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Cache Magazine homes History in

Century-old homes open to the public Saturday

The Herald Journal

SEPTEMBER 9-15, 2011


contents

September 9-15, 2011

MUSIC 3 Red Desert Ramblers

performing this weekend

5 Allred coming to Logan Arthouse

ART 5 Crowds will gather for

tonight’s Fall Gallery Walk

movies 7’Contagion’ gets three and a half stars

theater 5 Annual Celebrate

America show returns

10 Music Theatre West

director talks about “Annie”

PROFILE 10 Meet Ellie, a local dog

starring in upcoming play

BOOKS 12 See reviews and best sellers

CALENDAR 15 See what’s happening this week

Photos by Eli Lucero/Herald Journal

This window is located in the David and Ellen Eccles Mansion which is part of the Historic Home Tour in Cache Valley tomorrow. On the cover: The wooden staircase leads to the second floor of the David Eccles Mansion.

FROM THE EDITOR

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he few times I’ve seen my dad cry usually involved dog movies. When I was about 15 years old my family went to see “My Dog Skip,” which has the familiar sad ending many dog movies do — the beloved family pet dies, is buried under a tree in the backyard, and the whole audience is emotionally attached. I’ve also seen the tears flow during “Marley and Me” and “Where the Red Fern Grows.” What can I say, my dad has a soft spot in his heart for man’s best friend, and

he’s not alone. I love dogs. You probably love dogs. Everyone loves dogs. This week Beth Ellis came by The Herald Journal with her dog, Ellie, who will be starring as Sandy in Music Theatre West’s upcoming production of “Annie” (page 10). Everyone in the office was enamored by the presence of this cute stuffed-animal-looking dog who strutted around the office like a walking teddy bear. After I talked to Beth, three of us watched Ellie do tricks. I must say, that was the happiest moment I’ve had at work in a while because dogs are just that — happy. In the movie “Marley and Me,” Owen Wilson stars as John Grogan, the owner of yellow lab Marley, and

says, “A dog doesn’t care if your rich or poor, clever or dull, smart or dumb. Give him your heart and he’ll give you his. How many people can you say that about? How many people can make you feel rare and pure and special? How many people can make you feel extraordinary?” Every once in a while that quote pops in my head and it makes me want to be more like a dog — the kind of person who makes others feel rare and pure and special. I think, among other things (like licking feet and knowing how to give just the right “puppy-dog” eyes for dinner leftovers), dogs have those skills mastered. — Manette Newbold


Double Wide, the 6-piece country band out of Cache Valley led by lead singer Joaby Parker, has been chosen to perform at the Utah State Fair Friday, Sept. 9 from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Double Wide was chosen as one of this year’s performers from more than 200 entertainment applications. The State Fair performance will wrap up a very busy summer for the local band that has set it’s mark on the region as one of the best new bands in the area. With shows this summer all over the region at festivals, fairs and traditional venues, Double Wide is fast becoming an area favorite for great country music. “We are so excited to be playing Friday night at the fair. Nothing fits better at the fair than our band,” said

Joaby Parker, lead singer and band manager. Double Wide is a collection of some of the valley’s best musicians and vocalists. Parker was the Intermountain Colgate Country Showdown Champion in 2001 and put the band together. “I am lucky to get to play

with such talented musicians. We have such a fun group of people that not only love playing music but take it very seriously. But we don’t take ourselves too seriously. We have a blast on stage and I think that comes over to our audience,” Parker said. Joaby who grew up in

Paradise and now resides in Smithfield. Lyndi Benson, fiddle and vocals, is from Wellsville and is an accomplished violinist and teaches violin. Rich Hansen, bass, is originally from the south end of the valley but spent years touring with rock bands in Los Angeles. Hansen is an accomplished jazz bassist as well. Melissa Keller, keys, was raised in Hyde Park but played in bands on the east coast and now is employed at Utah State University. Sam Bryson, drums, has a master’s degree in percussion and regularly performs in symphonies and orchestras such as the Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre. The only non-Cache Valley resident is Rich Bischoff, a USU graduate that resides in Brigham City. He has played lead guitar in bands for over 20 years.

– Debbie Ditton, director of “Annie” at Ellen Eccles Theatre (page 10)

PET OF THE WEEK Available for adoption

Red Desert Ramblers perform tomorrow The Bridger Folk Music Society presents a concert with the bluegrass band Red Desert Ramblers on Saturday, Sept. 10, at 7:30 p.m. at Crumb Brothers Bakery. The Red Desert Ramblers play bluegrass, classic country and swing music. Combining 170 years of experience, they blend harmonies with smoking instrumental breaks. The Salt Lake Tribune says “when it comes to locally produced bluegrass bands, it’s hard to do better.” They have been honored by the International Bluegrass Music Association by being

the first Utah band (and Sharon Mitchell is the first hammered dulcimer player) to ever be hired for an IBMA performance. They are a regional band with national recognition and the five members hail from Salt Lake, Summit and Cache counties. Crumb Brothers Bakery is located at 291 S. 300 West in Logan. Tickets are $13 and are available by calling 435-757-3468, or take your chances at the door. Seating is very limited, so advance purchase is recommended. The concert is sponsored by Import Auto and Utah Public Radio.

Pet: Angela From: Four Paws Rescue Why she’s so lovable:

For more information, go to www.bridgerfolk.org or

reddesertramblers.weebly. com/.

Angela is a cute little orange tabby that is in search of her forever home! She loves kids, and enjoys having an open lap to sit on. She is very affectionate. Angela is also playful and energetic. She is looking for an indoor-only home. If you would like to meet Angela or learn more about her, please call Sheri at 435-787-1751.

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, September 9, 2011

Locals will play at Utah State Fair

“They say to never put kids and animals on stage, well, here we go — a whole show of kids and a dog.”

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ALL MIXED UP

Quotable


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, September 9, 2011

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all mixed up

FALL GALLERY WALK SEPTEMBER 9 IN DOWNTOWN LOGAN

It’s time for the Fall Gallery Walk! Join the Cache Valley Center for the Arts Downtown on Friday, Sept. 9, from 6 to 9 p.m. More than 13 locations will be hosting a variety of artists for one night only. Just look for the yellow banner at participating locations or visit www.cachearts. org to download a map. Each walk features new artists and venues so visit us online for highlight locations and up-to-date details. The fall walk features masterpieces by some of Cache Valley’s favorites and some up and coming artists including: David Hailey, Andy Worrall,

Shane Larson, Gen Borrego, Larry Winborg, Jeremy Winborg, David Hash, Mark Smith, and Megan Tullis Niemann. In addition, this walk will feature a few special group shows and artisan showcases. Sunshine Terrace will be highlighting some Cache Valley legends, Utah Public Radio will be hosting the USU Art Department grad and undergraduate students, and St. John’s Episcopal Church will showcase the Cache Valley painters featuring the works of Colleen Howe Bleinberger, Scott Bushman, Susan Dunker, Linda Morse, Sue Jelus, April Hay and others. Unusual

highlights on Main Street include the Logan Downtown Alliance’s display of artisan-crafted Trollbeads of Denmark at the Cache Chamber of Commerce and short performances by Valley Dance Ensemble. VDE will be performing “Sidewalk Talk,” a 5-minute repertoire, at 6:30, 7, 7:30, and 8 p.m. just outside the Bullen Center on 43 S. Main. Check out www.cachearts.org for more information. You can also call the Cache Valley Center for the Arts at 435-752-0026 for more info or to participate in a future walk, email events@centerforthearts.us or call 435-7536518 ext. 11.

Dr. David HAILEY

Furhiman’s Framing and Fine Art Dr. David Hailey has painted and written since his early 20s. He received a bachelor’s from The University of Puget Sound with equal emphasis in creative writing and painting. He received a master’s from the University of New Mexico in creative writing, but his thesis was a conceptual art piece made up of stanzas and photographs. It should come as no surprise that Hailey immediately turned to researching the rich, new media as it emerged, and he has developed and tested dozens of multimedia projects using video, animation, simulation, and even

virtual reality since 1993. One of his projects was an autobiography presented as a VR art gallery. His principal tools are animation and Web development software, plus Photo manipulation software.

In 2001, he began testing the idea of using software to evolve photographs into paintings, and in 2008 he began a project that ended with the photographs being presented in this show.

ART AT THE GROVE STUDENTS Sunshine Terrace will feature art by the students in our Art at the Grove class. The class is a collaboration between Utah State University Caine College of the Arts and Terrace Grove Assisted Living. Five students entered their work at the Cache County Fair and two won Director’s Choice awards. The paintings submitted to the fair will be on display at Sunshine Terrace.

Trollbeads Logan Downtown Alliance, Cache Chamber of Commerce

The concept of Trollbeads charms was developed over the past 25 years. Today, 18 Danish and internationally renowned jewelry designers create the beads. There are more than 200 different models. The original models are typically created in hard modeling wax – cast and finished in metal. Some models are then set with stones. Other models are created directly in molten, red-hot glass. Trollbeads have won international artistic recognition and have recently been exhibited at Sculpture Objects & Functional Art in Chicago and New York.

Gallery Walk locations: Caffe Ibis Gallery Deli, Caine Lyric Theatre, The Crepery & Citrus and Sage, Fuhriman’s Framing & Fine Art Gallery, Gia’s Italian Restaurant, Global Village Gifts, The Italian Place, S.E. Needham Jewelers, St. John’s Episcopal Church, ThatcherYoung Mansion, Sunshine Terrace, Utah Public Radio, Winborg Masterpieces Art Gallery


“The Day It Began” By Andrew L. Hyer It began on 9-11-2001 when Flight 11 was commandeered by evil men of terror and sin, then A second, a third, and then a fourth they did overtake without regard for lives their own they did forsake. With our own planes, passengers and crew the terrorist flew, into the World Trade Centers, one and two. Then next into the Pentagon they flew in devastating fury they blew. That’s when on the fourth flight #93 heroes did agree to fight it would be as it is now. History. On signal “You ready, OK let’s roll” thus they forced their plane plunging into the ground, preventing a greater disaster than where they may have been bound. Then the towers began to tumble in fire, steel, glass and rubble with civilians, emergency crews, Police and fireman in its wake it did take, many great heroes it did make. Another day of infamy. That day thousands died and millions cried. At Ground Zero amid the ash, smoke and hue another era anew, Great heroes raised Old Glory, there she flew! With her colors of red, white and blue. They knew they had a big job to do.

Allred performing tonight in Logan

Then there are other cowardly acts, as terrorists sent little packs of feared and deadly Anthrax. It’s been said “that fear itself is the biggest fear we have.” So fear not; our freedom does not relax.

Celebrate America show wraps up this weekend Allred will play at Logan Arthouse Friday, Sept. 9. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the concert starts at 7. Tickets are $10 and are available online at www. loganarthouse.com.

Your Stuff

The popular Celebrate America Show, “In The Miller Mood” takes the audience on a musical journey aboard the Chattanooga Choo Choo back to the 1940s, when Glenn Miller and other big bands made a significant contri-

bution to the morale of the country through music. Two remaining show dates are Sept. 9 and 10 in the Utah State University Ballroom. More information and tickets available at www.celebrateamericashow.com.

We must push on, there is much to be done, this war will be won. A great unity has begun as we all unite our nation as one. We know we have a big job to do and we will see it through. With our heads bowed on bended knee, we seek the help of Deity. He knows too, we have a big job to do, with His help we will see it through.

Send your poems to mnewbold@hjnews.com.

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, September 9, 2011

The next "Matinée Enchantée" performance at the Thatcher-Young Mansion, featuring deceptionist Richard Hatch, violinist Rosemary Hatch and their son, pianist Jonathan Hatch, will be on Saturday, Sept. 10, at 2 p.m. Although the program is subject to change, it is currently scheduled to include several new pieces that were not part of last season's programs, such as "The Music Box of Anna Eva Fay," which made its debut at the Mansion in August. Inspired by the popular vaudeville medium of that name, it combines mind reading with a magical surprise, accompanied by Beethoven's famous "Moonlight Sonata." In addition to the new pieces, favorites from last season such as Punx's "Heart of Glass," accompanied by Saint-Saens "The Swan" and Vernon's "Symphony of the Rings" accompanied by Kreisler's "Tambourin Chinois" are also among the pieces included on the program. Musical selections, both solo pieces and performed simultaneously with the magic, by Bach, Bartok, Miyagi and others will again be part of the afternoon performance. Tickets are $10 for adults, just $7 for children under 12. As only 56 seats are available, advance purchase is strongly advised to avoid disappointment. Tickets may be purchased online at the Hatch Academy website www. HatchAcademy.com or by calling 435932-0017.

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New pieces added to magic show


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, September 9, 2011

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movies

Reviews by The Associated Press A brawny B-action picture with a gorgeous, graceful woman wreaking havoc at its center: Yup, this is a Luc Besson movie. The director of “La Femme Nikita” and “The Fifth Element” serves as co-writer and producer here, but this is very much a spinoff of his brand, a continuation of the kind of stereotype- and gravitydefying characters he’s made his name on. “Colombiana” feels more hammy and muscular, though — but knowingly so, and that’s what makes it solid, late-summer escapist fun. Zoe Saldana stars as Cataleya, who saw her parents killed in front of her when she was a 9-year-old schoolgirl living in the slums of Bogota. Fifteen years later, with the help of her Uncle Emilio (Cliff Curtis), she’s transformed herself into a highly efficient professional assassin in the United States, but she still seeks revenge against her

Maybe it was all more resonant, more poignant on the page: the many highs and lows and major life shifts that occur during the decades-spanning friendship/ romance between Emma (Anne Hathaway) and Dexter (Jim Sturgess). But here they feel so cursory and rushed, it’s as if we’re watching a filmed version of the CliffsNotes of David Nicholls’ best-seller. The central conceit is this: Em and Dex meet after a long night of post-college graduation partying July 15, 1988. “One Day” keeps coming back to that one day, year after year, and checks in with them as they date other people, forge careers, share awkward dinners and basically wait around until the inevitable July 15 when they’ll be together. Big, weighty moments are thrust before us — and these should be serious hanky moments — but since the emotional groundwork hasn’t been laid for them, we’re not moved. We’re just not there yet. Emma Paul Rudd hops from one sofa to another to another as the title character, and that’s sort of what the film itself does, too. Rudd stars as an amiable, ambling dude named Ned who has no real goals in life; what he does have is a guilelessness that consistently gets him into trouble, both with his family and with the law. He has a knack for always saying or doing the wrong thing, even though he always means well. The movie makes no sense — there’s a gap of logic and emotion that’s hard to overcome. 90 minutes.

★★ ‘Colombiana’

Director // Olivier Megaton Starring // Zoe Saldana, Michael Vartan and Callum Blue Rated // PG-13 for violence, disturbing images, intense sequences of action, sexuality and brief strong language parents’ killers. Over-the-top bad guys spew generically menacing lines and hot women parade around in bikinis and lingerie: It’s all big and silly. But Saldana manages to earn our sympathy, as the script (which Besson wrote with frequent collaborator Robert Mark Kamen) allows her to convey a surprising amount of emotion and inner conflict. 108 minutes.

★ ‘One Day’

Director // Lone Scherfig Starring // Anne Hathaway and Jim Sturgess Rated // PG-13 for sexual content, partial nudity, language, some violence and substance abuse and Dexter feel more like ideas, types, rather than fleshed-out characters, so the supporting players who supposedly play crucial roles for them barely register either. It’s a handsome misfire, though. And it’s all the more curious coming from Danish director Lone Scherfig, whose last film was the excellent “An Education” (2009), which was nominated for three Academy Awards including best picture. 104 minutes.

★ ‘Our Idiot Brother’

Director // Jesse Peretz Starring // Paul Rudd, Elizabeth Banks, Emily Mortimer and Zooey Deschanel Rated // R for sexual content including nudity, and for language throughout

Time For Lunch! • Hearty Sandwiches & Seasonal Salads • Fresh Baked Cookies & Pastries • Cakes By The Slice

CRUMB BROTHERS BAKERY 291 S. 300 W. Logan • 435-792-6063 NEW Hours Mon - Fri 7:00am - 3:00pm Sat 8:00am - 3:00pm Visit our website www.crumbbrothers.com “like” us on facebook


The Reel Place

By Aaron Peck

outbreak there that was started by Beth Emhoff upon her return from her trip. Halfway across the world Dr. Leonora Orantes (Marion Cotillard) of the World Health Organization, tries to piece together the movements of Beth Emhoff from security camera tape at a casino, hoping to find the disease’s origin. In San Francisco Alan Krumwiede (Jude Law), a once thought crackpot journalist, is slowly gaining a following of believers who think that the government is hiding crucial information about the disease and its cure. I know all of this seems like a lot to take in, but each of these individual story threads are woven into a coherent, and all-too-real outbreak scenario. What is so refreshing about “Contagion” is that it shuns Hollywood melodramatics. The characters speak and act like normal people would in a situation like this. It’s

★ ★★ ‘Contagion’

Director // Steven Soderbergh Starring // Matt Damon, Kate Winslet and Jude Law Rated // PG-13 for disturbing content and language

easy to see the direction of Steven Soderbergh at work here. He keeps his actors cool and confined. Especially the government bureaucrats who do more meeting and posturing than they do trying to figure out what’s happening and how they can fix it. It’s easy to put ourselves in the shoes of

Action!

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Mitch, who’s just trying to protect the family he has left at any costs. While the disease is scary, what’s scarier is the way people act when they feel like doomsday is approaching. Fear is the real disease as the streets of America begin to look like post-apocalyptic messes the longer

1:20 3:20 5:20 7:20 9:20

THE HELP (PG-13)

HARRY POTTER 7 PART 2 in 2D (PG-13)

UNIVERSITY 6

1225 N 200 E., BEHIND HOME DEPOT MIDNIGHT SHOW FRI/SAT $6.00 COWBOYS AND ALIENS in Digital (PG-13) 1:55 4:20 6:55 9:25

SHARK NIGHT in Digital 3D 1:05 3:05 5:05 7:05 9:05

WARRIOR in Digital 12:40 3:40 6:25 9:10

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CONTAGION in Digital 12:35 2:45 4:55 7:05 9:15

RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES in Digital (PG-13) 12:30 2:50 5:10 7:30 9:40

JOSEPH SMITH VOL. 1: PLATES OF GOLD in Digital (PG) 1:00 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00

MOVIES STADIUM 5

2450 NORTH MAIN CAPTAIN AMERICA in 2D (PG-13)

THE DEBT (R)

THE HELP (PG-13)

12:35 4:00 6:45 9:05

OUR IDIOT BROTHER (R) 1:00 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00

Aaron Peck is a local movie critic. He is not an amployee of The Herald Journal. Feedback for Aaron can be sent to aaronpeck46@ gmail.com.

Hurry In For The.....

Super Sale! Everything Must Go!

(PG-13)

ONE DAY (PG-13)

12:30 2:40 4:50 7:00 9:10

the film goes on. What is portrayed is something that is far too real, because while watching it we can envision something like this actually happening. A virus that spreads across the earth, and then the world’s population going bonkers. Looting and killing. Trampling people in vaccination lines. It’s a scary proposition, but sitting there it’s easy to perceive how the human race can turn so easily when faced with desperation. There are no quick fixes in “Contagion.” No convenient plot devices concocted to give us a cathartic ending. Soder-

bergh’s tale is one of reality. He asks, “What if?” and then tries his best to show it happen. Perhaps that’s what I admire most about “Contagion.” It doesn’t feel like it needs to dumb itself down. It doesn’t feel like it needs any phony dramatics or action thriller cop-outs. Instead it’s a relentless assault of what might happen to the world if a plague like this cropped up. It’s pretty scary indeed. You may have heard the saying of needing a shower after a movie; well after “Contagion” you may feel like you need a complete disinfectant chemical rub-down (in a good way, if that’s possible). One thing’s for sure you’ll never leave the bathroom again without washing your hands.

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, September 9, 2011

People may go into “Contagion” thinking they’re going to get a plague-spreading action thriller like the 1995 movie “Outbreak,” but this couldn’t be further from the truth. “Contagion” is a different kind of thriller, one that eschews action-packed preposterous plot developments, and instead goes for a more realistic, and in essence, a much more terrifying approach. A virus is spreading like wildfire across the globe. It’s infecting people merely by touch. It causes fever, seizures and death within days. It is thought that Beth Emhoff (Gwyneth Paltrow) is patient zero, the first person on earth to have contracted the disease somewhere in China. The entire movie branches out from her. This movie is shot on a worldwide scale with integral characters living in completely different parts of the world. Mitch Emhoff (Matt Damon) is Beth’s husband whose life quickly spirals out of control as he becomes personally affected by the disease. In Atlanta at the Center of Disease Control (CDC) the government tries to get a handle on the situation. Chief among them is Dr. Ellis Cheever (Laurence Fishburne) who tries to balance the rough nature of his job and whether or not he should give preferential treatment and knowledge to his close family. Dr. Ally Hextall (Jennifer Ehle) is working tirelessly on the frontlines inside the CDC trying to find a vaccination for the disease. Dr. Erin Mears (Kate Winslet) is sent by the CDC to Minneapolis to get a handle on the

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‘Contagion’ is scary, thrilling, intriguing

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35 West 100 South (Behind the Opera)


Clockwise: The Relief Society Building in Richmond; The Joseph/Brigham Pond Home (1880-90) in Lewiston currently owned by Rod and Gwyn Hammer; The Bert Pond Home in Lewiston (1913) currently owned by Mark and Leslie Bergeson; Flowers at the entrance to the James and Amy Burnham Farmstead (1895) in Richmond. The home is currently owned by Pete Schroop and Jennifer Hines; The Hattie Merrill Morriston Farmstead (1908) home currently owned by Kurt and Lisa Anhder.

If you go ... • The tour is Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. • See historic homes in Logan, Richmond and Lewiston. • Tickets are $10 and are available for purchase at Cache Valley Visitors Bureau, Lee’s Market Place, Macey’s Food & Drug, or at each of the six historical houses. • Lunch provided from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Relief Society Building near 15 S. State St. in Richmond. It includes a pioneer heritage burger, chips and drink available for $5. • Proceeds help fund scholarships for USU students studying Cache Valley history and to the American West Heritage Center for school field trips.

history Living in

100-year-old homes open to the public this weekend

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hey don’t make them like they used to. Owning one of Cache Valley’s historic homes is like living in a time capsule for the families who painstakingly restore them. With today’s cookie-cutter approach to house construction, it’s easy to forget there’s more to a home than just a garage door and walk-in closet. So for anyone who likes local history, a nice Saturday drive or a taste of century-old architecture, the 2011 Historic Home Tour has something for everyone. Take a walk through the Joseph/ Brigham Pond Home in Lewiston for a fun bit of trivia about how early-day polygamists kept an eye out for federal law enforcement. Or step inside the Bert Pond Home in Lewiston to see how the current owners incorporated an authentic log cabin into the home’s interior. And no historic home tour in Logan would be complete without peaking into one of the 24 rooms in the 11,000-square-foot David and Ellen Eccles home built in 1907. Restoring the Hattie Merrill Morrison Farmstead in Richmond, built in 1908, was a passion for Kurt and Lisa Anhder. “I hate to see something thrown away,” said Anhder about the dilapidated structure he’s spent 20 years rebuilding. “I always feel I can make something out of it.” The couple kept the original floors and walls, stained glass windows,

By Matt Jensen Photos by Jennifer Meyers

transoms, original door and etched glass, and bathtub and the home is now on the National Register of Historic Places. Organizers say the home tour is an excellent way to get out and spend a Saturday. “The tour gives people an opportunity to see what people built more than 100 years ago and how ingenious some of our ancestors were,” said event co-chair Bernice McCowin of Logan. “Old homes have such unique features. We don’t build homes the same way that we did then.” Two of the homes on the tour were in such disrepair, they were condemned. Rod and Gwyn Hammer of Lewiston have spent the last 18 years restoring their home — a striking Italianate style home with a western flare, complete with a widow’s walk and cupola. When the couple bought the tattered structure in 1993, wind blew through its broken windows and mice ran through its rusted pipes. “We’ve done every bit of the work,” said Gwyn Hammer. “They say a house like this can cause divorces, but we never had problems like that. We worked right along side each other. Our kids don’t even like us to mention the thought of selling it.” Hammer said the restoration brought her family together. “As a family, it’s been wonderful,” she added. “We’ve always had something to do and our kids have learned to work. At one point it brought

my husband and his brother and dad together and all three were working on the house.” The Hammer’s home was likely constructed between 1880 and 1890 and is believed to be built with extra trusses left over from the construction of the Logan Temple. More than four tons of square nails were used on the home. Hammer says her favorite part of the home is the dining room. “It’s big and friendly,” she said. “We all sit around the table and talk.” Ticket holders can tour any of the homes and the James and Amy Burnham Farmstead — now the Rockhill Creamery in Richmond. This historic farm built in 1895, is on the National Register of Historic Places. Today, owners Pete Schropp and Jennifer Hines operate a micro dairy that dishes up handcrafted cheese. Schropp and Hines reused much of the original wood siding to preserve the history of the farm’s home and granary. Visitors are welcome to wander around the home and visit the historic “inside-out” granary, milk parlor, cheese parlor, calf barn and underground cheese aging room. “This is the perfect time of year to appreciate a drive through our beautiful agricultural valley and a wonderful chance to step inside historic homes you’ve always admired,” said Julie Hollist, director of the Cache Valley Visitors Bureau. Visitors can start the tour at any home during this fourth annual event.


Clockwise: The Relief Society Building in Richmond; The Joseph/Brigham Pond Home (1880-90) in Lewiston currently owned by Rod and Gwyn Hammer; The Bert Pond Home in Lewiston (1913) currently owned by Mark and Leslie Bergeson; Flowers at the entrance to the James and Amy Burnham Farmstead (1895) in Richmond. The home is currently owned by Pete Schroop and Jennifer Hines; The Hattie Merrill Morriston Farmstead (1908) home currently owned by Kurt and Lisa Anhder.

If you go ... • The tour is Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. • See historic homes in Logan, Richmond and Lewiston. • Tickets are $10 and are available for purchase at Cache Valley Visitors Bureau, Lee’s Market Place, Macey’s Food & Drug, or at each of the six historical houses. • Lunch provided from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Relief Society Building near 15 S. State St. in Richmond. It includes a pioneer heritage burger, chips and drink available for $5. • Proceeds help fund scholarships for USU students studying Cache Valley history and to the American West Heritage Center for school field trips.

history Living in

100-year-old homes open to the public this weekend

T

hey don’t make them like they used to. Owning one of Cache Valley’s historic homes is like living in a time capsule for the families who painstakingly restore them. With today’s cookie-cutter approach to house construction, it’s easy to forget there’s more to a home than just a garage door and walk-in closet. So for anyone who likes local history, a nice Saturday drive or a taste of century-old architecture, the 2011 Historic Home Tour has something for everyone. Take a walk through the Joseph/ Brigham Pond Home in Lewiston for a fun bit of trivia about how early-day polygamists kept an eye out for federal law enforcement. Or step inside the Bert Pond Home in Lewiston to see how the current owners incorporated an authentic log cabin into the home’s interior. And no historic home tour in Logan would be complete without peaking into one of the 24 rooms in the 11,000-square-foot David and Ellen Eccles home built in 1907. Restoring the Hattie Merrill Morrison Farmstead in Richmond, built in 1908, was a passion for Kurt and Lisa Anhder. “I hate to see something thrown away,” said Anhder about the dilapidated structure he’s spent 20 years rebuilding. “I always feel I can make something out of it.” The couple kept the original floors and walls, stained glass windows,

By Matt Jensen Photos by Jennifer Meyers

transoms, original door and etched glass, and bathtub and the home is now on the National Register of Historic Places. Organizers say the home tour is an excellent way to get out and spend a Saturday. “The tour gives people an opportunity to see what people built more than 100 years ago and how ingenious some of our ancestors were,” said event co-chair Bernice McCowin of Logan. “Old homes have such unique features. We don’t build homes the same way that we did then.” Two of the homes on the tour were in such disrepair, they were condemned. Rod and Gwyn Hammer of Lewiston have spent the last 18 years restoring their home — a striking Italianate style home with a western flare, complete with a widow’s walk and cupola. When the couple bought the tattered structure in 1993, wind blew through its broken windows and mice ran through its rusted pipes. “We’ve done every bit of the work,” said Gwyn Hammer. “They say a house like this can cause divorces, but we never had problems like that. We worked right along side each other. Our kids don’t even like us to mention the thought of selling it.” Hammer said the restoration brought her family together. “As a family, it’s been wonderful,” she added. “We’ve always had something to do and our kids have learned to work. At one point it brought

my husband and his brother and dad together and all three were working on the house.” The Hammer’s home was likely constructed between 1880 and 1890 and is believed to be built with extra trusses left over from the construction of the Logan Temple. More than four tons of square nails were used on the home. Hammer says her favorite part of the home is the dining room. “It’s big and friendly,” she said. “We all sit around the table and talk.” Ticket holders can tour any of the homes and the James and Amy Burnham Farmstead — now the Rockhill Creamery in Richmond. This historic farm built in 1895, is on the National Register of Historic Places. Today, owners Pete Schropp and Jennifer Hines operate a micro dairy that dishes up handcrafted cheese. Schropp and Hines reused much of the original wood siding to preserve the history of the farm’s home and granary. Visitors are welcome to wander around the home and visit the historic “inside-out” granary, milk parlor, cheese parlor, calf barn and underground cheese aging room. “This is the perfect time of year to appreciate a drive through our beautiful agricultural valley and a wonderful chance to step inside historic homes you’ve always admired,” said Julie Hollist, director of the Cache Valley Visitors Bureau. Visitors can start the tour at any home during this fourth annual event.


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, September 9, 2011

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Kids and dogs Meet ELLIE Sandy in Music Theatre West’s “Annie” in the theater ‘Annie’ director talks about A working with the adorable By Manette Newbold Cache editor

How do you choose 17 adorable girls to play orphans in “Annie” when you start with more than 150? Well, according to Music Theatre West director Debbie Ditton, you make them yell at you. “We really had to go with a little bit ornery,” Ditton said. “Not that they are ornery in real life, but they had to have a certain edginess in their voice, and a certain edginess to their characters.” Ditton said she made each of the little girls trying out of the orphan roles yell, “You stole my shoes!” She would reply with, “I did not!” And they would have to look her in the eye and yell, “Yes you did! Where did you put them?” The girls all had to dance as well, sing “Tomorrow,” and say “I love you, Miss Hannigan” as “naughty” as they could, Ditton said. The decision was tough as so many of the girls were very talented. Ditton attributes that to a valley full of art and opportunities for children to train in music, dance and theater. Music Theatre West aims to do a show every year filled with kids, and Ditton said she loves working with them. “They have no fear of offering their ideas,” Ditton said. “As a first time director, I love these little girls. You always know where you stand. You always know when they’re tired. And they also have boundless energy and are willing to do what you ask them to.”

Since the show also includes a dog, Ditton said the rehearsals have been a lot of work, but a lot of fun. “They say to never put kids and animals on stage, well, here we go — a whole show of kids and a dog,” she said, adding audiences are always drawn to them because they’re so honest on stage. When looking into getting a dog, Ditton said they were very close to hiring one out of New York. She said there are animal trainers who work specifically with plays; they come into the area for about a week, do the show, and then move on to the next one. “But there’s something charming about having a dog from here — something that says, ‘It’s all our valley.’ It’s just us, and we can make it happen,” Ditton says. Ditton decided to go with Ellie, a local Bichon Cavalier King mix, and her trainer, Beth Ellis, has been right there the whole time trying to figure out solutions when Ellie doesn’t want to listen to the orphans. “There’s no fear of the dog chewing anything up on stage. The worst thing that could happen is the dog goes off the stage, but it’s not the end of the show,” Ditton said. “It adds an uncertain element to it, but that’s the joy of live theater.” “Annie” will play at Ellen Eccles Theatre Sept. 15-20 and tickets can be purchased at centerforthearts.us. Ditton also mentioned there will be bins for non-perishable food items at each performance which will benefit Cache Food Pantry.

sk Ellie “Where’s the kitty?” and she’ll lick her nose like she ate it. The Bichon Cavalier King mix can do more than 50 tricks including all the regulars like sit and stay. But the 4-year-old can also dance, give high fives, sneeze on command and crawl. Taking a bow is also one of her specialties and may just come in handy next week as she stars as Sandy in Music Theatre West’s production of “Annie.” She has been working on the show since the spring and will even have her hair dyed a blond/sandy color for the role. If there’s one thing Ellis says about Ellie’s personality, it’s that she’s “way too smart for her own good.”

• Ellis adopted Ellie when she was 4 months old from a woman who was allergic to her. It turned out that the woman’s sister is involved with Music Theatre West and asked Ellis if Ellie would like to be in “Annie” after hearing how many tricks she could do. • Ellis said she works with Ellie up to an hour a day, and during play rehearsals training sometimes increases to two or three hours. • “She loves doing agility so we have ramps and tunnels. We’re involved in the agility club, Zoomdog, up here.” • Ellie loves working with the kids in “Annie,” however the challenge is getting her to listen to them. • “Overall she’s pretty happy with most people. She likes to get into trouble.” • Ellis does some dog grooming, and will be dying Ellie’s hair. She said human hair dye has ammonia in it so she’s getting a special pet dye online. • On stage Ellis has to work with Ellie so she will listen to the child actors. Ellie was trained to come to Ellis in new situations, so getting her to stay on stage is sometimes tricky. One of Ellis’ solutions is to give Ellie extra treats or chew toys that take longer to eat. Sometimes when Grace Mickelson (who plays Annie) is singing, Ellie has chew toys which are timed for the songs so that she’ll stay by Mickelson. * Ellis said she would love for Ellie to act in another live show.

Text by Manette Newbold Photo by Eli Lucero


excited to be able to handle Bailey in a competitive environment and to challenge both myself and my dog in different ways.” Following the trials, local groups will give health and training presentations. Attendees with dogs are welcome to try out some of the agility equipment. Booths and dog-themed carnival games for children (and the young at heart) will be available throughout the morning. Dogs and owners are invited to participate in fun contests such as a look-a-like contest and best trick contest. Zoomdog Agility and Sports Club is an organization that strives to build the bond between people and their dogs. Formerly Logan Dog Agility, established in 2009, Zoomdog offers a

variety of agility classes, provides opportunities for handlers to join their club and promotes friendships between people who love dogs. Zoomdog also offers delectable treats for canines. Zoomdog Gourmet is a way

for the group to not only raise funds for their club, but to also offer local residents healthy treat varieties for their pooches. Their treats are made with human-grade ingredients and no preservatives are added.

Zoomdog Gourmet offers many fun flavors, such as The Dog’s Revenge, barbeque flavored men, and Double Carob Brownies. Lisa Peterson and her dog, Howser, love buying Zoomdog Gourmet treats. “Howser’s favorite are definitely the Cheesy Chicken Chews!” says Peterson. The highlight, however, of Zoomdog Gourmet is their mini cupcake line, frosted and handmade especially for man’s best friend. Zoomdog Gourmet’s tasty treats will be available at the PoochPalooza. For more information about upcoming events, how to sign up for agility classes, and the PoochPalooza, please visit Zoomdog Agility and Sports Club’s website at www.zoomdogagility.org or call 801710-1046.

Nashville Tribute Band performing at USU Drawing large, enthusiastic crowds throughout the Western states with the release of their new CD “The Work: A Nashville Tribute to the Missionaries,” the Nashville Tribute Band will perform perform tonight at Utah State University’s Kent Concert Hall at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $11 for adults, $9 for students and $9.50 for groups, and can be purchased by going to the NTB website: www.nashvilletributeband.com. Jeremy Barron, director of Artist Management and Event Productions for R Legacy Entertainment, distributor of “The Work,” said in all of his years of music promotion nationally and internationally, “I’ve never seen anything sell so well. The shows have been well-attended and wellreceived.” Lead singer and songwriter Jason Deere has made a career out of writing hit songs and developing hit artists. His song, “Love’s

Lookin’ Good on You,” cowritten with Matt Lopez of Due West for Lady Antebellum, went platinum. He’s

also penned memorable tunes for Little Big Town, Leann Rimes, Jessica Simpson, Jim Brickman, SHeDAISY, Be

Be Winans, Natalie Grant, Point of Grace, Wanessa Camargo, Leonardo, Luiza Possi, The Wreckers, James

Wesley, Stealing Angels and Due West, and has a lengthy list of film and television credits. Deere assembled an all-star cast of musicians to create NTB including Dan Truman, Grammy-nominated piano player for Diamond Rio; Emmy-nominated guitarist/ composer Ron Saltmarsh; Katherine Nelson, known for her starring role as Emma in the film “Emma Smith: My Story,” as well as the hot country trio Due West. NTB’s latest musical compilation completes a trilogy of CDs dedicated to significant moments in the LDS Church’s past — from its beginnings to the epic handcart pioneer exodus to Salt Lake. “The Work: A Nashville Tribute to the Missionaries” brings to light the decades-old practice of men and women traveling around the globe to share the message of the church’s doctrine as missionaries.

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, September 9, 2011

On Saturday, Sept. 10, dog lovers of Cache Valley are invited to attend Zoomdog Agility and Sports Club’s first annual PoochPalooza. This free event will be held at the Cache County Fairgrounds from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The PoochPalooza is geared toward building up the Cache canine community and encourages people to spend more time with family, including the dog, and get together with other local dog owners. The day’s schedule will include low-key agility trials, showcasing many of Zoomdog’s handler/canine teams. Lee Tansock and her dog, Bailey, have been taking agility classes since last summer. Tansock explains that she is looking forward to the PoochPalooza because, “I am

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Get active with your dog at PoochPalooza


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, September 9, 2011

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Monument to recall jazz greats’ hotel AKRON, Ohio (AP) — The dream that first came to Miller Horns 16 years ago is coming to life. Horns dreamed there was a sacred spot in Akron to memorialize the Hotel Matthews, a North Howard Street fixture where such jazz giants as Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie, Dizzie Gillespie, Cab Calloway and others once stayed. “It is important” to remember the vibrant district that existed on North Howard Street, said Horns, a Navy veteran and artist who gradu-

ated from the Cleveland Institute of Art. “It will be good for people to recall the black businesses that had been on Howard Street that no longer exist.” Workers began by clearing grass from a city-owned piece of land on the northeast corner of North Howard Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard on Tuesday. That’s where the $100,000 to $110,000 monument to honor the rich African-American entertainment and business district that existed on North Howard Street in the 20th century will

be built — on the spot where the hotel stood. Popovic said the vast majority of the work on the project is being donated by a number of firms in Akron. Among them, Neidert Fabricating Inc., is donating a barber pole that it is making. It will be part of the monument because there was a barbershop in the hotel. “I think it’s pretty exciting,” said Thomas E. Gilbert, project manager and retired construction director for the Akron Metropolitan Housing Authority. “It is going to be a nice addition to Northside.”

Unstoppable Fassbender discusses new ‘Jane Eyre’ LONDON (AP) — At the moment, there’s just no stopping Michael Fassbender. The “X-Men: First Class” and “Inglourious Basterds” star has just stepped off the plane from the Venice Film Festival, where he’s promoting two films, not one. Those would be “Shame,” director Steve McQueen’s hugely anticipated follow to “Hunger” — another virtuoso Fassbender project — and Steven Soderbergh’s “A Dangerous Method,” in which Fassbender stars as Carl Jung alongside Viggo Mortensen and Keira Knightley. Oh, and he’s had a busy summer in the Scottish highlands filming Ridley Scott’s science fiction epic “Prometheus.” Now the German-born Irish actor is back in London for his latest film “Jane Eyre,” where his brooding and doleful Mr. Rochester runs smack into Mia Wasikowska’s timid but fiercely feministic Jane. “I started reading, I was like ‘God for me he comes across as very bipolar,’” Fassbender told The Associated Press. “He can be so distant, and sort of closed off and isolated really, even in a room full of people, and then he could be so connected and so sort of emotionally excitable, I thought that was something that could be played with.” Set in Yorkshire, England, in the early 19th century, Charlotte Bronte’s classic tale of the young governess who falls hopelessly in love with her employer has been told countless times. In addition to scores of TV, radio and stage adaptations,

there have been least 17 movies, with the first full-length feature film dating back to 1914. Until now, the most famous “Jane Eyre” was the 1943 film starring Orson Welles and Joan Fontaine, but American director Cary Fukunaga’s latest version may challenge that status. Fukunaga’s film opened in the U.S. in March to widespread critical acclaim and is now enjoying another round of positive reviews from British critics. Fassbender gives the credit to Fukunaga, whose last film “Sin Nombre” about Central American immigrants trying to reach the U.S won the 2009 directing and cinematography awards at the Sundance Film Festival. “Cary is someone that is really talented in terms of telling a story visually first and foremost,” he said. “His framing is exceptional.” The starkness of the Yorkshire Moors and the ostentatious yet austere setting of Thornfield Hall are beautifully portrayed, but Fassbender says Wasikowska’s performance is what makes this version stand out. “I do think that this is her film and she’s so exceptional in it, so young but so mature in her choices,” he says of his 22-year-old co-star. Despite Jane’s hands-off manner toward her employer, Fassbender and Wasikowska sizzle on the screen, and Rochester’s brooding and explosive character gets an extra touch of humanity from Fassbender.

Gilbert said that “even with our economic downturn, it speaks well of our community that these contractors will step up and donate their labor and material to recognize the Matthews Hotel’s place in history.” The Hotel Matthews was owned by George Mathews, who initially established a barbershop in 1920 and opened the hotel in 1925 at 77 N. Howard St. The hotel stayed open until 1978 and was torn down in the early 1980s. Mathews, who endowed a

scholarship at the University of Akron in 1964, died in 1982 at the age of 95. Horns, 62, an Akron native and North High graduate, has been talking about building a memorial since 1995. At one time, he said, there were more than 50 blackowned businesses, including nightclubs, barbershops and record stores, along North Howard Street. In 2001, the Ohio Bicentennial Commission, placed a marker on the site of what was called Hotel Matthews to commemorate it.


By Rasha Madkour For The Associated Press

Self-control, as it turns out, is like a muscle: It can be exhausted from overuse but it can also be strengthened through exercise. The latter quality is good news since most problems — drug abuse, violence, overspending, underachievement, unhealthy habits — can be traced back to a lack of selfcontrol. That’s according to “Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength,” a new book by Florida State University psychologist Roy F. Baumeister and New York Times science writer John Tierney. The authors cite fascinating lab experiments that reveal how the human mind and body work and, less compellingly, profile famous people who have exhibited

great self-control and explain how they did it. In one experiment, college students who had been fasting were put in a room suffused with the smell of freshly baked chocolate chip cookies. Some were allowed to eat cookies, others were offered chocolate and a third group could only snack on radishes. Researchers left the room to increase the temptation of the radish group. Afterward, the students were given unsolvable puzzles to work on. The first two groups of students attempted them for about 20 minutes, as did a control group of students who hadn’t been offered any food. The radish group, however, gave up after 8 minutes. Their effort resisting the sweets earlier had left them with less energy to tackle the puzzles. Researchers found a similar depletion effect among people

— even for people serving sentences for identical crimes. Interestingly, the board members’ midmorning snack break also made a significant difference: Prisoners appearing right before the break had about a 15 percent chance of being granted parole versus a 70 percent chance for those who came right after the break. When it comes to childrearing approaches, the authors tout the benefits of promoting self-control instead of the more in-vogue trend of promoting self-esteem. called to make decisions all day: members of an Israeli prison parole board. Prisoners whose cases were heard early in the morning were granted parole about 70 percent of the time, compared with less than 10 percent for those who appeared late in the day

Seifert writes an emotional love affair By Summer Moore For The Associated Press

Christine Seifert is known for her essays on Stephenie Meyer’s “Twilight” saga and for coining the term “abstinence porn.” In her debut young adult novel, “The Predicteds,” Seifert shows she can almost compete on Meyer’s turf. Sixteen-year-old Daphne has just moved to Quiet, Okla. Her high school is involved in PROFILE, a new program that can predict a student’s capacity for committing a violent crime. Daphne isn’t convinced the program is legitimate, but she’s more than a little involved because it was created by her mother. During her first week at Quiet

High, a student brings a gun to school and goes on a shooting spree. Daphne is spared because Jesse, a mysterious and attractive classmate, stuffs her into a cabinet and overpowers the shooter. Students and their parents decide that PROFILE is more relevant than ever and want the findings released to the public. As Daphne and Jesse start to fall for each other, rumors about Jesse’s past and his mysterious relationship with the shooter’s sister spread throughout the school. Seifert has clearly been studying the “Twilight” novels. Her

idea of “abstinence porn” is shown in the way Jesse and Daphne interact with each other: They have a tumultuous emotional affair, but hold back from sex. However, the intensity falls short of the scenes that Meyer wrote for the vampire Edward and his girlfriend, Bella. The Jesse-Daphne relationship is almost everything readers want in an angstfilled young adult novel. But readers don’t get to know Jesse, and although the story is told from Daphne’s perspective, she keeps readers at arm’s length.

They tell the story of two Asian-American sisters whose mother would pre-empt supermarket candy whining episodes by telling them they could have a candy bar on the next shopping trip if they read a book during the week. “Willpower” contains dozens of thought-provoking nuggets like these, including an entire section on the psychology of dieting. These bright spots are unfortunately diluted, however, by a rambling chapter on an African explorer and other instances of unfocused, belabored writing.

new york times best sellers COMBINED PRINT & E-BOOK FICTION 1. “The Help,” by Kathryn Stockett 2. “Blind Faith,” by CJ Lyons 3. “Second Son,” by Lee Child 4. “Water for Elephants,” by Sara Gruen 5. “Flash and Bones,” by Kathy Reichs E-Book Fiction 1. “The Help,” by Kathryn Stockett 2. “Blind Faith,” by CJ Lyons 3. “Second Son,” by Lee Child 4. “The Abbey,” by Chris Culver 5. “Water for Elephants,” by Sara Gruen E-Book Nonfiction 1. “Heaven is for Real,” by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent 2. “A Stolen Life,” by Jaycee Dugard 3. “Unbroken,” by Laura Hillenbrand 4. “In the Garden of Beasts,” by Erik Larson 5. “Bossypants,” by Tina Fey Hardcover Advice & Misc. 1. “The 17 Day Diet,” by Mike Moreno 2. “Go the _ to Sleep,” by Adam Mansbach. Illustrated by Ricardo Cortés 3. “The Dukan Diet,” by Pierre Dukan 4. “Prime Time,” by Jane Fonda 5. “Aftershock,” by David Wiedemer, Robert A. Wiedemer and Cindy Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, September 9, 2011

New book explores how willpower works

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Books


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, September 9, 2011

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CrossworD By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Way to be led 7. Persona non grata 12. “The Early Show” network 15. Smart-alecky 19. Garment part, of old 20. Peace 21. Survives 23. Father and son in entertainment 26. Irish revolutionary Robert 27. Sweep ___ 28. The Great ___ (Big Dipper) 29. Palindromic conjunction 30. Musical notes 31. Geologic period 33. Leaf unit 36. Netherlands city 38. Miss the mark 39. Without hope 42. Camelot, to Arthur 46. Horned goddess 49. Sourness 51. Cup filler 54. Islam denomination 55. Father and son in entertainment 59. Foreign dignitary 60. Easter’s beginning? 61. “___ How They Run” (Patterson novel) 62. Turning point? 63. Gone by 64. Speaker of only one language 67. Shines 69. Duck down 71. Refrain from singing? 73. Scared, in some parts of the south 76. “The Faerie Queene” division 79. Sacred text 81. Interval composed of three tones 85. Blood letters 86. Complete 89. Mom-and-pop grp. 91. Fifth, e.g. abbr. 92. Nigerian language

93. Father and son in politics 98. Iris holder 99. Electromagnetic unit, for short 100. Swellhead 101. Asteroid discovered in 1898 102. Snuggles 104. Early arriver 106. First lady 108. Copy to a floppy 111. Organic compound 112. “Earth Girls ___ Easy” (Julie Brown song) 113. “Now I get it!” 116. U.N. working-conditions agcy. 119. In danger of snapping 121. See 31-Across 123. Flightless birds 125. Father and son in sports 131. Scholarly folks 132. Who “ever loved you more than I,” in song 133. Rock salt 134. While starter 135. Kind of theater 136. Country album? 137. Heir, sometimes Down 1. Inquiring one 2. Snail trail 3. Footing 4. Lothario 5. Top-grossing film of all time as of 2011 6. Asian capital 7. Tony ___ (boot company) 8. Fujairah bigwig 9. Snap 10. Old verb ending 11. Shag rug 12. Carbonated drink 13. Move, under protest 14. Endured 15. Card 16. Catalina, e.g. 17. Top banana 18. To be, to Brutus 22. Like some calen-

dars 24. Federal grp. created in 1977 25. Porcelain piece 32. Kind of bar 33. Business competition 34. Tennis great Gibson 35. Maja painter 37. Screen 38. Founded: Abbr. 39. Half a sawbuck 40. Certain ratio 41. Math term 43. Coming up 44. Loyal subject 45. See 72-Down 46. Mosque V.I.P. 47. Kind of palm 48. Neighbor of Pakistan 50. Christmas ___ 52. Sticking point? 53. “The Matrix” hero 56. Clique 57. Atoll protector 58. Make more attractive 65. Giant Hall-of-Famer 66. Obsessed 68. Skin disorder 70. Simplified version of Esperanto 72. Resident of 45-Down 74. Strong liquors 75. Rosie, for one 76. Certain Louisianian 77. ___ the law 78. Butts in 80. Orbital high point 82. Literary adverb 83. Taro variety 84. Some beans 87. Not just “a” 88. Topper 90. One who hasn’t turned pro? 94. Chows down 95. Raspberry 96. Giant syllable 97. Watchman ___, Chinese Christian author 103. Debaucher 105. Wished undone

107. Like some abuse 109. Using the soft palate 110. Matrikin 112. Bibliophile’s suffix 113. Cliffside dwelling 114. Wapitis 115. Up to now 116. Not occupied 117. Animal house? 118. Leavings 120. Salon sound 121. Valle del Bove locale 122. Valuable deposits 124. In custody 126. On Soc. Sec. 127. ___ lab 128. Scribble 129. Fa follower 130. “Doctor ___” (BBC series)

answers from last week

Herald Journal one to two days prior to the event. Calendar items can be submitted Deadlines inbyThe email at hjhappen@hjnews.com. Any press releases or photos for events listed in the Cache Magazine calendar items are due Wednesday by 5 p.m. They will also run for free

first half of Cache Magazine can be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com. Poems and photos can also by sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com and run on a space-available basis if selected.

www.ThemeCrosswords.com


SATURDAY

We all look forward to great, healthy food from the garden! This month, Food $ense girls will share wonderful garden tomato recipes that are sure to be remembered! Join us Friday, Sept. 9 from noon to 1 p.m. for great food and healthy ideas. The class will be in the Providence Macey’s Little Theater.

The Cache Public Shooting Range and the Cache Valley Vaqueros will host a Cowboy Action Shooting (CAS) match Sept. 10, starting at 9 a.m. Rules of the Single Action Shooting Society (SASS) will apply. The cost will be $12 per shooter. The Cache Public Shooting Range (753-4600) is located at 2851 W. 200 North, three miles West on Logan on Highway 30 to Tremonton. If you would like to get involved in a CAS Club in the Logan area, this is the place. Eye and ear protection required. Spectators welcome. For more information contact Rich Meacham at 435770-9399.

OPTIONS for Independence will have a picnic at Tony Grove Friday, Sept. 9. Please bring a sandwich and OPTIONS will provide the rest. Cost is $2 for food and $2 for transportation. Call Mandie at 435-7535353 ext. 108 for more information or to schedule a ride. Join the Cache Valley Stargazers to learn about the night sky and hear about the latest astronomy news. The Cache Valley Stargazers are holding their monthly meeting Friday, Sept. 9 at 7:30 p.m. in Room 244 of the Science-EngineeringResearch (SER) Building on the USU campus (free parking in the lot adjacent to SER, behind the Performance Hall). The meeting will feature a joint talk by Dr. Jan Sojka from USU entitled “THE NORTHERN LIGHTS: Nature’s Paintings in the Sky” — get that dusty telescope out of the closet or the binoculars out from under the car seat and join the fun. Everyone is welcome to join us, experts and beginners alike! For information visit www. cachestargazers.org or email cache.stargazers@gmail.com. Come meet local children’s author Shaunda Kennedy Wenger at Hastings Book Store in Logan on Friday, Sept. 9, from 5 to 9 p.m. She will be signing her children’s books, “The Ghost in Me” and “Into the Forest Again,” as well as “The Book Lover’s Cookbook,” which was written with local author Janet Kay Jensen. See how she can bring fun, interactive presentations to your school with an author visit.

The fourth annual Hotter Than Haiti Fun Run will be held Saturday, Sept. 10, at the Wellsville Square. Registration is from 8 to 9 a.m. and the race starts at 9 a.m. Cost is $12 for adults and $8 for children ages 10 and under and includes a water bottle and Haiti bracelet. All proceeds go to “Reach Out to Haiti,” a nonprofit organization in Haiti. Raffle tickets will be sold for $1 each and we will have lots of fun raffle prizes. Haiti paintings for $15 will also be on sale. A fundraiser yard sale will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday at 57 S. Main, Smithfield. Money raised will go to cover medical expenses for the family of Stacey Buhler Heff, who was thrown from a horse on Aug. 16 and has suffered brain trauma and other injuries. Face-painting and baked goods will also be available. Commemorate the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11, 2001 through service. For 24 hours (9 a.m. Sept. 10 to 9 a.m. Sept. 11), we’ll be doing service projects across the valley and we need volunteers. Come to the Historic Courthouse Sept. 10 at 9 a.m. to sign up for a project or submit a project of your own at

911dayofservice.blogspot.com. Check out the website for more details. Andrew Morrill will be entertaining residents and the public with beautiful piano music Saturday, Sept. 10, at 3 p.m. at the Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. Please come and join us for this free event that is open to the public. For more information call 792-0353. The Apple Days Parade Committee is accepting entries for the 2011 Apple Days Parade, “America, Never Forget,” to be held Saturday, Sept. 10 at 3 p.m. in River Heights City. There are no entry fees, but please call Diane Weese at 753-2582 or Lisa Ellis at 7524680 to reserve your spot, or for more information. The Staples will perform rock/alternative music with The Dignitaries and Whilmington on Saturday, Sept. 10, at 7 p.m. at Why Sound. Cost is $5. River Heights Fun Run 5K will be held Saturday, Sept. 10, at 9 a.m. The children’s 1-mile run starts at 9:30 a.m. Prizes and awards will be given out. Apple pie and ice cream will be served. Register early at Runner’s North or day of registration. Cost is $2. Cache Demolition Derby will be held Saturday, Sept. 10, at 7 p.m. at the Cache County Fairgrounds. Cost is $12 for reserved seating, $10 for general admission and $5 for children younger than 12. Proceeds support non-profit auxiliary groups which aid the Sheriff’s Office. There will be a ceremonial flag raising Saturday, Sept. 10, at 9 a.m. at the newly installed flag pole at Emmanuel Baptist Church, 310 N. 800 East in Hyrum. The American Legion Hyrum, Post 47 led by Commander Kelly Cronquist, will officiate at this ceremony. All are welcome as we honor our

nation and those who have given so much. For questions call Pastor Steve at 208-5205077.

MONDAY Common Ground Outdoor Adventures is holding at Bike ‘n’ Ice activity Monday, Sept. 12, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Cost is $5. We will start at Common Ground (355 N. 100 East in Logan), ride for a half hour, then grab some delicious ice cream. Enjoy ice skating and “Gnomeo and Juliet” at a family movie night at Eccles Ice Center on Monday, Sept. 12, at 5:45 p.m. Cost is $30 for a family up to eight, or $6.25 for individual admission.

TUESDAY “Music for the Small and Tall” fall class session begins Tuesday, Sept. 13. The class is for babies and tots ages 9 months to 2 years. The focus of the class is for parents to have some happy, musical time with their babies. Lots of wiggles and tickles, knee bounces, simple instruments and singing. For more information call Ewa Wilczynski at 755-0853. Cost is $48 for the session which lasts through Nov. 1. Classes are held at the Thatcher Young Mansion, 35 W. 100 South in Logan.

WEDNESDAY OPTIONS for Independence will attend Disabilities Day at the Utah State Fair. Admission to the fair is $1 with complimentary snacks, drinks and rides from noon to 2 p.m. Lunch prices will vary and transportation is $5. Call Mandie at 435-7535353 ext. 108 for more information or to schedule a ride. Cache Valley Assisted Living will host community Bingo on Wednesday, Sept. 14, at 2:303:15 p.m. at 233 N. Main St., Providence

Trina Thomas will not only show us how to make her “Herald Journal Winning” salsa, but she’ll teach us a few other salsa recipes and how to make the tortilla chips to go with them! The class is Wednesday, Sept. 14, from 7 to 8 p.m. This is a free cooking and community class offered at Providence Macey’s Little Theater.

THURSDAY Stephanie Skews will teach a class how to make chicken breast with bone-in and herbbutter stuffed under the skin at a free cooking and community class Thursday, Sept. 15, from 7 to 8 p.m. at Macey’s Little Theater. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will be hold a rock climbing activity Thursday, Sept. 15, from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Rock Has. Cost is $8. For more information call 713-0288. Cache Valley Assisted Living will host a family BBQ Thursday, Sept. 15 from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at 233 N. Main Street, Providence. There will be entertainment and bouncy houses for children. An educational presentation titled “Navigating the Financial Storm” will be held on Thursday, Sept. 15, at 7 p.m. in the Cache Business Resource Center Room 1901 at the BATC West Campus located at 1410 N. 1000 West. This presentation is open (at no cost) to the entire community and everyone is invited to share in “Practical Strategies and Life Lessons” from the “School of Hard Knocks.” Contact Cindy Roberts at 435-760-7937 for more information. The monthly meeting of Community Education Classes on emergency preparedness will be held on Thursday, Sept. 15 at 7 p.m. at 640 N. 200 East in Smithfield in the Relief Society Room. This month’s topic is “Dehydrating and Freezing.” The class is open to everyone.

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, September 9, 2011

Friday

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The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, September 9, 2011

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