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An eye for art A look at Summerfest artist Larry Winborg

The Herald Journal

June 17-23, 2011


Page 2 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 17, 2011

Cache The Herald Journal’s

Arts & Entertainment Calendar

On the cover:

Magazine

What’s inside this week Mind reader coming to Logan

(Page 10)

“Early spring” by Larry Winborg.

(Page 10) Noon Music schedule

From the editor

I

tried my first gyro yesterday thanks to Summerfest. Since I’m a really, really slow eater it was easy to tell I loved it when it was gone in just a few bites. The meat was delicious, especially with the veggies, sauce and yummy bread wrapped around the outside. It makes me wonder why I haven’t devoured one before. I’m a huge fan of Summerfest food. It’s the same stuff you get at small town celebrations and fairs. Funnel cake? Yes please. Fried Oreos? I’ll have four. One of my favorite Summerfest memories in recent years consisted of my best friend’s family coming into town and eating one fattening food after another. We shared frozen bananas, snowcones, a navajo taco and cotton candy. Yum. This year there’s a whole slew of vendors selling everything summery from

mnewbold@hjnews.com

fresh-squeezed lemonade and pulled pork sandwiches to fried Twinkies, kettle corn, cinnamon glazed almonds and mini cake donuts. Don’t judge me if I try all of these things this weekend. You will, too. Of course I love Summerfest for all the art, too. People amaze me. This week Kate Rouse DuHadway interviewed Larry Winborg, one of the many artists who will be showcasing their work at the Tabernacle this week (page 8). I’ve been familiar with Winborg’s art for the last few years and especially love his paintings of Utah State University in the fall. Winborg has been painting since he was a child and has work in several galleries throughout the United States. This year he was chosen as Summerfest’s featured artist and has dozens of new paintings on display this weekend. Go check his work as well as more than a 150 other artists at Summerfest. And why not have a crepe and caramel apple while you’re at it. – Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

‘Green Lantern’ not a great character

(Page 7) Books .......................p.13 Crossword.................p.14

Cute

pet photo of the week

This cat is available for adoption! Pet: Kohl From: Four Paws Rescue Why she’s so lovable: Kohl

is a beautiful, silky, solid black female cat. We believe that she is about 2 years old. She was left at the old Ogden Animal Shelter after it closed down. She is very sweet and loving, but would prefer to be an only pet. Kohl needs to be an indoor-only cat, as she is declawed on all four paws. She is looking for a loving, forever home.

Slow Wave Slow Wave is created from real people’s dreams as drawn by Jesse Reklaw. Ask Jesse to draw your dream! Visit www.slowwave.com to find out how.


Crumb Brothers to host Seniors celebrated in upcoming concert Utah songwriter Jen Hajj ome celebrate and honor what has been called “Our Greatest Generation” with the “Best of Broadway” community concert. Come pay tribute to our seniors who overcame so much in their lifetime, such as “The Great Depression” and WWII, with a fun night of inspirational music. The trio “Music that Heals the Soul,” will be performing Broadway favorites. In addition, they will be performing many popular and inspirational favorites along with their own original compositions. Come hear vocalist and composer Jeremy Threlfall, pianist, composer, and arranger Kevin Kula, and violinist Mami Matsumoto. The concert will be Monday, June 27, at 7 p.m. at USU Performance Hall. Tickets cost $10. For tickets or information call (435)797-8022, or online at www.kevinkula.net, http://arts.usu.edu. Tickets available Monday through Friday at Caine College of the Arts Box Office located in the Fine Arts Building, or available at the door one hour to concert. The tribute is sponsored by Hallock and Hallock Attorneys, Spring Creek Dental, Realtors Russell and Christina Hallam, Mondell Ward State Farm, Fresh Market, Maya’s Corner, Alphagraphics, GraphiXpress, School of Hard Knocks, and NayDean Park C.H.A.

Pops music to fill Kent Concert Hall ache Symphony C Orchestra will perform its second of three summer pops

he Bridger Folk T Music Society presents a concert with singer

and songwriter Jen Hajj on Saturday, June 18, at 7:30 p.m. at Crumb Brothers Bakery, 291 S. 300 West in Logan. Tickets are $13 and are available by calling 757-3468, or take your chances at the door. Seating is very limited, so advance purchase is recommended. The concert is sponsored by Import Auto and Utah Public Radio. Hajj has performed at bluegrass jams, open mics, or and folk music camps. She spent her childhood in Tempe, Ariz., taking piano lessons, chasing lizards, and singing in church and school choirs. She made an early connection with composition as a child, noticing that music notation wasn’t just for interpreting what other people created, but

it could be used to express her own musical ideas. She took her first composition, “Mazurka,” to her piano teacher, who patiently played through the poorly notated piece, and gently introduced music theory into Hajj’s instruction. This is where her songwriting began. She moved to Utah in the mid-1980’s where her musical career began to take shape, singing with various choirs and moving her way into the church music scene. While working with various churches, she rediscovered her desire to write her own music. She entered music school and studied vocal performance and composition. For Hajj, being a part of the folk music scene is like coming home. She hopes when you hear her sing, you feel it too.

concerts Sunday, June 19. The concert will be held at 7 p.m. in the Kent Concert Hall in the Chase Fine Arts Center on the USU campus. The third concert in the series will be held in the same venue and at the same time July 3. Admission is free. Music Director Robert Frost will lead the orchestra in a program of light classics, Broadway tunes and popular songs. The program will include an arrangement of Steve Gibb’s “She Believes in Me,” Tchaikovsky’s “1812 Overture, and “Nimrod” from Elgar’s Enigma Variations. The orchestra will play selections from the musical “Grease” by Warren Casey and Jim Jacobs, Leroy Anderson’s “Serenata” and “Harlequinette” by Michael Leckrone. Johannes Brahms famous “Hungarian Dance No.1” and “What I Did for Love” from “A Chorus Line” by Marvin Hamlisch and Edward Kleban will also be performed. Featured soloist will be trombonist Steven Hunter. He will be playing the third movement from Richard Strauss’s Horn Concerto. Steven is a proud native of Cache Valley. He is currently teaching

music at Utah Valley University and Snow College and will be joining the Brigham Young University faculty in the fall. He holds degrees from University of North Texas, Manhattan School of Music, Brigham Young University, and Snow College. His teachers include Vern Kagarice, David Finlayson, Dave Taylor, and Rusty McKinney. In addition to his collegiate teaching, he has appeared as a guest clinician and maintained an active private studio during his time in Utah, Texas and New

York. Steve has performed on stages across the United States and Europe, including a recent appearance as a guest soloist at the College Band Directors National Association conference in Reno, Nev. He has also performed with the Park Avenue Chamber Orchestra, San Angelo Symphony Orchestra, UNT Wind Symphony, and Keystone Wind Ensemble. Steve has recorded with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, Tantara and GIA recording labels.

Page 3 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 17, 2011

All mixed up


Page 4 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 17, 2011

Can he read your mind?

Mentalist Paul Draper makes stop in Logan entalist and magiM cian Paul Draper will be making a special appear-

“Two-bit Street at Night” by Nard Nebeker

Photo gallery continues through next Wednesday he Brigham City Museum-Gallery is hosting an T exhibition entitled “A Broad View,” which offers a fresh perspective on even the most recognizable subjects. Photo-

graphs by 10 members of the Northern Utah Camera Club will be hanging through June 22. Participants are David Hurst, West Haven; Gary Hurst, Roy; Pat Hurst, West Haven; Debbie Keesler, Perry; Kaye Martin, Tremonton; Brett Mosley, Clearfield; Nard Nebeker, Layton; Don O’Leary, Providence; Barry Parsons, Wellsville; and Rodney Snyder, Sunset. There is always another horizon beckoning in the distance for members of the Northern Utah Camera Club. Some of the places they have photographed as a group are Saltair, Antelope Island, Hill Aerospace Museum, Promontory Point, Bear Lake and Hogle Zoo. The museum is located at 24 N. 300 West. The facility is open Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 1 to 5 p.m. Admission is free. For further information, please call (435) 723-6769 or visit brighamcitymuseum.org.

ance in Logan on Tuesday, June 21. Draper will be giving a 45-minute public show at 7 p.m., followed by a private lecture for magicians only at 8 p.m. at Magical Moon Toys, 1940 N. Main, North Logan. In “Mysteries of the Mind,” which Draper calls “a combination of lecture and performance,” he teaches the audience members some of his techniques and lets them try to read each others’ minds. Draper says his ability to read minds comes from his knowledge of people, which he’s spent a lifetime acquiring in his work as an anthropologist, an actor/director and a diversity trainer. He also takes to heart the advice he heard from fellow mentalist Max Maven to “read everything.” “I do not see how anyone can be truly successful in mentalism if they do not love learning,” Draper said in an interview with Magic Magazine. “If we have the skill to read people’s thoughts, we should know a lot about a lot of different subjects and areas. We must know about astronauts and bus drivers; we must know something about the South if he is from Atlanta, or about Wisconsin if he is from Appleton, and hopefully something about those exact cities. We should know details about peoples’ hobbies, interests and ideas that we could only know if we were peering into their minds.” Draper’s stage shows often include stories about his anthropology field work with the Navajo in Arizona, the Yanomami tribes in South America and Spiritualists in Louisiana. Many

of his mentalist techniques come from his observations of shamans and diviners across different cultures. Often the simple sleight of hand tricks Draper does between his mind-reading feats will be imbued with deeper meaning by a story Draper tells from one of the cultures he has studied. In performing both simple and complicated tricks, he is careful to preserve “the moment of awe.” Draper’s stage show also draws on his experience in theatre as an actor, director and singer. He has performed for the Venetian Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas which sent him overseas to perform at its Macau location. Now a regular at

the Magic Castle in Los Angeles, Draper takes every possible opportunity to perform live. “Mentalism must be practiced in front of a live audience,” Draper said. “It’s not like performing a billiard ball routine, which can be polished in front of a mirror or video cameras. Mentalism is fluid. It is interactive by nature. The mentalist must be aware, in the moment and capable of making instant choices. This can only be learned under fire.” Admission is $10. Advance purchase tickets are available from Magical Moon Toys, Peewee’s Sweet’s and the Hatch Academy of Magic and Music.


Belly dance instructor

W

ith a full-time job and family, 46-year-old Traci Hanzalik doesn’t have a lot of free time. But when she does, she’s dancing. Hanzalik picked up belly dancing, or Raks Sharki, 13 years ago and has been teaching women of all ages and levels how to shake it for 10. “This art form is beautiful and one of the oldest documented dance forms still alive,” she says. Because there may be some misconceptions about belly dancing Hanzalik encourages everyone to come to a show and give it a try. “Many folks will assume it’s one type of dance without really ever seeing it,” she says. “I think they would be surprised on how artistic and enjoyable this is.” Hanzalik, of Smithfield, has been able to travel and compete in belly dance throughout the years and says she enjoys the different styles, mood costuming and interpretation. “You know it’s a good performance when the audience is really connected to you and what you’re doing. When you hear them cheer you on, or are clapping along, it makes the whole experience exhilarating for you and the audience.”

• “My sister began taking classes, and brought me to one of her performances, and the music movement and costuming was so beautiful, I think I was hooked at that point.” • Shimmering Sands started as a USU club and grew from there into weekly classes and practices. The ensemble performs in Logan or Salt Lake City at least once a month, with soloists dancing frequently in various venues. Shimmering Sands also performs one night a month at Indian Oven. • “I have traveled extensively with belly dancing. Some places like Southern California, Portland, Orlando, Chicago and St. Louis are the few that come to mind first.” • Shimmering Sands has competed at Wiggles of the West, Belly Dancer of the Universe and Double Crown. As a group they placed each time they competed. • “As a troupe we hold six national awards. As a soloist I hold three national awards. In duets we hold two national awards.” • Shimmering Sands has beginning and intermediate level classes and group performance practice. • “We do not care about body type or age. With belly dancing it is nice because the focus isn’t on age and body type. It’s on musical interpretation and emotionally connecting with the music. We have students from teenagers to grandmothers and everything between. We welcome anyone who wants to learn the art form. Women really are attracted to this feminine expression and literally get hooked once they begin to take lessons.” Photo by Eli Lucero

Belly dancers to perform tonight himmering S Sands Belly Dance will perform “Sand-

storm” Friday, June 17, from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. at Utah State University’s TSC Auditorium. “Sandstorm” is one of Shimmering Sands’ largest productions of the year. The show will feature two special guests who will perform a special blend of liquid fusion and hip-hop belly dance. Shimmering Sands will also enchant

their audience with a diverse range of belly dance styles from Egyptian Cabaret to Tribal. Tickets are available at Indian Oven, by calling 615-306-2654, or at the door for $12. Those wanting to learn how to belly dance can sign up for a beginning belly dance class that starts July 5 at the Whittier Center. For more information email shimmeringsandsbellydance@gmail.com.

Former journalist speaks next week he Cache T Valley Visitors Bureau presents Vic-

tor Hogstrom, the new general manager of Utah Public Radio, on June 22 at 7 p.m. in the historic Cache County Courthouse. Hogstrom is the second speaker in the Visitors Bureau’s annual speaker series and will talk about the value, purpose and role of public broadcasting, and contrast public radio and commercial radio. Hogstrom became general manager of Utah Public Radio six months ago after a career in radio and television management across the United States. He is a former journalist and educator. He holds bachelor’s degrees in mass communications and

international relations. He holds a master’s degree in mass communications from BYU. Four additional talks round out the summer speaker series. All presentations are free to the public and held at 7 p.m. at 199 N. Main Street. Seating is limited. For more information, call 7551890 or log on to www. visitloganutah.com.

Page 5 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 17, 2011

Meet TRACI


Page 6 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 17, 2011

Film New this week

Still playing

“Mr. Popper’s Penguins” Rated PG ★★1⁄2 One assumes that when Hollywood gets its hands on a charming children’s book like Richard and Florence Atwater’s 1938 classic, bad things ensue. But director Mark Waters (“Mean Girls,” ‘’Freaky Friday”) surprisingly has turned in something with its own charm. Yes, it’s a saccharine family film with predictable story lines and glossy studio veneer. But thanks largely to Jim Carrey’s deft, funny performance, enough wit slides in between the cracks that it avoids becoming the kiddie schmaltz it would seem destined to be. Tom Popper (Carrey) has been transferred from the country to the Big Apple,

from the poor house to the penthouse. He’s a shark of a real estate developer, and his commitment to work has lost him his wife (Carla Gugino). He sees his kids (Madeline Carroll, Maxwell Perry Cotton) on the weekends. But when his father bequeaths him a penguin and five more follow, the tuxedoed ones — and you saw this coming — turn his life upside down. Slapstick and flatulence jokes follow, but Carrey continuously inserts clever lines and rubbery faces. Waters mixes it well, avoiding too much cheese ball humor, and the film maintains a light breeze despite its wintery environs. With Angela Lansbury as the owner of Tavern on the Green. 95 minutes.

“Super 8” Rated PG-13 ★★★ This is the rarest of things this time of year: a summer blockbuster that’s completely earnest and irony-free, not filled with cheeky pop-culture references or cheesy product placement. The effects, while spectacular, also happen to be germane to the plot, and they have an intimate, tactile quality, rather than seeming too glossy or removed from reality. So all you’re left with is ... story. And strong performances. And well-developed characters. And a believable emotional arc. And genuine thrills. And that’s apropos, given that it’s a love letter to the man who skillfully wove

together all those elements in inventing the modern blockbuster. J.J. Abrams has crafted a loving, meticulously detailed homage to Steven Spielberg, who’s one of the film’s producers — specifically, the director’s work from the late 1970s and early ‘80s — but it never feels like a rip-off, and it certainly never lapses into parody. As writer and director, Abrams effectively conveys a mood — a mixture of innocence, fear and ultimately hope — that Spielberg managed to create again and again. He also captures a familiar sense of childhood loneliness — a need to escape and belong — and the adventures that can spring from that yearning. And the kids at the center of this small-town, sci-fi thriller (Joel Courtney,

Riley Griffiths and Elle Fanning), many of whom had never appeared in a feature film before, are total naturals and bounce off each other with effortless, goofy humor. PG-13 for intense sequences of sci-fi action and violence, language and some drug use. 112 minutes. Three stars out of four.

– Reviews by The Associated Press

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e know we’re W neck deep in the summer movie season

when we finally get to the third comic book movie. This summer has already seen two decent comic book movies in “X-Men: First Class” and “Thor.” Those two films were fun, energetic and full of lively characters. That’s why they made such good movies. “The Green Lantern,” sadly, lacks in just about every category. Hal Jordan (Ryan Reynolds) is a hotshot fighter pilot who apparently has no fear when it comes to flying. Superheroes are interesting when their alter-egos are timid and afraid of the power they possess. It’s overcoming that fear and harnessing the power that makes them great. A cocky superhero that thinks he’s all-powerful to begin with is a bit of a turn off. Hal has no real inner struggle with himself. He isn’t like Peter Parker who was a nerdy young man thrust into being a superhero without wanting it. By all accounts egomaniac Hal Jordan craves attention. That really isn’t the mark of a hero. That’s the mark of a celebrity. After Hal’s hot-shot maneuvering crashes an expensive jet, he finds himself wallowing in self-pity. The only inner struggle going on with Hal is the fact that he just can’t get over himself. He’s too wrapped up in himself to care about the world or people around him. Then, well, here’s the cliffnotes

The Reel Place By Aaron Peck

version. A green ball picks Hal up, transports him to a dying alien who has just come to earth, the alien gives Hal a ring and a green lantern, and presto change-o, Hal is now an intergalactic protector of the universe. The ring gives the wearer the power to create anything his imagination can conjure. The Green Lanterns are protectors of the universe, which has been split up into something like 3,600 quadrants, each containing its own protector. Am I boring you yet? Well, I’m just getting you ready for the movie, which spouts exposition ad nauseam. That’s all these characters do. When Hal travels to a far away planet to train to become a superhero savior, they tell story after story. After all, we are apparently too dumb to figure it all out, right? We need to be guided step by step through the whole intergalactic his-

tory book. Of course earth will be in danger, and, of course Hal will have to save it. Of course the girl he cares about the most will be put in harms way, and, of course he’ll have to save her, too. So, if “The Green Lantern” is going to churn out comic book movie cliché one after another, there has to be something that sets it apart. Sadly, there isn’t. The movie’s herky-jerky tone shifts violently from one CG-laden action scene to the next punctuated by cheesy scenes with Hal talking to his girlfriend, or Hal talking to aliens, or Hal talking to himself.

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Page 7 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 17, 2011

‘Green Lantern’ boring and predictable

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In addition to featured artist Larry Winborg’s work, additional things to look for at Summerfest this year, according to Summerfest executive director Marianne Sidwell, are: • Recycled art gurus Rich Brooks from St. Louis, Mo., and Michael Bingham from Cache Valley • A silent auction and scholarship program to benefit a local artist • The Plein Air painting contest and local photography contest • 150 different artists displaying and selling their work • 24 food vendors • Performances by Way Way East Bay, Salsa Brava, the Dry Lake Band and others Summerfest performance schedule: Friday, June 17 11 a.m. - Old Barn Theater Review 12 p.m. - Sassafras-Folk 1:30 p.m. - Cold Fusion-Jazz 3 p.m. - Danielle Vaughan-Contemporary 4:30 p.m. - Avalanche-Youth Bluegrass 6 p.m. - Austin Weyand BandAcoustic Jazz 8 p.m. - Way Way East Bay-Rock Saturday, June 18 11 a.m. - Lyric Theater Review 12 p.m. - Leaping Lulu-Celtic 1:30 p.m. - Citrus & Sage-Jazz 3 p.m. - Libbie Linton-Contemporary 4:30 p.m. - Dry Lake Band-Bluegrass 6 p.m. - Double Wide-Country 6 p.m. - Grassroots ShakespeareTheater (South East side of Tabernacle grounds) 8 p.m. - Salsa Brava-Salsa

An eye for art

C

ache Valley painter Larry Winborg is always taking photographs wherever he goes, he said, gathering ideas for what may become his next masterpiece. “Whenever I see something, I’m driving down the road and I look out the window, or I see a tree or a sunset or a cloud or something, it gives me an idea for a painting,” Winborg said. “I have lots of reference material, I could probably paint here the rest of my life and never leave. ... I have hundreds, well, thousands of images.” Winborg, who has made a good living producing artwork for almost 50 years, goes to work each day in the art studio he built above his garage in Hyde Park. The studio is peaceful and comfortable, with his and his son’s artwork displayed around the room on muted burgundy walls. A few armchairs are gathered in front of the fireplace, and a pool table in one corner overlooks a spectacular view of Cache Valley to the west. With the panorama a constant reminder of one of the reasons he chose to come back to Cache Valley 16 years ago, the Utah State University alum paints mountain landscapes, harbor scenes and images of Cache Valley’s iconic landmarks such as Old Main, the tabernacle and the Logan temple. His main media are oil and acrylics, but lately he’s been doing a

lot of watercolors and even some nonobjective art. “People say, ‘well, what is that all about?’” Winborg said of his nonobjective work. “I like to call it the music without words, just the melody.” For Winborg, the best part about art materials is they don’t come with an instruction manual. Whether he paints from a photograph or goes outside to paint a scene, he said he always adds his own creativity and imagination to the piece. “My best painting is my next one, always,” Winborg said. “I’m always learning. I’m learning when I look at other artwork that people do, and I look at nature, and then I discover something for myself, I figure out how to do things a little different.” Winborg told his parents he wanted to be an artist in the first grade, and although they had their doubts, Winborg graduated with a master’s in fine arts from USU in the late ‘60s, and went on to a successful career as an illustrator for Sports Illustrated, Readers Digest, Audubon Magazine and other publications. He returned to Cache Valley and in 2002, partnered with Judge Kevin Allen to open a gallery inside the Coppermill Emporium. Winborg’s wife now runs the gallery, selling her husband’s and her son’s work to locals and collectors who travel from Salt Lake and even Park City to buy the paintings.

One of many Summerfest artists, Larry Winborg says he’ll never stop painting

Of Winborg’s four children, three are professional artists, he said. Jeremy Winborg paints alongside his father in the studio in Hyde Park and two of his daughters sell their work on Etsy and Target as Winborg Sisters Design. Another daughter does photography as a hobby, and Winborg’s 15 grandchildren love to come to the studio and paint with their own brushes and art supplies. “Art is something that’s always been in our family,” Winborg said. “When they were little, I gave (my kids) materials and supplies and didn’t try to tell them what to do, I just let them do their thing, and encouraged them.” As a full time artist, Winborg said he produces a couple hundred paintings in a year, and his total body of work is numbered in the thousands. For Summerfest this year, he said he and his son will have roughly 40 to 45 new pieces of art that have never been shown. And Winborg doesn’t plan on quitting anytime soon. “Somebody said, ‘oh, you ever going to retire?’” Winborg said. “Well, no, I’m not going to retire because what would I do when I retire? Same thing I’m doing now. So I won’t retire, I’m going to continue to paint the rest of my life.” –

By Kate Rouse DuHadway


In addition to featured artist Larry Winborg’s work, additional things to look for at Summerfest this year, according to Summerfest executive director Marianne Sidwell, are: • Recycled art gurus Rich Brooks from St. Louis, Mo., and Michael Bingham from Cache Valley • A silent auction and scholarship program to benefit a local artist • The Plein Air painting contest and local photography contest • 150 different artists displaying and selling their work • 24 food vendors • Performances by Way Way East Bay, Salsa Brava, the Dry Lake Band and others Summerfest performance schedule: Friday, June 17 11 a.m. - Old Barn Theater Review 12 p.m. - Sassafras-Folk 1:30 p.m. - Cold Fusion-Jazz 3 p.m. - Danielle Vaughan-Contemporary 4:30 p.m. - Avalanche-Youth Bluegrass 6 p.m. - Austin Weyand BandAcoustic Jazz 8 p.m. - Way Way East Bay-Rock Saturday, June 18 11 a.m. - Lyric Theater Review 12 p.m. - Leaping Lulu-Celtic 1:30 p.m. - Citrus & Sage-Jazz 3 p.m. - Libbie Linton-Contemporary 4:30 p.m. - Dry Lake Band-Bluegrass 6 p.m. - Double Wide-Country 6 p.m. - Grassroots ShakespeareTheater (South East side of Tabernacle grounds) 8 p.m. - Salsa Brava-Salsa

An eye for art

C

ache Valley painter Larry Winborg is always taking photographs wherever he goes, he said, gathering ideas for what may become his next masterpiece. “Whenever I see something, I’m driving down the road and I look out the window, or I see a tree or a sunset or a cloud or something, it gives me an idea for a painting,” Winborg said. “I have lots of reference material, I could probably paint here the rest of my life and never leave. ... I have hundreds, well, thousands of images.” Winborg, who has made a good living producing artwork for almost 50 years, goes to work each day in the art studio he built above his garage in Hyde Park. The studio is peaceful and comfortable, with his and his son’s artwork displayed around the room on muted burgundy walls. A few armchairs are gathered in front of the fireplace, and a pool table in one corner overlooks a spectacular view of Cache Valley to the west. With the panorama a constant reminder of one of the reasons he chose to come back to Cache Valley 16 years ago, the Utah State University alum paints mountain landscapes, harbor scenes and images of Cache Valley’s iconic landmarks such as Old Main, the tabernacle and the Logan temple. His main media are oil and acrylics, but lately he’s been doing a

lot of watercolors and even some nonobjective art. “People say, ‘well, what is that all about?’” Winborg said of his nonobjective work. “I like to call it the music without words, just the melody.” For Winborg, the best part about art materials is they don’t come with an instruction manual. Whether he paints from a photograph or goes outside to paint a scene, he said he always adds his own creativity and imagination to the piece. “My best painting is my next one, always,” Winborg said. “I’m always learning. I’m learning when I look at other artwork that people do, and I look at nature, and then I discover something for myself, I figure out how to do things a little different.” Winborg told his parents he wanted to be an artist in the first grade, and although they had their doubts, Winborg graduated with a master’s in fine arts from USU in the late ‘60s, and went on to a successful career as an illustrator for Sports Illustrated, Readers Digest, Audubon Magazine and other publications. He returned to Cache Valley and in 2002, partnered with Judge Kevin Allen to open a gallery inside the Coppermill Emporium. Winborg’s wife now runs the gallery, selling her husband’s and her son’s work to locals and collectors who travel from Salt Lake and even Park City to buy the paintings.

One of many Summerfest artists, Larry Winborg says he’ll never stop painting

Of Winborg’s four children, three are professional artists, he said. Jeremy Winborg paints alongside his father in the studio in Hyde Park and two of his daughters sell their work on Etsy and Target as Winborg Sisters Design. Another daughter does photography as a hobby, and Winborg’s 15 grandchildren love to come to the studio and paint with their own brushes and art supplies. “Art is something that’s always been in our family,” Winborg said. “When they were little, I gave (my kids) materials and supplies and didn’t try to tell them what to do, I just let them do their thing, and encouraged them.” As a full time artist, Winborg said he produces a couple hundred paintings in a year, and his total body of work is numbered in the thousands. For Summerfest this year, he said he and his son will have roughly 40 to 45 new pieces of art that have never been shown. And Winborg doesn’t plan on quitting anytime soon. “Somebody said, ‘oh, you ever going to retire?’” Winborg said. “Well, no, I’m not going to retire because what would I do when I retire? Same thing I’m doing now. So I won’t retire, I’m going to continue to paint the rest of my life.” –

By Kate Rouse DuHadway


Noon Music FREE CONCERTS FOR EVERYONE At logan high auditorium

Friday, June 17

Saturday, June 18 Irishfre Celtic Dancers

Susan Baker Susan Baker, soprano, has enjoyed many opportunities to sing for the Noon music series. Originally from Los Angeles, her performing experiences there included musical theater, opera, recital singing and being a regular National Anthem performer for the Los Angeles Dodgers. She is a graduate of California State University Northridge and of Utah State University. Her two red-haired sons are her proudest accomplishments. Sylvia Kirkland, accompanist, is a gradu-

Storyteller Ted Erekson ate of USU, having studied under Betty Beecher and Irving Wassermann. She studied organ with James Drake. She teaches piano and organ in Logan.

Ted is a professional storyteller, so you can be pretty sure that whatever he tells you has probably been beefed up a bit. But he has stayed true to the promise he made with his wife, Meg, when they got engaged. He told her he’d make every day an adventure. Ted has told stories all over Cache Valley and along the Wasatch front. He is a banker with Cache Valley Bank has three wonderful kids, an incredible daughter-in-law, and grandkids that are the joy of his life. He lives in Providence with his family and 16 chickens. He tells original tales as well as those authored by talented writers.

All photos taken by Sid Perkes. From left: The southern sky from the Boulevard in Logan; The LDS temple and a smoky sky; Clarkston Mountain from Benson.


Tuesday, June 21

Wednesday, June 22

Vocal performance by Emily Heap

Thursday, June 23

Emily Heap is a graduate of Utah State University with a BFA in acting and has appeared on stage with the Old Lyric Repertory Company for several seasons. Past credits include: “Percy in Spitfire Grill,” “Madge in the Dresser,” and “Mabel in Chaps!” Heap grew up acting in the Unicorn Children’s Theatre Company and went on to teach some of their drama classes. Currently, she is working backstage at the Cache Valley Center for the Arts. Heap has performed in the Noon Music concert series in the past and is delighted to return this summer with accompanist Amber Dawn Labau.

Old Lyric Repertory Company

Mark Gibbons

Noon Music is proud to present Utah State University’s Old Lyric Repertory Company (OLRC). Returning to Northern Utah this summer with four entertaining stage productions at the historic Caine Lyric Theatre, the OLRC, led by artistic director Dennis Hassan, is a professional theater program based in the Theatre Arts Department in the Caine College of the Arts at Utah State. “We are looking forward to the 2011 season,” said Hassan. “We’ll be showcasing our upcoming musical ‘Little Shop of Horrors.’” The musical is based on the book and lyrics by Howard Ashman and music by Alan Menken.

Mark Gibbons is a singer/songwriter/dairyman known for his unique talent and dairy adaptations of country songs. He has been the Master of Ceremonies and entertainment for many dairy princess pageants and other events all over Utah and Idaho. He has performed for conventions in California, Washington and Oregon and loves to share his talent and sings all kinds of music. Gibbons owns and operates a dairy farm in Lewiston, and is president of the Dairy Producers of Utah. He loves to sing and can often be heard serenading the cows early in the morning.

Ceramics camps Come play with clay during CVCA’s Summer Ceramic Camps. The four-day camps for children, pre-teens and teens run June 20-23, June 27-30 and July 5-8. Ceramics Camp at the Center caters to all ages and all skills, though children under 5 must be accompanied by an adult, and adults can take classes too. The adult ceramics camp begins June 15 and run every Wednesday through July 6. For details or to register, call 435-752-0026, click www.CacheArts.org, or visit CVCA at 43 S. Main. Children and pre-teen/teen classes are $46 plus *$15 for materials; Adult classes are $51 plus $15 for materials. Children may register for multiple camps and only pay the materials fee once. Space is limited. Ceramic skills are a part of the creative environment of CVCA Art Camp but they are also offered year-round. These programs at the Cache Valley Center for the Arts are sponsored in part by funds from the Marie Eccles Caine Foundation – Russell Family; Logan City Cultural Arts Grant; &Utah Division of Arts & Museums.

Garden tour

Painting by Trent Gudmundsen

Art on the Lawn Art on the Lawn’s seventh annual event will be Saturday, June 25, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 1491 E. 2300 North. Art on the Lawn is a nonprofit organization under Dean F. & Bessie C. Peterson Foundation for Cache Valley Arts. This is their only fundraiser and is held on an old homestead property in North Logan. The event is an interactive art event featuring nationally known Northern Utah artists. Entertainment will feature the Dry lake Band, Sasafrass, Speakeasy and Fathom. More than 40 artists and artisans will be participating.

The Alterniscapes Garden Tour will be held Saturday, June 25, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. This year’s self-guided Alterniscapes garden tour features seven gardens in Providence, Millville and Nibley. The focus this year is on gardens with native and waterwise plants. Tickets can be purchased for $5 for the tour at Cache County Extension (179 N. Main Street, Suite 111, Logan) Monday through Thursday, The Master Gardener’s booth at the Cache Valley Gardener’s Market (75 S. 200 East, Logan) on Saturday mornings, and June 25 at the Alterniscapes Tour information center at Zollinger Park. Maps to the gardens are only available June 25 at Zollinger Park. For more information contact the Cache County Extension office at 752-6263. The event is sponsored by the Cache Valley Master Gardeners and the Native Plant Society.


Page 12 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 17, 2011

The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board “Second Chance” nd by Glenda Grindela

“Fishing the ‘Bear Paw’” by Arther L. Olsen

of the shadow of death I walked in the valley d I had no wealth That is when I wishe I did drugs d plug I drank, smoked, an y came and pulled the the en wh me I was to bla second chance I wished that I had a nce give me a second gla uld wo ew No one I kn e day I had two visitors on y had to say the at wh to I listened chance for me nd I was told of a seco to do the deed ve ha uld wo me Someone o would do things for wh ne s believe I didn’t know anyo wa do to d ha I all t to worry The men told me no me ce waiting for With this second chan received I t tha ing ss It was a ble right track the Now I know I am on back me k too rcy me God in his re he ing an Wealth has no me r fea to me for ng thi no There is me to me ca My second chance ance and believe? Would you take a ch

I thought I’d try fishing the “Bear Paw” Way up in the Idaho wild. An area that’s tough to get into And rugged is putting it mild. The dead trees were down by the hundreds So thick one could barely get by. I crawled on my belly and climbed over limbs And twice almost put out an eye! When I found the stream – what a beauty! A picture no artist could match. And the trout – ah, the trout had gone crazy Consuming some strange-looking hatch. In spite of it all I was nervous And fearful about that first cast. I turned for a quick glance around me And froze in my tracks, hard and fast! A huge cat was half-crouched and waiting With that ominous twitch in his tail, All ready to pounce on his quarry And finish me there in the trail. I carried no weapon for safety; That seven-foot fly rod, a joke! But having no more for protection I might scare him off with a poke. And then, without thinking it over, And desperate for something to try, I cast the small Captain right at him And it caught in the flesh near his eye! He snorted and pawed where it struck him, Then turned and ran down the trail. He continued to paw at that fly near his eye But the twitch had gone out of his tail. The fishing trip ended in failure; I made a beeline for the car! The episode made quite a story – I told it nine times at the bar! Well, I see by your face you’re a skeptic; The story is one you reject. You admit, though, it gets some attention And it buys me a lot of respect!

“Pretence” by Billy Bird White shirt and tie, A saint does not make . Proud high success, Can give you quite a break. Spiritual pygmy, In fine expensive clo thes. Pretending self impo rtance, Making quite a pose . The great are humble people, Treating others with respect. Don’t preach a lot of sermons, Their lives you can ins pect. The great are kind an d civil, Treating all with dignit y. Don’t exalt themselv es with boasting, They are friends to yo u and me.

GET YOUR STUFF PUBLISHED! The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board is a place for our local community to share, well ... anything! From short stories to poems to recipes to photos to unique tips when it comes to rearranging your closet, Cache Magazine wants your stuff! Send it all to mnewbold@hjnews.com, or mail it to Cache Magazine, 75 W. 300 North, Logan, UT 84321. We’ll be waiting!

B


Oscar Hijuelos pens memoir on search for identity By Christine Armario For The Associated Press

n his novels, Pulitzer Icaptures Prize winner Oscar Hijuelos the loss and triumphs

of Cuban immigrants in tales of displaced dreams, lovelorn beauties and eternal music. Now he turns the pen to his story, the inspiration for many of his characters, and a candid, often heartbreaking portrait that reveals another layer of the Cuban experience in America. Growing up in New York, Hijuelos’ identity as a Cuban seems constantly stacked against him. With his blond hair and light skin, he is commonly confused as a German or American, even among

fellow compatriots — what might seem like an insignifi-

cant shortcoming, but a sort of jab to his already fragile identity each time he is mistakenly addressed in English. After an enchanting trip with his mother to Cuba as a young child, he becomes ill with a kidney disease and is hospitalized for a year, during which he loses, and never truly recovers, his Spanish. Once released, he is limited to a strict diet of bland food and forbidden from eating Cuban staples like crispy lechon or fried plantains that his family cherishes. “For the longest time, all I would know was that I had gotten sick in Cuba, from Cuban microbios, that the illness had blossomed in the land of my forebears, the

* This week’s New York Times Best-seller List * HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “Dreams of Joy,” by Lisa See 2. “Dead Reckoning,” by Charlaine Harris 3. “10th Anniversary,” by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro 4. “Buried Prey,” by John Sandford 5. “The Jefferson Key,” by Steve Berry HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “The Greater Journey,” by David McCullough 2. “In the Garden of Beasts,” by Erik Larson 3. “Unbroken,” by Laura Hillenbrand 4. “Bossypants,” by Tina Fey 5. “Those Guys Have All the Fun,” by James Andrew Miller and Tom Shales PAPERBACK TRADE FICTION 1. “The Help,” by Kathryn Stockett 2. “Water for Elephants,” by Sara Gruen 3. “Room,” by Emma Donoghue 4. “Cutting for Stone,” by Abraham Verghese 5. “A Visit From the Good Squad,” by Jennifer Egan Paperback Nonfiction 1. “Heaven is For Real,” by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent 2. “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,” by Rebecca Skloot 3. “Life,” by Keith Richards with James Fox 4. “Thank You Notes,” by Jimmy Fallon with the writers of “Late Night” 5. “Born to Run,” by Christopher McDougall

country where I had once been loved and whose language fell as music on my ears,” Hijuelos writes. “Of course, diseases happen anywhere, and children get sick under any circumstances, but what I would hear for years afterward from my mother was that something Cuban had nearly killed me and, in the process of my healing, would turn my own ‘Cubaness’ into air.” It’s an experience of displacement and a never ending inability to reach an identity he inherits, but cannot truly grasp, that many Cubans of his generation, along with anyone who has felt divided between two homelands, will understand and relate to. It also defines much of his

‘Miss Peregrine’s Home’ enchants and terrifies By Michelle Wiener For The Associated Press

s a child, Jacob loved A hearing his grandfather’s stories about the

Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/

development as a writer, as he initially hesitates to embrace his story, and that of his family, as a source of inspiration for his fictional characters — too ashamed to put them on paper, believing the world was indifferent to his tale. Indeed, Hijuelos himself acknowledges the unlikely course his life has taken and the near impossibility of becoming a writer. Raised in a tough Manhattan neighborhood in the 1960s, countless friends fell into a fatal spiral of drugs and alcohol abuse. He wasn’t surrounded by books, often picking up comic strips instead, if he read at all. Yet his life is rich with stories and characters that later populate his novels.

orphanage off the coast of Wales in which he grew up and all the friends he had — children with unusual abilities, like the invisible boy, the girl who could create fire and the boy with bees in his stomach. But kids grow up, and Jacob realized that his grandfather was telling tales, masking his experiences as a Jewish World War II refugee in the guise of fairy tales. The monsters the peculiar children feared were in reality Nazis; the children themselves Other in religion only. Or so Jacob believed,

until his grandfather is killed under mysterious circumstances and Jacob swears he saw a tentacle-mouthed creature lurking in the nearby woods. Everyone thinks he’s delusional from grief, but Jacob decides to follow his grandfather’s dying wish and go to the island to investigate. What follows is delightfully reminiscent of my favorite childhood books, ones in which the protagonist discovers a hidden passageway into a strange world where everyone has been expecting her. It’s a thrilling moment for Jacob and the reader alike to find out that the supernatural really exists, in more Technicolor detail than previously suspected.

Page 13 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 17, 2011

Books


Page 14 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 17, 2011

Answers from last week

Calendar Friday Stokes Nature Center invites curious toddlers, ages 2-3, to join them for Parent Tot from 10 to 11 a.m. Friday, June 17. Explore animals, plants, and nature through music, crafts and games. This program is parent interactive and all toddlers must have a parent present to participate and explore along with their child. The program fee is $3 ($2.50 for SNC members). For more information call 435-755-3239 or visit www.logannature.org.

Crossword

Singer/songwriter/guitarist Isael Tor-

res will perform on Friday, June 17, at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza, from 6 to 8 p.m. There is no cover charge. Pier 49 is located on 1200 South, across the street north of Maceys, near Stadium 8. The “Westernaires” live western dance band will be playing at Pioneer Valley Lodge, on Friday, June 17, at 7 p.m. It will be hosted by Integrity Home Health and Hospice. We’ll be serving hot dogs, pulled beef sandwiches, nachos, drinks and a variety of desserts. The address is 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. Join us for this free event open

to the public. For more information please call Julie or Cody at 435-7920353. Clarkston Pony Express Days will be held Friday and Saturday, June 17 and 18. There will be a turkey shoot at 6 p.m. Friday at the Clarkston gravel pit. For more information call Dan Godfrey at 535-5331. An outdoor family movie will be played at 9:30 that evening in the park. On Saturday there will be a flag ceremony and Citizen of the Year Award presentation at 7 a.m., breakfast at the fire department at 7:30 a.m., the Gunsight Gallop (3-mile race), Giddyup

www.ThemeCrosswords.com

By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Top dog 6. Support group? 10. Country singer Tillis 13. Iroquoian family member 19. Farm machine 20. Engineering science branch 22. Reverent one 23. Displays nervousness 26. Lab gel 27. Dark green mineral 28. Lawn base 29. 1968 Chemistry Nobelist Onsager 30. Badger’s burrow 31. Chinese dynasty 32. Contemptible ones 35. Violin named after maker Antonio, for short 37. More farinaceous 39. Moorbad Gmos, for one 42. Word with band or wrestle 45. Encouraging word 46. Trickles 47. According to 49. Summer treat 55. Purposeful 56. Military engineer 57. Art medium 58. Hindu holy man 60. Hard knocks 61. Hawaiian tuber 62. Popular TV show 63. Nutrition shake maker 65. Game and tape preceders 67. Nae sayer 71. Airhead

72. Actor Green of “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” 73. Zealous 78. Yellow flower native to the Alps 80. Kind of talk 82. “___ of My Heart” (Janis Joplin song) 83. Items in a food storers’ inventory 86. Skirt 87. NASCAR thrill 88. Scriber 89. Put it to 90. McCarthy quarry 91. Spark 95. Part of 42-Across 97. Plating alloys 98. ___ Street 99. Opposin’ 103. “Cogito ___ sum” 106. French vineyard 107. Snoopy, for one 109. Mysterious character 110. Triggered a frisson 115. Savannah Bird Girl, for one 116. Dumps 117. Put in the cup 118. The prince in “The Prince and the Pauper” 119. Leaves in a bag 120. Mix-a-Lot et al. 121. Diary bit Down 1. Old Jewish scholars 2. The “L” of XXL 3. Kilt feature 4. Card game 5. Tablet holder 6. Katzenjammers 7. Reddened, in a way

8. Simple protein 9. “Saturday Night Live” highlight 10. Elhi org. 11. Hyperbola part 12. Globulin 13. Course attendant 14. Much spam 15. Cat calls 16. Carbamide 17. Word with box or shift 18. Bell and Carney 21. Charlotte-to-Raleigh dir. 24. ___ laws 25. French novelist Pierre 32. Prank 33. Microprocessor type 34. Inhibit 36. Cough drop 37. Disease of old 38. Reduces to bits 39. ___ rotten 40. Pasta choice 41. Sharp spur 42. Makes a scene? 43. Mother of Hera 44. Influence greatly 46. Kick out 48. Destroy disk data 50. Massenet’s “Le ___” 51. Two-dimensional 52. Semi or RV 53. Emerald Isle 54. Distant 59. Not warranted 61. Belonging to the peerage 64. Persuaded 65. Smooth 66. Floral leaves 67. “60 Minutes” correspondent

68. ___ ball 69. Companion of Artemis 70. Seven up, e.g. 72. Personality aspects 74. ___ cage 75. A constellation 76. Locks up 77. Escritoire 79. Central European 80. Diarist Samuel 81. Indefatigable

84. Cuba’s ___ of Youth 85. Coils around 92. Like some passageways 93. 3-D figures 94. Charm 95. Musical Richard 96. Silvery game fish 97. Baked, in Bologna 98. Haka performers 100. ___ trip 101. Intrinsic

102. Strapped 103. Sum, ___, fui 104. Abbr. after many a general’s name 105. Bite like a beaver 107. Long ride? 108. Body of verse 111. Surly sort 112. Heavy-duty cleanser 113. Last word of “America, the Beautiful” 114. A mare, familiarly


Join us Friday, June 17, to hear from the author of “Your Future Demands Greatness: A Soldier’s Inheritance.” Jacob F. Roecker will speak in the North Logan City Library meeting room at 11 a.m. Roecker is a USU graduate and 13-year Army veteran. He will be selling books and autographing after his presentation until 2 p.m. For more information call 755-7169.

Saturday

Square dance lessons will be held Saturday, June 18, at 7:30 p.m. at the LDS church located at 1650 E. 2600 North, North Logan. Join us for lots of fun and great company. Round dance lessons will be held from 6:45 to 7:30.

Stokes Nature Center invites adults to Backyard Harvest: Chickens in Your Future? held from 2 to 4 p.m. on Saturday, June 18, at a local coop (call SNC for directions). Participants will learn the ins and outs of keeping backyard chickens and tour three local coops. Registration required. The program fee is $5 ($4 for SNC members). For more info, call 435-755-3239 or visit www. logannature.org.

Dads, come get a free hot dog lunch Saturday, June 18, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Fresh Market Bakery in Logan, 49 E. 400 North. Come check out the great deals and win your dad a cake at the cake walk from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. every hour on the hour in the bakery. The Bear River Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution invite you to their closing social on June 18 at 10:30 a.m. at the home of Marilynne Wright. A potluck luncheon will be served after a

program which will include a flag retirement, recognition service awards and honored guests from the DAR state board. For directions and information call Marilynne Wright 881-0458. Street Def presents Logan Hip-hop series #9 on Saturday, June 18 at 8 p.m. at Why Sound. Artists to be announced. Cost is $5. Spencer Jensen will perform from 6 to 8 p.m. on Saturday, June 18, at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza, located at 99 E. 1200 South. Spencer’s easy listening voice and wonderful guitar work are a wonderful combination. Everyone is invited. Colleen Shaffer will be entertaining on the piano at 3 p.m. on Saturday, June 18, at the Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. Please come and join us for this free event that is open to the public. For more information please call 792-0353. The 10th Annual Pony Express Days Car Show in Clarkston will be held Saturday, June 18 at Clarkston Town Square. Entries are free and registration begins at 10 a.m. Drive in the parade at 11 a.m. There will be a prize drawing for all entries at 2:30 p.m. Refreshments will be provided for exhibitors. For more information call Dan Cooper at 563-3519. A Father’s Day bake sale will be held Saturday, June 18, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Sam’s Club in Logan. All proceeds will benefit deaf and hard-of-hearing children and their families who are sponsored by Utah Hands and Voices. USU’s Museum of Anthropology will present three folktales with professional storyteller Ona Siporin on Saturday, June 18, as part of the “Saturdays at the Museum” summer schedule. The museum is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Neighborhood Nonprofit Housing is pleased to announce an open house celebrating the completion of eight houses built by owner-builders in the Mutual Self Help Housing Program. Pre-

view of houses will be Saturday, June 18, from 10 a.m. to noon and Tuesday, June 21, from 6 to 8 p.m. The open house main event will be Thursday, June 23, from 4 to 6 p.m. The homes are located in the Park Place Subdivision at 600 W. and 100 North in Smithfield. Open house signs will be posted in front of participating houses. The community is invited to come and walk through these homes and learn more about this affordable housing program that makes home ownership possible through sweat equity. Please go to www.nnhc.net or call 753-1112 for more information.  

Sunday

Sundays at the Park will continue June 19 at 1 p.m. on the lawn adjacent to the Old Main building on USU campus. Carol Secord, author and lecturer, will address the group on “accent the positive, eliminate the negative.” Bring your own lawn chairs. In the case of rain we will be meeting indoors. For more information call Norman Palmer at 787-1406.

Monday Mary and the Giant will perform bluegrass/acoustic music with The Pretty Darns and Fast Company on Monday, June 20 at 8 p.m. at Why Sound. Cost is $5. “Lilium” will perform a free concert in Providence Monday, June 20, at 7 p.m. at Zollinger Park, 61 N. 200 West. Bring your blanket and picnic and enjoy a night of great music.

Tuesday

able by calling Bryan at 7575102. On Tuesday, June 21, at 7 p.m. St. John’s Episcopal Church will hold a community prayer service. June 21 is the Summer Soltice and is an especially fitting time for prayer. You are invited to join us as we pray for people who are suffering in a variety of ways. Prayer includes both speaking to God and listening for God, and so there will periods of both speaking and silence for listening. Songs from the famous Taize Christian community in France will be sung. There will be candles to light, bread to share, and objects such as ribbons and leaves to hold during short guided meditations. For more information call St. John’s at 752-0331 or email stjohnschurch1@qwestoffice. net. St. John’s is located at 85 E. 100 North in Logan. Stokes Nature Center will host two Play with Your Food half-day camps: June 21, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., for ages 4-7, and June 23, 1to 4 p.m., for ages 8-12. Participants will learn where food comes from and how seeds grow into plants, and will use fruits and vegetables to play games and create art. Cost is $30 ($25 for SNC members). Registration required. For more info, call 435-755-3239 or visit www. logannature.org. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will be hosting a summer barbecue Tuesday, June 21, at 6 p.m. For more information call 713-0288.

Chef Whitney Olsen from Rhodes bake-n-serv will help The iris in Cache Valley are us get a great start to our day finally getting serious about with fun breakfast ideas at blooming. The Logan Iris SociMacey’s little theater Tuesday, ety invites you to visit four June 21, from 7 to 8 p.m. Seatiris gardens that belong to ing is limited, so reserve a seat members of the society, this at the Service Desk or by calling Tuesday, June 21, beginning at 6 p.m. until sundown. The “open 753-3301. garden” is the equivalent of an open house in that you can drop in any time. The first garden is in Hyde Park at 171 W. 300 Local easy listening group North. A map will be given at “City Heat,” featuring Bill that location for the other three gardens. Cameras are welcome. Gabriel on guitar, performs each Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Additional information is avail-

Wednesday

at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza, located on 1200 South across the street north of Maceys. Everyone is welcome. Michael Robinson will be performing cowboy music and poetry at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 22, at the Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. Please come and join us for this free event that is open to the public. For more information please call 792-0353. Free Love and Logic parenting classes for parents of children 1-6 years will continue Wednesdays, June 15 and 22, from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Logan Family Center 50 S. 400 East, Logan. Some babysitting available by pre-arrangement. All participants must pre-register. Call 755-5171 for more information. Scott Bradley will teach a free constitution class, “To Preserve The Nation,” on Wednesday, June 22, at 7 p.m. at the Book Table. For more information call 753-2930 or 753-8844.

Thursday A free seminar entitled “Do I Need a Trust? Why Good Estate Planning Still Matters” will be held Thursday, June 23, from 7 to 8 p.m. at the Riverwoods Elm Room, 615 Riverwoods Parkway, Logan. The seminar will be presented by attorney Todd N. Hallock. Seating is limited. To reserve a seat or for more information, call 753-2335 or email rachelw@hallock-law.com. Refreshments will be served. Priory will perform acoustic music with Boots to the Moon, The Shuttles and Britton Noel on Thursday, June 23 at 8 p.m. at Why Sound. Cost is $5. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will be hosting a hiking activity Thursday, June 23, at 5 p.m. For more information call (435) 713-0288.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 17, 2011

Gallop (1-mile race for kids), and softball tournament at 8 a.m. Throughout the day there will be a Pony Express Horse Relay Race, 3-on-3 basketball, a parade, lunch, vintage car show, team roping, kids games, bounce houses, Minute to Win It, barnyard animal chase, a fireman’s soak, bingo, dinner, dancing and more.


Page 16 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 17, 2011

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