(Page 4)

(Page 5)

Books .......................p.13 Crossword.................p.14

‘Tron: Legacy’ a CGI feast for the eyes

(Page 7) Spiritual statement

Cute

pet photo of the week

This dog is available for adoption! Pet: B.G. From: Cache Humane Why he’s so lovable: B.G. is a beautiful 2-to 3-month-old tricolor hound. She is sweet and full of energy and just waiting for a family. She does need obedience training and love and patience. Please come in and meet this beautiful girl. To learn more about B.G. call 792-3920. Adoption fees for dogs at Cache Humane Society start at $100.

Slow Wave

Slow Wave is created from real people’s dreams as drawn by Jesse Reklaw. Ask Jesse to draw your dream! Visit www.slowwave.com to find out how.


Page 3 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, December 17, 2010

All mixed up Shimmy and shake at Indian Oven show

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Pink Floyd tribute concert to benefit cancer patients

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TAH STATE University ArtsBridge student scholars and Fast Forward Charter High School arts students present “Smile On Your Brother” — a music and arts fundraiser, now in its 11th year to support the Ford Chancellor Campaign for Healing. The first event is a Winter Holiday Coffee House and Pink Floyd concert on Saturday, Dec. 18, at Fast Forward Charter High School, 875 W. 1400 North, North Logan. Acoustic music, coffee, donuts and art sale are slated from 1 to 5 p.m. in the school’s cafeteria. At 5 p.m., students will present a rock concert featuring the music of Pink Floyd. Admission is $3 at the door. The program continues with community musicians at 7 p.m., at the Bates House in Hyrum, 300 S. Center St. Admission is $5 at the door.

USU ArtsBridge students have been working with arts students from Fast Forward Charter High School to present the fundraiser that has historically featured young emerging performers and bands in a series of concerts to raise funds for a local cause. The Ford Chancellor Campaign for Healing is a fund at the Logan Regional Hospital Oncology Center that helps to pay for local patients’ cancer treatments not covered by insurance. Ford is a 23-year old local musician who was working toward a career as a firefighter when he was diagnosed with an aggressive form of Ewing’s Sarcoma cancer in September. He is currently undergoing treatment, and while he is insured, he realized how many other patients are not. He started the fund in fall 2010 to help others less fortunate.

HE INDIAN OVEN will host a belly dance show at 8:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 18, at the restaurant, located at 130 N. Main St. Three dancers from Shimmering Sands belly dance group will entertain guests during their meals. The restaurant typically hosts belly dancers on the final Saturday of each month. In addition, Indian Oven chef Ash Oberoi will offer a class on Indian cooking at 11 a.m. on Jan. 15, at Kitchen Kneads, 1211 N. Main St. Learn to make several Indian entrees. Oberoi has competed several times in the annual Spice On Ice cooking contest. Cost for the class is $20 per person. Prepared dishes will be available for tasting. For more information, call the Indian Oven at 787-17457 or Kitchen Kneads at 752-9220.

Free family movie at Whittier Center

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HE WHITTIER Community Center and the Cache Valley Volunteer Center are hosting a free showing of the family movie “Borrowed Hearts” on Monday, Dec. 20. Carolling and a service project will be at 6:30 p.m.; the movie will begin at 7 p.m. Bring your blankets and pillows and a suggested donation of $1 per person. The organizations will also be collecting food for “Hungry for the Arts” to donate to the Cache Community Food Pantry. Popcorn, drinks and goodies will be available for purchase. The movies will be shown at The Whittier Com-

munity Center, 290 N. 400 East. For more information, contact The Whittier Center at 753-9008 or The Volunteer Center at 554-8270. Starring Roma Downy and Eric McCormack, “Borrowed Hearts” follows Sam Field, a businessman who is about to close the biggest deal of his career with industrialist Javier Del Campo (Hector Elizondo), a family man. Sam loves his freedom, but to impress Javier during his holiday visit, Sam convinces single mom Kathleen (Downey) and her daughter to pretend to be his family. Eventually, love blossoms between the two.


Page 4 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, December 17, 2010

All mixed up

Valley artist’s work on display in Brigham W

ORKS BY ARTISTS Barry Parsons and Julie Parsons of Wellsville will be on display from Saturday, Dec. 18, through Saturday, Jan. 22, at the Brigham City Museum-Gallery with an artist’s reception from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 17. “With a Paintbrush and a Camera” includes Julie’s paintings and Barry’s photographs — all in vibrant color. “In its purest form, abstract art does not have a recognizable subject,” explained Barry. “But it’s acceptable for an artist to take slight, partial or complete liberties with the imagery.” Barry added there are a lot of recognizable subjects by him and his wife hanging in the show. At first sight, patrons probably could not identify Barry’s photo of a snowplow at Union Station because he concentrated on the lush red blades of the implement. When the image received positive responses from his friends, Barry decided this would be the first in a series of color abstracts of man-made subjects. In many of Barry’s subsequent photos, he was drawn to the timeless shapes found in geometry, specifically circles, squares, triangles and lines. As an example, old wooden skis leaning against

a wall at Dale’s Roadside Attractions in Wanship caught his eye because of the varied designs of the boot bindings and the “weathered” colors. Unfortunately, Barry bumped the skis with his tripod and they fell over. It took him 20 minutes to match the pairs and stand them upright so he could shoot the scene. Barry saw similar, yet distorted geometric elements in multicolored chewing gum stuck to a small area on the exterior of a building in Eureka, Utah, and photographed the site. From a distance, Barry thought it was a plaque. As he drew closer, he realized about 50 people used the wall to discard their gum which was smashed in every shape imaginable. Julie’s rendering of a wayward black ant is similar to the action painting of the artist Jackson Pollock who dripped, dropped, smeared, splattered and threw paint on his canvases. A vulture soaring in the hot sun appears doomed in another of the painter’s artworks; but she has combined the promise of a new life in the piece. There are no challengers for a grasshopper contemplating a game of hopscotch in Julie’s interpretation of the popular

Photo courtesy of the Brigham City Museum-Gallery

‘Gum Plaque’ by Barry Parsons, one of a number of the artist’s photographs on display at the Brigham City Museum-Gallery.

playground game. The grasshopper will have to navigate a course of dazzling blue squares and triangles as well as blazing yellow numbers and lines to reach home base. Julie’s artistic independence is also apparent in her depiction of the streamlined body and aerial movement of the fly. The artist painted some of her compositions on unstretched canvas and others on paper mache crafted with newspapers bound with plaster of Paris and

Annual ‘Cards for a Cause’ fundraiser to benefit local nonprofit Common Ground

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OMMON GROUND OUTDOOR ADVENTURES IS HAVING ITS 10TH annual “Holiday Cards with a Cause” fundraiser. Thanks to Square One Printing and Jerry Fuhriman, all proceeds directly provide outdoor recreational opportunities for youths and adults with disabilities in Cache Valley. This year’s collection features six new scenes including “Winter Choir,” one of Jerry’s coyote pieces. Gift boxes may be purchased at Common Ground, Fuhriman’s Framing and Fine Art, Square One Printing, Old Grist Mill, Caffe Ibis, Citrus and Sage and Global Village Gifts. Custom imprinting is available. Call 713-0288 or visit ww.cgadventures.org to order your cards today.

glue. Barry’s and Julie’s interests in art has extended throughout their lives. Barry says he has always liked to take pictures, and it has evolved into a passion. He has taught basic photography at the Brigham City extension campus of Utah State Universities for 10 years. The Brigham City native is also president of the Northern Utah Camera Club. Julie was 7 years old when she produced her first oil

painting, but she remembers creating pastel works even earlier because her mother was a painter. Julie’s father was a photographer, so she embraced this media as well. The artist was born and raised in Heber City. Patrons can view “With a Paintbrush and a Camera” Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 1 to 5 p.m. The museum is located at 24 N. 300 West. Admission is free. For more information, call 723-6769.


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Enjoy holiday favorites with Imperial Glee Club

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HE IMPERIAL GLEE Club will perform its annual Christmas concert at 7 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 17, at the Logan 10th Ward (500 E. 800 North). Free admission. Built upon the principles of fellowship and public service, the Imperial Glee Club of Logan is

one of the oldest independent and continuously performing male choruses in the western U.S. Founded in 1916 by a small group of male singers in the Logan Sixth Ward, the Club has grown and maintained a membership of 20 to 30 men from throughout Cache Valley. It is the goal of the members

Time for CVCA’s spring classes R

EGISTRATION FOR WINTER/SPRING classes at the Cache Valley Center for the Arts is underway. Offerings include modern dance technique and African dance with Valley Dance Ensemble, ceramic classes for all ages and skill levels, Cadenza Choir classes with Cache Children’s Choir, creative drama classes with Unicorn Theater, CVCA Art Camp, mixed level yoga with Dennise, pilates and a full-length spring production class of “The Tempest” with Logan Youth Shakespeare. The next session will run from Jan. 17 through May 6. Costs vary. For more information, call the Cache Valley Center for the Arts at 752-0026 or visit www.cachearts.org.

to foster and preserve four-part male vocal music. The club meets Tuesday evenings for practice and annually performs at 20 to 30 venues throughout Northern Utah and Southern Idaho. In the spring and during the Christmas season, the club performs public concerts in Logan.

ACHE VALLEY artist Michael J. Bingham won second place honors at the 25th annual Spiritual & Religious Art of Utah exhibition at the Springville Musuem of Art. The winning piece, titled “Good and Evil,” is a mixed media wall hanging sculpture more than six feet tall. Over 360 artists entered work into the show, with 195 selected for the final show. The exhibition, which runs through Dec. 28, allows Utah artists to express their beliefs and feelings, regardless of religion, through any medium or style of visual art. The Spiritual and Religious exhibition is distinctive in providing an opportunity to connect with artists’ true beliefs and feelings. While all artwork was considered for the show, only a few awards were given. Brian Kershisnik received the Director’s Award for his insightful piece “Decent From the Cross,” which displays weeping angels looking down upon a sorrowful crowd retrieving Christ’s body from the cross. First place went to Adam Abram for his artwork “No Greater Love.” This work shows Mary Magdalene kneeling in a wet, dirt road at the foot of the cross during a thunderstorm. Bingham and Patrick Devonas both received second place awards for their work, with third place going to artists Tyson Monson, Jonathan Linton and David Linn.

Utah’s first art museum, the Springville Museum of Art, is known as the foremost repository of Utah art and displays the largest public collection of 20th Century Soviet Socialist Realist Art in the western United States The beautiful Spanish Colonial style structure is located at 126 E. 400 South, Springville. Admission is free and Museum hours are Tuesday to Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Wednesday 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday 3 to 6 p.m. Closed Mondays and holidays. For more information on the Springville Musuem of Art visit the website, www.smofa.org, or call 801-489-2727.

Page 5 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, December 17, 2010

Local man wins in Springville Museum religious art contest


Page 6 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, December 17, 2010

Film Still playing “The Fighter” Rated R ★★★ — Mark Wahlberg produces and stars, David O. Russell directs, but supporting player Christian Bale owns this real-life tale about boxer Micky Ward, who rose from his bluecollar roots and overcame ugly family squabbles to earn a title shot in his mid-30s. The film itself is a strange stew, a raw portrait of working-class stiffs one moment, a comedy of family discord and vulgar people the next. Wahlberg as Ward, Melissa Leo as his mother and Amy Adams as his girlfriend are excellent. Yet Bale is truly extraordinary as Ward’s older half-brother, Dicky Eklund, a flamboyant but self-destructive former boxer who trains his sibling to climb to heights he never reached himself as his life unraveled amid crack addiction. Gaunt, wiry, always moving, always talking, Bale casts aside the stoicism of so many of his roles and becomes a lovable wreck. As with Ledger’s Joker, it’s the stuff that Academy Awards wins are made of. R for language throughout, drug content, some violence and sexuality. 116 minutes. “The Tourist” Rated PG-13 ★★ ½ — It’s probably best to head into this with the mindset that you’re going on an actual vacation yourself. If you’re in the mood for mindless, escapist fun — decadent hotel suites and expensive clothes — you’ll be fine. There are all the obligatory chases and shootouts you’d expect in a romantic action caper, but you never get the sense that anyone’s in real danger. There are twists, but they won’t make you think too terribly hard, and in the end you will have devoted fewer than

two hours of your life to a decent diversion. Watching Johnny Depp and Angelina Jolie bounce off each other isn’t torture. Pretty people went to Venice and made a pretty movie. “The Tourist” is the first Hollywood film from director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, whose debut, the excellent German film “The Lives of Others,” won the foreignlanguage Oscar in 2007. It comes from a script that’s credited to Henckel von Donnersmarck, Christopher McQuarrie (“The Usual Suspects”) and Julian Fellowes (“Gosford Park”). These acclaimed talents — Oscar winners, all — have given us something unabashedly frothy and ridiculous — almost knowingly preposterous PG-13 for violence and brief strong language. 105 minutes. “The Chronicles of Narnia: Voyage of the Dawn Treader” Rated PG ★★ — C.S. Lewis began the third book in his Narnia series: “There was a boy called Eustace Clarence Scrubb, and he almost deserved it.” Nothing in the three inspiration-less films adapted from Lewis’ series ever rises to the wit of that simple line, though the latest comes closest to the spirit of the original — arguably the most fun of Lewis’ seven Narnia tales. But spirit is something that has been consistently lacking throughout this franchise, which has now gone through two studios (previously Disney, now Fox) and two directors. “Dawn Trader” finds two of the Pevensie clan, Lucy (Georgia Henley) and Edmund (Skandar Keynes), sailing the Narnia seas with Prince Caspian (Ben Barnes), and with their bratty and unfortunately named cousin, Eustace (Will Poulter), in tow. Lewis’ Christian themes

are worn more openly here than in the last installment. But the religious allegory (which will go over the heads of most young viewers, just as it did young readers) isn’t what sinks the Narnia movies. It’s a lack of imagination. PG for some frightening images and sequences of fantasy action. 114 minutes. “Black Swan” Rated R ★★★ ½ — At once gorgeous and gloriously nutso, a trippy, twisted fantasy that delights and disturbs in equal measure. Darren Aronofsky takes the same stripped-down fascination with, and appreciation for, the minutiae of preparation that he brought to his Oscar-nominated “The Wrestler” and applies it to the pursuit of a different kind of artistry: ballet. But then the director mixes in a wildly hallucinatory flair as “Black Swan” enters darker psychological territory. Working with his frequent cinematographer, Matthew Libatique, and incorporating dazzling effects, Aronofsky spins a nightmare scenario within a seemingly gentle world. The visions and dreams soar over-the-top at times, but always knowingly so, and with great style; “Black Swan” wallows in its grandiosity, and if you’re willing to go along with it, you’ll find yourself wowed by one of the best films of the year. Natalie Portman gives it her all in a brave and demanding performance as Nina, a driven New York City ballerina. When it comes time to stage a bold, new production of “Swan Lake,” the company’s artistic director (Vincent Cassel) thinks Nina is perfect to play the White Swan. But he needs a dancer who also can portray the fierce sexuality of the Black Swan. Enter Lily (Mila Kunis), a savvy and confident newcomer who represents Nina’s

biggest threat to getting the lead role. R for strong sexual content, disturbing violent images, language and some drug use. 110 minutes. “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1” Rated PG-13 ★★★ — Doom and gloom permeate nearly every minute of the beginning of the end of the behemoth boy-wizard series. This seventh film in the franchise, directed once again by David Yates (who previously helmed parts five and six, “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” and “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince”), begins with nearly suffocating tension, as Harry (Daniel Radcliffe) finds himself face-to-face with his des-

tiny: being the target of the evil Lord Voldemort’s (Ralph Fiennes) deadly wrath. Friends and allies will have to band together to protect him; some of them won’t make it out alive. Finally, the weight of Harry’s past and the frightening unknown of his future, as detailed so vividly in J.K. Rowling’s beloved books, are about to collide. Yates’ film is gorgeously bleak, with sprawling, end-of-the-Earth shots of foreboding mountains and lonely beaches from Oscar-nominated cinematographer Eduardo Serra (“Girl With a Pearl Earring”) that reflect the characters’ moods. The films have grown darker in tone and theme, and given this heightened emotional challenge, the three

young stars (Radcliffe, Emma Watson and Rupert Grint) once again rise to it. Having spent half their lives in these characters, their interactions with one another seem more believable than ever. But because “Part 1” sets up the final showdown in “Part 2” — which Yates also directed — there’s lots of exposition in Steve Kloves’ script, lots of characters and plot lines reintroduced from films past. While it’s thrilling off the top, it repeatedly sags in the middle before picking up at the cliffhanger climax. PG13 for some sequences of intense action violence and frightening images. 143 minutes. — All reviews by The Associated Press

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T’S NOT LIKE anyone asked for a sequel to the 80s cult classic “Tron,� which told the story of computer engineer Kevin Flynn (Jeff Bridges) and his journey into digital space. He was transported to a world that resides in circuit boards and computers. A world where programs take on human form and are at time subjected to merciless, gladiator-style games where they have to destroy or be destroyed. The original “Tron� became a cult classic once it hit home video and has been passed down through the generations, remembered for its innovativeness, originality and what we now regard as pretty cheesy special effects (they weren’t back then). Now we find ourselves with a sequel to that movie called “Tron: Legacy.� Kevin Flynn had a son, but one night Flynn disappeared and hadn’t been heard from in 20 some-odd years. Sam (Garrett Hedlund) is now the largest share holder in Encom, his father’s company, although, Sam doesn’t want any part in actually running the company. Instead he sabotages it from the inside, year after year, trying to fulfill his dad’s wishes that all programs are free and open to the world. After talking to one of his dad’s old friends, Sam finds his way to his father’s old arcade. There he discovers his dad’s secret work room and is, in no time, transported to the digital world via a laser beam where he meets endless streams of bad programs and his long-lost father. The world that Sam enters is a lot different than the world Kevin

The Reel Place By Aaron Peck

★★★ “Tron: Legacy� Rated PG entered in 1982. It’s been jazzed up quite a bit. With modern day CGI technology the filmmakers were able to create a vast digital existence for hordes of programs that act more like it’s ancient Rome than anything else. There’s pulse-pounding disc battles where enemy combatants chuck flying discs at one another hoping to erase them from exis-

tence. The light cycles are back and better than ever. Truthfully, “Tron: Legacy� is visually astounding. If you liked the complete engrossing effect of “Avatar� then “Tron: Legacy� and its CGI digital dreamscape is for you. Watching it in IMAX was even better, as some of the movie’s scenes have been filmed in IMAX aspect ratio. They fill the entire screen, causing you to get lost in the movie’s awe-inspiring visuals (I wouldn’t suggest any 3D viewings, as the 3D viewing I attended was plagued by double-vision caused by the glasses and screen). Besides the astounding visuals “Tron: Legacy� is pretty much void of any

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ELLSVILLE — There’s one word to describe octogenarian artist Beverly Byington’s creative prowess: Prolific. Though the majority of the work she’s done has been with the brush — her husband, Jerry, is quick to tell you her paintings number over 2,500 — Beverly has tried her hand at just about any form of art you can think of, from ceramics to handbags to quilts with a message. In her 80s, Byington still cranks out the artwork today with the same passion she had when she started back in 1962. While her work frequently appears in art shows around the state, her home is an ever-expanding museum of all her work. Byington can always be found in her basement studio, where much of what ends up on canvas came to her in a dream or in the moment. “Everything I paint either came out of my head or I was out sitting on the ground doing it,” Byington said. “I don’t even take pictures and then paint from my paintings. ... I do dreams. I like to do things that have stories. They all have got a story.” Not only are Byington’s pieces so numerous that it would take volumes just to mention each one, but even the ones that stand out are so great in number that a description of each would fill a small book. Byington says it usually takes her from a half hour to half a day to finish pieces — and the work never stops. “This is the way I paint: I say to myself ‘I don’t want to vacuum, I think I’ll go paint,’” Byington said. “So I come down and paint. Whatever comes out of the first thought or the first brush, that’s what I do.” One thing that stands out in Byington’s paintings is her ability to portray emotions, especially since she rarely paints facial features. In a scene she painted of four men sitting on a bench at a mall in Fresno, Calif., Byington makes it easy for you to get a sense of the mood of each man on the bench. It’s one of the few paintings in which Byington uses facial features. “These guys were there and I thought they just looked so interesting,” Byington said. “I’m not good at doing people, but I do love to do these little ones because it kinda gives you the idea. What it does have in it is emotions. That’s the kind I really like to do. I don’t paint peaceful paintings, really.” Byington has also done several pieces that she calls “social comment” works. Down the

hall from her studio, Byington has a number of this type of paintings, one called “The Last Crucifixion,” about pollution. It features an oil rig made to look like a cross. “I was so sick of the pollution,” Byington said. “... And nobody likes it. Nobody wants to be shown.” In another painting, a chaotic scene at Macey’s, Byington illustrates a crazy day at the grocery store, with piles of produce toppling and mothers trying to keep track of their kids. “I’d sit up there, up in that little (food court), and that’s what it looked like to me,” Byington said. “I have never seen so many kids and pregnant women, and confusion. I like to do that kind of thing. I just kinda watch people. ... I like either really serious or funny.” Byington, who was born in Cache Valley but moved back about 14 years now, also designed a series of handbags, and even had them produced and sold by Woof & Poof of Chico, Calif. One bag in particular — a pink bag with straps of interlocked flamingo necks — was a favorite of opera singer Beverly Seals. Byington has also made several quilts. One she likes to show off features a number of women on it, with the embroidered inscription “We are the creators and keepers of all life.” Beverly began painting after she and Jerry moved to Overland, Nev., while Jerry was working for the federal government. A friend of theirs was into painting, and Beverly thought it would be a fun thing to try. She got some brushes, a little paint and the rest is history. “I can’t turn down a challenge,” she said, “I met a park ranger and he was a painter, and I said ‘Oh, I’d love to do that.’ He said ‘OK, I’ll show you, get you started.’ We didn’t have much money, so I bought three (colored) tubes of paint and one white, and a brush and a palate knife. That started it.” Byington has also done volumes of books with both artwork and stories in them, many for her family, including her own history from birth to the age of 20. She is also a member of the Cache Watercolor Society, and has had a number of her pieces featured at Fuhrimans Framing & Fine Arts in Logan.

Octogenarian artist Beverly Byington has no plans to put down her brushes

All works by Beverly Byington

Story by Joey Hislop *** Photos by Jennifer Meyers


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Still going

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ELLSVILLE — There’s one word to describe octogenarian artist Beverly Byington’s creative prowess: Prolific. Though the majority of the work she’s done has been with the brush — her husband, Jerry, is quick to tell you her paintings number over 2,500 — Beverly has tried her hand at just about any form of art you can think of, from ceramics to handbags to quilts with a message. In her 80s, Byington still cranks out the artwork today with the same passion she had when she started back in 1962. While her work frequently appears in art shows around the state, her home is an ever-expanding museum of all her work. Byington can always be found in her basement studio, where much of what ends up on canvas came to her in a dream or in the moment. “Everything I paint either came out of my head or I was out sitting on the ground doing it,” Byington said. “I don’t even take pictures and then paint from my paintings. ... I do dreams. I like to do things that have stories. They all have got a story.” Not only are Byington’s pieces so numerous that it would take volumes just to mention each one, but even the ones that stand out are so great in number that a description of each would fill a small book. Byington says it usually takes her from a half hour to half a day to finish pieces — and the work never stops. “This is the way I paint: I say to myself ‘I don’t want to vacuum, I think I’ll go paint,’” Byington said. “So I come down and paint. Whatever comes out of the first thought or the first brush, that’s what I do.” One thing that stands out in Byington’s paintings is her ability to portray emotions, especially since she rarely paints facial features. In a scene she painted of four men sitting on a bench at a mall in Fresno, Calif., Byington makes it easy for you to get a sense of the mood of each man on the bench. It’s one of the few paintings in which Byington uses facial features. “These guys were there and I thought they just looked so interesting,” Byington said. “I’m not good at doing people, but I do love to do these little ones because it kinda gives you the idea. What it does have in it is emotions. That’s the kind I really like to do. I don’t paint peaceful paintings, really.” Byington has also done several pieces that she calls “social comment” works. Down the

hall from her studio, Byington has a number of this type of paintings, one called “The Last Crucifixion,” about pollution. It features an oil rig made to look like a cross. “I was so sick of the pollution,” Byington said. “... And nobody likes it. Nobody wants to be shown.” In another painting, a chaotic scene at Macey’s, Byington illustrates a crazy day at the grocery store, with piles of produce toppling and mothers trying to keep track of their kids. “I’d sit up there, up in that little (food court), and that’s what it looked like to me,” Byington said. “I have never seen so many kids and pregnant women, and confusion. I like to do that kind of thing. I just kinda watch people. ... I like either really serious or funny.” Byington, who was born in Cache Valley but moved back about 14 years now, also designed a series of handbags, and even had them produced and sold by Woof & Poof of Chico, Calif. One bag in particular — a pink bag with straps of interlocked flamingo necks — was a favorite of opera singer Beverly Seals. Byington has also made several quilts. One she likes to show off features a number of women on it, with the embroidered inscription “We are the creators and keepers of all life.” Beverly began painting after she and Jerry moved to Overland, Nev., while Jerry was working for the federal government. A friend of theirs was into painting, and Beverly thought it would be a fun thing to try. She got some brushes, a little paint and the rest is history. “I can’t turn down a challenge,” she said, “I met a park ranger and he was a painter, and I said ‘Oh, I’d love to do that.’ He said ‘OK, I’ll show you, get you started.’ We didn’t have much money, so I bought three (colored) tubes of paint and one white, and a brush and a palate knife. That started it.” Byington has also done volumes of books with both artwork and stories in them, many for her family, including her own history from birth to the age of 20. She is also a member of the Cache Watercolor Society, and has had a number of her pieces featured at Fuhrimans Framing & Fine Arts in Logan.

Octogenarian artist Beverly Byington has no plans to put down her brushes

All works by Beverly Byington

Story by Joey Hislop *** Photos by Jennifer Meyers


Page 10 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, December 17, 2010

The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board “This Year For Christmas” by Terri Barnes This year for Christmas, Let’s do something new. Instead of doing the same old thing, Let’s ask, What would Jesus do. Would he roam the streets and malls To find the perfect gift, Trying to get through all the crowds Just to give someone a lift Would he get so caught up in things That he would forget why we celebrate I think we better think real hard Before it gets too late So please enjoy your Christmas And remember for whom it’s for Let our heart receive his precious gifts So he need not shop any more

“The Incredible Me!!” by Saige Falslev I am not.... dangerous hills. A stream darting down ing through bushes. her slit ke A snoopy sna Black, plain, Boring. A snowman still, and cold. thing. A stapler only good for one ed. fus con , sed res Sad, dep I am...

A sister Always ready for fun In others business Grade A eling tornado Early in the morning a trav

Merry Christmas and a joyful New Year

“Once I Thought You Really Loved Me” by William Humphrey Oh I thought you really loved me, now I’m all alone and blue. Since you up and went away, Dear, I’ve been wondering what I’ll do.

“Movin’ On” by Sam and Fam Twenty years at the desks she’s processed the claims Car collision disputes and removing teeth stains The Queen of Insurance has her eye on the door The goodbye’s are said; now it’s “me time” in store Her hair shimmers silver, her eyes sparkle blue Now the “in your life” grandma can go with the crew. New adventures await her, Dave starts at Bel Air The aroma of Elsha lingers in there They wave from the Chevy as they drive out of sight Young lovers once more, at least for tonight! Happy retirement, Sherry H.

You know we once were sweethearts, and I thought the world of you. Only now it has ended, and it looks like we are through. Yes I thought you really loved me, only you’ve found someone new. And it leaves me oh so lonesome, all alone and feeling blue.

GET YOUR STUFF PUBLISHED! The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board is a place for our local community to share, well ... anything! Send your works to kburgess@hjnews.com. We’ll be waiting!


South African icon’s early days explored in ‘Young Mandela’ By The Associated Press

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EARLY HALF A CENTURY ago, a South African judge pronounced a life sentence against Nelson Mandela for planning guerrilla war against the racist state. Mandela had expected hanging and, with his codefendants, decided in advance not to appeal. “Young Mandela: The Revolutionary Years” — at age 46 Mandela hadn’t yet lived half his life — covers only the years before that. His career as an international symbol of freedom began only when the South African government, under international pressure, released him at age 72, after 27 years confinement. Now, 20 years later, he’s a revered ex-president of the Republic of South Africa. He shared a Nobel Peace Prize with F. W. de Klerk, South Africa’s last white prime minister, whom he helped dismantle South Africa’s extreme segregationist system. Author David James Smith writes that he wants to rescue his hero “from the dry pages of history, to strip away the myth and create a fresh portrait of a rounded human being, setting his political achievements in the context of his natural character.” According to Mandela, his African name, Rolihlahla, can be translated as “trouble maker.” His first English teacher, who found African names hard to pronounce, dubbed him Nelson. The reference to the British naval hero may have encouraged unfriendly critics to think of him as a “black Englishman.” He liked keeping fit, especially with amateur boxing. His tall, slender frame went well with fashionable three-piece suits. He acquired the best legal education South Africa could afford — part of it by correspondence with London while a prisoner on South Africa’s Robben Island. Smith traces the problems of his two failed marriages, mentions his third at age 80 to the widow of a president of Mozambique, and makes discreet references to relationships with other women.

Much of this information comes from Mandela’s children and grandchildren. Readers with the American, French or Russian revolutions in mind may find Mandela’s revolutionary activity on the tame side. A busy fundraiser on a foreign trip, Mandela planned in his early 40s to get six months of military training in Ethiopia. The six months shrank to about one; colleagues had called him home to handle a problem with another dissident group. On the way, he crossed paths with the first 21 South African recruits going in the opposite direction. Besides an active legal career, he spent much of his time on the African National Congress. He tried to run it on a narrow policy: Keeping white South African communists from taking over while ensuring their valuable support. One of the papers found after his arrest was an essay he was writing on “How to Be a Good Communist.” Avid consumers of African political intrigue will probably find fascinating material in conflicts among African dissidents in the mid-20th century. Readers less familiar with the fine points, like this one, may find themselves dozing over a seemingly endless parade of names, doubtless of personalities important to one another at the time but with backgrounds and motivations often omitted.


Page 12 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, December 17, 2010

Culture

Angelou shares favorite recipies By The Associated Press

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OR MAYA ANGELOU, the holidays bring family and friends to the table to eat, to laugh. And to one-up each other. “This is a time when people get to ‘show out,’ as my grandmother used to say,” says Angelou, poet, memoirist and civil rights icon. “Moe is going to try to out cook Joe. It becomes amusing and delightful.” Angelou, whose second cookbook, “Great Food, All Day Long” (Random House, 2010), features holiday-worthy dishes such as crown roast and prime rib, helped a generation understand why caged birds sing. But what about how to make prefect veal chops? “I’m a cook, a serious cook,” she says. “I plan meals not only for their nutritional value but for their beauty. I plan them around who’s going to eat them and when. It’s ceremonial, for jubilation or commiserating over something.” Which makes Angelou’s cooking very much like her

writing. The 82-year-old Pulitzer winner approaches the kitchen with the same respect for ingredients that she gives her words. “You have to examine and be familiar with every element,” she says. “So you should know a red pepper, what it will do in a skillet with a tablespoon of olive oil, how it will look. How if you give more heat what will happen to it. You know the materials well.” Despite a fractured childhood shuttling between the families of her estranged parents, Ange-

lou learned to cook much the way everyone wishes — at her grandmother’s knee. “She would say ‘Now sit down and watch me.’” Angelou says. “I loved her so much that I followed her around. People would say, ‘You got your shadow with you again.’ I watched her carefully.” When Angelou lived with her mother as a teenager, she watched again, learning shortcuts like using a gas stove and making shortcake with store-bought cake, luxuries her grandmother in rural Arkansas

didn’t have. “My grandmother didn’t know anything about that,” says Angelou, who was usually put in charge of the scrubbing and chopping of vegetables. “I learned both techniques.” Cooking can be a gateway to creativity of all kinds, Angelou says, if you pay careful attention to the craft. “I ask folks to read poetry, to read it aloud, so they can hear the music, the melody of it,” she says. “I would encourage a person who wants to cook to buy cookbooks.” Angelou estimates her own cookbook collection at somewhere around 300 volumes. And at this time of year, she says, cooking for others takes on a deeper meaning. “When a person cooks for me, I like to think of the cooking itself as a gift,” she says. “I’m always glad and really so grateful to anyone who cooks for me. And I love to cook for others.” Angelou cooks for her friends, Hall of Fame songwriters Ashford and Simpson, every Christmas, when she is their

guest. As per tradition, she creates the dessert, sometimes a trifle, sometimes a chocolate cake, but always something festive. Her other tradition involves people she has never met, and likely will never meet again. “I like to spend one day during the holidays either serving food at a shelter or preparing food to be given to one,” she says. “We’re told in the Judeo-Christian bible that it’s more blessed to give than to receive. And sometimes we just receive.” Now “82 plus,” as she says, the Pulitzer winner has seen Christmas changes over the decades. And though like many people she is concerned about the commercialism of the holiday, she says she still loves the other sentiments it inspires. “I like that families still try to come together,” she says. “Quite often when we go to homes, to give, we find a lot of young people, black and white, washing dishes, trying to seriously be part of the community and to justify the space they occupy.”

Painting from Hitler’s apartment on display By The Associated Press

APAINTING OF THE.

Florence skyline that hung in Adolf Hitler’s Berlin apartment throughout World War II and was missing for decades went on show Thursday in an exhibition of works returned to the collection of a major German museum. The exhibition centers on 18 works returned to the Alte Nationalgalerie over the past decade, more than half a century since they were removed from its premises. It also uses official shipment and loan lists, photographs and other documents to show how these pieces were taken down

museum officials say a recent international push for restitution has resulted in an increase in the number of works returning to the museum in the past 10 years. “In recent years, attitudes have changed,” said Dorothea Kathmann, a legal expert with for the Prussian Culture Foundation. Efforts to track down and restitute art looted from Jewish collectors AP photo by the Nazis have helped encourThe painting ‘View of Florence’ by age a broader focus on tracing August Wilhelm Julius Ahlborn. pieces that were stolen or went missing during the Nazi era and from the museum walls to wind up on odysseys through flak tow- World War II. “Today not only the question ers, salt mines and water-soaked of ownership is in focus, but cellars. attempts to trace Jewish collecMany of these works found tions, have brought an ethical and their way into private hands, but

moral —even political — element” to research, Kathmann said. At the end of the World War II in 1945, some 800 works that had been in the collection of the Alte Nationalgalerie were missing. About two-thirds of them were recovered by the end of the 1950s. Since 1990, more than two dozen others have been returned, including those in the exhibit. Political developments, including Germany’s — and Berlin’s — reunification and use of the Internet to circulate databases, however, have made it easier to spread the word about missing artworks, leading to a jump in

the number of returns since 2000, Berlin Museum director Michael Eissenhauer said. “A View of Florence,” by 19thcentury German painter Wilhelm Ahlborns, was one of 68 works loaned by the gallery to the Nazi regime and hung in Hitler’s private quarters at his chancellery. Earlier this year, it turned up in a Berlin art gallery, which in turn alerted the museum. Kathmann said that in most cases, once the gallery proves ownership, using pre-war documentation or markings on the paintings, it has been able to negotiate a “finder’s fee” for the current owners, worth 10 percent of the picture’s market value.


‘Last Sacrifice’ not Mead’s best work

By The Associate Press

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N RICHELLE MEAD’S “Last Sacrifice,” the muchanticipated finale to her young adult Vampire Academy series, 18-year-old Rose Hathaway is facing the death penalty after being framed for the murder of Moroi vampire Queen Tatiana. With the help of her friends and her estranged father, Abe, Rose breaks out of jail and goes on the run, leaving her boyfriend, Adrian, and her best friend, Lissa, to find the real killer while she hides out with her former lover Dimitri and an alchemist named Sydney. In Mead’s supernatural world, there are two kinds of vampires: the Moroi, a relatively peaceful society possessing magical

talents, and their mortal enemy, the evil Strigoi. Both kinds of vampires live mostly undetected among humans. Rose is a guardian, trained to protect the Moroi from attacks by the Strigoi. The Strigoi have no magical abilities; their sole purpose is to kill. Half-vampire Rose has been training to become a guardian for Lissa, the last known member of a royal Moroi bloodline. In “Shadow Kiss,” the third book in the series, Dimitri was turned into an evil Strigoi vampire during a battle. Rose and Lissa were able to reverse the change in the fifth book, “Spirit Bound,” but Rose was denied a reunion when Dimitri, haunted by the atrocities he had committed, rejected her, vowing to never love again.

Now, Rose, Dimitri and Sydney have set off on a never-ending road trip that was initially meant to evade capture but turns into a mission to locate Lissa’s newly discovered halfsibling. Along the way, they seek refuge within a primitive renegade Moroi community and team up with Victor Dashkov, an old enemy who only helps because it serves his needs. In contrast to previous books in the series where battles against the Strigoi provided thrilling action, such battles have no significant role in “Last Sacrifice.” Instead, Mead focuses on a convoluted murder mystery and a political election as candidates from all the royal bloodlines compete to be the new monarch. “Last Sacrifice” has a few

‘The Gift’ continues Witch & Wizard series By The Associated Press

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AMES PATTERSON HAS a formula for young adult novels, and it works. In “The Gift,” the latest in his Witch & Wizard series, Patterson continues the saga of Whit and Wisty Allgood, a pair of magical brother-and-sister teens on a mission to save the world from The One Who Is The One and his army of brainwashed New Order soldiers (cleverly described as the N.O. soldiers). The One is trying to rid the world of any creative stimuli, including art, books and music. In doing so, he is turning everyone into loyal, zombielike followers. Magic is banned above everything else. The One is the only person who

is allowed to use it, and he does so on a regular basis to send people to the “shadowland,” a place where souls roam eternally. Wisty has a self-destructive streak. She talks back to her captors, makes quips in the face of death and sarcastically baits her mortal enemy. Whit is brooding, strong and introverted. But since “The Gift” is told from both siblings’ point of view, the audience is allowed inside Whit’s head, which humanizes him. “The Gift” is action-packed, but very little headway is made. Each Witch & Wizard novel chronicles no more than a few weeks in Whit and Wisty’s lives, so readers will likely grow up faster than the characters. But if Patterson, who is best known for his Alex Cross novels, gets kids to put down their remotes for just a few days, then he’s done his job.

memorable moments — both tender and taut — between Rose and Dimitri. They battle when Rose tries to escape in an ill-considered plan to return to Lissa. Later, Rose comforts Dimitri when he becomes emotional after an encounter with a Strigoi — his first since his reversal. Mead does little to build the love triangle among Rose, Adrian and Dimitri. As a dreamwalker, Adrian can invade people’s dreams. His interactions with Rose are primarily in this state and don’t last long, so her choice is not at all surprising. What is surprising, however, is the identity of Queen Tatiana’s killer. Mead’s Vampire Academy series started out strong but peaked with the fourth book, “Blood Promise.” Although the

last installment is more fizzle than sizzle, “Last Sacrifice” manages to tie up loose ends while introducing new story lines for Mead’s upcoming young adult series featuring another character.

* This week’s New York Times Best-seller List * HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “Port Mortuary” by Patricia Cornwell 2. “The Confession” by John Grisham 3. “Cross Fire” by James Patterson 4. “Full Dark, No Stars” by Stephen King 5. “The Girl ....The Hornet’s Nest” by Stieg Larsson PAPERBACK (TRADE) FICTION 1. “The Girl .... The Dragon Tattoo” by Stieg Larsson 2. “The Girl...Played With Fire” by Stieg Larsson 3. “House Rules” by Jodi Picoult 4. “Cutting For Stone” by Abraham Verghese 5. “Happy Ever After” by Nora Roberts HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “Decision Points” by George W. Bush 2. “Autobiography of Mark Twain, Vol. 1” by Mark Twain 3. “Unbroken” by Laura Hillenbrand 4. “Life” by Keith Richards with James Fox 5. “America By Heart” by Sarah Palin HARDCOVER ADVICE 1. “Barefoot Contessa: How Easy Is That?” by Ina Garten 2. “Guinness World Records 2011” edited by C. Glenday 3. “Kardashian Konfidential” by the Kardashian sisters 4. “Delivering Happiness” by Tony Hsieh 5. “My Passion For Design” by Barbra Streisand

Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/

Page 13 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, December 17, 2010

Books


Page 14 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, December 17, 2010

Answers from last week

Injured ‘Spiderman’ actress back at work

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ATALIE MENDOZA, who was injured during the first preview of Broadway’s “Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark,” is back on stage. A publicist for Mendoza says the actress returned to the production on the night of Dec. 15 after suffering from a concussion when she was hit on the head by equipment backstage. She had been out of the show since Dec. 2. The musical, now in pre-

views, will officially open Jan. 11. Mendoza plays SpiderMan’s evil love interest Arachne — a part written by director and co-book author Julie Taymor — and was the third actor to be injured in the problem-ridden $65 million musical. Her credits include the British TV drama “Hotel Babylon” and the cavethemed horror film hit “The Descent.”

Crossword 93

www.ThemeCrosswords.com

By Myles Mellor and Sally York 1. 6. 11. 15. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 31. 32. 33. 34. 38. 39. 41. 42. 44. 46. 51. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 68. 70. 71. 72.

Across Level Cover story? Calcite rock Small salmon Hang loose 60’s protest Passing notice Financial page headi- ng Ready Serf ___-soap Like hen’s teeth Jackson Prom conveyance Cousin of an ostrich Dissertation Indian queen Morning moisture Narcissist’s love Member of Cong. Small fort Cobbler 2009 tsunami site Johnson Devout Disconcert Make a comeback Bring in Sir or madam Goes bad Blueprint Dump Pokes fun at Breathe hard “The Three Faces of ___” Kilt pattern

75. “Saturday Night Fever” music 77. Scale part 78. Subjective 80. To whom a Muslim prays 81. Aussie “bear” 84. Adams 88. Creep 89. Plastic ___ Band 90. Most like a ghost 91. Madness 94. Lackluster 97. European peak 99. To be, to Tiberius 100. Army units 105. Go right 106. Tree trunk 108. Carter 115. Prefers, with “for” 116. Pivot 117. Lush 118. Showed displeasure 119. “Groovy!” 120. Deep-six 121. Keyboard key 122. Greek mountain nymph 123. Bungles 124. Ella Fitzgerald spe cialty 125. Some factory work- ers 126. Joins Down 1. Mavens 2. Fast time? 3. Puente ___

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 28. 29. 30. 34. 35. 36. 37. 40. 43. 45. 47. 48. 49. 50. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 64.

Indian bread Cough up “That’s ___” Hide “___ have to do” Deserts or grass lands, e.g. Eventually Brit’s “Baloney!” German sub Marching band mem- bers Potsdam Conference attendee Diamond measure Certain Arab Range rovers Kind of daisy Spread Mea ___ Payments of a sort Invitation request Medicinal berry Serious Empowers Alpine sight Kind of control Ancient Italian Electrify Some preserves Club publication Skilled Welcome ___ From the beginning Like some communi- ties Man, for one ___ cheese Suffix with auction Female lobster Electrical pioneer

66. 67. 69. 70. 72. 73. 74. 76. 77. 79. 82. 83. 85.

Tablelands Happening Easter flower Kind of cut Seat for an extra rider “Malcolm X” director Not to mention Physicist Georg Gull-like bird Darjeeling or oolong Setback Bet Cut out

86. Large branch 87. Big name in comput- ers 92. Lampoons 93. As a whole 95. Let 96. Tart 97. Maltreater 98. Introverts 100. Call 101. Persona non grata 102. Place to exchange vows

103. Exams 104. “King Cotton” com- poser 107. Macaroni shape 109. Egg container 110. Burlap fiber 111. Bygone time 112. Wassailer’s song 113. Numb 114. Puts in


Ongoing

Ye Olde Tyme Quilters meet at 10 a.m. on Wednesdays at OPTIONS for Independence, The Heritage Theatre presents “The Best 1095 N. Main St. Lunch will follow. Prices will vary. For more information or to schedule free Christmas Pageant Ever!” at 7:30 p.m. on transportation, contact Royella at 753-5353 ext Mondays, Fridays and Saturdays through Dec. 18 at 2505 S. Hwy 89, Perry. Matinees 105. at 2 p.m. on Dec. 11 and 18. Tickets are $9 The Post-Mormon Community’s Cache Valfor adults; $8 for children. Call for reservations Monday and Wednesday through Sat- ley chapter meets every Sunday at 6:30 p.m. This non-sectarian organization is made up of individuurday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., 723-8392. als and families who have left Mormonism. The Cache Valley chapter meets for dinner and social The Old Barn Community Theatre izing at a local restaurant, every Sunday evening presents “A Christmas Carol” at 7:30 p.m. on Mondays, Fridays and Saturdays through at 6:30 PM. We welcome newcomers! For more information call Jeff at 770-4263, or go to www. Dec. 18. Matinees at 2:30 p.m. on Dec. 11 and Dec. 18. The theater is located at 3605 postmormon.org/logan.

Local author Daniel Bingham will sign copies of his book “Big Sky Consortium” from 5 to 9 p.m. on Friday at Hastings, 50 E. 400 North. Stokes Nature Center invites toddlers, ages 2 to 3, to join them for Parent Tot from 10 to 11 a.m. on Friday. Explore animals, plants, and nature through music, crafts and games. This program is parent interactive, and all toddlers must have a parent present to participate and explore along with their child. The program fee is $3 ($2.50 for SNC members). To register, call 755-3239 or e-mail nature@logannature.org.

Bigler Road, Collinston. Tickets are $8 for adults and $7 for children and seniors. For more information, go to www.oldbarn.org.

Four Paws Rescue is having their Christmas Adoption Event from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday at the Logan Petsmart. Kittens and cats available for adoption. Free treats and samples are also available.  Adopters will receive free coupons for free food and litter, plus donated toys and other supplies. To preview some of the cats, visit www.4paws.petfinder.org, or check them out on Facebook at fourpawsrescuelogan,utah-thecatslair.

Pickleville Playhouse’s new musical “Santa’s Elves: A North Pole Musical,” will be staged at 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 17, 18, 20, and 23 with a 3 p.m. matinee on Dec. 23. The show will be at USU’s Eccles Conference Center. An optional holiday buffet meal catered by The Copper Mill is available before each performance. Tickets can be purchased by calling 755-0968. Show-only ticket prices are $16 for adults; $10 for children 11 years and under. Dinner and show prices are $32 and $19 respectively. Discounted pricing available for company/office groups and groups of 25 people or more. Join dentists Keith Hammond and Celeste Mortenson in donating non-perishable food items to Cache Valley Food Bank. Through Dec. 22, bring your donations to their office, 290 N. 200 East.

Brigham City’s Fine Arts Center is seeking people who are interested in a storytelling group. Call 435-723-0740 to be on the group e-mail list for meeting times. Also contact the center if you are interested in telling Halloween tales or for information about local storytellers who can perform at youth meetings or parties.

The Knotty Knitters meet from 6:15 to 8:30 p.m. on Thursdays at the Senior Citizens Center. Come in through the south doors by the dining The Multicultural Center of Cache Valley room. Come knit, crochet, or spin. For more inforwill host a Latino Family Christmas Party at mation, contact Cathy at 752-3923. 5 p.m. on Saturday at Club New York Event Center, 399 N. Main St. Come for music, food, Mom or Dad & Me sessions are held from 10 karaoke, raffles and children’s activities. Dance to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays at at 8 p.m. Cost is $10 for adults, $5 for kids age the Eccles Ice Center, 2825 N. 200 East. For $6 4-12, $1 for kids age 3 and under. Proceeds go a session, pre-school age children skate for free to the Multicultural Center of Cache Valley and with a paying adult and receive a complimentary Union Bilingual Preschool. For more information hot chocolate. Call 787-2288 or visit www.ecclecall 753-8486 or visit www.mccutah.org. sice.com for more information.

“Out of the Blue” entertainment puts on a changing weekly show of improv comedy, sketch comedy, stand-up comedy, stunt comedy and The Utah State Courts is offering a free class each month for children 9- to -12-years puppet-prov at 9:30 p.m. on Saturdays at the Brigham City Fine Arts Center, 58 S. 100 West. old whose parents have filed for divorce or Ticket price is $5 at the door. whose parents are divorced. There is no charge to attend the class, which is offered from 3:30 to 5 p.m. the last Thursday of the month at the Cache County Courthouse, 135 N. 100 West. For more information, call 750 Tracing Yesterday with Antiem and The 1300 or go to www.utcourts.gov and click on Never Ending Summer will perform alternative/ Divorce Education Classes. rock music at 8 p.m. on Friday at Why Sound, 30 Federal Ave. Cost is $5. The Eccles Ice Center offers Family Night from 5:30 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. on Mon A tour of six of Cache Valley’s finest homes, days at the center, 2825 N. 200 East, North decorated for the season and filled with live Logan. Up to eight people can skate for music by local artists will be held from 5 to 9 p.m. $30, including skates. Call 752-1170 for an on Friday. Finish the evening with a performance updated, daily schedule as times are subject by the Cache Children’s Choir’s Cantate choir to change. For more information, call 787and warm refreshments. Tickets are $10 per per2288. son and are available at Lee’s Marketplace (555 Sunshine Terrace Wellness Center and E. 1400 North and 850 S. Main St, Smithfield) or at www.cachechildrenschoir.org. BRAG are offering “Mighty Me” workshops on brain health from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Thursdays at SST Wellness Center, 209 W. The Logan TaVaci School of Performing Arts will be performing at 7 p.m. on Friday at the Mor300 North. Classes are free of charge. Call gan Theater at USU. Admission is free. Allison at 713-1468 or the Wellness Center

Friday

at 752-9321 with any questions.

Saturday

The Westminster Bell Choir will have a christmas concert at 3 p.m. on Saturday at Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East, North Logan. For more information, call 7920353. The Utah Safety Council is offering a fourhour defensive driving course from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Saturday at the Sheriff’s Complex, second floor. Cost is $40 per person, $10 for those 55 and older who are seeking a reduction in their insurance rate. For additional information or to register, contact the Utah Safety Council at 800-933-5943 or visit www.utahsafetycouncil. org. A silent auction of paintings by artiist Sean Wallis will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. on Saturday at the Dansante Building, 59 S. 100 West.

Monday The Whittier Community Center and the Cache Valley Volunteer Center are hosting a family friendly holiday movie night featuring “Borrowed Hearts” on Monday at the Whittier Center, 290 N. 400 East. Caroling and a service project at 6:30 p.m.; the movies begins at 7 p.m. Bring blankets, pillows and a donation of $1 per person. For more information, contact The Whittier Center at 7539008 or The Volunteer Center at 554-8270.

The National Alliance on Mental Health, A weekly Peace Vigil is held from 5:30 to Cache Valley Affiliate, is having a Christmas Open House from 6:30 to 8 p.m. on Friday at the 6 p.m. on Fridays on the east side of Main A Kevin Kula Christmas Concert will be Street between Center St and 100 North. For NAMI office, 90 E. 200 North. Call 787-4165 or eheld at 7 p.m. on Monday at the Prince of Peace more information, e-mail info@loganpeace. mail cachevalley@namiut.org for more informaLutheran Church, 930 N. 400 West. The event will tion. org or call 755-5137.

benefit Cache Humane Society. Free. Donations for Cache Humane are appreciated. The Smithfield Summit Camp of Daughters of Utah Pioneers will hold a meeting and Christmas social at 12:30 p.m. on Monday at the Smithfield Senior Center. A luncheon will be served. Visitors welcome. The Daughter of Utah Pioneers Wm. B. Preston Camp will meet at 1 p.m. on Monday at the Sizzler Restaurant. The lesson will be given by Clair Hammond. Elizabeth Matthews Camp of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers will meet at 1:30 p.m. on Monday at the Coppermill Restaurant, 55 N. Main St. Hostesses are Madeline Barlow and Nikki Estada. Lesson by Ruth Ann Lewis and artifacts by Carolyn Wyatt. Bring a $5 gift for exchange.

Tuesday Join OPTIONS for Independence on a trip to see the lights at Willard Bay and dinner at 5 p.m. on Tuesday. Dinner prices will vary. This activity is part of the Community Integration Program at OPTIONS for Independence which encourages people with disabilities to take part in the variety of activities. To sign up, schedule transportation or for more information, contact Mandie at 753-5353 ext. 108. The Cache Valley Gluten Intolerance Group will have a meeting at 7 p.m. on Tuesday at Logan Regional Hospital. The event is a gluten free cookie exchange. Bring two dozen GF cookies to share. For more information, e-mail CacheValleyGIG@gmail.com.

Wednesday Scott Bradley hosts a weekly class on the Constitution titled “To Preserve The Nation” at 7 p.m. on Wednesdays upstairs at the BookTable. There is no charge. For more information, call 753-2930 or 753-8844.

Thursday A “Messiah” Sing-Along will take place at 7 p.m. on Thursday at the Logan Arthouse and Cinema. Admission is non-perishable food or personal hygiene items. A few scores will be available to borrow; singers are encouraged to bring their own scores.

New online ‘Happenings’ calendar at hjnews.com Keep up with area events and submit your own using the new calendar feature at hjnews.com. It’s easy to find. Just look for it at the top of the homepage.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, December 17, 2010

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Page 16 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, December 17, 2010

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Cache Magazine  

Cache Valley's arts and entertainment magazine