Page 1

PASSION FOR

PUPPETS

Paradise resident crafts puppets, presents shows in the area

The Herald Journal

JUNE 20-26, 2014


contents

June 20-26, 2014

COVER 8 Local has been making puppets for 35 years

MUSIC 4 2014 Summer Concert Series continues

5 Gabrielle Louise to

perform at Crumb Brothers

6 Alumni Band performing Sunday at USU

10 Sherrié Austin concert upcoming

MOVIES 7 ‘Jersey Boys’ earns two stars

THEATER 3 ‘Musical of Musicals’ coming to the stage

5 Performances of ‘Seven Brides’ ongoing

COLUMN 11 Charlie Schill calls

Old Lyric’s performance of ‘Forum’ a rollicking comedy

CALENDAR 15 See what’s happening this week

Above: Fruit Growers Express – Combined Ventilator Refrigerator Rail Car (out of Kansas City). Artifacts, photographs and paintings are on display as part of an exhibit about commerce in Box Elder County. The exhibit, “Work and Whimsy,” is at the Brigham City Museum of Art and History. For more information, see Page 11. (Photo courtesy of the Brigham City Museum of Art and History) On the cover: One of Paul and Carla Schulz’s puppets on display at their home in Paradise. (Eli Lucero/Herald Journal)

FROM THE EDITOR Last summer, during a trip to Washington, D.C., my mom and I went to a Washington Nationals baseball game. It was the highlight of our trip. It was a beautiful, hot summer day. We ate hot dogs and drank lemonade. The Nats won. Just being there was exciting — meeting people at the game, watching the Presidents Race, cheering for the Nats as one of the players hit a grand slam and then celebrating a

win at Nationals Park. I’ve been thinking about this experience as I have followed the 2014 World Cup games. It has all reminded me of what I enjoy most about events like these — I like the feeling of community and enthusiasm a baseball game, soccer match, or whatever the sport, can create. I remember being in Madrid, Spain, years ago during a Real Madrid championship game. The streets were crowded with cheering fans all decked out in their team’s gear and people were honking car horns in an unending rhythm — the excitement was palpable. It will be exciting to watch the United

States play another match Sunday in Brazil. I’m also anxious to see how the Nationals will do tonight, Saturday and Sunday as they play against the Braves. But I don’t intend to spend my whole weekend checking scores. There are, of course, many additional things to do this weekend — the Mendon Mountain Music Festival is Saturday, the Alumni Band kicks off their summer season Sunday and performances of “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown” continue at Old Barn Community Theatre. Check out this week’s Cache Magazine for more events. And, next week, Jeff will be back. — Arie Kirk


Old Lyric presents ‘Musical’ Five musicals in one take Logan stage The Old Lyric Repertory Company, part of the Caine College of the Arts at Utah State University, presents “The Musical of Musicals, The Musical!” opening June 25 at the historic Caine Lyric Theatre in downtown Logan. Written by Eric Rockwell and Joanne Bogart, “The Musical of Musicals, The Musical!” borrows from some of Broadway’s most notable productions to make one standing ovation to musical theater. “‘Musical’ is a very clever show,” said Jim Christian, Cast members from the Lyric Rep production of “The Musical of Musicals, The Musical!” (back) director, musical director and Jonathan McBride, Emilie Starr, Camille Van Wagoner, (front) Lacy J. Dunn, W. Lee Daily and choreographer for the show. Tyson Baker. The production plays June 25-27 and select dates through July 29. “You take one of the most simple plots in the world and variations on characters ater, this show will be incred- Musical of Musicals, The beginning with “Corn!,” a retell it five times with a nod ible for you,” said Christian. Musical!” will then run on Rodgers and Hammerstein to some of the most popular “If you don’t, it will still be a select dates through July 29. roundup that takes its notes productions to ever be perblast with humor that works The Lyric Rep’s 2014 seafrom “Oklahoma!,” “The formed.” on every level.” son also includes “A Funny King and I” and “The Sound Each segment pays homThe second act takes on the Thing Happened on the Way of Music.” Next the cast age to the classic melostyle of Andrew Lloyd Weber to the Forum,” “Tons of changes into ’70s-style street drama plot “You must pay in the “Aspects of Juanita,” Money” and “The Elephant clothes for “A Little Comthe rent!”/“I can’t pay the reminiscent of “Phantom of Man.” plex,” a Stephen Sondheim rent!”/“I’ll pay the rent!” the Opera,” “Jesus Christ For more information and mashup that parodies “Into landlord/tenant/dashing hero Superstar” and “Cats.” In tickets, visit the CCA Box the Woods,” “Sweeney tale, with an all-knowing the fifth and final musical, Office located in room 139-B Todd” and “A Funny Thing older woman giving ques“Speakeasy,” the work of John of the Chase Fine Arts Center Happened on the Way to the tionable advice. Kander and Fred Ebb’s “Chi- on USU’s Logan campus, Forum,” to name a few. Next, cago” and “Cabaret” close “This show is fun, fastcall 435-797-8022 or see the paced, light and refreshing,” “Dear Abby” parodies Jerry out the show with a kick. Caine College’s Production Herman’s “Hello Dolly” and said Christian. “Each per“‘Musical’ is poking fun at Services website (arts.usu. former has to be a chameleon, “Mame.” iconic musical theater,” said edu). The box office is open “The Musical of Musicals, and all the roles are like a big Dennis Hassan, co-artistic from 9 a.m. to noon MonThe Musical!” is a comic val- director of the Lyric Rep. game played with the audiday through Friday. Tickets entine to musical theater and “We have a strong cast who ence.” may also be purchased at the was the longest running show are adapting to five different Cast members Tyson Caine Lyric Theatre in downin the York Theatre ComBaker, W. Lee Daily, Lacy styles of singing and danctown Logan at 28 W. Center pany’s 35-year history before ing.” J. Dunn, Jonathan McBride, St. Monday through Friday 1 Emilie Starr and Camille Van moving to Off-Broadway. Opening June 25 and conto 4 p.m. and one hour prior “If you know musical theWagoner journey through tinuing June 26 and 27, “The to curtain on show nights.

“Standout vocal performances are almost too numerous to mention in this production.” – Charlie Schill on Old Lyric’s production of ‘A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum’ (Page 11)

PET OF THE WEEK Available for adoption

Pet: Dori From: Cache Humane Society Why she’s so lovable: Dori is our cat that we have all fallen in love with. Just like the character Dori on the Disney film “Finding Nemo,” this cat has worked her way into our hearts with her cute personality. She is patiently waiting for her family to come and get her, and it just may be you!

Page 3 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 20, 2014

ALL MIXED UP

Quotable


Page 4 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 20, 2014

all mixed up ‘Tons of Money’ now on Logan stage The Old Lyric Repertory Company, part of the Caine College of the Arts at Utah State University, presents “Tons of Money,” which opened June 19 at the historic Caine Lyric Theatre in downtown Logan. Written by Will Evans and Arthur Valentine and revised by Alan Ayckbourn, “Money” is a British farce about a broke inventor who inherits tons of money, only to discover he won’t see a penny of it due to his massive debts. “‘Money’ was originally written in 1922,” said W. Vosco Call, director of the show and founder of the Lyric Rep. “Alan Ayckbourn prepared a new version in 1986 while retaining the spirit and most of the text of the original. ‘Tons of Money’ is in the true tradition of British farce.” A British farce is a humorous play or film where the characters become involved in unlikely situations. Co-artistic director for the Lyric Rep and grandson of W. Vosco Call, Richie Call, remembers “Tons of Money” being one of the first shows he saw at the Caine Lyric Theatre. “To this day I’ve never laughed as hard as I did when I was 11 years old watching ‘Tons of Money,’” said Richie

“tons of money” before he lays a hand on it. In order to escape creditors, the deeply in-debt Allington, and his wife, Louise, cook up an elaborate scheme to retain their fortune. “Tons of Money” cast includes W. Lee Daily (Sprules), Kailin Vannatter (Simpson), Camille Van Wagoner (Miss Benita Mullett), Lacy J. Dunn (Louise Allington), Richie Call (Aubrey Henry Maitland Allington), Nick Selting (Giles), Jonathan McBride (James Chesterman), Emilie Starr (Jean Everard), Chris Klinger (Henery) and Gordon Dunn (George Maitland). Opening June 19, “Tons of Money” continues June 20 and 21 and then on select dates through July 31. For more information and tickets, visit the CCA Box Office located in room 139-B of the Chase Fine Arts Center on USU’s Logan campus, call 435-797-8022 or see the Production Services website (arts.usu.edu). The box office is open 9 a.m. to In a scene from “Tons of Money,” Richie Call, left rear, who plays Aubrey Henry Maitland Allington, holds noon Monday through Friday. Tickets may also be purchased Jean Everard, played by Emilie Starr. Lacy J. Dunn, right, plays Louise Allington. at the Caine Lyric Theatre In the farce, Aubrey Henry the form of a large inheritance, in downtown Logan at 28 W. Call. “This is the year I get to Maitland Allington is an unsuc- Aubrey’s exuberance is quickly Center St. from 1 to 4 p.m. play the very role that made cessful inventor with a list of quashed when he realizes his me laugh so hard, and to top it Monday through Friday and creditors will certainly snatch off, my grandfather is directing debts longer than his name. one hour prior to curtain on When financial relief arrives in up all of his newly acquired me.” show nights.

Noon performances at Logan Tabernacle continue The Summer Concert Series continues at the Logan Tabernacle. All concerts begin at noon. Admission is free and everyone is welcome. For more information visit facebook. com/logantabernacle.

their favorite music in addition to previewing their upcoming season, which includes “Les Miserables,” “Vanessa,” “Oklahoma!” and other performances. For more information, go to www.utahfestival.org.

Monday, June 23 Singers and instrumentalists from the Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre will perform

Tuesday, June 24 Kermit Herd, baritone, and John Waldron, harmonica Kermit Herd has sung and

performed various roles in a variety of venues throughout the United States. He attended USU and earned an MFA degree. While a student, he sang three years with the Salt Lake Philharmonic Orchestra in their Days of

’47 celebration. John Waldron will provide a three-segment program: 1) Harmonica history, including types and playing styles with examples; 2) Name that tune sing along; 3) Harmonica solos with cello and organ

accompaniment. As a young man, he found a harmonica, took it apart and cleaned it, and learned to play it and keyboards by ear. He has played his harmonica on many Scout outings. John graduated from USU and spent his career working in electrical engineering. See SERIES on Page 12


The Heritage Community Theatre in Perry will bring the classic musical, “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers,” to the stage beginning Friday, June 6. Based on the popular movie, “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers” is the story of Adam Pontipee and his six younger brothers, who are backwoodsmen with no proper social ways. Adam goes to town looking for someone to take care of the boys and brings back Millie, whom he takes to wife. She cleans them up and smooths out their “mountain man” tendencies. The boys attend a barn raising where they meet and fall in love with six girls. The plot

of all audience members. Directed by Dee Pace, the musical features new songs by Al Kasha and Joel Hirschhorn. “Seven Brides” will be performed at 7:30 p.m. June 6-28, with matinees at 2 p.m. June 14 and 21. Tickets are $10 for adults and $9 for seniors and children 12 and under. The Heritage Theatre is located at 2505 S. U.S. Hwy. 89 in Perry. Tickets may be obtained online at Productions of “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers” heritagetheatre.com, continue through June 28. by phone at (435) 7238392 or at the box office thickens as they kidnap ter. Each scene brings Mondays and Wednesthe girls and carry them delightful antics, and, days through Saturdays into the mountains. Mil- most importantly, toe between the hours of lie, horrified by their tapping musical num11 a.m. and 2 p.m. The actions, bans them from bers and dancing that box office also opens on the house for the winwill lighten the hearts show nights at 7 p.m.

Gabrielle Louise concert upcoming The Bridger Folk Music Society presents a concert with Colorado singer/songwriter Gabrielle Louise at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, June 21, at Crumb Brothers Bakery, 291 S. 300 West in Logan. Tickets are $13 and are available via PayPal at www.bridgerfolk.org, by calling (435) 757-3468, or take your chances at the door. Seating is limited; advance purchase is recommended. The concert is cosponsored by Import Auto. Gabrielle Louise is a nationally touring troubadour noted for her poignant lyrics and lush voice. She has toured and recorded with a wide variety of configurations, but all presentations fall under the creative umbrella of “The Gabrielle Louise Show.” Variety is the ticket. Don’t be surprised to catch a tango performance by the dancers who frequent her shows, or an exhibit by a local artist or photographer. She can be found serenading and storytelling around the country, sometimes solo, sometimes with a Photo courtesy Gabrielle Louise full band in tow. More information at www.bridgerfolk.org or at www. Singer/songwriter Gabrielle Louis will perform Saturday, June 21, at Crumb Brothers Bakery. gabriellelouise.com.

Mendon Music Festival

The Mendon Mountain Music Festival for Summer Solstice Celebration is Saturday, June 21, at 250 S. Main St., Mendon. The Festival gates open at 11 a.m. Music begins at noon and ends at 8 p.m. Limited camping is available at the Festival or nearby National Forest. Vendors will be offering food items. Admission is $15. Check out the Festival at: https://www.facebook. com/MendonMountainMusicFestival. This will be a gathering of local and regional nonprofit organizations with an emphasis on environmental organizations addressing issues in our area.

Corinne Pageant

It’s time to bring out your blankets and lawn chairs and come watch the Corinne Pageant, “Corinne, the Gentile City” at the Corinne City Park to be held the evenings of June 27 and 28. This play is a musical comedy featuring some of Corinne’s colorful history and is very entertaining for young and old. There is no charge for this outdoor play, but bring a dollar for peach cobbler, served at intermission. This play is sponsored by the Corinne Historical Society, a nonprofit organization. The show will begin at dusk (a little after 9 p.m.), and concessions of hot dogs, hamburgers and homemade root beer will be sold beginning about 7 p.m. At intermission, Dutch oven peach cobbler will be sold. Come join the fun and visit with friends and neighbors prior to the show. Corinne is 5 miles west of the I-15 exit 365 on state highway 13. The park is on the south side of this highway across from the Golden Spike Cafe. If anyone has any questions, call Beulah Wells at 435-744-2442 or 435-720-7304.

Freedom Fire tickets

Join your family, friends, neighbors and fellow Americans on Thursday, July 3, to celebrate the greatest country in the world at Cache Valley’s own patriotic Freedom Fire Independence Day Celebration and Fireworks Show at USU’s Romney Stadium. Gates open at 7 p.m. and the show begins at 8 p.m. Tickets are on sale now at the Logan Community Recreation Center (195 S. 100 West); Logan Aquatic Center (451 S. 500 West); Cache Valley Visitors Bureau (199 N. Main St.); USU Spectrum Ticket Office (850 E. 900 North) or online at www.logan utah.org/PR. Tickets are $8 or you can purchase a Six-Tix pack for $36. All tickets are general admission. This year’s program features Craig Jessop and the American Festival Chorus and Orchestra and also includes local Scouts, honor guard, military tributes and music by Mile Marker 6.

Page 5 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 20, 2014

‘Seven Brides’ musical in Perry Coming up


Page 6 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 20,

Alumni Band begins summer performances Utah State University presents five Sunday evening performances this summer with the Alumni Band. “Talented and dedicated alumni come together each summer to make music for all to enjoy,” said Nick Morrison, conductor of the band and senior associate dean in the Caine College of the Arts at USU. “Each sacrifices time they could spend with their families to perform, and this is a labor of love for them.” Founded in 1963 by Max Dalby, faculty member in the Department of Music, the Alumni Band was born when administrators expressed concern that

summer students had nothing to do Sunday evenings. Whether newly graduated or retired, the Alumni Band features musicians of all ages who have graduated from Utah State. Each summer the band performs five concerts, rehearsing for only a few hours before performing. Alumni regularly travel from Idaho, Wyoming and southern Utah to perform in at least one concert, with others traveling greater distances. “I would like to encourage the community to attend these great performances we’re providing at no cost,” said Michael Bankhead, head

of the music department at USU. “It’s a great activity for Sunday nights with the family.” The first performance of the season on June 22 features Brigham Young University’s Steve Call on tuba. Call is a USU alumnus, but has taught music at BYU since 1979. He also directs the award-winning BYU Jazz Legacy Dixieland Band. As a soloist Call has presented guest recitals and concerto performances throughout the United States. He is also principal tuba with Utah Premiere Brass and the Wintergreen Summer Festival Orchestra in Virginia and has performed with

a variety of ensembles in Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Finland, Canada and Italy. Throughout the band’s history, there have been only two conductors. Dalby led the band for 30 years, and this season marks Morrison’s 22nd year of leading the group. “I love being involved with Alumni Band and the sense of community it brings to campus,”

Morrison said. “These performances are a great opportunity to pack a picnic, bring the family up to the Quad and enjoy some live music.” This year’s concerts are presented June 22, July 6, 13 and 27, and Aug. 10. All Alumni Band performances begin at 7 p.m. and are free and open to the public. Concerts will be held on the USU Quad.

The July 27 concert is scheduled in the Kent Concert Hall. In case of inclement weather, the other performances will also be held in the Kent Concert Hall. For more information, visit the CCA Box Office in room 139-B of the Chase Fine Arts Center, call 435-797-8022 or see the Caine College’s Production Services website (arts.usu.edu).

Benefit at

Angie’s Restaurant 20% of all proceeds benefit UPR. Welcome Friends & Summer Citizens!

Survey Code: 188

“Where the Locals Eat” 690 N. Main • Logan For more information and to make reservations visit upr.org

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

5:00-10:00 p.m. Meet and Eat with UPR Staff

6:00-8:00p.m. Order off the regular menu or select 1 of 4 special entrees.


Action!

The Reel Place Aaron Peck

There’s just something about “Jersey Boys” that doesn’t translate well from stage to screen. Perhaps it’s the clunky breaking-the-fourth-wall narration, or the ham-fisted acting that works better on Broadway than it does in the movies. Maybe it’s simply the fact that acclaimed director Clint Eastwood appears to be on autopilot for the entirety of the film. Whatever the reason, “Jersey Boys,” the story of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, never reaches above and beyond the clichéd trappings of music biopics. The strongest aspect of the film is its musical numbers. Casting some of the original Broadway cast helps with that. John Lloyd Young, who plays Frankie Valli, has the slightly nasally, high, rich voice down. He can belt out all of the Four Seasons’ greatest hits, making them sound identical to those you’ve heard hundreds of times over the past few decades. However, while Young is a perfect choice for the singing, he’s less than perfect for the dramatic toll a musical biopic demands. Lacking here is a central force.

AP photo/Courtesy Warner Bros.

John Lloyd Young as Frankie Valli in “Jersey Boys.”

★★

the motions, only shining whenever called upon to perform one of the Four Seasons’ greatest hits. Director // Clint Eastwood The arc here is tediously Starring // John Lloyd Young, Erich Bergen and similar to many other Michael Lomenda musical biopics out there. Rated // R for language throughout That’s not to disparage the real-life parallels, but it does speak to the audience’s ability to surmise Think Joaquin Phoenix to get us to really buy in. exactly what’s going to as Johnny Cash in “Walk Phoenix sold “Walk the happen and when. If music the Line.” Young’s perfor- Line,” with his enigmatic mance just doesn’t carry performance. Young seems biopics are any indication, enough emotional weight to be simply going through the moment someone starts

‘Jersey Boys’

PROVIDENCE 8

2297 N. Main

MOVIE HOTLINE 753-6444 • WWW.WALKERCINEMAS.NET 2D SEATS $4.00 • 3D SEATS $6.00 OpEN SuN AT 3:30 pM OpEN MON-SAT AT 11:30 AM FOR OuR MATINEES ON 9pM SHOWINGS ON SuNDAY

SuMMER MATINEE DESpICABLE ME 2 MON-THuRS 12:00 & 2:00

CApTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTERS SOLDIER 2D (pG-13) 4:00, 6:45 DIvERGENT MILLION DOLLAR ARM (pG) (pG-13) 7:00, 9:40 4:00, 6:40, 9:25 Fri & Sat Mats 1:00 RIO 2 2D (pG) RIO 2 3D (G) 4:40 2:30 Mats Daily except SuN 12:20 CApTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTERS SOLDIER 3D (pG-13) 9:30 Fri & Sat Mat 12:40

BLENDED (pG-13) 7:30, 9:50

LEGO MOvIE 2D (pG) 4:20 Mats Daily except Sun 11:40, 1:45

2D Edge of Tomorrow (PG-13) 11:30 2:00 4:30 7:10 9:40

The Fault In Our Stars (PG-13) 10:45 1:25 4:00 6:45 9:25

2D How To Train Your Dragon 2* 11:00 12:00 2:30 3:40 5:00 6:05 7:30 10:00

Private Screenings & Events 435-752-7155

12:40 3:05

5:30 7:55 10:00

June 6 - June 11

Edge of Tomorrow 2D (PG-13) 10:40 12:55 3:20

MOVIES 5

5:45 8:05 9:55

Edge of Tomorrow 2D DBox (PG-13)

2450 North Main, Logan

10:40 9:55

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG-13)

Fault in Our Stars (PG-13) 10:35

The Fault In Our Stars (PG-13) 1:20

3:55 6:35 9:15

1:10 6:55

7:05 9:55**

4:10

3D How To Train Your Dragon 2*(PG) Godzilla (PG-13) 3:20 8:45** Heaven Is For Real (Pg) 1:00 6:10 1:20 8:20 2D How To Train Your Dragon 2* (PG) Jersey Boys (R) 12:15 3:15 6:30 9:30 12:30 5:20 7:45 3D How To Train Your Dragon 2* (PG) Maleficent (PG) 1:15 3:05 6:20 8:45 2:55 10:10** Think Like A Man Too (PG-13) 10:30 Million Dollar Arm (PG) 4:10 9:55** 12:45 3:05 5:15 7:40 10:05 X-Men: Days Of Future Past (PG-13) X-Men: Days Of Future Past (PG-13) 12:40 3:40 6:40 9:40** 10:30 3:30

If this is your “plan”…

1225 North 200 East, Logan

22 Jump Street* (R) 10:35

2:15 4:50

7:15 9:50

See REEL on Page 13

UNIVERSITY 6

535 West 100 North, Providence

22 Jump Street* (R) 11:45

a band and has a hit, it’s only a matter of time until their life, family and band disintegrate. Frankie Valli’s meteoric rise to the top is no exception. At one point band member Tommy DeVito (Vincent Piazza) tells the band’s songwriter, Bob Gaudio (Erich Bergen), that his songs are derivative. Such is the case with the film. It feels like a mix between a warmedover Broadway play and a semi-interesting episode of VH1’s “Behind the Music.” Eastwood, along with

director of photography Tom Stern, give the movie a great look. It’s muted, gauzy, dreamy. At least the movie looks good. It’s almost got that “Sin City,” feel, but with a little more color. The look and sound of the film are excellent; it’s all the other wishy-washy dramatics that don’t sit well. We watch as Valli and the other Four Seasons members start out playing rink-a-dink clubs. Picking up gigs wherever they can. Tommy DeVito is the brains of the operation, using most of what he’s learned from being in the mob in running the band. Before he was Frankie Valli, he was Francesco Castelluccio, a neighborhood kid who worked at the local barbershop, singing while sweeping up hair. Frankie is taken under the wing of powerful, but soft-hearted

1:15

How to Train a Dragon 2* 2D (PG) 1:00

3:15 5:30 7:45

How to Train a Dragon 2* 3D (PG) 10:30 am 10:20

Maleficent 2D (PG) 10:45

1:10 3:25 5:40

7:50 10:25

Maleficent 2D DBox (PG) 1:10

3:25

5:40 7:50

X-Men: Days of Future Past 2D (PG-13)

**Does not show on Sunday 10:35 1:20 4:05 6:50 9:35 Showtime Updates:

www.MegaplexTheatres.com

WE CAN HELP!

*No Discount Tickets or Passes

(435) 554-1242 www.pharoslaw.com Trusts – Wills – Powers of Attorney – Probate – Elder Law Entity Formation - Asset Protection - Retirement Planning Family Law – Real Estate - Intellectual Property – Business Succession Member of the American Academy of Estate Planning Attorneys

Page 7 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 20, 2014

‘Jersey’ doesn’t translate well to screen


PASSION FOR

PUPPETS Paradise resident crafts puppets, presents shows in the area

A

Carla and Paul Schulz of Paradise hold some of their puppets. Carla Schulz, who discovered the art form at age 6 while putting on Tinkerbell shows with a friend, rediscovered puppetry decades later. Today Schulz has been making her own puppets for 35 years and boasts a trailerful of every variety.

Article by Kim Burgess • Photos by Eli Lucero

passion for puppets came early for Cache Valley native Carla Schulz, who discovered the art form at age 6 while putting on Tinkerbell shows with a friend. “We did them all summer,” Schulz recalled. “I enjoyed it even then.” The Paradise resident rediscovered puppetry decades later after taking her young children to the library and picking up a book on marionettes. Building puppets and performing with them looked like a great family activity to Schulz, an eventual mother of eight and grandmother of 17. Today Schulz has been making her own puppets for 35 years and boasts a trailerful of every variety, from a marionette leprechaun to a sock puppet wolf (made from her daughter’s old car seat covers; Schulz is a dedicated recycler) and even a kind

of alter-ego — a sassy, hard-of-hearing grandma named Hildegard who speaks with a thick German accent. Hildegard is Schulz’s most elaborate production to date — a paper mache ventriloquist dummy that took roughly 200 hours to create. After having problems with the dummy’s hands breaking off, Schulz remade them of neoprene that she molded and cast herself. Many of the dummy’s delicate fingers feature sparkling rings, and her tight, curly gray hair is particularly lifelike. “We do a short routine together — she asks me to turn up her hearing aid and then says, ‘You don’t need to shout!’” Schulz said of her act with Hildegard. While any of Schulz’s puppets would fetch a hefty price for their See PUPPETS on Page 13

TYPES OF PUPPETS ROD PUPPET A rod puppet is manipulated with a wooden or wire rod. Rod puppets can sometimes have a complete hinged mouth, but many do not. A rod puppet can have a fixed facial expression. Arms are usually a requirement as rods are attached to them. HAND PUPPET A hand puppet is controlled by the hand that occupies the interior of the puppet. Glove puppets are a variation of hand puppets. CARNIVAL PUPPET Also called body puppets, they are designed to be part of a large spectacle. They are often used in parades and demonstrations, and are at least the size of a human and often much larger. One or more performers are required to move the body and limbs. SHADOW PUPPET Closely related to magic, this ancient art form existed in Egypt and Asia. Unlike other types of puppets, the shadow puppet itself is never seen, only its effect. The shadow puppet is not just a single object of wood or cardboard, but a collection of things that work together to cast a shadow. MARIONETTE A jointed puppet manipulated from above by strings or wires attached to the limbs. This style allows for an unusual freedom of movement and demands a great deal of skill. Marionettes have played a large role in history — largely replacing actors in ancient Burma and being placed on children’s graves in Rome, where they also were used in morality plays. Source: Puppetry Logbook


PASSION FOR

PUPPETS Paradise resident crafts puppets, presents shows in the area

A

Carla and Paul Schulz of Paradise hold some of their puppets. Carla Schulz, who discovered the art form at age 6 while putting on Tinkerbell shows with a friend, rediscovered puppetry decades later. Today Schulz has been making her own puppets for 35 years and boasts a trailerful of every variety.

Article by Kim Burgess • Photos by Eli Lucero

passion for puppets came early for Cache Valley native Carla Schulz, who discovered the art form at age 6 while putting on Tinkerbell shows with a friend. “We did them all summer,” Schulz recalled. “I enjoyed it even then.” The Paradise resident rediscovered puppetry decades later after taking her young children to the library and picking up a book on marionettes. Building puppets and performing with them looked like a great family activity to Schulz, an eventual mother of eight and grandmother of 17. Today Schulz has been making her own puppets for 35 years and boasts a trailerful of every variety, from a marionette leprechaun to a sock puppet wolf (made from her daughter’s old car seat covers; Schulz is a dedicated recycler) and even a kind

of alter-ego — a sassy, hard-of-hearing grandma named Hildegard who speaks with a thick German accent. Hildegard is Schulz’s most elaborate production to date — a paper mache ventriloquist dummy that took roughly 200 hours to create. After having problems with the dummy’s hands breaking off, Schulz remade them of neoprene that she molded and cast herself. Many of the dummy’s delicate fingers feature sparkling rings, and her tight, curly gray hair is particularly lifelike. “We do a short routine together — she asks me to turn up her hearing aid and then says, ‘You don’t need to shout!’” Schulz said of her act with Hildegard. While any of Schulz’s puppets would fetch a hefty price for their See PUPPETS on Page 13

TYPES OF PUPPETS ROD PUPPET A rod puppet is manipulated with a wooden or wire rod. Rod puppets can sometimes have a complete hinged mouth, but many do not. A rod puppet can have a fixed facial expression. Arms are usually a requirement as rods are attached to them. HAND PUPPET A hand puppet is controlled by the hand that occupies the interior of the puppet. Glove puppets are a variation of hand puppets. CARNIVAL PUPPET Also called body puppets, they are designed to be part of a large spectacle. They are often used in parades and demonstrations, and are at least the size of a human and often much larger. One or more performers are required to move the body and limbs. SHADOW PUPPET Closely related to magic, this ancient art form existed in Egypt and Asia. Unlike other types of puppets, the shadow puppet itself is never seen, only its effect. The shadow puppet is not just a single object of wood or cardboard, but a collection of things that work together to cast a shadow. MARIONETTE A jointed puppet manipulated from above by strings or wires attached to the limbs. This style allows for an unusual freedom of movement and demands a great deal of skill. Marionettes have played a large role in history — largely replacing actors in ancient Burma and being placed on children’s graves in Rome, where they also were used in morality plays. Source: Puppetry Logbook


GET YOUR Fun for your FAMILY OF FOUR! DEALS.HJNEWS.COM Visit for more details

Facebook & Instagram

Performances of Charlie Brown” will are $8 for adults, $7 for “You’re a Good Man, run from June 6-28 with children and seniors. Charlie Brown” are con- performances beginning For tickets and more tinuing at The Old Barn at 7:30 p.m. Matinees information, call (435) Community Theatre in will also be at 2:30 p.m. 458-2276 or visit www. Collinston. June 14 and 21. Tickets oldbarn.org. Directed by Audrey Mason and Becka Shultz, “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown” is an entertaining musical comedy based on Charles Schultz’s famous comic strip “Peanuts.” The show depicts an average day in the life of Charlie Brown. A day made up of little moments, from Valentine’s Day to the baseball season, from wild optimism to utter despair, all mixed in with the lives of his “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown” is showing at Old friends. Barn Community Theatre in Collinston. “You’re a Good Man,

Traditional Swiss Muesli for Breakfast Bike Climb Hike

Yodel to your Delight

like us!

Australian singer/ songwriter Sherrié Austin will perform at 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 27, at the Bullen Center Carousel Ballroom. Tickets are $28 and are available at cachearts.org, by calling 752-0026 or at the Cache Valley Center for the Arts Box Office at 43 S. Main St. Tickets are limited. Austin burst onto the American country music scene in 1997 Photo courtesy Sherrié Austin with the release of her Australian singer/songwriter Sherrié Austin will perform first album, “Words,” at 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 27, at the Bullen Center Carousel Ballroom. The Carousel Ballroom is located which produced the on the second floor of the Bullen Center at 43 S. Main hit singles “Lucky in St. in Logan. Love,” “One Solitary Tear,” “Put Your Heart into It” and “Innocent released in Nov. 2011. and Shelton entitled “If Man.” In addition to singI Was A Woman.” She went on to The Carousel Balling, Austin is also well release “Love in the room is located on the known in Nashville Real World” (1999), second floor of the for her songwriting “Followin’ a Feelin’” Bullen Center at 43 S. abilities. In recent (2001) and “Streets of Main St. years she has written Heaven” (2003). The The concert is part numerous hits for other title track from “Streets artists, including Tim of an effort to conof Heaven,” which tells McGraw’s “Shotgun tinue the mission of the the heartbreaking story Rider,” Blake Shelton’s Cache Valley Center of a mother praying “Good At Startin’ Fires” for the Arts to “engage, for her dying 7-yearinspire and entertain and George Strait’s old daughter, reached “Where Have I Been All through the arts.” No. 18 on the Billboard My Life.” Most recentThe Sherrié Austin country music chart in ly, Austin’s songwriting concert is an initial June 2003. effort to draw in artists prowess was responAustin’s latest album, to perform in the Carsible for the hilarious “Circus Girl,” was ousel Ballroom. duet by Trace Adkins

Find us! crumbbrothers.com

Page 10 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 20, 2014

Austin coming to Logan ‘Charlie Brown’ at Old Barn

Bakery & Cafe Hours

M-F. 7am-3pm & Sat. 8am-3pm

with

Crumb Brothers Muesli Rolled oats hydrated with local apple juice, served with yogurt, toasted coconut & walnuts, with fresh dried fruit

A

on the corner of

300 S. & 300 W. Logan, UT (435)792-6063

Bakery & Cafe


Old Lyric’s ‘Forum’ a rollicking comedy By Charlie Schill

Charlie Schill

The Old Lyric Repertory Company’s 2014 season kicked off with a bang Thursday, June 12, when an enthusiastic local audience greeted the premier of “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum” with riotous laughter and thunderous applause. With music and lyrics from Stephen Sondheim and a script coauthored by Burt Shevelove and Larry Gelbart, “A Funny Thing … Forum” has been pleasing crowds worldwide for more than 50 years. Under the skillful guidance of director Vanessa Ballam, this Old Lyric production blends traditional elements of farce with vaudeville slapstick to produce a rollicking comedy. The musical’s plot centers on a slave named Pseudolus who attempts to win his freedom in ancient Rome by

Aisle Views

helping his dim-witted master woo a virginal courtesan who lives next door. Pseudolus is cunningly played by Old Lyric veteran Richie Call, whose strong voice and comic timing dominate “A Funny Thing … Forum” from start to finish. Local favorite Lee Daily helps to keep the musical moving through its serpentine plot twists by delivering one of his trademark hilarious performances as fellow

slave Hysterium. Camille Van Wagoner provides another familiar face and voice. Last seen during the Old Lyric’s 2013 productions of “Nunsense” and “The Drowsy Chaperone,” Van Wagoner returns as a jealous Roman matron who single-mindedly pursues a reluctant husband winningly portrayed by Jonathan McBride. Standout vocal performances are almost too numerous to mention in this production. As the play’s ditzy lovers, newcomers Kayli Jackson and Nick Selting blend beautifully in their charming duets, and Wyn Moreno’s powerful baritone voice is as impressive as his character, Roman captain Miles Gloriosus, believes himself to be. Finally, no review of “A Funny Thing … Forum” is complete without mentioning the Proteans, a geeky band

of theatrical chameleons who change from soldiers to slaves to eunuchs to cross-dressing courtesans at the drop of a hat throughout the play. In these scene-stealing roles, Gordon Dunn, Jack Johnson, Chris Klinger and Lance Rasmussen deliver some completely over-the-top bits of comic business. Repertory performances of “A Funny Thing … Forum” will continue at the Caine Lyric Theater at 28 W. Center St. in Logan through Aug. 2. Charlie Schill is a former city editor of The Herald Journal. He has directed and performed with theater groups in the United States, South Korea and Germany. Schill also served as theater critic for The Temple Daily Telegram in Temple, Texas, and Pacific Stars & Stripes and Japan The Old Lyric Repertory Company will present “A Funny Times, both daily newspa- Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum” on select pers in Tokyo, Japan. dates from June 12 to Aug. 2.

‘Work and Whimsy’ exhibit open

AARP offering discounted Commerce in Box Elder County highlighted at museum tickets to July 2 Old Lyric performance of ‘Forum’ By Mary Alice Hobbs

Fruitful fields and orchards haven’t been the only successes in Box Elder County since the 1850s. Many businesses and industries in the county have also thrived. A historic exhibit about commerce in the county titled “Work and Whimsy” opened at the Brigham City Museum of Art and History on May 17 and continues through June 25. Admission is free. The museum is located at 24 N. 300 West. The entrance is on the west side. Hours are Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m.

Photo courtesy the Brigham City Museum of Art and History

An exhibit about commerce in Box Elder County is open in Brigham City. Pictured See EXHIBIT on Page 13 above: Garland Sugar Factory.

Do you want to have an enjoyable way to kick off your 4th of July celebration? AARP Utah has partnered with the Caine Lyric Theatre to offer AARP members a $17 discount on $27 dollar tickets for the July 2 performance of “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum.” The show begins at 7:30 p.m. We see this as a way to offer real possibilities for our members

in the Logan area to connect with other members and enjoy a wonderful night at the theater. Members can call the theater box office for tickets at 435797-8022 or buy their tickets in person upon showing their AARP membership card, with a limit of four tickets per member. The offer is limited. The Caine Lyric Theatre is located at 28 W. Center St. in Logan.


Page 12 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 20, 2014

Series Continued from Page 4 Wednesday, June 25 Sassafras Folk String Band will present stunning vocals and a flawless mix of guitar, fiddle, mandolin, banjo and bass in styles of folk, old-timey and bluegrass with some contemporary and blues. The band has been perSassafras Folk String Band forming for over 10 years at many venues includ14” and a duet with her David won first prize in ing the Gallavan Center, brother. She is a piano the Weber State Piano Summerfest, the Interstudent of Luke Hancock Festival and was selected mountain Acoustic Music and has been playing at as one of the finalists for Society and Brigham the Utah State UniverUtah Symphony Salute Young Park. This allsity Youth to Youth audition. He is a woman group is known Conservastudent of Gary Amano. for its tight harmonies and tory since Andrew Johnson, virtuosic fiddling. Mem2007. 17, will be performing bers of the Sassafras are Jennifer “Romanza Andaluza” by Betty Leishman, Genet has won Pablo de Sarasate, “MediBrown, Marianne Sidwell, many tation” from Thais by Emily Miner, Kristen Day awards at Jules and Candice Kempton. the USU MassPiano Festival and was enet, and Thursday, June 26 the piano soloist with two “Banjo Incredible Youth: Piadifferent orchestras last and Fidnists, Violinist, and Cellist year. Besides piano, Jendle” by Rachel Smith is a nifer plays the violin and William 12-year-old pianist and is the concert master in Kroll. will be playing Chopin’s the Logan High School He has “Impromptu No. 1 in A orchestra. She often plays received Superior ratings flat Op. in recitals in the commuat the state music compe29” and nity such as Youth Contition the last three years. Bach servatory, Tabernacle and He performs solos, chamFrench assisted living homes. ber music and symphonic Suite David Ban, 12, will works. Andrew has par“Gigue in be playing “Preludes Op. ticipated in both the G major 38. No. 1 & 2” by KabaTacoma Youth Symphony BWV levsky, “Gardens in the in Washington State and 816.” Rain” by Debussy. This the Utah Youth SymphoShe has been studying year, David won the Utah ny in Salt Lake City, and with Gary Amano since Symphony Youth Guild currently studies violin she was 8 years old. She Recital under Dr. Mark Emile has won numerous top and perof Utah State University. prizes in the USU piano formed When he isn’t playing competition, finalist for twice as the violin or piano he Beverly Sorenson Youth a piano is listening to music by Music Festival 2013 and soloist his favorite composers. Utah Symphony Salute with two Andrew has been acceptto youth 2012. She was orchestras. ed into the Pittsburgh named one of the Utah For the Youth Symphony in PennState University Youth past few years, David sylvania, where he will be Conservatory Outstanding participated in the USU living this upcoming year. Performers of the year in Piano Festival and won Charlotte Petersen 2014. top prizes and was named will be playing the 1st Jennifer Ban, 15, will as one of the Youth movement of the “Sonata be playing Mendelssohn’s Conservatory Outstandin G” by Sammartini, “Rondo Capriccioso Op. ing Performers. In 2013 and “Scherzo” by van

Goens, accompanied by John Price. At the age of 5, Charlotte started learning to play the piano and violin. At the age of 8 she switched to the cello. She loves music, especially when it involves other people. She currently studies cello with Dr. James McWhorter and this fall plans to go to BYU-Idaho and study music education.

and artistic director of the group. Richard will melt your heart with his rich baritone voice. Michelle, a performance graduate of USU, BYU, and even BYU’s prestigious “Singer of the Year,” will thrill you with her gorgeous high notes and down-to-earth delivery. James, whose

Friday, June 27 The Broadbent Family are gifted musicians who share their talents with joy and enthusiasm; their program includes great music and lots of variety. Merrilee is the arranger

Featuring: Dry Lake Band, Sassafras. Austin Weyand, Creative Tension and The 4 Hims Free admission, free parking, leashed dogs welcome. Some lawn space available, Lucy 752-4749 luciart@comcast.net,

background includes everything from musical theater to opera, brings warmth and beauty to your favorite melodies. He and his talented wife, Annie, light up the stage with their love songs. Christopher, age 14, is just plain fun.

The Broadbent Family

SATURDAY JUNE 28 1491 EAST 2300 NORTH 10 AM TO 6 PM

Old Home Art Show and Silent Auction


Alafair Burke’s latest book is one of her best By Jeff Ayers Associated Press

Alafair Burke tells a compelling tale that combines a police procedural and a legal thriller in “All Day and a Night.” Anthony Amaro, convicted of killing six women 18 years ago, has always claimed he is innocent and that he was coerced to confess. Now the murder of a psychotherapist puts his convictions in doubt, and a hot-shot attorney named Linda Moreland sees the case as a way to further her career. She hires a woman named Carrie Blank who works with federal appeals in a prestigious law firm to assist her. Carrie, whose

Exhibit Continued from Page 11 to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 1 to 5 p.m. For further information, please phone (435) 226-1439 or visit www.brighamcity museum.org. “Work and Whimsy” presents a blend of artifacts, photographs and paintings. Artifacts consist of a daily program for the Liberty and Elberta theaters; an ice saw from Bosley’s Grocery Store; a menu from Grill Café; a dance card with an advertisement for the Howard Hotel; and a flour sack from Jensen Bros. Milling and Elevator Co. (Big J Mill). History repeats itself in photographs of the old post office on the

sister was one of Amaro’s victims, is eager to help find the killer. NYPD Detectives Ellie

corner of Main Street and 100 South, a display of Jell-O boxes at Wess’ Market, an 1800s Box Elder News Journal, Greyhound Depot on Main Street, the Bank of Brigham City, R.K. Wilson and Sons Wine and Liquor and Packer Motor Company, all in Brigham City. The Central Hotel in Corinne and Pearl Saloon in Garland are also on display. The sweat of generations is captured playfully in the sculpture “Vessel 3” that was created by Karyl Sisson with clothespins and zippers. Museum Director Kaia Landon says, “The public is invited to ‘step into the shoes’ of the men and women that worked tirelessly through the years to better their lives and their community. We stand on their shoulders today.”

Hatcher and JJ Rogan are assigned to give the case a fresh eye, even though it’s out of their jurisdiction. Ellie is dating the lead prosecutor in the case, and she’s forced to question whether she earned the job or it’s preferential treatment. There isn’t much time to ponder why she and Rogan got the assignment because the investigation of the psychotherapist’s death appears to prove Amaro’s innocence. Burke’s talent as a writer continues to grow along with Ellie’s character. Although this is the fifth book in the Ellie Hatcher series, there isn’t a better starting point than “All Day and a Night,” which will keep the reader up all night.

Reel Continued from Page 7 mob boss Gyp DeCarlo (Christopher Walken). Everyone loves little Frankie. They love his voice and his naïve attitude. Everyone from Tommy to Gyp sees Frankie

Puppets

new york times best-sellers HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “Mr. Mercedes” by Stephen King 2. “Skin Game” by Jim Butcher 3. “The Hurricane Sisters” by Dorothea Benton Frank 4. “The Goldfinch” by Donna Tartt 5. “A Shiver of Light” by Laurell K. Hamilton HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “One Nation” by Ben Carson with Candy Carson 2. “Capital in the Twenty-first Century” by Thomas Piketty 3. “The Closer” by Mariano Rivera with Wayne Coffey 4. “Think Like a Freak” by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner 5. “Unbroken” by Laura Hillenbrand

as someone who needs protection. Perhaps it’s that voice that needs protection. Either way he’s always got someone looking out for him. Tommy is the monkey wrench that wrecks everything. As we know, most biopics feature a rise and a fall. It usually begins with backbiting within the band. Secret deals are made. Band money is

“The Three Little Pigs” was reinterpreted as “The Wolf’s Tale,” which showed how bad allergies caused the notorious villain to accidentally sneeze down the pigs’ Continued from Page 9 houses. expert craftsmanship and detail, Other sources of inspiration have parting with one would be kind of included “Little Red Ridinghood,” like giving away a child. “The Princess and the Pea” and “I put so many hours into them, it would be hard to sell them,” she “Jack and the Beanstalk.” Schulz, her husband, Paul, and said. a rotating cast of grandchildren Though she works full time at bring these shows to area schools, Cache Valley sensor technology company APG “to support my pup- churches and senior centers several pet habit,” Schulz is always churn- times a year. The family has also participated in the Timpanogos ing with ideas for new shows. Storytelling Festival in Utah ValFairy tales and folk tales are her ley and the inaugural Cache Valley first love, and she has drawn from Storytelling Festival, which took many of the classics, but usually place June 7. with a twist.

misused, and suddenly the band is squabbling over dollars instead of making hit records. It’s the same old story you’ve heard again and again. Fans of the Broadway play might want to keep that as their only memory of Valli’s story. Even with Eastwood behind the camera, the whole experience is awkward and fairly dull. “I would love to see that take off,” Schulz said of the latter. “We had so much fun.” Audiences can next catch the Schulzs at Puppets in the Park at 11 a.m. Aug. 3 in Brigham City’s World of Puppetry Museum. Cost is $2 per person or $5 per family. Schulz has a variety of other projects in the works: finishing her story “Simon and the Dragon,” which will feature a dragon puppet operated by three people, and producing a line of videos using puppets to discuss medical procedures with sick children. “I can’t think small,” said Schulz, who calls Muppets creator Jim Henson her hero. “I always have ideas.”

Page 13 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 20, 2014

Books


Page 14 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 20, 2014

CrossworD By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Types 7. Discontented looks 14. Start a fire 20. Talisman 21. Herb 22. Towered 23. MLB great 25. Equitable way to return a favor 26. “Take ___” 27. Home of the lima bean 28. “And I could go on...” 29. Rest of the afternoon? 30. Stage item 33. Dish with seasoned rice 36. Chiselled 38. Ground furrow 40. Airmail letters 42. Springs area 45. Idle 48. High quality vineyard 49. Complex subject, perhaps 52. NFL great 57. Without understanding the consequences 58. Berry considered a superfruit 59. Knight’s protection 61. Sonnets and such 62. Ill-advised move 63. Undue speed 64. Italian brandy 67. NY Opera 68. It may be white 70. Jewel theft movie starring Gene Hackman 72. Trucker’s spot 75. Divests of weapons 78. Cut short 80. Oxen’s burden 84. Strip of equipment 86. Institutions 88. Landing on the water 89. City pests 92. Swimming great

94. Small cobalt-colored bird 95. Pastry choice 96. Down Under native 97. Capitol VIP 98. Logic 103. Golf starting location 104. Setting for much of “The English Patient” 106. Incurred 108. Weasel 112. Make drinkable, in a way 115. Mesozoic, e.g. 117. Tested 100% 119. Back when 120. “Hair” extra 121. Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer 126. Get there 127. Court wear 128. Sickly 129. Dutch cheese 130. Bric-a-brac shelf 131. Spurs on Down 1. Blair’s predecessor 2. Dweller along the Arabian Sea 3. Italian commanders 4. Large northern deer 5. Luau souvenir 6. Type of ladder 7. Rock classic written by Van Morrison 8. Small part of a leaf 9. Jedi first name 10. Cyst 11. Other than that 12. Violent troublemaker 13. Safe places 14. Isle of Man’s locale 15. Spirit 16. Like many a model 17. Writer, Murdoch 18. Tepee 19. Manual of Icelandic poetry 24. Gym unit 31. Shoreline problem

32. Charge 34. Mysterious 35. Meeting of the minds 37. “Let’s go already!” 39. Extended discussion period 41. Soviet Union labor camp 42. Kind of whale 43. Blender button 44. As of now 45. Land east of Saudi Arabia 46. Kind of salad 47. Qom’s country 50. Stars on stage 51. ‘-- had it!’ 53. ___ apso (dog) 54. ‘Star Wars’ weaponry 55. In shape 56. White wine aperitif 60. Punjabi city 65. Jeopardy 66. Noise of little feet 69. Should, with “to” 71. Pre-print action 72. Puts the brakes on 73. Certain lizard 74. Oscillograph inventor Karl 76. Madam, slangily 77. Saucy ones 78. Wise Greek goddess 79. Ovine bleat 81. Perfume ingredients 82. Military cap 83. Scotch/Irish 85. Surface for Sharks 87. More standoffish 90. ____ wheeler 91. Meeting place for Plato 93. Tints 99. Threatening words 100. Is afraid to 101. Trapper 102. Trick-taking card game 104. Palatable 105. Kicking partner

107. Royal insomnia cause 109. Haven 110. Nickname for the Red Sox’s Adrian Gonzalez 111. Fireplace implements 112. East Indian lentil sauce 113. Galway country 114. Active 116. Lost 118. It’s no fun at all 122. Place for a price 123. Live on the edge of existence 124. City on Guanabara Bay 125. United Nations agcy.

answers from last week

Herald Journal one to two days prior to the event. Calendar items can be submitted by Deadlines The email at hjhappen@hjnews.com. Any press releases or photos for events listed in the first Cache Magazine calendar items are due Tuesday by 5 p.m. They will also run for free in

half of Cache Magazine can be sent to jhunter@hjnews.com. Poems and photos can also be sent to jhunter@hjnews.com and run on a space-available basis if selected.

www.ThemeCrosswords.com


Friday The Stokes Nature Center will host Knee-high Naturalist: Sticky, Slimey Bugs! from 9 a.m. to noon or from 1 to 4 p.m. Friday, June 20. Cost is $25. Crawl, splash, dig and search your way through the wonders of nature. Be inspired by stories, laugh through games and create nature-themed art during this fun outdoor learning time. Best for ages 4-7. Registration is required, so call 755-3239 or email nature@logannature.org to save your place.  Tr3ason will perform at 8 p.m. Friday, June 20, at Why Sound, 30 Federal Ave. Admission is $5. Watch “Frozen” for Nibley City’s Movie in the Park. Movie shorts start first at 9 p.m. Friday, June 20, followed by the movie at 9:20 p.m. at Nibley City Park on 3200 South. The Concerts at Noon Series at the Logan Tabernacle continues Friday, June 20, with the Old Lyric Repertory Company. Members of the OLRC will preview some of this year’s theater productions. All concerts begin at noon. Admission is free and everyone is welcome. For more information, visit logantabernacle.blogspot. com, facebook.com/logantabernacle or www.cachecommunityconnections.com. MonsterXTour is rolling into the Cache County Fairgrounds on Friday, June 20, and Saturday, June 21. Come out and enjoy quality, safe, family entertainment. MonsterXTour series features all the top monster trucks battling it out all around the world. Admission is $19 for 13 years and up; children 3 to 12 are $10. Advanced tickets available at Discount Tire in Providence and Logan. Gates open at 6 p.m.; show begins at 7:30 p.m.

SATURDAY Summer Solstice Nature

Art will be from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, June 21, at Stokes Nature Center. Come harness the power of the sun to create beautiful, intricate artwork. Join art enthusiast and USU student Paige Gardner to learn how to use the shadows of the planets to make an abstract, organic piece that you’ll be proud to take home. This art workshop is appropriate for all ages. Cost is $6; $5 for SNC members. Registration is required, so call 755-3239 or email nature@ logannature.org to save your place. Visit logannature.org for more information. The Heritage Days Parade will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday, June 21, at Heritage Elementary to 1000 West to 2600 South to 800 West to 3200 South and ending at Heritage Elementary in Nibley. The Heritage Days Benefit Breakfast will be from 7:30 to 9 a.m. Saturday, June 21, Heritage Park in Nibley. Cost is $3.50 per person or $17 per family, if you pre-register at the city offices by June 18. Cost at the door is $4 and $20. All proceeds will go to building a pioneer memorial at Heritage Park. Jill Cohn will perform at 1 p.m. Saturday, June 21, at Caffe Ibis, 52 Federal Ave.

SUNDAY Back to Dodge will perform at 2 p.m. Sunday, June 22, at Caffe Ibis, 52 Federal Ave. Sunday in the Park near Old Main will feature Dennis Hassan at 1 p.m. Sunday, June 22. Bring your lawn chairs; in case of inclement weather, meet at Old Main, room 225. Hassan is the artistic director at the Caine Lyric Theatre and will be speaking on the Old Lyric Repertory Company.

MONDAY The Holy Trinity Lutheran Church will hold a free vacation Bible school from 9 a.m.

to noon June 23-27, at Willow Park, 450 W. 700 South. There will be games, crafts, songs and Bible stories for all area kids, preschool through sixth grade. Call 213-3382 or visit holytrinitylutheranlogan.org for more information. The Concerts at Noon Series at the Logan Tabernacle continues Monday, June 23, with the Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre. Singers and instrumentalists will perform their favorite music in addition to previewing the upcoming UFOMT season. For more information, visit utahfestival.org. All concerts begin at noon. Admission is free and everyone is welcome. For more information, visit logantabernacle.blogspot. com, facebook.com/logantabernacle or www.cachecommunityconnections.com. The Logan Library will be showing “Catching Fire” at 6:30 p.m. Monday, June 23, in the Jim Bridger Room. The movie is rated PG-13. Admission and popcorn are free.

TUESDAY The Concerts at Noon Series at the Logan Tabernacle continues Tuesday, June 24, with baritone Kermit Herd and harmonicist John Waldron. All concerts begin at noon. Admission is free and everyone is welcome. For a more information, visit logantabernacle. blogspot.com, facebook.com/ logantabernacle or www.cachecommunityconnections.com. Logan Library presents Learning @ the Library, classes showing how to get the most from your e-reader device, computer or tablet, using the free resources available at the library. Computer Basics will be offered at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 24. All classes are held at the Logan Library. You can use the library’s devices or bring your own. Sign up at the information desk at the Logan Library or call 716-9120.

WEDNESDAY Wednesday, June 25, is the Logan area car cruise night at Pizza Pie Cafe, 1400 N. Main St. #25. Bring out your classic car, hot rod, specialty vehicle, etc. and join the fun. Everyone is welcome to attend. If you don’t have a vehicle, you are welcome to come and take a look. Time will be from 6:30 p.m. ‘til dark or whenever the last car leaves. For more information, call 799-7149.

of the cooking class at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 26, at Macey’s Little Theatre in Providence. Amy Smith will be teaching recipes in this class that don’t require much time in the kitchen, so you can enjoy more time outside the kitchen. You must reserve a seat at the service desk, and please be on time. Classes are for ages 10 and up. Check us out on Facebook or visit littletheatrerecipes.blogspot. com for more information.

The Utah Small Business “Garden Variety” is the title Development Center Network, of the cooking class at 7 p.m. along with the Utah District Wednesday, June 25, at MacExport Council, is sponsoring ey’s Little Theatre in Providence. a four-hour workshop entitled Even though harvest time isn’t “Open to Exporting: Find and generally until August, there isn’t Enter New Global Markets” any reason why you shouldn’t that will help businesses idenenjoy fresh vegetables now. tify the best markets for their Trina Thomas loves to cook with products and learn about the vegetables, especially from the resources available to help you garden, so she will be teaching enter or expand into these marus a handful of great recipes kets. Presentations from export that will help you use your garresource providers, international den vegetables to their fullest business experts and small potential. You must reserve a business exporters will provide seat at the service desk, and a wealth of critical information. please be on time. Classes are This is a hands-on workshop, so for ages 10 and up. Check us bring your computer. The workout on Facebook or visit littleshop will be held from 9 a.m. to theatrerecipes.blogspot.com for 1 p.m. Thursday, June 26, at the information. Riverwoods Conference Center. New Life Fellowship Assemblies of God church will host a vacation Bible school from 6 to 8:30 p.m. June 25-27. “Kingdom Rock” is the theme, so come rock the kingdom. There will be games, snacks, songs and Bible Stories. Ages 5-12 are welcome. The Concerts at Noon Series at the Logan Tabernacle continues Wednesday, June 25, with Sassafras, a women’s folk band. All concerts begin at noon. Admission is free and everyone is welcome. For a more information, visit logantabernacle.blogspot.com, facebook. com/logantabernacle or www. cachecommunityconnections. com.

THURSDAY “Summer Splash” is the title

The Concerts at Noon Series at the Logan Tabernacle continues Thursday, June 26, with Incredible Youth. All concerts begin at noon. Admission is free and everyone is welcome. For a more information, visit logantabernacle.blogspot. com, facebook.com/logantabernacle or www.cachecommunityconnections.com. Logan Library presents Learning @ the Library, classes showing how to get the most from your e-reader device, computer or tablet, using the free resources available at the library. E-readers & the Library will be taught at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 26. All classes are at the Logan Library. You can use the library’s devices or bring your own. Sign up at the information desk at the Logan Library or call 716-9120.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 20, 2014

calendar


Page 16 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 20, 2014

out on the town your ticket to the hottest spots in cache valley To advertise on this page please contact Tracy Munson at 792-7263 Monday – Friday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

El toro

Callaways

Buy One Dinner Entree Get The Second Dinner Entree

1/2 Off

M-T 11–10 • F-S 11-11 • Sun 12-10 1079 N. Main • Logan • 753-4084

One Coupon Per Table Coupons May Not Be Combined With Any Other Offer Valid M-Thurs Only

Effective until 6/27/14

Pork Scallopini ~ Greek Salad ~ Fresh Basil Tomato Angel Hair Open Mon. - Sat. at 4:30 pm • 54 No. Main, Smithfield Reservations 563-9179


062014  

Cache Magazine

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you