Page 1

Step by Step Artist Colleen Howe savors the scene before beginning her creations. The Herald Journal

Nov. 5-11, 2010


Page 2 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, November 5, 2010

Cache The Herald Journal’s

Arts & Entertainment Calendar

What’s inside this week (Page 11) USU’s Museum of Anthropology highlights Egypt

Magazine

On the cover:

Colleen Howe discusses her artwork during an interview with Lance Frazier. Read about Howe’s artistic process on page 8. Photo by Eli Lucero/Herald Journal

From the editor HIS WEEK WAS A LITTLE T like Christmas here at Cache Magazine. On Tuesday, I unexpectedly

received a massive package in the mail that turned out to be full of toys. There was Thomas the Tank Engine complete with track, a pirate-themed Lego set, dragonthemed Lego set and plastic bear that you can draw on with markers. The bounty came courtesy of a company in Canada that was hoping Cache Magazine would review their products. As we don’t have anyone on the toy-testing beat here, that left me with the question of what to do with all this stuff. Of course, the Journalist Code Of Honor (JCOH) prevents me from taking it home for myself. Yeah, I made up the JCOH, but it’s true that reporters are committed to not being swayed by outside influences, including free toys. All we really have is our integrity

Slow Wave

Get your gingerbread on

(Page 5)

(Page 4) kburgess@hjnews.com

— though it is admittedly tempting to sometimes set it aside and pick up some cool Legos. In any case, since I can’t accept these swag shipments myself, I’ve decided to pass along the particularly droolworthy stuff to you, Cache Magazine’s readers. In December, look for an entry form to win the toy collection, which has a retail value of $135 according to the company’s press release. This will be my second giveaway after last week’s package of tickets, CDs and posters for two country acts — the Nashville Tribute Band and Due West. Wellsville mom Kaylene Ames won the gift pack and took her 12-year-old son, Jackson, to both shows. Jackson is a straight-A student, Green Day fan and musician who needed to attend a concert for a band class requirement. I was glad to help. Kaylene wrote back that they’d had a great time, which was even more satisfying than keeping the swag for myself. — Kim Burgess Cache Magazine editor

Books .......................p.13 Crossword.................p.14

Buddy movie madness: Aaron reviews ‘Due Date’

(Page 7)

Cute

Martha Graham dancers to perform

pet photo of the week

This dog is available for adoption! Pet: Blacky From: Cache Humane Why he’s so lovable: Small and compact, Blacky is very friendly and playful with children and would love a family to snuggle with. He is an inside/outside boy who would improve his housetraining skills with consistency, timing and a doggie-door. He is at that age where he is eager to learn and please. With striking tri-color coat and sparkling personality, he is an excellent candidate to be a great family pet. To learn more about Blacky, call 792-3920. Dog adoption fees starts at $100.

Slow Wave is created from real people’s dreams as drawn by Jesse Reklaw. Ask Jesse to draw your dream! Visit www.slowwave.com to find out how.


Kuss Quartet next for Chamber society

T

together since 2001. That year HE CHAMBER they were invited to study at Music Society of Boston’s New England ConserLogan welcomes the vatory. In 2005 the ensemble acclaimed Kuss Quartet at accompanied German President 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. Horst Kohler on a visit to Israel 16, at Utah State University’s and gave an acclaimed concert in Performance Hall. Jerusalem. This Berlin-based string The quartet maintains close quartet is celebrated for exciting programs as well as sincere, hon- contact with young composers, accompanying them as they creest, captivating interpretations. ate their first works. The group The Houston Chronicle said the also visits schools, providing quartet demonstrates “provocaconcerts and tive, driving, discussions. impassioned “Provocative” They reguplaying. … The develop purity of sound “Impassioned” larly programs with was almost actors that bring heavenly.” ★ Who: Kuss Quartet together music The Kuss ★ When: 7:30 p.m. Nov. 16 and literature. Quartet offers ★ Where: Manon Caine RusTo begin their flawless sell-Kathryn Caine Wanlass Logan conensemble playPerformance Hall at USU cert the Kuss ing while grant★ Season tickets: Regular, Quartet will ing free rein $96; student, $40 play Mozart’s to each player. ★ Single concert tickets: “Quartet in BThe Musical Regular, $24; student, $10 flat Major, K Intelligencer ★ Single tickets can be pur458.” The piece describes the chased at the door prior to opens with the quartet’s greatthe concert, by visiting arts. jaunty Allegro usu.edu/htm/box-office or by est strength as calling 797-8022. vivace assai, “absolute preci★ More information: www. then continues sion of timing cmslogan.org through the that produces second movean uncanny ment’s lush harmonies. The Adatogetherness, fusing four indigio that follows is dominated by viduals into strongly connected a long theme in the first violin. members of one musical body.” In the final movement, Mozart Founded in 1991 when its concludes with a return to the members were still students, the opening mood and provides an Kuss Quartet began at Berlin’s enthusiastic finish. Hanns-Elisler Academy. Its The next two selections are current members have played

by influential rious calm, but composer concludes with Igor Stravina rhythmic, The Kuss Quartet will offer a master class for USU string stusky. The first energetic pulse. dents on Tuesday, Nov. 16, from 10:30 a.m. to noon at the USU selection, After Performance Hall. It is free and open to the public. Middle school “Three Pieces intermission, and high school students are encouraged to attend. This communifor String Tchaikovsky’s ty outreach is an opportunity for students to expand their horizons, Quartet,” “Quartet No. hone musical skills and build appreciation for classical music by was writ1 in D Major, working directly with some of the finest musicians in the industry. ten in 1914 Op. 11” will be and offers performed. This dissonant, eerie and dark, like a variety of Tchaikovsky a slow motion, trance-induced styles. “Danse” hints of Rusquartet begins with a gentle, setexperience. sian folk-tunes with colorful tling piece with satisfying harmoJust before intermission, Kuss ny and a spirited conclusion. The melody and swirling energy. Quartet will play Stravinsky’s “Excentrique” uses syncopated second movement, “Andante “Concertino,” a piece in one rhythm pushing into a rush of cantabile,” is very familiar. The movement. With vigorous wandering notes. “Pizzicato” last movement, “Finale: Allegro sound, this loud and fast syncho- giusto,” provides a lovely cliprovides bolts of sound and pated music tumbles to a mystedynamic quality. “Cantique” is max.

Quartet to conduct master class

Page 3 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, November 5, 2010

Rhythm

‘From the sublime to the impossible” HE CAINE COLLEGE T of the Arts presents the return of Grammy Award-winning guitarist Pat Donohue. The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 10, in the Performance Hall at Utah State University. Tickets are $15 for general admission; $5 for USU students with ID

and can be purchased at the Caine College of the Arts Box Office in the Chase Fine Arts Center, Room 139-B, or at the Caine College of the Arts Dean’s Office Box Office. Tickets can also be purchased online (arts.usu.edu) or by phone at 797-8022. Mike Christiansen, music

professor and director of guitar program at the Caine College of the Arts, called Donohue “an amazing guitarist and one of the most popular entertainers to visit Utah State University.” “His performances have excited audiences nationally, and we are proud to bring him

back,” Christiansen said. “With a music range from the sublime, to the impossible to the hilarious, it’s inspirational.” Donohue’s music is admired by professional musicians as well as the non-musicians throughout the world. His repertoire includes swing, jazz, bottleneck blues and folk.


Page 4 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, November 5, 2010

All mixed up

Graham company offers varied program HE CACHE VALLEY T Center for the Arts presents Martha Graham Dance

Company at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 12, and Saturday, Nov. 13, in the Ellen Eccles Theatre. Tickets are $26 to $38 with a wide variety of discounts for USU students, half off for kids ages 5 to 18 and 15 percent off for groups of 15 or more. Save 15 percent when you buy tickets to any four CVCA shows. No discounts will be available on the days of the shows. Tickets can be purchased online without any additional fees at www.EllenEcclesTheatre.org or at the Cache Valley Center for the Arts Ticket Office in the Bullen Center at 43 S. Main St. For over 85 years, the name Martha Graham has been synonymous with American modern dance. Featuring the Utah State University Orchestra, the Martha Graham Dance Company will perform one of Graham’s most beloved works, “Appalachian Spring.” The evening starts with a multimedia montage titled “Prelude and Revolt” that charts the era when dancer and choreographer Martha

Graham first began her revolution. This event connects several dances with projections and narration that add context to the years of discovery and rebellion. “Prelude and Revolt” begins with an arrangement of three solos that show the style of dance that Graham emerged out of and then rejected: “Gnossienne” (1917), “Tanagra” (1926) and “Incense” (1906.) These are followed by “Serenata Morisca” (1916), a sensual serenade that Graham performed as a star of the Greenwich Village Follies. The audience can experience theatrically the seismic shift that took place when that have a political message. the next solo was premiered: After intermission, the per“Lamentation” (1930). This formance continues with “Lamseminal solo contains the entation Variations,” three new essence of Graham’s innovadances that are connected to the tive new movement style and early years of Martha’s revoher pioneering use of fabric and stage design. “Steps in the lution. In 2007, the company Street” and “Prelude to Action” performed on the anniversary of 9/11. To commemorate the (1936), choreographed just a date, they commissioned three few years later, are examples important, young choreograof Graham’s growing impact. phers to create short dances for A response to the rise of fasthe company inspired by a film cism in Europe at the time, of Martha dancing “Lamentathey are among the few works tion.” The new works were so that Graham choreographed

Martha Graham Company dancer will present public master class The Martha Graham Dance Company will hold a master class from 6 to 7 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 11. The instructor will be Denise Vale, senior artistic associate. Cost is $7 per individual. Space is limited to 15. Register at the CVCA Ticket Office or call 752-0026 for details. For more information, go to www.marthagraham.org.

well received that they have toured the world since as part of the company’s repertory. Program and dancers subject to change. The evening concludes with “Appalachian Spring,” which premiered in 1944. Aaron Copland composed his Pulitzer Prize winning score in close collaboration with Graham and the renowned sculptor Isamu Noguchi, who designed the onstage set. The three collaborators set our to create a work about the optimism and determination of America. They considered the “dance/drama” to be their contribution to the war effort. This special performance will be accompanied by the

Utah State University Orchestra. “These two performances will remind our audiences that Martha Graham’s classic works deliver a theatrical experience as powerful and as moving as when they were created,” said Wally Bloss, executive director for the Cache Valley Center for the Arts. “We are proud to route this production back to Utah so that our audience members can enjoy some of the greatest 20th Century masterworks of American dance, performed by some of the most powerful 21st Century artist-athletes in the world today.” For more information on the Cache Valley Center for the Arts, visit www.CacheArts.org. For more on the Graham Company, go to http://marthagraham. org.

Two USU Press books recognized at Utah Book Awards

T

WO BOOKS FROM USU Press were finalists in the recent Utah Book Award competition, and one, “Comb Ridge and Its People: The Ethnohistory of a Rock,” won the award in the nonfiction category. “A River Knows Everything: Desolation Canyon and the Green” by James M. Aton was a finalist in the nonfiction category as well. “Comb Ridge and Its People” explores a unique 100-milelong, 200-foot-high serrated cliff and the human cul-

tures it has defined in a small section of the Colorado Plateau. Author Robert McPherson, a history professor at Utah State University — College of Eastern Utah, described his award-

winning book as providing “a glimpse of what this corner of Utah holds and can teach us all about the human experience.” “Writing about this kaleidoscope of history, culture and place has been a rewarding experience that, for me, has fostered a love for the land and those who lived there,” he said. Southern Utah is a land of many contrasts — not just from the sands of the desert to the alpine flora, but also its different cultures — Ancestral Puebloans, Utes, Paiutes, Navajos and Anglos, he said.

John Alley, executive editor theme or setting. Established at USU Press, acknowledged in 1999, the award was prethe award and the efforts of all sented to one book. Since then, involved in the process at USU. categories have been added “The award not only reflects in fiction, nonfiction, poetry the great work by professor and literature for children and McPherson, but also our staff young adults. members and their efforts to The 2009 Utah Book Award continually produce high-qualwinners include Peter Rock, ity books,” Alley said. “My Abandonment,” fiction; The Utah Book Award is Robert S. McPherson, “Comb sponsored by the Salt Lake Ridge and Its People,” nonficCity Library and the Utah Cen- tion; Lance Larsen, “Backyard ter for the Book. The award Alchemy,” poetry; Sara Zarr, honors achievements by Utah “Once Was Lost,” young adult writers who produce excepliterature; and Brandon Mull, tional literature having a Utah “Pingo,” literature for children.


Utah State professor to lecture on Egypt AVID LANCY, AN D anthropology professor at Utah State Univer-

sity and expert on ancient Egypt, is the next guest in the Museum of Anthropology’s Saturdays at the Museum Series. Lancy presents a lecture at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 6, focusing on the importance of the afterlife to ancient Egyptians. Activities for adults and children take place throughout the day. Guest can learn how to write their names in hieroglyphics, start an apple mummy and make gold bracelets. “This event will be a great way to learn about ancient Egypt,” said Aurora Durfee, a Saturdays program planner. “Dr. Lancy’s lecture will be full of interesting facts about the afterlife, and our activities should be lots of fun for the whole family.”

Healing sounds Hypnotic hilarity M

USICIAN KEVIN Kula presents “An Evening to Remember” at 7 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 12 at the Utah Festival Opera Building/ Dansante, 59 S. 100 West. Tickets are $12 and are available at www.kevinkula. net or by calling 757-0335 or e-mailing info@kevinkula.net. Kula and his group will perform his own composi-

tions for piano and full orchestra, along with wellknown Broadway, inspirational, and popular songs. A performer since he was 8 years old, Kula began composing at age 15. He believes music is one of the greatest gifts that God has given to us. His CDs include “Music That Heals the Soul” and “Spirit of Utah.” For more information, go to www.kevinkula.net.

LEAN HYPNOTIST” “C Kerry Sharp will perform at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 6, at the

Logan Arthouse and Cinema, 795 N. Main St. Tickets are $5 at the door, general admission. Families are encouraged to come. For nine years, Sharp has presented a new show every time he has taken the stage. What keeps his work fresh and exciting is the nearly infinite power of the mind, and what can happen when the mind is open to suggestion. He performs a comedy hypnosis show with volunteers from the audience who become the stars. High-energy, hilarious and always in good, clean taste (PG rated). The true magic of his show is

seeing people experience the amazing side of their imagination. The subconscious mind is revealed in a powerful and entertaining way. Volunteers are always treated with respect. Sharp has entertained audiences all over the country, appearing at fairs, high schools, college and universities, as well as corporate events. He has also performed on TV and radio. For more information, go to www.cleanhypnotist. com.

The Museum of Anthropology is open six days a week, with regular hours Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free. For Saturday activities, free parking is available in the adjacent lot, south of the building. The USU Museum of Anthropology is on the USU campus in the south turret of the historic Old Main building Room 252. Funding for Saturday events is provided by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services. The Museum of Anthropology is part of the Anthropology Program at USU. For more information on this event, call museum staff at 797-7545 or visit the museum website (anthromuseum.usu.edu).

Page 5 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, November 5, 2010

All mixed up


Page 6 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, November 5, 2010

Film Still playing “Red” Rated PG-13 ★★ This spy caper admirably rejects the frenzy of many modern action thrillers, slowing things down to a digestible pace appropriate for vintage-bordering-on-geriatric heroes Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Helen Mirren. Yet despite the impressive cast, which includes Mary-Louise Parker, Richard Dreyfuss and Ernest Borgnine, this latest adaptation of a hip graphic novel fails to fill in the spaces between the action with anything terribly interesting. Director Robert Schwentke aims for a mix of action and comedy but never quite delivers on either. The action is OK, though nothing you haven’t seen done better a hundred times before, while the laughs are slight and sporadic, the filmmakers unable to generate enough clever interplay among the story’s band of ex-CIA operatives targeted for elimination. It’s a missed opportunity, given Willis’ cool-underfire comic charms and the brilliant co-stars off whom he could have been bouncing better wisecracks. PG-13 for intense sequences of action violence and brief strong language. 111 minutes. “Secretariat” Rated PG ★★1⁄2 In a world of inspiring real-life sports stories, the tale of Secretariat is one of a kind. It’s too bad the Hollywood version about the racehorse is just another one of the pack. Director Randall Wallace and his team do what the horse and its caretakers never did on the way to Triple Crown glory in 1973. They play it safe, offering a classy but standard Disney-fication of the tale, whose thrilling race scenes are offset by some of the blandest “you can do it if you try” dialogue you’re likely to encounter on film. Cheery performances from Diane Lane as the housewife-turned-horseowner and John Malkovich as Secretariat’s oddball trainer help rein in some of the movie’s sentimental excesses. Still, the movie has exhilarating

cast includes Andrew Garfield (the new Spiderman), Justin Timberlake and Armie Hammer playing a set of twins. One of the year’s best films. PG-13 for sexual content, drug and alcohol use and language. 120 minutes.

“Paranormal Activity 2” Rated R ★1⁄2 If there was any lesson to draw from the first “Paranormal Activity,” it’s that men should take their girlfriends’ concerns seriously, especially when it comes to encounters with the demonic. The sequel follows similar gender lines, as a family of four (Sprague Grayden and Brian Bolden play the parents) wilt under the threat of a haunting demon in their house. The film is the slightly Hollywood-ized sequel to “Paranormal Activity,” which used a shoestring budget for moments, especially the re-creation of Secretariat’s Belmont Stakes finale. PG for brief mild language. 116 minutes. “The Social Network” Rated PG-13 ★★★★ Facebook was created to allow people to share mundane updates and observations immediately. But the origin tale of Facebook itself is filled with high drama, betrayal and rage — just one of the many fascinating contradictions that make “The Social Network” so smart, meaty and compulsively watchable. Director David Fincher and writer Aaron Sorkin have gotten together to create an epic tale about how we’re able to tell the world about the tiniest details of our lives; they depict potentially dry, unwieldy topics — computer coding and competing lawsuits — and they do it in an intimate way. These are two guys who

a “Blair Witch”-like hit. Tod Williams (“The Door in the Floor”) has been brought in to direct the script by Michael R. Perry and Oren Peli, who wrote and directed the first film. Most everything we see is from surveillance cameras, a perspective that gives the film’s frights a naturalism, but most everything else a boringness. This is a subtle demon who likes to take its time, and express itself through haunted interior design. Beware of the kitchen cabinets. R for some language and brief violent material. 91 minutes aren’t exactly checking their smart phones constantly for new friend requests, but “The Social Network” represents the best of what they do: Fincher’s mastery of fluid, visual storytelling, Sorkin’s knack for crisp, biting dialogue. It’s sharp, funny and tense, has great energy and pulsates with the thrill of discovery. Facebook creator Mark Zuckerberg is the biggest contradiction of all: a socially inept guy who came up with a revolutionary way for others to connect, a hugely inventive genius who’s also depicted as being small, petty and backstabbing. Jesse Eisenberg rises beautifully to the challenge of portraying an unlikable protagonist and making us feel engaged by him — or even want to see him succeed, depending on your perspective. And perspective is everything here. The excellent supporting

“Saw 3D” Rated R (10%) A review for “Saw 7” was not available from The Associated Press. In lieu, please accept this synopsis from www. RottenTomatoes.com: “The Saw series continues with this seventh entry, spearheaded by director Kevin Greutert. Marcus Dunstan and Patrick Melton also are back to pen the script, which details the ongoing exploits of long-dead serial killer Jigsaw and the people who continue his gruesome morality lessons. Sloppily filmed, poorly acted and illogically plotted, ‘Saw 3D’ leaves viewers trapped in the most lackluster installment of the series.” R for sequences of grisly bloody violence and torture and language 91 min. “You Again” Rated PG ★1⁄2 Really, the women of “You Again” should just get over it. They should move on from the resentments, jealousies and grudges they’ve held onto since high school and embrace the people they’ve become today — even if what they’ve developed into are stock characters in a lame, PG-rated comedy. Instead, they try and tear each other apart in the most crass, slapsticky manner possible. “You Again” perpetuates all the worst cliches about women being insecure and cruel, and it does it in the name of comedy — which is a problem, because it’s pretty much never funny. Kristen Bell stars as a former nerd whose older brother is marrying the mean girl (Odette Yustman) who tormented her in high school. Coincidentally, Bell’s mom (Jamie Lee Curtis) and Yustman’s aunt (Sigourney Weaver) are former high school best friends who had an ugly falling out over 30 years ago. Jokes are telegraphed from a mile away and characters have

well-timed epiphanies. PG for brief mild language and rude behavior. 105 minutes. “Life As We Know It” Rated PG-13 ★★ Katherine Heigl has again been saddled with an unexpected baby, only this time, no one calls her parenting mate a schlub. Unlike Heigl’s “Knocked Up” co-star, Seth Rogen, Josh Duhamel is emphatically in her league. In “Life As We Know It,” they have a good and believable chemistry as opposites pushed together through fate. Heigl and Duhamel have handsome moviestar presences and keep the movie entertaining, even though its familiar story passes with nothing to distinguish itself from the many other similarly plotted films and sitcoms. They play godparents to mutual friends, who die suddenly. Guardianship of their baby girl is left to the pair, even though they hate each other. Everything from there proceeds exactly as you’d expect: some combination of antics with diapers, anxious speeches over kitchen sinks and — Spoiler Alert!! — gradual heartwarming toward each other and their new makeshift family. With Sarah Burns and Melissa McCarthy as candid onlookers. PG-13 for sexual material, language and some drug content. 115 minutes. “Hereafter” Rated PG-13 (50%) A review for “Hereafter” was not available from The Associated Press. In lieu, please accept this synopsis from www. RottenTomatoes.com: “A supernatural thriller centered on three people — a blue-collar American, a French journalist and a London school boy — who are touched by death in different ways. Despite a thought-provoking premise and Clint Eastwood’s typical flair as director, ‘Hereafter’ fails to generate much compelling drama, straddling the line between poignant sentimentality and hokey tedium.” PG-13 for mature thematic elements including disturbing disaster and accident images, and for brief strong language. 126 min. — All reviews by The Associated Press


B

UDDY ROAD trip comedies are a dime a dozen nowadays. A duo or group of guys sets off across By Aaron Peck country and wacky hijinks ensue. They inevitably find themselves tangling with nefarious characters and after a while the law. There’s usually a normal guy who’s surrounded by idiocy as his friends end up causing most of his problems, but that’s where “Due Date� differs. Here we have two people that cause an equal amount of trouble for themselves. This isn’t just one man’s doing; they’re both to blame. “Due Date� Peter Highman (Robert Rated R Downey Jr.) is a narcissistic jerk with an anger problem. He’s one of all cell phones and other those people that must electronic devices Peter correct anything and is still found texting his everything someone is wife. Ethan confronts doing wrong. He gets Peter and asks him to turn in people’s faces and off the phone because doesn’t back down until people may think that he unavoidably finds out he’s using it to trigger a that he’s just inserted “bomb� like “terrorists� his foot into his mouth do. After a scuffle with for the hundredth time. the air marshal, Peter Ethan Tremblay (Zach Galifianakis) is a budding finds out he’s been thrown off the plane without his young actor who is comluggage or wallet. He’s pletely oblivious to the now stuck, and to make world around him. He’s got no sense of other Action! people, personal space or what is socially acceptable behavior. 2297 N. Main The two men meet at MOVIE HOTLINE 753-6444 an airport accidentally ALL SEATS ALL TIMES $3.00 OpEN SuNday-FRIday aT 3:45pM and end up switching OpEN SaTuRday aT 11:30aM FOR OuR MaTINEES carry-on bags at curbside INcEpTION (PG-13) TOy STORy 3 through a slight mix-up. (G) 4:30 6:40 & 9:25 On the plane they end up Saturday Matinee 11:45 & 2:05 sitting close to one anothTHE OTHER guyS (PG-13) er. Peter is on his way LEgENd OF THE 7:15 & 9:40 home to see his wife give guaRdIaNS (PG) 4:45 birth to their first child. aLpHa & OMEga Saturday Matinee (PG) 4:15 Ethan is making his way 12:15 & 2:30 Saturday Matinee 12:00 & 2:15 to “Hollywood� to make it big in acting. EaSy a (PG-13) WaLLSTREET: 5:00, 7:30 & 9:45 After the announceSaturday Matinee MONEy NEVER 12:30 & 2:45 ment is made to turn off (PG-13) 7:00 & 9:30

The Reel Place

★★★

matters worse he’s ended up on the No Fly List. We already know it’s going to happen. As Peter tries to rent a car without ID or a credit card, Ethan drives up in his newly rented car offering him a ride. And so it begins. What follows is your generic road trip story, but director Todd Phillips (“The Hangover�) is able to inject some much needed charm and some hilari-

ous situations to distract from the fact that we’ve seen this type of movie numerous times. Sure at times the situations the guys find themselves in are so completely farfetched that it almost pull us out of the movie, but the characters are so well-rounded and so well-defined that we care what happens to them. Peter is a jerk, but “he’s working on it.� He really

1-":*/(/07&.#&3 .07*&)05-*/&

45"%*6.

8/1307*%&/$&

DUE DATE (R)

1:15 3:15 5:15 7:15 9:15

RED (PG-13)

12:35 2:50 5:05 7:20 9:35

HEREAFTER (PG-13) 12:45 3:45 6:30 9:05

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2 (R) 1:30 3:30 5:30 7:30 9:30

MEGAMIND in 3D (PG)

6/*7&34*5:

/& #&)*/%)0.&%&105 .*%/*()54)08'3*4"5

RED

(PG-13)

12:30 2:45 5:00 7:15 9:30

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2 1:05 3:05 5:05 7:05 9:05 SATURDAY NO 1:05 SHOWING

SAW 7 in Digital 3D

(R)

(R)

1:25 3:25 5:25 7:25 9:25

DUE DATE

(R)

1:10 3:10 5:10 7:10 9:10

MEGAMIND (3D)

(PG)

12:40 2:40 4:40 6:40 8:40

SECRETARIAT

(PG)

12:35 3:30 6:35 9:15

1:00 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00

.07*&445"%*6.

12:50 2:50 4:50 6:50 8:50

MEGAMIND (PG)

MEGAMIND in 2D (PG) SECRETARIAT (PG) 1:10 4:00 6:50 9:20

YOU AGAIN (PG)

12:30 2:40 4:50 7:00 9:10

HARRY POTTER TICKETS NOW AVAILBLE AT STADIUM 8 AND UNIVERSITY 6

/035)."*/

4:30 6:30 FRI/SAT 8:30

SOCIAL NETWORK

4:05 6:35 FRI/SAT 9:05

(PG-13)

IT'S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY (PG-13) 4:15 6:40 FRI/SAT 9:00

DESPICABLE ME (PG) 4:10 6:50 FRI/SAT 9:10

LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) 4:05 6:45 FRI/SAT 9:10

GIFT BOOKS AND CARDS AVAILABLE BUY TICKETS ONLINE AT WWW.MOVIESWEST.COM

is. Ethan is lost in a world of his own disillusion-

ment, but somehow he is able to bring Peter into reality. He is able to make Peter forget of his selfish ways. Character growth in an R-rated road trip comedy? Well I never! Above all “Due Date� is extremely funny. Yes, it can be over-the-top at times, but tons of people loved “The Hangover� and there’s nothing in here that isn’t any less believable than a group of guys stealing one of Mike Tyson’s tigers. Robert Downey is the perfect person for the role. In a role that would be so easy to mail-in, Downey makes it known that whatever role he’s in he’s one of the best actors in Hollywood right now. Well, that’s until Ethan Tremblay takes the town by storm.

Page 7 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, November

‘Due Date’ a charming road trip movie


Step by Step Artist Colleen Howe savors the scene before beginning her creations. When Colleen Howe comes across a vista that inspires her to paint, she doesn’t immediately envision the final product. Instead, she see possibilities. A cheery red barn may become gray; green trees may turn blue; and the blue sky may be rendered in yellow. It’s all part of Howe’s interpretation of the scene, which is often based as much on what’s left out as what’s included. When she works from a photo, spent choosing the (pastel) sticks for instance, she carefully pares that work well together” — she down the number of elements to embarks on producing the final simplify the final product. product in a larger size. “Photos usually lie,” she said. Howe’s work is displayed in “There’s usually way too much galleries in Jackson Hole, Park stuff going on, and if you try to City and St. George, as well as include it all (in a painting), you here in Logan. To support and end up with too much going on.” promote the local art scene, she and other valley artists are offer Howe’s pieces tend to include few objects rendered in carefully ing a lecture series titled “Art considered, coordinated hues. Institute of Cache Valley.” Howe That’s why many people conwill present the first installment, sider her a “colorist,” she said. “Demystifying the Painting Pro“I just feel it’s cess,” at The Art Art Center hosts so important to Center in downhave beautiful Logan on new lecture series town harmony.” Thursday, Nov. 18, followed by She also The Art Center at 25 W. 100 North, Logan, will host works through a presentation a free lecture series by each painting by portrait artlocal artists beginning at in painstaking ist and religious 7 p.m. Nov. 18, when Coldetail, usually illustrator Doc leen Howe will talk about starting with Christensen on “Demystifying the Painting a black-andFriday, Dec. 3. Process,” and continuing white drawing, The series will at 6 p.m. Dec. 3 with a then moving run through presentation by Doc Chrison to create April, according tensen. To view Howe’s several smallto Eugene Needwork, go to www.colleenish versions ham, who owns howe.com. of the piece in The Art Center. slightly varying “I like to teach colors. Once people how to she settles on a color combinatake an idea ... and turn it into tion — “50 percent of my time is a thoughtful piece of artwork,”

Howe said. The presenting artists “want to draw the public to The Art Center, and people who want to further the understanding of fine art and the painting process, and sculpture.” She sees being an artist as “a calling; one way I can express something about form and color that is hopefully pleasing to the people who see it.” To her students — Howe also teaches art classes — she hopes to impart the steps that go into creating that final product. That doesn’t mean that she expects them all to mimic her practices, but she does intend to teach them “how to solve problems before making a painting.” “Every artist’s process is dif-

ferent,” she said. “A lot don’t go through all these steps. I enjoy the process, so I don’t rush toward the end result. “A lot of artists focus on the end result and don’t realize how important it is to enjoy the process. If you don’t really think about what you’re doing from the beginning, you might end up copying something instead of interpreting it and making it your own. And there’s a big difference between copying something as an artist and interpreting something into art.” That’s why Howe ends up with purple grass sometimes, while other times her pieces reflect the actual colors of mountains, sky and fall foliage. Or at least what

the actual colors seem to be to the untrained eye. Howe tells her students that painting is “not this mystical, magical thing that just happens,” but a series of steps that can be followed even by raw beginners. “To create a successful piece of art there are things that need to be done first.” During class she invites students to help her choose color combinations as she roughs out a picture. She explains how to use “warm” and “cool” colors, and which color combinations work best. The best thing about such discussions? There is no wrong answer. “As long as you stick to the color patterns I chose to begin with, it doesn’t matter,” she said, pointing at one of her oil paintings resting on an easel. “If I have a gold here, I’ll probably need a violet next to it. It’ll be very warm right here and get cooler as it goes away from us.” Or she could have gone with different colors. That’s the beauty of Howe’s process.

Story by Lance Frazier Photos by Eli Lucero


Step by Step Artist Colleen Howe savors the scene before beginning her creations. When Colleen Howe comes across a vista that inspires her to paint, she doesn’t immediately envision the final product. Instead, she see possibilities. A cheery red barn may become gray; green trees may turn blue; and the blue sky may be rendered in yellow. It’s all part of Howe’s interpretation of the scene, which is often based as much on what’s left out as what’s included. When she works from a photo, spent choosing the (pastel) sticks for instance, she carefully pares that work well together” — she down the number of elements to embarks on producing the final simplify the final product. product in a larger size. “Photos usually lie,” she said. Howe’s work is displayed in “There’s usually way too much galleries in Jackson Hole, Park stuff going on, and if you try to City and St. George, as well as include it all (in a painting), you here in Logan. To support and end up with too much going on.” promote the local art scene, she and other valley artists are offer Howe’s pieces tend to include few objects rendered in carefully ing a lecture series titled “Art considered, coordinated hues. Institute of Cache Valley.” Howe That’s why many people conwill present the first installment, sider her a “colorist,” she said. “Demystifying the Painting Pro“I just feel it’s cess,” at The Art Art Center hosts so important to Center in downhave beautiful Logan on new lecture series town harmony.” Thursday, Nov. 18, followed by She also The Art Center at 25 W. 100 North, Logan, will host works through a presentation a free lecture series by each painting by portrait artlocal artists beginning at in painstaking ist and religious 7 p.m. Nov. 18, when Coldetail, usually illustrator Doc leen Howe will talk about starting with Christensen on “Demystifying the Painting a black-andFriday, Dec. 3. Process,” and continuing white drawing, The series will at 6 p.m. Dec. 3 with a then moving run through presentation by Doc Chrison to create April, according tensen. To view Howe’s several smallto Eugene Needwork, go to www.colleenish versions ham, who owns howe.com. of the piece in The Art Center. slightly varying “I like to teach colors. Once people how to she settles on a color combinatake an idea ... and turn it into tion — “50 percent of my time is a thoughtful piece of artwork,”

Howe said. The presenting artists “want to draw the public to The Art Center, and people who want to further the understanding of fine art and the painting process, and sculpture.” She sees being an artist as “a calling; one way I can express something about form and color that is hopefully pleasing to the people who see it.” To her students — Howe also teaches art classes — she hopes to impart the steps that go into creating that final product. That doesn’t mean that she expects them all to mimic her practices, but she does intend to teach them “how to solve problems before making a painting.” “Every artist’s process is dif-

ferent,” she said. “A lot don’t go through all these steps. I enjoy the process, so I don’t rush toward the end result. “A lot of artists focus on the end result and don’t realize how important it is to enjoy the process. If you don’t really think about what you’re doing from the beginning, you might end up copying something instead of interpreting it and making it your own. And there’s a big difference between copying something as an artist and interpreting something into art.” That’s why Howe ends up with purple grass sometimes, while other times her pieces reflect the actual colors of mountains, sky and fall foliage. Or at least what

the actual colors seem to be to the untrained eye. Howe tells her students that painting is “not this mystical, magical thing that just happens,” but a series of steps that can be followed even by raw beginners. “To create a successful piece of art there are things that need to be done first.” During class she invites students to help her choose color combinations as she roughs out a picture. She explains how to use “warm” and “cool” colors, and which color combinations work best. The best thing about such discussions? There is no wrong answer. “As long as you stick to the color patterns I chose to begin with, it doesn’t matter,” she said, pointing at one of her oil paintings resting on an easel. “If I have a gold here, I’ll probably need a violet next to it. It’ll be very warm right here and get cooler as it goes away from us.” Or she could have gone with different colors. That’s the beauty of Howe’s process.

Story by Lance Frazier Photos by Eli Lucero


Page 10 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, November 5, 2010

The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board

Festival Chorus celebrates vets

T “Oh My Dear Boy” by Aubrey Pirtle, Age 12 Oh dear boy please come here, Come here and dry my tear. Oh dear boy come hear my cry, Living in fear that you may die. Oh dear boy come and see my face, Oh let me plead my case. Oh dear boy come here and hold me tight, Come, and help me stop this fight. Oh dear boy how I missed you so, While you were gone, no one was friend but my foe. Oh dear boy come and rub my feet, For they feel awfully beat. For all days I walked looking for you, In the end I found it too hard to be true, That you were gone and the fear of you never coming back, Felt like a knife jabbed into my back. And now dear boy seeing you here, I can’t help but to shed a tear. Oh dear boy you have conquered my fear, Now come dear boy, come and dry my tears. Hear me know dear boy, never again shall you leave, For I am just beginning to feel relived. What an awful thing is war! It’s like a huge, gigantic boar. For it is a creature everyone fears, And makes us all shed fearful tears. Oh my dear boy what a blessing it is to have you home unharmed, And your coat so very well charmed. Oh dear boy I’m so glad you’re home, That’s why I’ve written you this long, sweet poem. Oh dear boy I’ll love you ‘till the end of rhyme, Or shall I say: “I’ll love you ‘till the end of time, oh my dear sweet boy.”

“Through the Gloom” by William Humphrey Through all the trials and darkness now before me, only one can help me make it through the gloom. She’s the dearest sweetest one in all the world today, and I’d fight for her until I met my doom. No matter how the world may turn against me, I know that she will always be my bride. Yes I can face each sad tomorrow, as long as she is by my side.

HE AMERICAN FESTIVAL Chorus will perform its third annual Veterans Day Tribute at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 11, in the Kent Concert Hall on the campus of Utah State University. This concert is presented by the Caine College of the Arts. Seating is general admission and free tickets are available in person at the Caine College of the Arts and Ellen Eccles Theatre box offices and at the Cache Valley Visitors Bureau, 199 N. Main St. Tickets are required, but empty seats will be released at 7:15 p.m. Call 797-8022 for more information. “One of the most important things we can do as citizens of the United States is to never forget the sacrifices that have been made for us to enjoy our freedoms,” said Craig Jessop, American Festival Chorus music director and dean of Utah State University’s Caine College of the Arts. “This annual tribute to our veterans is one way we can say to our citizens who have served past and present, ‘Thank you. We will never forget.’” The patriotic concert is a salute to veterans of Cache Valley and will include a special musical armed forces tribute and patriotic favorites like “God of Our Fathers,” “America the Beautiful,” “The StarSpangled Banner,” “Battle Hymn of the Republic” and others. The USU ROTC will present the colors. The evening’s emcee will be Lt. Col. Gary Griffin, USAF retired. Gen. Robert C. Oaks, USAF retired, will

Robert C. Oaks

be the guest speaker. Oaks is a retired four-star general, commander in chief, U.S. Air Forces in Europe, and commander in the Allied Air Forces Central Europe. He also served as a member of the Second Quorum of the Seventy and in the Presidency of the Quorums of the Seventy for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Active military and veterans are encouraged to wear their uniforms to the event. The American Festival Chorus is commencing its third year and consists of 260 singers who live within a 50-mile radius of Logan. The professional American Festival Orchestra is composed of Utah State music faculty, outstanding musicians in the community and top select senior USU students. Principal strings are the Fry String Quartet. For more information, visit www. americanfestivalchorus.org.


One sweet contest L

OGAN’S DOWNTOWN Alliance invites community members to create gingerbread homes to create entries for the 11th annual Parade of Gingerbread Houses. The top 12 entries will receive prizes valued at $100 from participating downtown businesses. The public will vote on the Grand Prize Winner from Dec. 3 to 18. The winning gingerbread home will receive the Grand Prize valued at nearly $300. A panel of judges will also present awards. The homes will be on display in downtown Logan at various businesses from Dec. 3 to 29. During those dates, the public is invited to come downtown to see them. For more information, contact the Logan Downtown Alliance at 554-8696 or e-mail logandowntown@gmail.com.

Braden Wolfe/Herald Journal file photos

Above, “Hagrid’s Hut,” a gingerbread house by Laura Barlow and Andrea Scanlon, on display at U & I Furniture in 2009. Right, “Home for Christmas,” a creation by Megan Stettler on display at Bernina’s Stylish Fabrics in Logan in 2009.

First Utah appearance for star of “The Office”

A

CTOR, WRITER AND comedian B.J. Novak will give his first and only Utah performance at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 6, at Utah State University’s Kent Concert Hall. Tickets are $10 for the first thousand students, $15 for other students in advance, $20 for students the day of the event or for community members in advance and $25 for community members the day of the event. Tickets are available through the Caine College of the Arts website at www. arts.usu.edu or by calling the box office at 797-8022. Novak is best known for his contributions to NBC’s Emmy Award-winning comedy, “The Office,” where he stars as Ryan Howard, the former temp who rose to a sales position at Dunder Mifflin’s corporate office in New York. Novak is also the co-executive producer for the hit series and has written many of the show’s memorable episodes including “Diversity Day,” “Sexual Harassment,” “The Fire,” “Initiation” and “Local Ad.” Novak was discovered as a stand-up comedian and has been called one of the most original and popular new voices in come-

dy. He has performed on various TV shows, including “Comedy Central” and “Late Night With Conon O’Brien,” as well as at sold-out live shows across the country. Born in Newton, Mass., in 1979, Novak earned undergraduate degrees in English and Spanish literature from Harvard University. His father, William Novak, is a noted ghost writer. B.J. and fellow “Office” actor John Krasinski (Jim Halpert) were high school classmates.

Daniel G. Harmann and band coming to Why Sound people.” “Risk” was recorded the album, and is also the EATTLE ROCKERS S Daniel G. Harmann & The live over five days at Electrok- shortest track. itty Studios with Long Winters “It’s about someone evil,” Trouble Starts will perform at

8 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 12, at Why Sound, 30 Federal Ave. Primarily a solo artist, Harmann is known for a pop sound similar to Death Cab for Cutie For his sixth album, “Risk,” Harmann has beefed up his sound with The Trouble Starts. Harmann describes the new album as a collection of “Big songs you dream about making and playing to lots of

bassist Eric Corson. Harmann said. Lyrically, the songs are At the other end of the specabout taking chances. On the trum emotionally and timeurgent, sobering opener “We length wise, the eight minute Are Professionals,” Harmann “Estrella” describes the family describes the “slicing skin and he loves. crushing bone” he has expe“Call it what you will,” Harrienced working construction mann says, “But at its core, and that it’s “always feast or it’s rock and roll. It’s dirty and famine/ in my glass or in my imperfect. It’s quiet and loud.” bed.” For more information, go “The Horse and The Sistine to www.myspace.com/danielChapel” is the first single from gharmann.

Page 11 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, November 5, 2010

All mixed up


Page 12 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, November 5, 2010

Culture

Kander and Ebb musical a ‘marvel’

By The Associated Press

OHN KANDER AND J Fred Ebb have managed to turn some of the darkest

themes into brilliant musicals: Nazis (“Cabaret”); Latin American repression (“Kiss of the Spider Woman”); and the dancing murderers of the Cook County jail (“Chicago”). Now Kander and Ebb have transformed another horrific tale into a powerful and provocative musical with “The Scottsboro

AP photo

In this undated theater publicity image, Joshua Henry is shown in a scene from “The Scottsboro Boys.”

Boys,” based on the real story of nine black teenagers charged with raping two white girls and wrongfully put on death row. Designed to push the audience’s level of discomfort to a breaking point, the musical has a song about rape sung by men pretending to be women, a tap-dancing number about electrocution and a menacing tune about “Jew money.” It has black men playing cartoonish stereotypes of white racists, and even has black performers singing in blackface. As confounding as this all sounds, what has emerged is an absolute marvel. The creators — including director and choreographer Susan Stroman and book writer David Thompson — walk a fine line between satire and alienation but emerge with what surely must be the edgiest play on Broadway. “The Scottsboro Boys,” which opened Sunday night on Broadway at the Lyceum Theatre, frames the story as a minstrel show — that deeply racist storytelling device performed by whites — and then immediately subverts it by having an all-black cast, except for

AP photo

An undated publicity photo showing the cast of “The Scottsboro Boys,” playing at the Lyceum Theatre in New York.

the master of ceremonies, John Cullum. The show starts with typical over-the-top happy energy as a minstrel show takes the stage and the emcee decides to tell the story of nine innocent men pulled off a train in 1931 in Scottsboro, Ala. One of the men asks: “This time can we tell the truth?” That’s when the minstrel show’s performers become the nine accused men, even playing the

two white women who falsely accuse the group of rape. Two stock, buffoonish minstrel characters — Mr. Bones (Colman Domingo) and Mr. Tambo (Forrest McClendon) — help the action along, but not in typical fashion. Originally designed by whites to ridicule blacks, Mr. Bones and Mr. Tambo here gleefully portray white racist police, jailers and lawyers. Once this inversion is estab-

lished, the musical hits a head of steam as it details the nine men’s struggle through years of trials. The show tries to give each of the nine men, usually lumped together as “the Scottsboro Nine,” what history did not: a unique personality. That’s a tall order for nine men, but the musical generally succeeds. Even so, Joshua Henry as Haywood Patterson, the de facto leader of the group, stands out with a great voice and a fearless, intense style. Of the rest of the cast, Cullum is honey-warm as the emcee, but also dark as the governor of Alabama. And McClendon and Domingo are marvelous in their multiple roles as thuggish cops and slimy lawyers. Kander and Ebb seem to thrive on having their characters behind bars. A hint that the nine defendants here have been railroaded is established by all the action happening beneath a set of three enormous crooked frames. The dancing is high energy and the songs are strong, with melodies that linger.

‘Social Network’ actor no computer wiz

ESSE EISENBERG J may play Facebook’s founder on screen, but in real

life the actor is no technology wizard. Eisenberg, who stars as Mark Zuckerberg in “The Social Network,” said Monday he doesn’t even use Facebook and doesn’t understand coding. Instead of acing technology, he tried to explore the psychology of his character. “I never use Facebook,” Eisenberg told The Associated Press in Rome, where “The Social Network” was shown out of competition at the Rome

Jesse Eisenberg

Film Festival. “I used it for about two weeks while we were rehearsing for this movie to understand what my character had built.” “The Social Network,”

directed by David Fincher, opened last month in the U.S. to strong reviews and has been a box-office hit. It traces Facebook’s evolution into a cultural touchstone from its creation in a Harvard University dorm, and looks at Zuckerberg’s relationship with his friends on his way to fame and fortune. Eisenberg said he took computer classes with a consultant to prepare for the movie, but it was no use. “The more he taught me, the less I thought I understood,” he said. “I decided to just learn the

coding phonetically,” Eisenberg added. “And I really focused on the emotional inner life of this character who is very unique.” Eisenberg portrays an ambiguous — if not downright unlikable — protagonist. Zuckerberg is seen as an emotionally guarded genius who doesn’t look back as he builds his fortune and cuts out his closest friend in the process. The actor was fascinated by what he said were Zuckenberg’s conflicting feelings — “alienation, ambition, great social insight and yet kind of a complete detachment from other

people.” “He has difficulty gauging the emotional life of others,” Eisenberg said in the interview. “This to me is far more interesting to explore than coding.” Eisenberg’s performance was generally praised. The actor had won critical acclaim years ago for his portrayal of a boy going through the separation of his parents in “The Squid and the Whale.” Just as well, since technology isn’t an option. “I like technology but it doesn’t seem to feel the same way about me, “ he quipped.


Kookie, quirky crafts from Sedaris By The Associate Press

I

F THERE WAS ANY doubt that Amy Sedaris is a kookier, kitschier version of Martha Stewart in the four years since the release of her best-selling, “I Like You: Hospitality Under the Influence,” get out your Popsicle sticks, toupee tape and clamshells. Sedaris proves her place as a domestic maven for today’s irony-loving do-it-yourselfers with her latest book. “Simple Times” is steeped in ‘70s campiness, with a youthful, can-do attitude walking through an extensive list of projects, neatly indexed in the back, from Acorn Crafts to Macaroni Alien Mask and Yesterday’s Newspaper Scuffs. The actress-comedian is a

practical crafting guide. Before diving into the sausage cookies (yes, there are recipes) and wizard duck costume, she tells readers why they should join in. “Crafting, or ‘making things,’ has always been a delightful pastime of mine because it requires putting common elements together in order to achieve a lovely something that nobody needs,” she writes. The definition is astute, and from the projects in the book, all too true. Sedaris pokes fun at the craft world in all its eccentricity, but also yearns for the simpler times it evokes. “Simple Times” is two parts picture book and one part how-to guide and can be enjoyed by crafters and non-crafters alike. It has more than 20 sections of kitsch,

including “The Joy of Poverty,” ‘Teenagers Have a Lot of Pain,” “Sausages” and “Knowing Your Knack for Knickknacks.” The projects range from the absurd but practical (using doll wigs as doorknobs) to the

Lee will direct 3D movie adaptation of ‘Life of Pi’ By The Associated Press

T

HE OSCAR-WINNING director Ang Lee said he is counting on the innocent looks and storytelling ability of an Indian boy to assure the success of Yann Martel’s “Life of Pi,” the fantasy book he is making into a film. Lee has chosen 17-year-old Suraj Sharma from 3,000 candidates for the title role of the boy who drifts on the open sea with a Bengal tiger and a hyena, saved after a ship carrying the rest of his family sinks. “There is no dialogue, and he is not Tom Hanks,” Lee said of the boy. “The film is about humankind’s spiritual pursuit, and he must have an appealing temperament.” Newcomer Sharma “showed the storytelling ability, and you will believe this is a true story,” he said. Lee will shoot the entire film in 3D in his home of Taiwan and in India. Filming is to start in January. Lee said that at first he did not

Ang Lee

believe a fantasy story of a boy surrounded by nothing but water could be made into a film. “I have not seen any good movies about water,” he said. “Then I realized 3D could be a way to break the dilemma.” With new technologies, Lee said, “I hope to take viewers to the sea so they can feel for themselves the relationship between humankind and their beliefs.” Published in 2001, “Life of Pi” was an international best-seller. In 2002, the UK edition won the Man Booker Prize for Fiction.

downright bizarre: building a miniature ghetto for an injured mouse that is close to dying. Household objects, including a cardboard box, coffee grounds and tatters of things, can be instantly transformed into a mouse tenement. Don’t forget “the ability and desire to create a depressing space.” That must come from within. Sedaris is her own living craft project with her ability to transform herself into dozens of characters, from a shut-in to a fireside storyteller to an extremely unseductive model in a seashell bathing suit. Pictures dazzle, amuse and sometimes frighten. (Beware the section on safety.) The author lives crafts, no matter how absurd the hobby is portrayed. She genuinely

wants to share it with others in her snarky, silly way. For any would-be crafters, Sedaris suggests starting a crafting club. One tip: Exclude people on purpose to create an air of exclusivity. “After a few months of denying people membership to something they didn’t know existed, I sit back and watch them desperately flock to my circle, like deer to a bait pile.” Also, have a dress code. Elastic waistbands in. Straw hats out (fire hazard, she says). “Simple Times” is an ideal gift for the crafter who has crafted everything. There’s one thing they haven’t made yet: a “Dutch Bonnet” out of the cover. (Directions are on the back flap.)

* This week’s New York Times Bestseller List * HARDCOVER FICTION 1. Worth Dying For by Lee Child 2. In the Company of Others by Jan Karon 3. American Assassin by Vince Flynn 4. The Girl...The Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson 5. Fall of Giants by Ken Follett PAPERBACK (TRADE) FICTION 1. The Girl...The Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson 2. The Girl...Played With Fire by Stieg Larsson 3. Little Bee by Chris Cleave 4. Cutting For Stone by Abraham Verghese 5. Half Broke Horses by Jeannette Walls HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. Earth (The Book) by Jon Stewart and others 2. Autobiography of Mark Twain, Vol. 1, by Mark Twain 3. Trickle Up Poverty by Michael Savage 4. The Last Boy by Jane Leavy 5. Pinheads and Patriots by Bill O’Reilly HARDCOVER ADVICE 1. The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman 2. What To Expect...Expecting by H. Murkoff, S. Mazel 3. Waiting For ‘Superman’ edited by Karl Weber 4. Crazy Love by Francis Chan with Danae Yankoski 5. Cook This, Not That! by D. Zinczenko and M. Goulding

Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/

Page 13 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, November 5, 2010

Books


Page 14 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, November 5, 2010

Answers from last week

Calendar Friday Auditions for Unicorn Theatre’s production of “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever” will be at 5 p.m. on Friday at the Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 W. Center St. Casting all roles in the age range of 3 to 18 years old. The show will rehearse from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Monday to Friday starting Tuesday, Nov. 9. Performances are Dec. 16 to 18 in the Caine Lyric Theatre. Call 535-5528 for more information. A show and sale of antique and estate jewelry will be held from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Friday and from noon to 6 p.m. on Saturday at SE Needham Jewelers, 141 N. Main St. The event is free and open to the public. Included are French and British items from the 1780s to the 1980s ranging from $10 earrings to rare museum-quality jewels.

The first annual Richmond Fall Craft Fair will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. on Friday and 10 to 6 p.m. on Saturday at the Richmond Community Building, 6 W. Main St. Included are over 20 local vendors with items like jewelry and purses.

vides micro-loans and support in starting small businesses in underdeveloped countries. For more information, e-mail seedfundraiser@gmail.com

The Small Enterprise Education and Development (SEED) program from USU will hold a benefit featuring the movie West Side Story at 4:45 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. on Friday at the Logan Arthouse and Cinema, 795 N. Main St. Tickets are $5 at the door, cash or check only. The SEED Program pro-

The First Presbyterian Church will be hosting the second annual Holiday Treasures Boutique. It will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday at the First Presbyterian Church, 200 W. Center St. The sale will feature local artisans including soap, jewelry, aprons, and wonderful home-

Stokes Nature Center invites curious toddlers, ages 2-3, to join them for Parent Tot from 10 to 11 a.m. on Friday. Explore Shimmering Sands presents animals, plants, and nature through Shazadi’s Soireé, a belly dance show music, crafts, and games. This program featuring Talia, a dancer from San is parent interactive, and all toddlers must Diego, at 7:30 p.m. on Friday at USU’s have a parent present to participate. The Taggart Student Center Auditorium. program fee is $3 ($2.50 for SNC memTickets are $15 and are available at the bers). To register, call 755-3239 or e-mail door or at The Indian Oven restaurant. nature@logannature.org.

Crossword 88

www.ThemeCrosswords.com

By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Artemis’s twin 7. More salacious 13. Fallacious argumentation 20. Expression of respect 21. Small dry fruit 22. Aggravation 23. Poem division 24. Julia’s star pupils? 26. Brass 28. Sorority letters 29. Garden tool 30. Ends partner 31. Nicholas II, for one 33. ___ Oop 35. Folklore fiend 37. Sharon’s charity? 41. Start of a refrain 46. Jockey Turcotte 47. Chinese dynasty 48. “Chances ___” 49. Head covering worn by Muslim women 50. ___ case 53. Lowly worker 55. Mint family member 56. Besets 57. Jude’s rulebook in Vegas? 59. Man of La Mancha 60. Stirred 61. Big Apple attraction, with “the” 62. Desert-like 63. Medicine measure 66. Fish hawk 69. “Begone!” 73. Chinese dynasty 74. Old World bird 75. Assoc. of nations 80. Kevin in Vancouver?

84. What’s left 86. Sustenance 87. Double curve 88. Euripides drama 89. Scattering 90. “That’s nice!” 91. Lightning fast Jamaican 93. Balderdash 94. Skating jumps 95. In need of Johnny? 100. Computer menu option 102. “Gotcha” 103. Heidi’s home 104. Black 108. ___ Baba 109. Mediocre 110. Cartoon bear 112. Bill-paying time for Doris? 116. Swindler 120. German city 121. Draw near 122. Dark green mineral 123. Au courant 124. Long Island county 125. Like some hair Down 1. Infomercials, e.g. 2. Fave 3. Fertility clinic stock 4. Exotic fruit 5. Gecko, e.g. 6. Like some history 7. Varnish ingredient 8. Level 9. Bleach 10. Snags 11. Concludes 12. Capitol V.I.P.

13. Butt of jokes 14. Command 15. Islands dish 16. Justice Black 17. Footnote abbr. 18. Runners carry it 19. Clutter 25. River of Lyon 27. Shaping machines 31. Flute sound 32. Vacation souvenir? 34. Golf ball position 36. Old anesthetic 37. Tightens, at sea 38. Masseur’s target 39. Starch source 40. “Carmina Burana” composer 42. Indian melodies 43. “Haste makes waste,” e.g. 44. Hermit 45. Came up 49. Aegean vacation locale 51. Before now 52. Bean ___ 53. Cause 54. Meadow mother 55. In excess of 57. Journal 58. Concert array 60. English writer John Barrington 64. Behind 65. Musical chairs goal 66. Mitch Miller’s instrument 67. Fall from grace 68. Its motto is “Lux et veritas” 69. La ___

70. Chalice 71. Japanese cartoon art 72. Indian tongue 74. Diamonds, to hoods 76. Fluid container 77. Catch 78. Straddling 79. Poet’s “below” 81. Doltish 82. Tusked animal 83. Turkish honorific 84. Place for bats?

85. Low woman? 90. Room at the top 91. Colorful flower 92. Poetic homage 95. Mum 96. Pitchfork parts 97. “Pocket full of ___...” 98. Seasoned stew 99. Dependent 101. Starts of some pranks 104. Old Icelandic literary work

105. Fishhook’s end 106. ___ and terminer (criminal court) 107. Bridge site 109. Fizzy drink 111. Edible tubers 113. Govt. agency 114. Understanding 115. Bearded beast 117. “Cool” amount 118. Grazed 119. Nancy Drew’s beau


Chapel on 800 S. 1000 East. This year’s conference, “Apron Strings, the Ties That Bind,” opens at 8:45 a.m. with various displays, followed by the keynote speaker, Cheryl C. Lant, who served as the LDS General Primary President until last April. Between 10:30 a.m. and noon, women can choose to attend two out of three workshops focusing on the family. The Skyler Smith, of the band Logan’s News event is free and women of all ages throughout Boys, will perform a solo set at 6 p.m. on Fri- the area are invited to attend; there is a sugday at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough gested donation of $3 for a continental breakfast. Pizza, 99 E. 1200 South. He will be followed at 7 p.m. by Irv Nelson of the oldies band The Macey’s will hold a free tailgate party from Fender Benders. No cover charge, although 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday in the Romney tips are encouraged. Stadium parking lot. For more information, call 753-3301.

Saturday

Acoustic rock groups “RacecaR RacecaR” will perform from 6 to 8 p.m. on Saturday at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza near Stadium 8. Check them out at www. myspace.com/racecar1racecar. No cover charge; tips encouraged. The Cache Valley Folk Dancers and The Bridger Folk Music Society are hosting their monthly “first Saturday” contra dance at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday at the Whittier Community Center, 290 N. 400 East. A $5 donation is suggested at the door. This month live music will be provided by Idaho contra music band The Bellows Fellows with calling by several talented local callers. Beginners and families are welcome, all dances are taught. For more information call 753-2480 or 753-5987 or visit www. bridgerfolk.org. Visit the World of Puppetry Museum from 2 to 5 p.m. on Saturday at the Fine Arts Center, 58 S. 100 West, Brigham City. Free activities include puppet history tours and demonstrations, puppet making and puppet play, a “Punch & Judy” show at 3 p.m., and puppet story time at 4 p.m. The Museum is open the first and third Saturday of each month from 2 to 5 p.m. or by appointment for groups. Admission is free, but donations are accepted. For more information, call 435-723-0740. Adult Improv will be held from 8 to 9:30 p.m. on Saturday at the Fine Arts Center, 58 S. 100 West, Brigham City. Participants are free, audience members are encouraged to donate $2. Come try your luck at Improv games, learn and try out some fun techniques and build your ad lib skills. “Lillium” will sing at 3 p.m. on Saturday at the Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East, North Logan. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call 792-0353. Celebrate National Sadie Hawkins Day at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday at Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East, North Logan. Enjoy live music by Tim Holwig from the 1940s and donuts and cider as a refreshment. This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please call 792-0353. American Mothers, Inc. of Cache Valley is sponsoring the 21st annual Mothers Mini Conference on Saturday at the River Heights

Utah State University presents B.J. Novak of “The Office” in his only comedy performance in Utah at 8 p.m. on Saturday in the Kent Concert Hall. Tickets are available at the Caine College of the Arts Box Office located in Room 139B in the Chase Fine Arts Center. The Stokes Nature Center will hold its 13th annual dinner and auction fundraiser at 6 p.m. on Saturday at the Copper Mill Restaurant, 55 N. Main St. Cost is $50 per person, $500 for a table of 10. Attendees should dress “green,” with costume prizes for “most green,” “luckiest,” “most sustainable,” “most self-powered” and “lucky lady.” Tickets are available at www. logannature.org or at Fuhriman’s Framing & Fine Art (75 S. Main St.), the College of Natural Resources dean’s office at Utah State University and Stokes Nature Center. For more information, call 755-3239. Stork Landing is having its first free Mommy Fair from, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday at the store, 99 W. Center St. The event includes a free baby registry and gift bags that have information about health during pregnancy, infant care, local doctors, magazines, coupons and samples. Two free classes are scheduled — learn about strollers, car seats and other baby gear at 11 a.m.; pick up skills in infant massage at 4 p.m. Participates will receive a free gift and there will be drawings through the day. For more information, call 792-4453 or visit www.stork-landing.blogspot.com. Providence will host a baby-sitting clinic for youth ages 11 to 15. The event is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday at the city offices, 15 S. Main St. The American Red Cross will be teaching the class. Cost is $30 plus $10 for the first aid kit. For more information, contact Sheri at 752-9441 ext. 22.

Sunday The Post-Mormon Community is a nonsectarian organization of individuals and families who have left Mormonism. The Cache Valley chapter meets for dinner and socializing every Sunday at 6:30 p.m. at a local restaurant. Newcomers welcome. For more information, visit www.PostMormon.org/logan or call 770-4263. Rehearsal for the 12th annual benefit Christmas concert continue at 6 p.m. on Sunday at the Dansante Building, 59 S. 100 West. Scores will be provided. The concert is

in support of the Food Pantry. Also at 7 p.m. on Sunday are rehearsals for Handel’s “Messiah” at the Dansante Building. Adult singers are welcome and should bring scores (Shirmer Edition). For more information, call 754-7184. Members of the Northern Chapter of the American Bikers Aiming Towards Education (A.B.A.T.E.) will hold their monthly meeting at noon on Sunday at Ruby Tuesday’s 43 E. 1400 North. All interested motorcyclist over 18 years old are invited to attend.

Monday Banjoman & Co. will perform at 3:30 p.m. on Monday at Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East, North Logan. The public is invited. For more information, visit www.sonicbids. com/BanjomanCo. The Logan Chapter of NARFE will meet at 1:30 p.m. on Monday at the Cache Senior Citizens Center. The speaker will be Bob Larsen from LLS Insurance Agency who will explain the many changes and options in health insurance plans for seniors in 2011. Retired and active federal employees and their spouses are invited.

NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, is having an open meeting at 7 p.m. on Wednesday at the NAMI office, 90 E. 200 North. This month’s presentation will be provided by Marcy Skinner, local author and storyteller. The regularly scheduled support group meeting will be at 5:30 p.m. Grammy-winning guitarist Pat Donohue will perform at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday in the Performance Hall at USU. Tickets are $15 for general admission and $5 for USU students with ID. Tickets can be purchased at the Caine College of the Arts Box Office in the Chase Fine Arts Center, Room 139B, or at the Caine College of the Arts Dean’s Office Box Office, open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets can also be purchased online (arts.usu.edu) or at 797-8022.

Thursday Daughters of Utah Pioneers Cache Far South Company will meet at 1 p.m. on Thursday at the Hyrum Civic Center. The group will be having a Thanksgiving lunch and program. For more information, call 245-3918.

A self-advocacy group for people with a disability, their family and support staff is offered by OPTIONS for Independence and the Grassroots Advocacy Partnership at 6 p.m. on Thursday at OPTIONS, 1095 N. Main Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will St. The group will learn about the legislative be going up the canyon for an afternoon hike on process and how to make their voices heard. Tuesday. The group will depart at 3:30 p.m. and To join, for more information or to schedule return after dark. Call 713-0288 for more details. transportation, call Traci at 753-5353 ext. 106. The American Festival Chorus will per The Cache Valley Watercolor Society will form a Veterans Day Tribute at 7:30 p.m. on meet at 6:30 on Tuesday at the Logan Library, Thursday in the Kent Concert Hall. Seating is 255 N. Main St. Guest artist is John Berry from Wellsville. general admission; free tickets are available at the Caine College of the Arts and Ellen Eccles Theatre Box Offices and the Cache Valley Visitors Bureau, 199 N. Main St. Call 797-8022 Mandi & Chalene will teach some of their favor- for more information. ite recipes for soup and roll from 7 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday at the little theater in the Maceys Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will be playing Wally Ball from 6:30 to 8 p.m. grocery store in Providence. Limited seating. To on Thursday at the Logan Rec. Center. make a reservation, call 753-3301.

Tuesday

Wednesday

The Cache Valley Historical Society will host a lecture from Dennis Hassan, USU associate professor of theater arts, at 7 p.m. on Wednesday in the Lyric Theater. Hassan is responsible for the theater’s maintenance and for approving performances. His training is in set design and he is responsible for most of the sets in the summer plays. He will take the audience on a “show and tell” tour of the theater and discuss its history and plans for future use. Senate candidate Scott Bradley hosts a weekly class on the Constitution titled “To Preserve The Nation” at 7 p.m. on Wednesdays upstairs at the BookTable. There is no charge. For more information, call 753-2930 or 7538844. The John Birch Society (JBS) will be meeting at 7 p.m. on Wednesday upstairs in the BookTable. No charge to attend. The meeting will include a discussion on current events and legislation. For more information, call 753-2930 or 753-8844.

Shauna Flammer will share potato recipes from 7 to 8 p.m. on Thursday at the little theater in Macey’s grocery store in Providence. Limited seating. To make a reservation, call 753-3301. Bridgerland Applied Technology College will hold its Single Mothers Seminar from 7 to 9 p.m. on Thursday at BATC, 600 W. 1301 North. The free event includes information on employment, financial aid and scholarships. For more information, call 750-3224. Stokes Nature Center invites adults and kids ages 8 and up to History & Lore of Logan Canyon, a free program scheduled for 4 to 5 p.m. on Thursday in Room 154 of USU’s Merrill-Cazier Library. Elaine Thatcher of USU’s Mountain West Center will presents stories from this historic canyon, including Old Ephraim the giant grizzly, the Bear Lake Monster and more. For more information, call 755-3239.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, November 5, 2010

made things. All proceeds from the sale, the silent auction and the Bread of Life sale (tasty homemade breads for your freezer for Holiday serving) will be returned to the community to help who are having some financial stress this winter.


Page 16 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, November 5, 2010

CACHE MAGAZINE DINING GUIDE L

B S

Logan Burgers & Sandwiches

Delicious Food at Reasonable Prices

Charbroiled Gourmet Burgers • Gyros • Souvlaki BBQ Pork • Kababs •Calamari Salads Seafood Dinners • Falafel coupon

Greek Salad with Gryo Meat & Feta Cheese (with garlic toast & soda) Only $4.99 coupon

Mushroom Swiss Burger (with fries & soda) Only $4.99 coupon

Chicken Parmesan Sub (with salad & soda) Only $5.99 coupon

Breaded Butterfly Shrimp Dinner

(with salad, fries & garlic toast) Only $5.99

Offer Expires 11/12/10 • Must Present Coupon • Limit 4

1085 North Main, Suite 130, Logan

435-752-1215 • Mon-Sat 10:30-8:00pm

Cache Valley’s favorite for over 20 years! NOW Serving Frozen Yogurt With Probiotics Mon-Thurs: 11AM - 10:30PM

Fri-Sat: 11AM - 12 MIDNIGHT 1219 North Main • Logan 753-4355

²5IF4PVMPG*OEJBJO$BDIF7BMMFZ³

Tandoori Oven 'JOFTU*OEJBO$VJTJOF

Now Serving Wine & Indian Beer (Taj Mahal & Kingfisher)

10% OFF

with purchase of $25 or more. Expires 11/12/10. Not valid with any other offer.

Dine In • Take Out • Catering

720 East 1000 North 750-OVEN (6836) Gift Certificates Available

For information about advertising on this page please call 792-7263 • Monday – Friday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Cache Magazine  

Cache Valley's arts and entertainment magazine

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you