Page 1

Let it fly

Valley artists use dairy machinery to create sculpture for Flying Objects display

The Herald Journal

JUNE 22-28, 2012


contents

June 22-28, 2012

MUSIC 5 See what’s coming up at the Logan Tabernacle

theater 3 ‘Big River’ portrays

classic Mark Twain tale

10 Charlie Schill reviews

Old Lyric’s ‘Steel Magnolias’

12 ‘Private Lives’ continues at Caine Lyric Theatre

MOVIES 6 ‘Brave’ isn’t Pixar’s best 7 ‘Vampire Hunter’ gets three

stars

ART 4 Summerfest contest winners announced

BOOKS 13 See reviews and best-sellers

COLUMN 12 Dennis Hinkamp returns

CROSSWORD 14 Try this week’s puzzle

CALENDAR 15 See what’s happening this week

Jerry Fuhriman works on a sculpture entitled “Queen Priscilla’s Gambit” made of old dairy machinery. The sculpture, completed by Cache Valley artists Fuhriman and Arthur Taylor, was chosen to be on display in Salt Lake City as part of the Art Council’s Flying Objects 3.0 contest. (Cody Gochnour/Herald Journal)

FROM THE EDITOR

F

or the last two days, the Salt Lake Art Design Board has been installing a series of sculptures depicting flying objects near Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, near Abravanel Hall and at the Hotel Monaco as a temporary public art project in Salt Lake City. “Queen Priscilla’s Gambit,” a flying aircraft sculpture created by Cache Valley artists Jerry Fuhriman and Arthur Taylor, is in the mix. Their sculpture was constructed with old dairy machinery and will be their second sculpture to be displayed as part

of the Flying Objects display. They had to enter the “Gambit” in a contest and 12 sculptures constructed of steel, bronze, copper, found objects, industrial tools or fiberglass were selected. When I heard about the contest, I found a few websites where photos of previous Flying Objects winners are posted. I love the creativity. When I think of flying, I automatically turn to airplanes and birds, but artists always seem to think outside the box. A few years ago, another Cache Valley artist, Michael Bingham, sculpted a cow flying with a rocket on its back for the contest. That’s a pretty cool idea if you ask me. There was also a flying fish sculpture and paper airplanes made of mylar

and metal. One woman constructed a big orange and yellow umbrella, and another artist made a sculpture of hands playing with yo-yos. One of my favorite sculptures displayed as part of the project was an 18-foot dandelion stalk with a single “parachute” still clinging on. It reminded me of all those dandelions I blew on to make wishes as a child. I love that artists can create objects beyond the ordinary and remind us of simple and extraordinary things. I also like the idea of taking used objects — like dairy machinery — to create something new. Read all about Fuhriman and Taylor’s sculpture on page 8. — Manette Newbold


Take to the river with Huck and Jim Mark Twain’s classic novel “Huckleberry Finn” is brought to life in “Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” part of the Old Lyric Repertory Company’s 2012 season. “This is one of my favorite musicals of all time,” said Dennis Hassan, artistic director of the OLRC and professor in the Caine College of the Arts at Utah State University. “The music ranges from hilarious blue-grass numbers to intensely moving spirituals, all combined with musical theater tunes.” Set to the distinctly American music of country singer-songwriter Roger Miller, “Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” is a toe-tappin’ kneeslappin’ adventure, said Denise Albiston, director of marketing and public relations for the CCA. “Big River” opens June 28 and continues June 29-30 and then selected dates through Aug. 8. Curtain is 7:30 p.m. with select matinee performances at 2 p.m., including a matinee June 30. The full schedule is online at http:// arts.usu.edu/lyric/htm/ schedule. “This show is an epic journey that will change you,” said Stefan Espinosa, who plays Huckleberry Finn. “No one will leave the theater the same person they were when they entered.” Huck, an uneducated, backwoods boy, innocent in many ways, tells this story, said Espinosa. This show asks the audience to personally assess each individual moral compass

WHAT: “Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” WHEN: June 28, 29 and 30, and select dates through Aug. 8 WHERE: Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 W. Center St., Logan TICKETS: For tickets, visit the Caine College of the Arts Box Office, call 435-797-8022 or go online at arts.usu.edu. Tickets are also available at the Caine Lyric Theatre.

and define right and wrong. Espinosa returns to the OLRC for his second season, appearing last year as Seymour Krelborn in “Little Shop of Horrors,” as well as in “Amadeus” and “See How They Run.” Long time OLRC audiences will remember Lego Lewis who returns to the company this year and is first seen as Jim in “Big River.” A USU graduate, Lewis has extensive credits, including a national tour of “The King and I” where he logged more than 500 performances. With the OLRC, he also appears in “Lend Me a Tenor” this season. The 2012 OLRC season also includes “Steel Magnolias,” “Private Lives,” “Lend Me a Tenor,” “Greater Tuna,” and “Charlotte’s Web.” Each show runs on selected dates June through August and is performed in the Caine Lyric Theatre, located at 28 W. Center St. Tickets for OLRC pro-

“‘Brave’ has less in the way of grown-up humor and more in the ‘kids will laugh at naked bums’ type of humor. That’s not to say that ‘Brave’ is a bad movie, but it simply has a hard time stacking up to the likes of ‘Toy Story’ or ‘Wall-e.’” – Aaron Peck, page 6

PET OF THE WEEK Available for adoption

Lego Lewis (as Jim) and Stefan Espinosa (as Huck) headline the Old Lryic Repertory Company production of “Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” The musical opens at the Caine Lyric Theatre on Thursday, June 28.

ductions can be purchased by visiting the Caine College of the Arts Box Office at Utah State University in Room 139-B of the Chase Fine Arts Center open 10 a.m.­to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, by calling 435-797-8022 or online at the Caine College of the Arts website, arts.usu.edu. Tickets are also available at the Caine Lyric Theatre,

from noon to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, and an hour prior to curtain on show nights. Individual ticket prices range from $18-$25 for adults, $15$21 for seniors and USU faculty and staff and $12$18 for USU students and youth. For more information on the OLRC’s 2012 season, visit arts.usu.edu/lyric.

Pet: Marigold From: Four Paws Rescue Why she’s so lovable: Mari-

gold is sweet, gentle and loving. She has a beautiful white, cream and gray coat, with unusual “marbling” on her sides. She is a little bit shy in new situations, but once she warms up, she is very affectionate and playful. Marigold is 1 year old. She has been spayed, is fully vaccinated, and ready to join her new family. She needs to be an indoor-only cat.

Page 3 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 22, 2012

ALL MIXED UP

QUOTABLE


Page 4 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 22, 2012

all mixed up Summerfest winners chosen from 97 entries The winners of the Summerfest contests have been announced. The Plein Air paintings and photographs were created in the Cache Valley area between 8 a.m. Monday, June 11, and noon Wednesday, June 13. Local and regional artists turned in their framed artwork and sculptural creations Wednesday, June 13, to be reviewed and judged for the Summerfest 2012 Contests. The judges for the contests included Lisa Sewell, executive director for the Utah Arts Festival; Sheryl Gillilan, executive director and curator for Art Access Above: “He Painted as Far in Salt Lake City; and as He Could Reach,” by Holly Conger, local Brienne M. Brown. Right: artist and USU Arts “Trenton Mill” by Joseph Bridge Program CoorAlleman. dinator in Logan. “We were all really “This creative process impressed with the size was so exciting that of the show and the Summerfest wanted to quality of the pieces,” find a way to inspire said Gillilan. “Cache more participation as Valley is such a beauwell as multiple meditiful area so it’s no ums,” said Marianne surprise that so many Sidwell, executive artists were inspired to director for Summerparticipate.” fest. This was the first All 97 entries were year that Summerfest on display throughout offered a contest for the Summerfest Arts Found & Recycled Festival as part of the Art. This contest was silent auction. made possible in part In addition to the by funding from the Plein Air contests, the Utah Division of Arts public was invited to & Museums through the Random Acts of Art fill out forms for “Best of Show.” This award grant. Last year, Summerfest had guest artist was chosen from four artists who received the Rich Brooks create a most votes. From there, Jeff Wallis who has partraveling piece of art ticipated in Summerfest the Summerfest Board out of found and recyfor multiple years and of Trustees selected cled materials.

Plein Air Paint-out winners First Place: Brienne M. Brown, “He Painted as Far as He Could Reach” Second Place: Joseph Alleman, “Trenton Mill” Third Place: Sean Wallis, “Standing Strong” Honorable Mention: Jeannie Millecam, “Caffe Ibis” Honorable Mention: Lynda Burrus, “My Cache Valley Farm” Honorable Mention: Suzanne Welling, “I Saw Wellsville Morning” Honorable Mention: Matt Larson, “Any Street Logan” Plein Air Photography winners First Place: Levi Sim, “Girl With a Hoop Earring” Second Place: Levi Sim, “Summer Camp” Third Place: Amy Jensen, “Day Dream” Honorable Mention: Peter Warda, “Cryciformalis” Honorable Mention: Tyson Godfrey, “Golden Sunset” Honorable Mention: Andrea Lynn, “Painted Dragonfly” Honorable Mention: Alyssa Henke, “Building Dreams” Honorable Mention: Mandy Bagley, “Workman of the Skies” Honorable Mention: Brooke Snow, “The Fort” Honorable Mention: Sherrie Troseth, “Stay Away!” Found and recycled art winners First Place: Bradley Van Anderson, “Skiing for America” Second Place: Peggy Wolford Rasmussen, “What Wood it Be?” Third Place: DeAnna Hulme, “Pooped Tired Exhausted” Honorable Mention: Doug Adams, “Patent Date” Honorable Mention: Nikki Root, “Vintage Classics”

is a regular in the plein air competitions. This project was sup-

ported in part by the Utah Division of Arts & Museums, with funding from the State of Utah and the National Endowment for the Arts and generous support provided by the

Cache County RAPZ fund. Artist hospitality and reception was provided by support from Utah State University Dining Services and USU Inn and Conference Center.


Monday, June 25 Utah Festival Opera and Musical Theatre Singers and instrumentalists will perform their favorite music in addition to previewing the upcoming UFOMT season.

Wednesday, June 27 Willow Valley Singer and String Band

and Hyrum area. Members are Bonnie and Larry Slade, Vaughn and Linda Griggs, Susan Huff, Sheri Schiess, Jenna Oakey, Todd Slade, Jeff Jeppsen, Shelley Waite, Leigh Hopkins and Wes Smedley. The Willow Valley String Band will join the Singers with a selection of delightful Swedish folk dances to celebrate Midsummer, a popular holiday in Sweden.

Willow Valley Singers specializes in a cappella hymns, gospel songs and sentimental songs from the 1800s to modern times. “Singing this inspirational music, and particularly the music of the Civil War period, is a unique bonding experience,” says Bonnie Slade, founder and director of the group that is made up of friends and neighbors in the Nibley

Thursday, June 28 Karla Axtell

Karla Axtell, pianist and organist, will perform a collection of organ pieces featuring brilliant keyboard works of Charles-Marie Widor, J.S. Bach, Johan Pachelbel, Robert Cundick and James Kasen. She has accompanied the Cache Children’s Choir, the Multi-Cultural Messiah Choir, vocal soloists, and is currently a rehearsal accompanist for the American Festival Chorus directed by Craig Jessop.

Friday, June 29 Megan Line and Randall Bagley Megan Line, from American Fork,

started playing the piano at the age of six where she continued to take lessons for 12 years. She started vocal training at the age of 14 and began writing music when she was 16 years old. She moved to Logan in the summer of 2011 where she attended Utah State University and studied music education. Randall Bagley has been performing stand up comedy for almost 20 years and this is his fourth year in a row performing at the Tabernacle Summer Series. He is a past winner of the Utah State University Comedy Competition and has opened for the Smothers Brothers.

Tuesday, June 26 Mountain Crest High School Young Artists

Steve Albrechtsen is a tried it out in seventh 2012 graduate of Moungrade, I was a natural. tain Crest High School I’ve been playing for four where he was a Valedicyears now and I still love torian and Music Sterling it,” Jacob says. Scholar. Steve has been Jessica Burt has taken playing the saxophone lessons from Laurie Hart for seven years and has for two years. She is a enjoyed playing in the recent graduate of MounUSU All-Northern HS tain Crest High School. Jazz Band. He received This summer Jessica is superior ratings this year working with the Utah at Region and State Solo Festival Opera Company. and Ensemble for his “Singing is what I love alto sax solo and saxoto do and I hope I can phone quartet. He is the continue working on it son of Doug and Connie throughout my life,” she Albrechtsen of Provisaid. dence. Erin Colledge, 16, is Jacob Matthew Barthe daughter of Brent rett plays the tuba. He and Annette Colledge knew he wanted to play of Providence and will after watching a friend’s be a junior at Mountain brother play the instruCrest High School. She ment. “When I finally has been studying the

cello for six years and is “Carmen” and “George currently studying with M!” She has studied Kelly McConkie Stewart voice under Laurie Hart of Salt Lake City. Erin for two years. is planning to major in Emma Mark, vocally cello performance and performing since the age pedagogy in college and of 4, grew up in a musiwill be performing with cal family, learning to the Lyceum Music Festi- read music and harmoval at Zermatt Resort this nize with her two older summer. siblings. Singing, howEmily Feuz grew up ever, isn’t her only interwith a love of music est; theatre has caught and has worked to her attention. Through develop her singing talthe four years of her high ent. Soon to be a senior school education she at Mountain Crest High has performed in sevSchool, she participates eral shows, musicals and in the Magic and Acaplays. Emma will attend pella choirs. She is also Weber State University in a member of the drama the fall to begin studies club. She has previously in psychology. worked with the Utah Jefferson Merkley, Festival Opera and Musi- 18, just graduated from cal Theatre Company in Mountain Crest High

School. He is working as the nature director at a Boy Scout Camp for the summer and then plans to go on an LDS mission in the fall. Jefferson is the son of Erik and Karen Merkley and resides in Providence. He has been taking piano for 10 years and is a student of Annette Colledge. Marquessa Merkley, 16, will be a junior at Mountain Crest High School. Marquessa has been taking piano lessons for 10 years and is a student of Annette Colledge. She is the daughter of Erik and Karen Merkley and resides in Providence. She teaches Handicraft Merit Badge Classes at Camp Hunt during the

summer. Charlotte Petersen, 16, started with the violin when she was about 5 years old and then switched to the cello at age 8 because her older sister played the cello. Charlotte also likes to run. She participates in track and cross country. She likes to play Ultimate Frisbee at meets and after practice. Jake Whitney, 18, son of George and Julie Whitney of College Ward, is a 2012 graduate of Mountain Crest High School. He has studied piano for 12 years and voice for two years. He enjoys music of all kinds, but especially likes to sing.

Page 5 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 22, 2012

Here’s the lineup for Tabernacle performances


‘Brave’ isn’t Pixar’s best, but it’s worth seeing The Reel Place Aaron Peck

Page 6 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 22, 2012

movies

Pixar has had an illustrious run of stellar movies. Their one-andonly stinker coming with last year’s dismal “Cars 2.” “Brave” somewhat restores Pixar to its lofty stature, but many people will recognize it as being a second-tier Pixar film. While it’s beautifully animated and has a decent story attached to lively characters, it feels like it’s missing that connective emotional tissue which runs through most of their movies. Most Pixar movies speak to all ages; there’s usually something in there that everyone from the tiniest tot to the most hardened parent can enjoy. “Brave” has less in the way of grown-up humor and more in the “kids will laugh at naked bums” type of humor. That’s not to say that “Brave” is a bad movie, but it simply has a hard time stacking up to the likes of “Toy Story” or “Wall-e.” It’s easier to think of “Brave” as a fairy tale that a mother might tell to her daughter

Disney/Pixar

This film image shows the character Merida in a scene from "Brave."

★★★ ‘Brave’ Directors // Mark Andrews and Brenda Chapman Starring // Kelly Macdonald, Billy Connolly and Emma Thompson Rated // PG for some scary action and rude humor

before bedtime: A lesmovies before, Elinor son learned once upon a and Merida find themtime about a young prin- selves at an impasse. cess, Merida (voiced Kudos goes to the by Kelly Macdonald), people who made who wants desperately the trailer to “Brave” to escape her perceived because I didn’t see the shackles of royal life. second act coming at all. She doesn’t think that What happens is surprisher husband should ing, so I won’t spoil it be chosen for her, she here. What I will say believes that she should is that “Brave” is very be able to follow her much worth seeing even own path. Merida is if it isn’t one of the best a tomboy who enjoys movies Pixar has come riding her horse and per- up with. What they’ve fecting her archery skills. done is taken a simple “Princesses don’t need fairy tale and made weapons!” her mother, a simple movie out Queen Elinor (Emma of it. Sure, the beginThompson) exclaims. ning of the film goes Elinor is dead set on for the obvious laughs. making her daughter the Sure, it doesn’t feel as perfect princess without emotionally layered as listening to anything previous Pixar movies. she has to say. Like so Sure, the middle of the many mother/daughter film feels oddly rushed relationships in so many like they’re hurrying

toward an ending before they’ve really established the crux of the story. Even with all that, it still turns into a movie that is well worth taking your children to. This is the first time Pixar has helmed a film where the central protagonist is a heroine. Merida is a strong female character. Her flowing red hair is gorgeous and just as fun to watch as Sully’s hair was the first time you saw “Monsters Inc.” The movie is astoundingly animated. The

animation transports you to the highlands of Scotland with its lush, green landscapes. Even though I didn’t feel as connected to the characters and their plight as I have in preceding Pixar films, I must say that the emotional impact of the last five minutes snuck up on me without me realizing what was happening. The weight of the story finally sinks in at that moment; don’t be surprised if you shed a See BRAVE on p. 12

PC SuPPort and rePairS

From basic virus removal, scans, and software installation to system restores, data backups and networks, we can do it

WebSiteS: baSiC-CommerCe

Whether you need a basic website, or a complex shopping system, we have the training and tools to meet your needs

deSign Work

We can do anything from logos, business systems, brochures - you name it, we’ll design it

it SuPPort

We offer monthly plans from heavy needs to just occasional help - even if you just need a back-up, we’re your team

435-554-1048

www.utahtechsolutions.com


The Reel Place Aaron Peck

By any logical measure “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter” is a bad movie. The key here is that it knows it’s a bad movie. After the screening, one of my critic colleagues turned to me and exclaimed, “Gleefully bad.” The movie isn’t trying to reinvent the wheel; it simply wants to rewrite history in the most illogically entertaining way possible. Expectations need to be tempered before seeing it. If you go in expecting anything other than a hilarious, self-aware action film with Honest Abe swinging a slivertipped axe at the heads of vampires, then you’ll end up disappointed. I mean really, why would you go into a movie with a title like “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter,” directed by the same guy who directed “Wanted,” with any expectations at all? The movie is based on the tongue-in-cheek novel by Seth GrahameSmith who also penned the screenplay. Smith weaves a ludicrous, but entertaining tale about how Abraham Lincoln (Benjamin Walker), the 16th president of the United States, was more than just a politician. When Lincoln was just a boy he witnessed his mother’s murder as a man sneaked into their home in the dead of night and bit her. Seeking revenge, Lincoln grew up with the sole purpose of finding and killing his mother’s murderer, a man named Jack Barts (Marton Csokas). Barts isn’t what he seems to be. He’s a vampire. After a botched attempt at killing the man he hates more than anything, Lincoln meets up with a mysterious friend

20th Century Fox

Benjamin Walker is shown as Abraham Lincoln in a scene from "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter."

★★★ ‘Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter’ Director // Timur Bekmambetov Starring // Benjamin Walker, Rufus Sewell and Dominic Cooper Rated // R for violence throughout and brief sexuality

named Henry Sturgess (Dominic Cooper). The movie wastes no time getting to the reason why we’re here: ACTION! And there’s plenty of it. Sturgess has been hunting vampires his entire life and is about to pass the knowledge onto Lincoln. A few training montages later, and Lincoln has become a fullfledged, axe-wielding vampire slayer while also studying to be a lawyer and eventually finding a home in politics. Lincoln soon gains the ire of the head vampire of

the South, Adam (Rufus Sewell). See where this is going? In the South, vampires thrive by drinking the blood of slaves. Lincoln, as he becomes more entrenched in politics, wants to free all slaves. The Civil War commences. It’s actually quite a bit of fun watching how the movie casually rips out pages of our history books and replaces them with pages from a bloodspattered graphic novel. That’s what the movie feels like. A graphic novel come to life (much

like “Wanted”). men in U.S. history fight The movie is fully his way through hordes aware that its entire plot of computer-generated is absurd and it revels in vampires “300”-style. it. Lincoln is always one Slow motion action step away from turning to scenes, complete with the camera and winking “Matrix”-style whoosh at us. The movie’s tongue sounds take center stage. is placed firmly in its It’s dumb, but extremely own cheek as we watch fun if you’re in the right one of the most famous mindset. Action!

PLAYING JUNE 22-28

MOVIE HOTLINE 435-753-1900

STADIUM 8

2297 N. Main MOVIE HOTLINE 753-6444 WWW.WALKERCINEMAS.NET ALL SEATS ALL TIMES $3.00 OpEN SuNDAY AT 3:45 pM OpEN MON. - SAT. AT 11:30 AM FOR OuR MATINEES

SuMMER CHILDREN’S MAT. HOp MON.-THuRS. 12 & 2

CHIMpANzEE DARK SHADOWS (G) 4:15 (pG-13) 5:00, 7:15 & 10:00 Daily Mat. (except Sun.) Fri. & Sat. Mat. 12:30 & 2:20 12:00 & 2:30 THE HuNGER GAMES (pG-13) 3:55, 6:45 & 9:35 Fri. & Sat. Mat. 12:15

DR. SEuSS: THE LORAX (pG) 4:30 Daily Mat. (except Sun.) 11:45 & 2:10

MIRROR MIRROR (pG) 7:00 & 9:15

THE LuCKY ONE (pG-13) 7:30 & 9:45

It’s all style and no substance, but if you went in expecting any kind of substance, again I refer you to its self-referential title. This is “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter” and that’s exactly what you get. No more, no less. It’s a hoot watching Lincoln decapitate oncoming vampires all the while wondering how they’re going to fit this all into some sort of fauxhistorical context. The movie never takes itself too seriously. It knows that its entire premise is completely preposterous and it doesn’t care one bit. “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter” is one of the best bad movies I’ve ever seen.

Page 7 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 22, 2012

‘Vampire’ one of the best bad movies

535 W. 100 N. PROVIDENCE

BRAVE 2D (PG)

12:30 2:40 4:50 7:00 9:10

SEEKING A FRIEND FOR THE END OF THE WORLD (R)

12:35 2:45 4:55 7:05 9:15

ABRAHAM LINCOLN: VAMPIRE HUNTER 2D (R)

1:00 3:10 5:20 7:30 9:40

SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13)

12:50 3:35 6:25 9:05

THE AVENGERS 2D (PG-13) 12:30 3:30 6:30 9:30

MADAGASCAR 3 2D (PG) 12:45 2:45 4:45 6:45 8:45

ROCK OF AGES (PG-13) 12:40 3:50 6:45 9:20

THAT'S MY BOY (R) 1:00 4:15 7:00 9:35

UNIVERSITY 6

1225 N 200 E., BEHIND HOME DEPOT MIDNIGHT SHOW FRI/SAT $6.00 ROCK OF AGES in Digital (PG-13) 10:35 1:10 3:45 6:30 9:05

MADAGASCAR 3 in Digital 3D (PG) 10:40 12:40 2:40 4:40 6:50 8:50

BRAVE in Digital 3D

(PG)

10:30 12:40 2:50 5:00 7:10 9:20

SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN in Digital 12:15 3:15 6:15 9:15

(PG-13)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN: VAMPIRE HUNTER in Digital 3D (R) 10:35 12:45 2:55 5:05 7:15 9:25

PROMETHEUS in Digital 3D (R) 10:30 1:05 3:40 6:40 9:20

MOVIES STADIUM 5 2450 NORTH MAIN

NOW AT MOVIES 5: ADULTS $6.00 CHILDREN/SENIORS/MATINEES $4.00 NO LATE SHOWS ON SUNDAY

BRAVE 2D (PG) 3:10

5:20

7:30

9:40

THE AVENGERS 2D (PG-13) 4:00

6:45

9:30

MEN IN BLACK 3 2D (PG-13) 5:15 WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU'RE EXPECTING (PG-13) 3:05 7:25 MADAGASCAR 3 2D (PG) 3:00

5:00

7:00

9:00

BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL 3:30

6:30

9:00

9:35

(PG-13)

GIFT BOOKS AND CARDS AVAILABLE BUY TICKETS ONLINE AT WWW.MOVIESWEST.COM


Let it fly By Chuck Nunn

F

lying objects of all kinds have descended on Salt Lake City this month, but they’re not from outer space. In fact, one of them comes from Cache Valley. “Queen Priscilla’s Gambit,” an outdoor sculpture by valley residents Jerry Fuhriman and Arthur Taylor, was assembled largely from old dairy machinery to resemble a royal interstellar conveyance as part of the Salt Lake City Arts Council’s Flying Objects 3.0 contest. It’s the second sculpture by Fuhriman, a noted artist, architect and professor emeritus at Utah State University, and Taylor, a successful metal fabricator and owner of Black Dog Manufacturing in Hyde Park, to be selected by the Arts Council for the contest — their submission titled “Missy’s Rocket” was a winner of Flying Objects 2.0 and was recently purchased by the Salt Lake City Redevelopment Agency. Both “Missy’s Rocket” and “Queen Priscilla’s Gambit” are constructed of scrap metal, largely from old dairy machinery. “I really keep an eye out for these milkers, because they’re getting hard to come by,” Fuhriman said of the equipment. “I’ve actually bought them on eBay; I’ve had them shipped from Wisconsin, so I like it when I can find them.” The transition from painting to outdoor sculpture may seem like a stretch for some, but for Fuhriman, it was a natural outgrowth of the artistic process. “I’m basically a painter,” Fuhriman said. “Most people know me as a water-color and an oil painter. And then I went to a salvage yard and just happened to look at it, and I just loved the feel of it. I loved the way it looked.” Fuhriman took the first step between working with paint and working with metal in the late ’70s. After taking a class in

Photo courtesy Jerry Fuhriman

silversmithing, he decided to run his own little shop in Jackson. Wyo., during the summer when he wasn’t teaching. “I had silver jewelry, turquoise jewelry. It really was pretty much this kind of thing,” Fuhriman said. “I still do jewelry — it’s very similar, because you’re still concerned about form, still concerned about space, you know, how one part of the design ties in to the other part of the design.” After beginning his association with Taylor, Fuhriman’s admiration for metal found its expression. “I always wanted to weld, so Arthur said, ‘Hey, I’ll show you how to weld.’ And that was kind of it,” Fuhriman said. “I got a welder, and then I went back to the salvage yard and just kept going back and forth to the salvage yard, and that was kind of it.” The two men have known each other for years, but their collaboration in the arts began in 2006, when Fuhriman was commissioned to do a painting of Taylor and his late dog, Jet — “the greatest dog in the history of the world,” Taylor is quick to add. When asked about compensation, Fuhriman finally decided that he’d like Taylor to teach him how to weld. “So we set him up in a corner of the shop, we determined what he wanted to do, and he went out and purchased a welder, really top of the line,” Taylor said. “And I wish he would’ve done everything I told him to do, but he’s an artist, and artists are, well, a little different. But anyway, he picked it up, and then he started putting things together. “That’s how we started, and he kept building stuff, so there’s Jerry’s corner of the shop, and it’s got all his parts and everything. And if he needs help, we walk back there and pick something up.” The combination of a talented artist and

Locally made sculpture on display in Salt Lake City an experienced craftsman has resulted in work that is not only visually pleasing, but structurally sound. “Jerry is able to design in his mind this sort of scramble of things, and then it’s sort of up to me to make sure it balances and that structurally it will work,” Taylor said. “They’re both important aspects, because an artist typically doesn’t have the precision mindset that a construction guy would have. You have to have both, or the thing’s going to fall on somebody’s head. “It’s been a fine collaboration, and Jerry’s the chief. He breaks the glass, and I just sort of sweep up after him, and that’s how I like to describe it.” To illustrate the point, Fuhriman related their experience with “Missy’s Rocket” compared to other sculptures during Flying Objects 2.0. “In the Flying 2 competition, we had ‘Missy’s Rocket’ down at Symphony Hall,” Fuhriman said. “And we put it up, and there were maybe 10 other art pieces in the competition. And the first night they lost three of them — they came crashing to the ground. We don’t want that to happen.” “In outdoor sculpture, structure becomes critical, and safety becomes critical,” Taylor added. “So those things that are design aspects need to be balanced with structural and safety aspects, and I think that’s where our collaboration kind of comes together. A lot of artists don’t have that other side to call upon. They don’t have, I guess, the capabilities that we have, so it works out.” If you find yourself in Salt Lake City anytime in the next two years, be sure to see “Queen Priscilla’s Gambit” for yourself. It has been placed on the median on 300 North between Rose Wagner Gardens and Squatters bar. “Missy’s Rocket” is on permanent display at the Trax station downtown.


Let it fly By Chuck Nunn

F

lying objects of all kinds have descended on Salt Lake City this month, but they’re not from outer space. In fact, one of them comes from Cache Valley. “Queen Priscilla’s Gambit,” an outdoor sculpture by valley residents Jerry Fuhriman and Arthur Taylor, was assembled largely from old dairy machinery to resemble a royal interstellar conveyance as part of the Salt Lake City Arts Council’s Flying Objects 3.0 contest. It’s the second sculpture by Fuhriman, a noted artist, architect and professor emeritus at Utah State University, and Taylor, a successful metal fabricator and owner of Black Dog Manufacturing in Hyde Park, to be selected by the Arts Council for the contest — their submission titled “Missy’s Rocket” was a winner of Flying Objects 2.0 and was recently purchased by the Salt Lake City Redevelopment Agency. Both “Missy’s Rocket” and “Queen Priscilla’s Gambit” are constructed of scrap metal, largely from old dairy machinery. “I really keep an eye out for these milkers, because they’re getting hard to come by,” Fuhriman said of the equipment. “I’ve actually bought them on eBay; I’ve had them shipped from Wisconsin, so I like it when I can find them.” The transition from painting to outdoor sculpture may seem like a stretch for some, but for Fuhriman, it was a natural outgrowth of the artistic process. “I’m basically a painter,” Fuhriman said. “Most people know me as a water-color and an oil painter. And then I went to a salvage yard and just happened to look at it, and I just loved the feel of it. I loved the way it looked.” Fuhriman took the first step between working with paint and working with metal in the late ’70s. After taking a class in

Photo courtesy Jerry Fuhriman

silversmithing, he decided to run his own little shop in Jackson. Wyo., during the summer when he wasn’t teaching. “I had silver jewelry, turquoise jewelry. It really was pretty much this kind of thing,” Fuhriman said. “I still do jewelry — it’s very similar, because you’re still concerned about form, still concerned about space, you know, how one part of the design ties in to the other part of the design.” After beginning his association with Taylor, Fuhriman’s admiration for metal found its expression. “I always wanted to weld, so Arthur said, ‘Hey, I’ll show you how to weld.’ And that was kind of it,” Fuhriman said. “I got a welder, and then I went back to the salvage yard and just kept going back and forth to the salvage yard, and that was kind of it.” The two men have known each other for years, but their collaboration in the arts began in 2006, when Fuhriman was commissioned to do a painting of Taylor and his late dog, Jet — “the greatest dog in the history of the world,” Taylor is quick to add. When asked about compensation, Fuhriman finally decided that he’d like Taylor to teach him how to weld. “So we set him up in a corner of the shop, we determined what he wanted to do, and he went out and purchased a welder, really top of the line,” Taylor said. “And I wish he would’ve done everything I told him to do, but he’s an artist, and artists are, well, a little different. But anyway, he picked it up, and then he started putting things together. “That’s how we started, and he kept building stuff, so there’s Jerry’s corner of the shop, and it’s got all his parts and everything. And if he needs help, we walk back there and pick something up.” The combination of a talented artist and

Locally made sculpture on display in Salt Lake City an experienced craftsman has resulted in work that is not only visually pleasing, but structurally sound. “Jerry is able to design in his mind this sort of scramble of things, and then it’s sort of up to me to make sure it balances and that structurally it will work,” Taylor said. “They’re both important aspects, because an artist typically doesn’t have the precision mindset that a construction guy would have. You have to have both, or the thing’s going to fall on somebody’s head. “It’s been a fine collaboration, and Jerry’s the chief. He breaks the glass, and I just sort of sweep up after him, and that’s how I like to describe it.” To illustrate the point, Fuhriman related their experience with “Missy’s Rocket” compared to other sculptures during Flying Objects 2.0. “In the Flying 2 competition, we had ‘Missy’s Rocket’ down at Symphony Hall,” Fuhriman said. “And we put it up, and there were maybe 10 other art pieces in the competition. And the first night they lost three of them — they came crashing to the ground. We don’t want that to happen.” “In outdoor sculpture, structure becomes critical, and safety becomes critical,” Taylor added. “So those things that are design aspects need to be balanced with structural and safety aspects, and I think that’s where our collaboration kind of comes together. A lot of artists don’t have that other side to call upon. They don’t have, I guess, the capabilities that we have, so it works out.” If you find yourself in Salt Lake City anytime in the next two years, be sure to see “Queen Priscilla’s Gambit” for yourself. It has been placed on the median on 300 North between Rose Wagner Gardens and Squatters bar. “Missy’s Rocket” is on permanent display at the Trax station downtown.


The Old Lyric Repertory Company opened its 46th season Thursday, June 14, with a crowd-pleasing production of the tragic southern comedy of manners “Steel Magnolias.” The selection of this play by Robert Harling was a bold choice for the Old Lyric troupe. “Steel Magnolias” is best-known as the beautifully-executed and much-beloved 1989 film directed by Herbert Ross. But Hollywood successfully expanded the scope of Harling’s story by fleshing out male characters only mentioned in the play, plus adding more action, new dialogue and outdoor scenes. Returning to its original single-set, all-female, six-character tion as a professional staging, this version therapist and socially of “Steel Magnolias” prominent womanseems both static and about-town who can claustrophobic to audihandle anything except ences who have had her daughter Shelby. more than two decades Amanda Mahoney is to become familiar with equally perfect as Shelthe film. by Eatenton, a headBut director Terence strong young woman Goodman has assempursuing marriage and bled a cast of gifted motherhood even at the actresses who not only risk of her own health. breathe life into HarMitzi Mecham and ling’s script, but also Jackie Fullmer share embody the seemingly the spotlight as the improbable resiliency hinted in the play’s title. play’s comedy relief. Mecham warmly porRegional stage vettrays Clairee Belcher, a eran Arika Schockmel wealthy widow who is plays Truvy Jones, the a much-needed voice of proprietor of the Louireason at Truvy’s Beausiana beauty parlor in ty Parlor, while Fullmer which the action of delivers an absolutely “Steel Magnolias” takes over-the-top perforplace. Schockmel skillmance as the obstreperfully plays Truvy as ous dog-loving Ouiser a caring friend to her Boudreaux. customers who hides Young MarKaye behind a tart tongue and Hassan rounds out the a breezy manner. cast as Annelle DupuyOLRC alumna Desoto, a newcomer to Tamari Dunbar is back the beauty parlor. Given as M’Lynn Eatenton, providing a wonderfully only a bare minimum of dialogue, Hassan still nuanced characteriza-

Aisle Views Charlie Schill

Page 10 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 22, 2012

Cast of ‘Steel Magnolias’ brings script to life

roring her emotions as they listen to M’Lynn’s lengthy soliloquy of grief. Set sometime in the mid-1980s, the atmosphere of “Steel Magnolias” can only be described as delightfully dated. But Goodman has wisely resisted any impulse to modernize the play, choosing instead to revel in nostalgia. The set design by Spencer Potter is appropriately quaint and the costuming by Bethany Deal is a hoot. Sydnee Fullmer also deserves kudos for creative hair styling that changes throughout the play to perfectly match the performers’ evolving characterizations. Repertory performances of “Steel Magnolias” will continue at the Caine Lyric Theater at 28 W. Center St. in Logan through Aug. 18. Seemingly frail southern belles transform to be as tough as steel in the Old Lyric Repertory Company’s season opener “Steel Magnolias” by Robert Harling. Pictured at the top from left to right are Tamari Dunbar, Jackie Fullmer and Arika Schockmel. Pictured above are Amanda Mahoney, Arika Schocklmel and Mitzi Mecham. “Steel Magnolias” will be showing at Logan’s Caine Lyric Theater through Aug. 18.

convincingly portrays a gradual transition from a stereotypical lost soul into a self-assured expectant mother. “Steel Magnolias” is very much an ensemble

show and Goodman’s six heroines selflessly share the stage during the first three-quarters of the play. The final scene belongs to Dunbar alone, however, as

M’Lynn finally melts down into hysterics in the wake of Shelby’s death. But even then, her fellow cast members generously support Dunbar by subtly mir-

Charlie Schill is a former city editor of The Herald Journal. He has directed and performed with theater groups in the United States, South Korea and Germany. Schill also served as theater critic for The Temple Daily Telegram in Temple, Texas and Pacific Stars & Stripes and Japan Times, both daily newspapers in Tokyo, Japan.


Archaeologist to speak as part of summer series Dr. Bonnie Pitblado will speak at 7 p.m. June 27 at the historic Cache County Courthouse as the Cache Valley Visitors Bureau’s summer speaker series enters its third week. Pitblado will discuss the recovery of a treasured Fremont artifact known as the Pilling figurine in her talk entitled “I Once was Lost,

Center to host book signing The American West Heritage Center is excited to welcome international historical romance author Marcia Lynn McClure for an exclusive VIP dinner/ meet-and-greet Friday, June 29, from 5 to 10 p.m. in the Livery Stable. There will be a catered dinner, prizes and giveaways, as well as a reenactment of one of her most classic books of all time. Books will be available for purchase, and McClure will sign up to two books for each guest. To make reservations and for more information, visit www. distractionsink.com. The next evening, June 30, a free booksigning will be open to the public from 6 to 10 p.m. Only two books will be signed per guest. “Marcia Merchandise” and a collection of her works will be available for purchase. Originally from New Mexico, McClure is the author of dozens of books and e-books, including “Dusty Britches,” “The Highwayman of Tanglewood” and “Shackles of Honor.”

but Now I’m Found: Reuniting the DecadesMissing Pilling Figurine With His Mates.” This 5-inch Pitblado piece of prehistoric art was found in a southern

Utah cave in 1950 but disappeared in the early 1960s during the exhibit’s state tour. Series director Mike Bullock said, “The tale of how this figurine has been identified is almost like an Agatha Christie mystery.” A variety of forensics experts have investigated the artifact. This is somewhat of a farewell presentation

for Pitblado, who has been a faculty member at USU and the director of the university’s Anthropology Museum since 2002. She has recently accepted the prestigious endowed chair in anthropology at the University of Oklahoma. However, Pitblado will continue her archaeological research in southeastern Idaho

and northern Utah. The speaker series continues July 11 when Sally Sears and Randy Wirth, owners of Caffe Ibis Coffee Roasting Company, talk about their unique industry. On July 18, Cathy Ferrand Bullock, director of the Westminster Bell Choir, will discuss the magic of English handbells with demonstra-

tions and solo ringing. The series will wrap up Aug. 1 with deceptionist Richard Hatch presenting “Wizards in the Valley: Pioneers of Prestidigitation.” All presentations are free and held at 199 N. Main St. Seating is limited so arrive early. For more information, call 755-1890.

Genocide the focus of Saturday’s discussion An expert will discuss a sobering subject at the next activity presented by Utah State University’s Museum of Anthropology. The museum hosts Gerald Brown, director of the Utah Refugee Services Office, Saturday, June 23, as part of its “Saturdays at the Museum” series. Brown’s presentation provides insights into the process of resettling in the United States as a refugee, escaping areas where genocide is taking place. He will discuss the roadblocks encountered in incorporating people into a new culture and the help refugees often need to overcome their traumatic experiences. The presentation begins at 1 p.m. at the museum. Brown has more than 30 years experience working with refugees and people displaced as a result of genocide and is an expert in this field. Museum staff warn that the topic of this presentation is adult oriented but, as always, children are welcome in the museum and alternative activities such as mask making and storybooks will be available.

“Whenever people hear the word ‘refugee,’ they mostly think of the refugees of the Rwandan genocide, but there have been other countries with this unfortunate situation, and we want people to be knowledgeable about modern genocides,” said Annie Gamez, a Saturdays program worker. “We also want to educate the public about the difficult process of becoming a refugee. We want to answer questions such as: what do organizations do to help refugees, what are the roadblocks they encounter and what are the solutions they find?” In addition to the Saturday activity series, community members and USU students alike can visit the museum during its standard operating hours, 8 a.m .to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. Funding for the Saturday events is provided by a grant from the United States Institute of Museum and Library Services. More information about the IMLS is available at www.imls. gov. The USU Museum of Anthropology is on

the USU campus in the south turret of the historic Old Main building, Room 252. Admission is free. For Saturday activities, free parking is available in the adja-

The Cache Humane Society is holding a Super Adoption. Over 100 animals will be available for adoption. Help our less fortunate companions in Cache Valley find a home. Your sponsorship will secure a kennel at the event for a dog or cat.

cent lot, south of the building. For more information about museum events, call museum staff at 435-797-7545 or visit the museum website,

anthromuseum.usu.edu. The Museum of Anthropology is part of the anthropology program at USU in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

June 22, 23, & 24

For $25 a kennel will display your name and/or special thought to sponsor the enclosed pet.

SAVE A LIFE SPONSOR FORM Sponsor’s Name:________________________________________________________________ Address:_______________________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip:__________________________________________________________________ Phone:________________________________________________________________________ Email:_________________________________________________________________________ In Loving Memory of (Optional):____________________________________________________ Credit Card #:__________________________________________Exp:________Sec Code______ For checks, make payable to The Cache Humane Society

Mail complete entry form and donation to The Cache Humane Society 2370 W. 200 N. Logan, UT 84321. Any donations and late sponsors accepted at event also. (435)792-3920 www.cachehumane.org We are a 501 (C)(3) Charitable Corporation


I would like to congratulate China for continuing manned and womened space exploration; it inspired several previous generations of Americans. Sadly, we have now decided to become spectators and passengers. We launched the space race because we felt like we had to compete with a cold war era Russia. China appears to be doing it simply because they want to show off how cool and smart they are; what’s wrong with them? What’s the response from the United States? We have just dropped the space shuttle program and all other plans for human space

exploration. Seriously, I would trade my own Social Security to pay for human space exploration even though I may never live long enough to benefit from either. The Space Race elevated us as a nation. For the first time, kids were growing up wanting to be something other than professional athletes, musicians or movie stars. Being an astronaut offered the promise of being famous, smart and at least moderately wealthy doing something dangerous. It gave us Tang and Space Food Sticks. Kids stopped pretending to be cowboys and Indians in their playtime

and dreamed of space mutants and ray guns. The end of manned space exploration fits our new national demeanor. America’s new bumper sticker should be “We like to watch.” The more we watch the bigger the gap becomes between us and the people we watch — and the bigger that gap gets, the more we want to watch. The amount of money we spend on all forms of entertainment makes the national debt look like the change under the sofa cushions. Watching can and should be illegal. You can actually get arrested for something called voyeurism. I

Slightly Off Center DENNIS HINKAMP

Page 12 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 22, 2012

Space exploration inspired, gave us Tang

know this to be a fact because I had a neighbor who went to the county slammer for mistaking the windows of the adjacent apartment complex for pay for view cable TV. I’m not trying to condone or encourage his behavior,

but it is hard to see how that is a crime since voyeurism has become a national pastime. We live vicariously through people who are doing things we think we can’t do. At a time when people are getting fat faster than feed lot cattle, our highest paid icons are athletes, entertainers and models. We spend more money and time on professional sports and super models than at any time in history, but we can’t afford to send humans to the moon or any place else outside our atmosphere. We are starting to feel that we can’t do anything but watch because we can’t shoot like

‘Private Lives’ still showing at Logan theater The Tony Award-winning play “Private Lives” comes to Utah State University’s Caine Lyric Theatre in downtown Logan as part of the 2012 Old Lyric Repertory Company season. The show tells the story of Elyot and Amanda, a divorced couple who find themselves honeymooning in neighboring rooms at the same hotel with their new spouses. Their highly charged relationship will keep you guessing throughout the whole show, said Hassan. “Private Lives” opens June 21 and continues June 22-23, with additional dates through Aug. 18. Curtain for evening performances is 7:30 and selected matinee dates have a 2 p.m. curtain. The season’s full schedule can be seen at arts.usu.edu/lyric/htm/ Nicholas Dunn as Elyot and Tamari Dunbar as Amanda are shown in a schedule. scene from Old Lyric Repertory Company’s “Private Lives.” “This is one of the best Noël Coward shows,” said Tamari comparable to Shakespeare. deus.” Kenneth Risch, USU Dunbar who plays Amanda ‘Private Lives’ is the perfect date Theatre Arts Department head, Prynne in the OLRC producmakes his OLRC directing debut tion. “It’s a true masterpiece. The night.” Elyot Chase is played by with “Private Lives.” show is reminiscent of a 1920s Tickets for the “Private Lives” and ’30s love story. It’s romantic, Nicholas Dunn, seen last season as Mozart in the OLRC’s “Ama- production can be purchased by witty and embodies language

WHAT: “Private Lives” WHEN: June 22, 23 and select dates through Aug. 8 WHERE: Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 W. Center St., Logan TICKETS: For tickets, visit the Caine College of the Arts Box Office, call 435-797-8022 or go online, arts.usu.edu.

Labron James, move like Jagger or run like Usain Bolt. And now we can no longer float weightless like the Chinese. I’m rooting for China, maybe not in the Olympics, but in space exploration. Luba Hinkamp thanks all the readers who followed her columns, she may return after completing her memoir. Dennis Hinkamp is among a number of freelance writers whose columns appear in The Herald Journal as part of an effort to expose readers to a variety of community voices. He is not an employee of the newspaper. Feedback can be sent to dennis.hinkamp@ usu.edu.

Brave Continued from p. 6

tear or two. I’d like to issue a warning though. I would resist seeing this one in 3D, simply because most of the movie is set against dark backdrops. Once you put on those glasses it gets even darker (like trying visiting the Caine College of the to navigate low-lit hallArts Box Office at Utah State ways with sunglasses on). University in Room 139-B of the Many of the crucial action Chase Fine Arts Center open 10 scenes toward the end are a.m.­to 5 p.m. Monday through quite unintelligible, even Friday, by calling 435-797-8022 if the projector is as bright or going to arts.usu.edu. Tickets as it should be. are also available at the Caine Also, I’d be amiss if I Lyric Theatre, from noon to 4 didn’t mention the splenp.m., Monday through Friday did short “La Luna” which and an hour prior to curtain on plays before the feature. show nights. Individual ticket I enjoyed “Brave,” and prices range from $18-$25 for thought it was decent, but adults, $15-$21 for seniors and one has to wonder what USU faculty and staff and $12type of movie “Brave” $18 for USU students and youth. could’ve been had the For more information on the same boundless imaginaOLRC’s 2012 season, visit the tion and energy that was OLRC website, arts.usu.edu/ applied to “La Luna” been lyric. injected into Merida’s tale.


Cultural biography gives voice to Superman’s creators By Michael Hill Associated Press

Superman started as a reject. Writer Jerry Siegel and artist Joe Shuster were two naive kids from Cleveland who repeatedly failed to get anyone to take a chance on their strongman hero before a publisher with a past in “girlie” magazines needed something to fill the first issue of Action Comics in 1938. The duo sold the rights to their creation for $130. Superman would go on to star in comics, serials, TV shows and movies. He became the prototype for hundreds of superheroes, earned countless millions and became a transcendent American pop culture icon on par with Mickey Mouse. And as for Siegel and Shuster? Their story is a lot more melancholy. Larry Tye’s book, “Superman: The High-Flying History

of America’s Most Enduring Hero,” is a cultural biography of Superman that tracks the famous character over the decades and gives voice to the many creators who shaped Superman on the page and screen, starting with Siegel and Shuster. Superman doesn’t “grow up” like a real person, but Tye does a thorough job showing Superman’s evolution from the rambunctious building leaper of the ’30s to the Christlike figure in the 2006 movie “Superman Returns.” Tye deftly explores the natural tensions among the writers and artists who have breathed life into Superman and the evolving demands of the marketplace. When creators hit it right, like in the first “Superman” movie from 1978, the character really does soar. It doesn’t always work, though. It’s best to forget some of the superpets introduced to spice

up the comics long ago, especially Streaky the Supercat. And a more assertive Clark Kent with stylish round glasses was panned by fans in the late ’80s. The book makes clear that the hero’s greatest superpower might be as a salesman. Superman has been enlisted to sell

Haddon’s ‘The Red House’ disappoints By Kim Curtis For The Associated Press

Mark Haddon is best known for 2003’s best-selling “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time,” told from the point of view of an autistic teenager. Unfortunately, his new novel has little of the sweetness and humor of that gem. Instead, Haddon revisits well-trodden material and fails to provide any new insight in “The Red House,” which tells the story of an estranged brother and sister who take their families on vacation together shortly after the death of their mother. Not surprisingly, Angela and Richard, who had spent “no more than an afternoon in each other’s company over the last 15 years,” and their families are thrown together for a week at a house in the English coun-

tryside — an obvious setup for drama. Big drama. In fact, so many crises get revealed and aired out in this 264-page novel that it starts to feel a bit like a Jerry Springer episode. The book’s other major short-

coming is its characters. With only eight people to keep track of — two couples and four children, three of whom are teenagers — it shouldn’t be a problem. But none, especially the adults, is particularly clearly drawn, leaving them muddled and difficult to tell apart. On the upside, Haddon’s prose is lovely. “Time speeds up. A day becomes an hour, becomes a minute, becomes a second. Planes vanish first, cars are smeared into strings of colored smoke then fade to nothing.” Or this: “The witching hour. Deep in the watches of the night, when the old and the weak and the sick let go and the membrane between this world and the other stretches almost to nothing.” And the writing is just about enough to keep readers engaged.

soda, video games, T-shirts, “krypto-ray guns,” briefs, lunchboxes and much, much more. When Superman — that model of righteous living — is tossed into the side of a Marlboro truck in “Superman II,” the product placement is no coincidence. While Tye writes that “Superman’s handlers would not let him shill just any product,” readers might ask: Like what? Super Suppositories? Tye has done an exceedingly good reporting job that included deep dives through court filings and dozens of interviews. He found a lot of stuff, though too much of it appears on the page. There are too many reviews quoted and too many paragraphs that should have been pared down.

Superman has had dozens of midwives — writers, illustrators, editors, directors, TV producers — who shaped the character. But the book is haunted throughout by the two nerdy kids who dreamed him up. Lightning never struck for Siegel and Shuster again. The pair ended up fighting a long legal fight for compensation. Siegel in particular became embittered about the loss of control over and the lack of compensation for his one great contribution. But he was still driven to tears after seeing the character he made fly across the big screen in the big-budget 1978 movie. He reportedly told the comic’s publisher, “It was exactly how I had imagined it.”

new york times best-sellers COMBINED PRINT & E-BOOK FICTION 1. “Fifty Shades of Grey,” by E. L. James 2. “Fifty Shades Darker,” by E. L. James 3. “Fifty Shades Freed,” by E. L. James 4. “Gone Girl,” by Gillian Flynn 5. “Kiss the Dead,” by Laurell K. Hamilton COMBINED PRINT & E-BOOK NONFICTION 1. “The Amateur,” by Edward Klein 2. “Wild,” by Cheryl Strayed 3. “The Great Destroyer,” by David Limbaugh 4. “Unbroken,” by Laura Hillenbrand 5. “Killing Lincoln,” by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “Kiss the Dead,” by Laurell K. Hamilton 2. “Gone Girl,” by Gillian Flynn 3. “Calico Joe,” by John Grisham 4. “The Storm,” by Clive Cussler and Graham Brown 5. “Spring Fever,” by Mary Kay Andrews HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “The Amateur,” by Edward Klein 2. “The Great Destroyer,” by David Limbaugh 3. “Wild,” by Cheryl Strayed 4. “Unbroken,” by Laura Hillenbrand 5. “It Worked for Me,” by Colin Powell with Tony Koltz Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/

Page 13 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 22, 2012

Books


Page 14 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 22, 2012

CrossworD By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Battle of Britain grp. 4. Shakespeare title word 7. Tropical snake 10. Descendant of Jacob 13. Solecism 18. Pertaining to electronics 20. ___-American 21. Huntsville native 23. Fish catcher 24. Cipher 25. Plane curves 26. Song composed and recorded on the same day: April 14,1969 (with “The”) 29. “Recondita armonia” by Tosca, e.g. 30. ___ tempore 31. Divine power, in Gnosticism 32. Jockey Turcotte 33. Take in 34. Chase away 36. Krypton, for one 37. Moldovan moolah 38. Indian physicist who worked with Einstein 42. Song whose title was inspired by the pet phrase of Little Richard’s favorite DJ 46. Purse items 49. ___ gestae 50. Jennet 51. Provide (with) 52. Essential oil 53. Clancy subj. 54. Holy terror 55. QB, at times 56. Horace’s “The Ship of State,” e.g. 57. Citizen 60. Elbow-wrist connection 61. Song about a couple who fell asleep at a drivein theater 67. Let the cat out of the bag 68. Pins partner

69. Landed 72. Chiffoniers 75. Chicken order 77. Neighbor of Bulg. 78. Lord’s attendant 80. Sit in on 81. Young sheep 82. Thimbleful 83. Expand 85. Song that inspired a 1986 movie starring Kathleen Turner 89. Perfect plot? 90. Mins. and mins. 91. Part of O.H.M.S. 92. Cry over spilled milk 93. Radios 96. Hart Trophy winner, 1970-72 97. Like 98. Field call 99. Islam denomination 100. Irving Berlin’s first song 106. Parts of flowering plants 108. Priest’s robe 109. Plunge into, as a swimming pool 110. Farm equipment 111. ___ chi (martial art) 112. Disperse 113. Medicated 114. Recommendations 115. Early Jackson 5 single 116. Western omelet ingredient 117. Pitches Down 1. Hodgepodge 2. It’s for the birds 3. Bonus 4. Writer Quindlen 5. Popped one’s clogs 6. Devilfishes, e.g. 7. Guitar kin 8. Medley 9. Medicinal plants 10. Asian monarchy 11. Exuberance 12. Matron

13. Libreville’s land 14. Run ___ 15. Pastry dough 16. Govt. watchdog 17. U.S.N.A. grad 19. ___ podrida 22. Louisiana sights 27. Pre-kiss prince? 28. Curious to a fault 34. Whiskey ___ 35. Furrow maker 36. Diamondlike 37. Talk like Daffy 38. Wee tree 39. Cutlass or Delta 88 40. Turn on a pivot 41. Appraiser 42. Cookie grp. 43. Cantilevered window 44. Mayan language 45. Wherewithal 46. Way of the East 47. Common contraction 48. Brood 53. Edible mushroom 54. Breaks 55. Personality ___ 57. Sloughs 58. Prayer ___ 59. Had a beef? 60. Wear and tear 62. Transfer a right 63. Hello ___ 64. Antiparkinsonian agent 65. Blight victim 66. “Zounds!” 70. Latish lunchtime 71. Mark of perfection 72. ___ Verde 73. Colored 74. Margin 75. Historic Virginia family 76. Baby carrier? 78. Stocking stuffers 79. Hornswoggled 81. Like many a castle 82. Biblical wounds 83. Earth-toned 84. Torn comic? 86. ___-wrapped 87. Its quarter says

“Birthplace of Aviation Pioneers” 88. Sheepskin leather 93. Parchment or paper 94. Took in water 95. Detective fiction writer Dorothy 96. Companion of Artemis 97. Getup 98. Three-dimensional 99. Leave in, to an editor 100. 1951 N.L. Rookie of the Year 101. Tiptop 102. Airport in Portugal 103. Concrete section 104. Village People song 105. Mosque V.I.P. 106. Third degree? 107. Pathet ___

answers from last week

Herald Journal one to two days prior to the event. Calendar items can be submitted Deadlines inbyThe email at hjhappen@hjnews.com. Any press releases or photos for events listed in the Cache Magazine calendar items are due Wednesday by 5 p.m. They will also run for free

first half of Cache Magazine can be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com. Poems and photos can also be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com and run on a space-available basis if selected.

www.ThemeCrosswords.com


Friday The Cotton Ponies will perform rock/punk/alternative music with Atomica and Tragedy Never Fails at 8 p.m. Friday, June 22, at Why Sound. Cost is $5. A Dutch oven cooking demonstration will be at 5 p.m. Friday, June 22, at the North Logan Library, 475 E. 2500 North. Free. Come sample food and get great recipes. Guitarist/singer Kris Krompel will perform from 6 to 8 p.m. at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza, located at 99 E.1200 South. Kris is one of the most versatile and talented guitarists in the valley. There is no cover charge; everyone is welcome. The Bridgerland Amateur Radio Club will be participating in Amateur Radio Field Day up Logan Canyon, half a mile off Highway 89 on Swan Flat Road, behind the State Road Sheds on June 22 and 23. They invite the public to come and see ham radio’s capabilities and learn how to get their own FCC radio license before the next disaster strikes. A selection of hand-pulled prints by Sally Bigelow Rydalch will be on display at an art reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, June 22, at Caffe Ibis, 52 Federal Avenue in Logan. Jazz music will be performed by Spencer Devilbiss and Todd Milovich. Free.

SATURDAY Summer Aggie Ice Cream tours will be June 23 every hour starting at noon until 4 p.m. Cost is $3 and includes a single scoop. Self-guided tour of gardens featuring native/water-wise plants, unique landscaping and gardening ideas will be from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June

23, at Jens Johansen Park, 850 E. 100 North. Participants will learn ways to conserve water and other resources while adding beauty and interest to their landscapes. This year gardens in the Central Logan area will be featured. Tour maps, plants for sale and tips on growing herbs will be available at the park. Cost is $5. Tickets may be purchased at the Cache County Extension Office, 179 N. Main St., Suite 111 in Logan, Monday through Friday. Cash or checks only. On Saturday mornings, purchase tickets from the Master Gardeners Booth at the Cache Valley Gardeners’ Market at Merlin Olsen Park, 75 S. 200 East, or on the day of the event at Jens Johansen Park. Macey’s will have a classic car show from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 23. There will be a bounce house for kids, snow cones, cotton candy, games, a $2 sidewalk barbecue and a live DJ. The Sky View High School band will hold a garage sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 23, outside on the lawn at Sky View High School. Furniture, clothing, outdoor products, books, games, crafts, homemade items and more will be for sale. The fund from this sale will help the band students pay fees, instrument rental expenses and marching band fees. Deicidal Carnage will perform metal music with Dethblo at 8 p.m. Saturday, June 23, at Why Sound. Cost is $5. Come get acquainted with Paso Fine horses at an open house at 1 p.m. June 23 at Cala De Vison, Paso Fine Horse Farm, 6843 E. Hwy 36 (Mink Creek) in Preston. For more information, call Richard and Vickie Free at 208-852-2993 or Jeff and Camille Knudson at 208-852-7159. Father and son musicians Dee and Zach Putnam will perform from 6 to 8 p.m. at

Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza. Dee will take the first set, at 6 p.m., followed by Zach (who goes by the stage name “Smartfoot Jones”) at 7 p.m. Come and enjoy the valley’s best pizza and some great music!

SUNDAY Cache Singles Fireside with Paralympian Jeff Griffin will be at 7 p.m. Sunday, June 24, at the Willow Park Church, 340 W. 700 South, Logan. Jeff was a five-star athlete in high school and played football for Ricks College before a tragic accident left him paralyzed. His resilient spirit and willingness to accept and magnify the Lord’s will has blessed his family and thousands of others as he has traveled the world sharing his example and testimony. Brother Griffin teaches seminary, and he and his wife, Emily, are EFY coordinators. Sunday in the Park continues June 24. Larry Boothe will talk about “Our Intelligence Cummunity” at 1 p.m. Meet on the lawn adjacent to the Old Main Building on the USU campus. Bring your own chairs. In the event of rain we meet in the Family Life Building, Room 206. Questions? Call Norman Palmer, 435-787-1406. Jazz guitar duo Kelin and Clovis will perform at noon Sunday, June 24, at Caffe Ibis, 52 Federal Avenue, Logan. They play jazz standards, funk, rock, and blues. Come out for their debut at Caffe Ibis! Free.

MONDAY The Utah Patriot Camp for children grades one through six will be from 9:30 a.m. to noon June 25 to 29 at the Whittier Community Center. Cost is $35. Students in grades seven through 12 can sign up to visit various industries on a twoday field trip to get first-hand experience in how science and

math applications are used in real jobs. For more information, email Marvin Lowe at marvin. lowe@loganschools.org.

TUESDAY Common Ground Outdoor Adventures is hosting a cycling and ice cream activity at 4 p.m. Tuesday, June 26. Cost is $5. To sign up for this activity, request transportation or to learn about other activities, call 435-7130288, visit www.cgadventures. org or stop by 335 N. 100 East in Logan. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will hold volunteer orientation at 6 p.m. Tuesday, June 26. To sign up for this activity or request transportation, call 435-713-0288, visit www. cgadventures.org or stop by 335 N. 100 East in Logan.

WEDNESDAY Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will host a canoeing activity from 3 to 5 p.m. Wednesday, June 27. Cost is $3. To sign up for this activity or request transportation, call 435713-0288, visit www.cgadventures.org or stop by 335 N. 100 East in Logan. Join Legacy House Assisted Living for a free seminar about long-term care insurance and financial planning for your longterm care from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Legacy House of Logan, 330 E. 1400 North in Logan. The North Logan Library will hold kitchen chemistry from 10:15 to 11 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. to noon Wednesday, June 27, at 475 E. 2500 North. Space is limited to 25 fourth- through sixth-grade children per session. Parents are welcome to assist, but are not required to be there. The North Logan Library will host four sessions of The Butterfly Project beginning at 1 p.m. Wednesday, July 27. This project is for children entering kindergarten through third grade.

Children ages 5 to 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Registration is required. Call 7557169. Following sessions will be 1 to 3 p.m. July 25, 1 to 3 p.m. Aug. 9 and at 11 a.m. Aug. 25. Come play chess for free at Merlin Olsen Central Park under the covered pavilion. Chess sets and pieces available to borrow. We will play chess from 1 until 4 Wednesday afternoons. You are welcome to come earlier or later, but that is when a USCFA player is scheduled to instruct, play, and promote chess. All ages are welcome, but good sportsmanship is essential. Email minkman5052@excite.com for more information.

THURSDAY A Living Well with Chronic Conditions class will be at OPTIONS for Independence, 1095 N. Main in Logan, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. June 28. For more information or to sign up for the workshop, contact Anna at 435-753-5353 or Deanna at 435-723-2171. The Cache County Alzheimer’s Coalition will present “The ABC’s of Caregiving” at 3 p.m. Thursday, June 28, at the Cache County Administration Building Room 109, 179 N. Main St., Logan. The AARP Senior Defensive Drivers class will be from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday, June 28, at Cache County Senior Center. Cost is $12 for AARP members, or $14 for non-members. The Certificate of Completion will reduce auto insurance rates. Call Susie at 435-753-2866 for reservations. The Housing Solutions workshop provides free Foreclosure Intervention Education every Thursday until July 26 at Neighborhood Nonprofit Housing Corporation, 195 W. Golf Course Road, Suite 1 in Logan. RSVP required. For more information, email ben@nnhc.net or call 435753-1112.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 22, 2012

calendar


Page 16 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 22, 2012

CACHE MAGAZINE DINING GUIDE L

B S

Logan Burgers & Sandwiches

VoteD BeSt BurGerS & SaNDwicheS iN LoGaN Gourmet Burgers • Gyros • Souvlaki • BBQ Pork Kababs • Salads • Seafood Dinners

Bacon Cheeseburger

Chipotle Bacon Swiss Wrap

Only $5.99 Breaded Shrimp Basket

Only $5.99 Chicken Souvlaki

(with fries & soda)

(with fries & soda)

Only $5.99

Full Service Dinner Not Just For Lunch Anymore

(with salad & soda)

(with salad, fries & pita)

Only $6.99

Offer Expires 6/29/12 • Must Present Coupon • Limit 4

1085 North Main, Suite 130, Logan • 435-752-1215 • Mon-Sat 10:30-7:00pm

Buy One Dinner Entree Get The Second Dinner Entree

1/2 Off

M-T 11–10 • F-S 11-11 • Sun 12-10 1079 N. Main • Logan • 753-4084

One Coupon Per Table Coupons May Not Be Combined With Any Other Offer Valid M-Thurs Only

Effective until 6/29/12

For information about advertising on this page please contact Angie Duncombe at

792-7263

Monday – Friday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Breads • Great Sandwiches • Soups 78 East 400 North, Logan 981 South Main St., Logan 755-0262 charbroiled753-6463 Gourmet Burgers • Gyros • Souvlaki • BBQ Pork Kababs • calamari Salads • Seafood Dinners

633 S. Main • Logan • 750-6555 Mon-Sat 11:30am - 9:30pm www.mygauchogrill.com

20% OFF 10% OFF Menu Full Rodizio AnyItem Must present coupon at time of service. Not valid with any other offer. EXP. 6/29/12 Holidays excluded.

deals

Must present coupon at time of service. Not valid with any other offer. EXP. 6/29/12 Holidays excluded.

HJNews.com

Register at: deals.hjnews.com

Gift Cards are available

24/7

Buy One Get One Free Equal or lesser value. Expires 6/29/12

18 East Center St. Logan • 227-0321 Mon-Fri 9:30am - 9pm Sat 7am - 10pm

2.00 OFF

$

Any MeAl

Coupon may not be combined with any other offer. Must present the coupon at time of purchase. Offer expires: 6/29/2012

690 North Main, Logan • 752-9252

Open Sun- Thurs 6am - 10pm • Fri & Sat 6am - 11pm

Cache Magazine  

June 22-28, 2012

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you