Page 1

Taste of summer

The Herald Journal

JUNE 15-21, 2012


contents

June 15-21, 2012

MUSIC 3 Seattle-based band to share sound with Logan

4 The noon Tabernacle series continues

12 Local band For

Tomorrow We Die heads to Warped Tour on Saturday

theater 5 ‘Private Lives’ opens Thursday

MOVIES 7 ‘Rock of Ages’ review by The Associated Press

PAGE 8

MISC. 3 Registration open for

People walk through a section of food vendors at Summerfest on Thursday. On the cover: Marlea Preston serves up a plate of BBQ Boneless Ribs with potatoes and vegetables at the Let’s Go Dutch booth at Summerfest. (Photos by Jennifer Meyers/Herald Journal)

5 Japan tsunami film to be

FROM THE EDITOR

kids camps

screened at USU

BOOKS 13 Local author writes about Mormon war

COLUMN 10 Lael Gilbert says summer is in citrus

CALENDAR 15 See what’s happening this week

F

resh watermelon lemonade. Organic hummus. Homemade strawberry/ raspberry jam. Last Saturday the Gardeners’ Market did not disappoint. Trying to stick to $10, those were my three purchases of the day. I did exceed my budget by $2.50, but the perfectly pink watermelon lemonade with a hint of mint was worth it. I love the taste of summer. One of these weekends I’ll go to the Gardeners’ Market again and purchase locally made feta cheese and fresh salsa with diced hot peppers. I also want to purchase something

from the pancake and taco stands, and when peaches, raspberries and corn on the cob are in season, you can bet I’ll get in line. The Gardeners’ Market isn’t the only place to experience the mouthwatering taste of summer. I also love snow cone stands, ice cream shops and city celebrations where the Lions Club serves breakfast and vendors sell giant pickles, cotton candy and churros. For food columnist Lael Gilbert, summer means the light, sweet taste of citrus and this week she’s sharing a lemon meringue pie recipe (page 10). It really does sound like a perfect summer dessert. For this week’s main feature, Lance Frazier focused on Summerfest food

which is being grilled, fried, dipped and blended this weekend on the Logan Tabernacle grounds (page 8). I looked at the list of vendors earlier this week and salivated over Navajo tacos, Dutch oven peach cobbler, mini donuts and funnel cakes. There are also some items I’ve never tried before that sound delicious including the Texas Twister made with fresh squeezed oranges, lemons and limes, the Coco Colada made with coconut and fruit colada and fry bread with peanut butter and jelly. Whether it be at the Gardeners’ Market, a snow cone stand or Summerfest, I hope you too can track down summer food that fits your fancy. — Manette Newbold


Indie band Barcelona comes to Logan

Barcelona performs live in concert at 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 15, at the Logan Arthouse, 795 N. Main St. in Logan. The performance was scheduled on the heels of their latest album release, “Not Quite Yours.” The concert will also feature local guests Once the Lion, Good Blood and acoustic guitarist Corey Walton. Barcelona formed in 2005 in Seattle, Wash. The band cites U2, Coldplay, Copeland, Death Cab for Cutie and Lovedrug as its influences. Barcelona independently released their debut album “Absolutes” in September 2007. On Dec. 18, 2008, the band announced they had been signed to the major record label Universal and mixed by Michael Records which re-mixed H. Brauer, a two-time “Absolutes.” At that time, Grammy winner for his Barcelona added four new songs to the album. The re- work with artists such as Coldplay and John Mayer. release of “Absolutes” was self-produced by Barcelona The song “Please Don’t

“We’re not like trying to be rock stars, we’re not trying to make it to Hollywood or anything, we’re just doing this because it’s fun.” – Rex Davis, For Tomorrow We Die

PET OF THE WEEK Available for adoption Go” is used in a trailer for the 2011 film “Water for Elephants,” which starred Robert Pattinson and Academy Award winners Reese Witherspoon and Christoph

Waltz. Doors open for the concert at 6:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at the door for $12 or online at www.smithstix.com for $10.

Kids can still sign up for summer camps • The American West Heritage Center is still taking day camp registration for children entering first through sixth grade. Camps available include “Life on the Farm,” “Art in the Barn” and “Little House in the Valley.” The one- and four-day camps last from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost is $69 for four-day camps and $19 for one-day camps. For more information or to register, call 435-2456050. Camp descriptions can also be found online at www. awhc.org. Campers will learn through hands-on experiences what it was like to come across the

CAMP: American West Heritage Center day camps • Kids will learn through hands-on experiences about American West history.

plains in a handcart company and how famous explorers such as Lewis, Clark, and Sacagawea made it through the West. Campers can also learn how art techniques can be used to tell stories about nature, or how to take care of a milk cow and her calves. The center is located at 4025 S. Hwy 89-91 in Wellsville.

• Kids can still register for the 2012 Cache Children’s Choir summer music camp to take place July 9-13 at the USU Chase Fine Arts Center. Children ages 5 to 11 are welcome to sign up for the musical experience that includes age-appropriate vocal instruction, instruments (xylophones, glockenspiels, drums, etc.), dance, art, drama and an outside water game day. Each session of the CCC summer music camp is divided into three age groups: 5-6 years old (must be 5 by Jan. 1), 7-8 years old and 9-11 years old.

CAMP: Cache Children’s Choir summer music camp • Kids will participate in vocal instruction, dance, art, drama and an outside water game day.

Cost is $60 per child. There will be one session of music camp from 9 a.m. to noon daily. An afternoon session will be offered depending on enrollment. Space is limited. For more information, call Sharon Hopkins at 753-0194 or Kathryn Hadfield at 753-2745 or visit www.cachechildrenschoir.org and click on Camps.

Pet: Shadow From: Four Paws Rescue Why he’s so lovable: Shad-

ow is great with all other dogs, kids and cats. He is completely house-trained and crate-trained. He has a wonderful sweet temperament. He is very wellbehaved and doesn’t jump fences or up on people. He loves his dog toys and is a wiggly, fun, happy dog. Shadow is a black Labrador Retriever and is about 2 years old.

Page 3 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 15, 2012

ALL MIXED UP

Quotable


Page 4 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 15, 2012

all mixed up Here’s what’s happening next week at the Tabernacle Monday, June 18 Utah Festival Opera and Musical Theatre

Singers and instrumentalists will perform their favorite music in addition to previewing the upcoming UFOMT season.

Tuesday, June 19 Hatch Family

Magician Richard Hatch, vio-

linist Rosemary Hatch and pianist Jonathan Hatch will perform highlights from their popular “Magic and Music at the Mansion” programs. Among the ensemble pieces will be Punx’s “Heart of Glass,” accompanied by Saint-Saëns “The Swan” and “The Miracle of the Jadoo-Wallah,” accompanied by Rimsky-Korsakoff’s “Scheherazade.” Musical and magical solos will alternate with the ensemble pieces.

Wednesday, June 20 Students from Liz Sampson’s Piano Studio

Thursday, June 21 Lightwood Duo

Clarinetist Eric Nelson and guitarist Mike Christiansen formed the Lightwood Duo in 1992. Nelson has been active as a freelance musician in the Salt Lake City area and has performed as an extra with the Utah Symphony and Ballet West Orchestra, and in New York with the Riverside Trio and Wagner/Nelson Chamber Jazz. Christiansen has been head of the guitar program at Utah State University since 1977.

Friday, June 22 Mark Gibbons: Western Vocal

Mark is coowner of Gibbons Brothers dairy located in Lewiston. He milks 600 cows and owns and leases 1,200 acres of ground. He raises alfalfa, silage corn, wheat and barley. Mark is president of the Dairy Producers of Utah, president of the Governors Agriculture Advisory Board, and is involved with Western States Dairy Producers Trade Association and has served as vice president.

Saturday, June 23, 7 p.m.

Violin-Piano Duo

Loi Anne Eyring, a violinist with the Utah Symphony for 50 years, will play favorite violin melodies and virtuoso showpieces on her treasured Guarnerius violin dating from 1705. John C. Bailey, her brother, will accompany her on the piano. They’ve been performing together since they were teenagers.

James Conger, 14, will attend Logan High School this fall. In addition to playing the piano, James has played violin for the past eight years, and participated for two years in honor orchestra and the Mount Logan Middle School orchestra. Alexis Marie Dykstra is a 14-year-old freshman at Logan High School. Alexis has been studying piano for nine years and enjoys playing classical and contemporary music. Alexis also plays soccer and dances with the Cache Valley Civic Ballet. Luke Facer is 10 years old. Besides his love for the piano, Luke enjoys a variety of hobbies including drawing, painting, reading, snowboarding, wakeboarding, skateboarding and his favorite, team sports. Michal Anne Gibson has been studying piano for two years. When Michal isn’t practicing the piano, she loves to cook, read and write short stories. Above all,

Michal is a horse enthusiast. Levi Hopkins is 11 years old. He began taking piano lessons when he was 7 years old. He took second place in the Northern Cache Valley Performing Arts Festival, and recently played a main part in his school musical. Scott Johnson will be in the ninth grade next fall at South Cache Junior High. He has studied piano since he was 8 years old. He also loves to play tennis. Savannah Knight is 13 years old and will be a freshman at South Cache. Savannah has been taking piano from Liz Sampson for six years. In her spare time, she enjoys playing soccer, basketball and camping.  Braden Petersen is 11 and will enter middle school as a sixth grader. He started piano and violin at 6 years old. He recently picked up the cello as an additional instrument. Bradley Petersen is 17 and will be a senior at Logan High School. His piano experience began when he was 6

years old. He also started the bass at age 7. He is involved with track and field and orchestra. Brindi Petersen is 15 and will be a sophomore at Logan High. She started playing the piano at 6 years old and the violin at age 5. She is involved in track and field and orchestra. Bryson Petersen is 13 and will be in eighth grade. He began piano lessons at 6 years old and picked up the violin at age 7. He is involved in orchestra and his interests include soccer and Airsoft. Emmalee Smedley has been playing the piano since she was 7. She has also been playing the cello for two years in her school orchestra and enjoys singing as well. She also took part in her school play this last quarter. Catherine Whitney is currently attending USU majoring in animal and dairy science. Catherine has studied the piano for more than 10 years and has taken lessons from Liz for four years. 


Utah State University students joined a nationwide effort to translate a documentary film created about the deadly tsunami that struck the eastern coast of Japan last year. The film, “Protecting Today — Voices of Northern Japan Tsunami Survivors,” will be screened at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 21, at the USU Performance Hall. The event is free and open to the public. Director and producer Yuka Kan’no will fly in from Japan for the event. She made the film as a student at the University of Yamanashi in Kofu, Japan, after the tsunami wiped Courtesy of Atsuko Neely out much of her hometown. USU students working on the translation for “Protecting Today.” She created it so people would not forget what happened there. sity. With the help of more than screening is the first in Utah. Senior lecturer of Japanese The subtitle translation proj60 students across the country, ect was started by professor subtitles for the 70-minute film language and culture at USU, Atsuko Neely supervised the Kazumi Hatasa of Purdue Uni- were completed in April. translation project at USU versity in late January 2012 but The film debuted at the and views the event as a way quickly spread to 11 other uni- Yamanashi Film Festival in to thank the Cache Valley versities in the United States, 2011 and has been shown including Utah State Univerthroughout Japan. The June 21 community who generously

responded to last year’s Help Japan fundraising effort, which raised more than $16,000 for the Japanese Red Cross. “Professor Hatasa proposed the subtitling project so that people in English-speaking countries might view this wonderful film,” Neely said. At USU, a dozen students participated in the project. One student took on the task of translating the theme song. The lyricist of the song, Wakako Kaku, was moved by this effort and paid her own way to come to Logan for the screening. A group of local volunteer singers led by Caine College of the Arts Dean Craig Jessop will sing the theme song at the event. The composer of the song, Megumi Maruo, created a special choir arrangement for the occasion. While the screening is free, donations will support a future project. CDs of the theme song will be available for purchase.

‘Private Lives’ will keep the audience guessing

The Tony Award-winning Dunbar who plays Amanda play “Private Lives” comes Prynne in the OLRC producto Utah State University’s tion. “It’s a true masterpiece. Caine Lyric Theatre in down- The show is reminiscent of a town Logan as part of the 1920s and ’30s love story. It’s 2012 Old Lyric Repertory romantic, witty and embodCompany season. ies language comparable to The show tells the story Shakespeare. ‘Private Lives’ of Elyot and Amanda, a is the perfect date night.” divorced couple who find Elyot Chase is played by themselves honeymoonNicholas Dunn, seen last seaing in neighboring rooms son as Mozart in the OLRC’s at the same hotel with their “Amadeus.” Kenneth Risch, new spouses. Their highly USU Theatre Arts Departcharged relationship will ment head, makes his OLRC keep you guessing throughdirecting debut with “Private out the whole show, said Lives.” Hassan. Tickets for the “Private “Private Lives” opens June Lives” production can be 21 and continues June 22-23, purchased by visiting the with additional dates through Caine College of the Arts Aug. 18. Curtain for evening Box Office at Utah State performances is 7:30 and University in Room 139-B of selected matinee dates have a the Chase Fine Arts Center 2 p.m. curtain. The season’s open 10 a.m.­to 5 p.m. Monfull schedule can be seen at day through Friday, by callarts.usu.edu/lyric/htm/scheding 435-797-8022 or going ule. to arts.usu.edu. Tickets are “This is one of the best Noël also available at the Caine Coward shows,” said Tamari Lyric Theatre, from noon to 4

Nicholas Dunn as Elyot and Tamari Dunbar as Amanda are shown in a scene from Old Lyric Repertory Company’s “Private Lives.”

p.m., Monday through Friday and an hour prior to curtain on show nights. Individual ticket prices range from $18$25 for adults, $15-$21 for seniors and USU faculty and

staff and $12-$18 for USU students and youth. For more information on the OLRC’s 2012 season, visit the OLRC website, arts. usu.edu/lyric.

Conductor to speak on her ‘Life in the Pits’ Maestro Karen Keltner will speak at 7 p.m. June 20 at the historic Cache County Courthouse as the Cache Valley Visitors Bureau’s summer speaker series enters its second week. Titling her talk “Life in the Pits: Stories Keltner from a career with opera orchestras,” Keltner will discuss her experiences as resident conductor with San Diego Opera, her 14 years at Utah Festival Opera and Musical Theatre and her pioneering appearances with major opera companies in Europe and across the United States. Keltner is a native of Indiana and a graduate of the University of Indiana, where she studied both French and music. This year she will conduct Puccini’s “Tosca” and “My Fair Lady” by Lerner and Loewe during the summer season of Utah Festival Opera and Musical Theatre. The speaker series continues with five more presentations. On June 27, archaeologist Dr. Bonnie Pitblado will discuss the recovery of the Pilling Figurine, an ancient Fremont artifact missing for almost 50 years. On July 11, learn about the coffee business with Sally Sears and Randy Wirth, owners of Caffe Ibis Coffee Roasting Company. July 18, Cathy Bullock, director of the Westminster Bell Choir, will talk about the magic of English handbells with demonstrations and solo ringing. On Aug. 1, deceptionist Richard Hatch will discuss “Wizards in the Valley: Pioneers of Prestidigitation.” All presentations are free and at 199 N. Main St. Seating is limited so arrive early. For more information, call 7551890.

Page 5 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 15, 2012

Japan tsunami film to be screened at USU


Page 6 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 15, 2012

movies Nothing could possibly satisfy the fervent expectation that has built for this sorta-prequel to the genre-defining “Alien,” Ridley Scott’s return to science fiction for the first time in 30 years, but “Prometheus” comes close. Strikingly beautiful, expertly paced, vividly detailed and scary as hell, it holds you in its grip for its entirety and doesn’t let go. You’ll squeal, you’ll squirm and you’ll probably continue feeling a lingering sense of anxiety afterward. That’s how effective it is in its intensely suspenseful mood. But the further you get away from it, the more you may begin to notice some problems with the plot, both nagging holes and a narrative fuzziness. Noomi Rapace, Charlize Theron, Idris Elba and Logan Marshall-Green lead a crew of space explorers to a remote moon in the year 2093 hoping to find answers to the origin of mankind on Earth. But when they arrive at this gorgeously severe land, they (naturally) stumble upon secrets and perils they never could have Ben Stiller’s Alex the Lion provides a review so we don’t have to. Halfway into the third animated tale about New York City zoo animals on their overseas adventures, Alex tells some new circus friends that their act was not too entertaining for families “because you were just going through the motions out there.” So, too, for this latest sequel, which goes through a lot of motions — explosions of action and image so riotously paced that they become narcotic and numbing. With Eric Darnell and Tom McGrath, creators of the first two “Madagascar” flicks, joined by a third director in Conrad Vernon (“Shrek 2”), the filmmakers just cannot stop stuffing things, to the point of distraction, into “Europe’s Most Wanted.” The result: A cute story about zoo animals running off to join the circus becomes overwhelmed by a blur of color and animated acrobatics. The pictures certainly are pretty, but the filmmakers

Reviews by The Associated Press

★★★ ‘Prometheus’ Director // Ridley Scott Starring // Noomi Rapace, Logan Marshall-Green, Michael Fassbender and Charlize Theron Rated // R for sci-fi violence including some intense images, and brief language imagined. Scott and writers Damon Lindelof (executive producer of “Lost”) and Jon Spaihts vaguely touch on the notions of belief vs. science and creation vs. Darwinism, but these philosophical debates never feel fleshed out fully. Still, the performances are excellent, especially from Michael Fassbender as a robot with the looks and impeccable manners of an adult but the innocence and dangerous curiosity of a child. 123 minutes.

20th Century Fox

Logan Marshall-Green, Noomi Rapace and Michael Fassbender are shown in a scene from “Prometheus.”

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Alex the Lion, voiced by Ben Stiller, and Gia the Jaguar, voiced by Jessica Chastain, are shown in a scene from “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted.”

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Directors // Eric Darnell, Tom McGrath and Conrad Vernon Starring // Ben Stiller, Jada Pinkett Smith and Chris Rock Rated // PG for mild action and rude humor apparently are unwilling to risk the slightest lapse of audience attention, so they put the movie on fast-forward and let centripetal force hurtle viewers along from start to finish. Joining Stiller are returning voice stars

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By Christy Lemire AP Movie Critic

Just when you thought you’d never hear Def Leppard’s “Pour Some Sugar on Me” again outside of a strip club comes “Rock of Ages,” a shiny, splashy homage to the decadence of 1980s rock ‘n’ roll. Specifically, we’re talking about 1987 on the Sunset Strip, the birthplace of bands like Guns N’ Roses and Poison, and all the big-haired, eyelinered debauchery that defined that scene. Your enjoyment of this musical, based on the Tonynominated Broadway show, will depend greatly on your enjoyment of this music — because director Adam Shankman (“Hairspray”) crams in a lot of it. The characters are all broad types, from freshfaced newcomers with dreams of stardom to grizzled, cynical veterans who’ve seen it all. And sure, their antics are glossed-up and watereddown compared to reality to ensure a PG-13 accessibility. But the movie has enough energy to keep you suitably entertained, as well as a knowing, cheeky streak that prevents it from turning too reverent and selfserious. The impossibly adorable Julianne Hough stars as Sherrie, a wholesome blonde fresh off the bus from Oklahoma who hopes to make it as a singer in Los Angeles. Instead, she ends up working as a waitress at the venerable (and fictional) Bourbon Room, where she quickly falls for aspiring rocker Drew (Diego Boneta). But the club has lost

Warner Bros.

Tom Cruise is shown as Stacee Jaxx in “Rock of Ages.”

★★ ‘Rock of Ages’ Director // Adam Shankman Starring // Julianne Hough, Diego Boneta and Tom Cruise Rated // PG-13 for sexual content, suggestive dancing, some heavy drinking and language

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wife (Catherine ZetaJones) of L.A.’s mayor (Bryan Cranston), who’s on a crusade to clean up the Strip. Even though the “Chicago” star’s intentionally rigid performance of Pat Benatar’s “Hit Me With Your Best Shot” is good for a laugh, the whole story thread seems like a feeble attempt at injecting tension. Far more effective is the presence of Mary J. Blige as the strip club owner with a heart of gold who takes Sherrie under her wing when life in Los Angeles gets too tough. The second she struts into a room and opens her mouth, she just blows everyone else away — a powerful reminder of how a superstar can truly rock.

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mance from rock god Stacee Jaxx (Tom Cruise, easily the best part of the film) will keep them alive. Stacee’s sleazy manager (a well-cast Paul Giamatti, who’s also game enough to sing) merely wants to continue milking his notoriously unreliable client. With a bandana tied around his long, wild tresses, aviator sunglass-

es and fur coat over his bare, tatted chest, Cruise is clearly aping Guns N’ Roses lead singer Axl Rose. (And speaking of apes, everywhere the character goes, he’s accompanied by his pet baboon named Hey Man). But the swagger is reminiscent of his supporting role in “Magnolia,” still his best work yet. Cruise gives a performance that’s intensely weird and weirdly intense; it’s sexy and funny and a great fit for his own status as a rock star among actors. Unfortunately, this film version (with a script from Chris D’Arienzo, who created the stage show, Allan Loeb and Justin Theroux) also feels the need to cram in a subplot about the self-righteous, uptight

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Page 7 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 15, 2012

‘Rock of Ages’ revels in big-haired kitsch


Kettle corn, Navajo tacos and other treats are part of the allure of Logan’s Summerfest he paintings, sculptures and brightly colored knickknacks are the obvious attractants at Summerfest, and at any given moment rock, folk or bluegrass music provides the auditory background. But there is another, unseen lure in the air that is equally powerful. The smell of barbecued meat swirls around, mixing with the aromas of smoked sausage, orange chicken and French fries, even the sweetness of kettle corn, each a siren song of culinary delight. What would Summerfest be without the food vendors? This year’s lineup at Logan’s Tabernacle Square includes long-time standards such as Let’s Go Dutch and Formosa Restaurant’s Chinese food, along with some newer offerings such as baked potatoes and corn on the cob and ... hamburgers. That’s right, burgers have long been verboten at Summerfest, for the simple reason that they’re so widely available. The committee that chooses vendors for the 25 available slots favors unique items, along with the classics (defined as those vendors that traditionally

draw long lines of customers). “You can get a hamburger anywhere,” said Summerfest food coordinator Ann Parrish. “We try to do something a little different every year, but we always bring back the crowd favorites.” One of the can’t-miss treats at this outdoor arts fair for about a decade is the Navajo taco. Even before she set up shop at Summerfest, Laura Andrade was selling the popular items at the Cache County Fair for 20 years. She still sets up at those two events, although unlike many of the vendors, this is not a full-time business for her. “I always tell people, I cook for Logan twice a year,” Andrade said, “and if they miss out they have to wait until next year.” Andrade picked up her authentic recipe growing up in the Four Corners area, and starting cooking for the fair some 30 years ago, when she lived in Logan. She now lives in Pleasant View, and although selling Navajo tacos is a part-time gig for her, it did give her enough confidence that when she tried — and loved — Zeppe’s Italian Ice, she became a

franchise owner. Her son will run the Zeppe’s booth at Summerfest this year. The food, Parrish said, is a big part of the allure of Summerfest, which draws up to 30,000 visitors each year. “It’s very important because it brings a crowd in,” she said. “Even for people who can’t afford to buy the art, they can come eat.” For those who think they’ve tried everything at Summerfest, Andrade has one more challenge: “The Indians say that you’re not a real man unless you can eat a Navajo taco and then eat a fry bread.” Of course, anyone who’s not up for that amount of deep-fried dough can find plenty of other options, from crepes to pizza to chicken wings. “It’s a great event,” said Parrish, who is in her final year as food coordinator of this feast for the senses. “Come down and try some of this wonderful food. You name it, we have it.” ———— For a complete list of food vendors and Summerfest events, go to www.logansummerfest.com.

Caramel apples from Forbidden Fruit Sweet Shoppe, cinnamon roasted almond nuts from Totally Nuts and Navajo tacos from Laura’s Navajo Tacos are just some of the treats available at Summerfest.


Kettle corn, Navajo tacos and other treats are part of the allure of Logan’s Summerfest he paintings, sculptures and brightly colored knickknacks are the obvious attractants at Summerfest, and at any given moment rock, folk or bluegrass music provides the auditory background. But there is another, unseen lure in the air that is equally powerful. The smell of barbecued meat swirls around, mixing with the aromas of smoked sausage, orange chicken and French fries, even the sweetness of kettle corn, each a siren song of culinary delight. What would Summerfest be without the food vendors? This year’s lineup at Logan’s Tabernacle Square includes long-time standards such as Let’s Go Dutch and Formosa Restaurant’s Chinese food, along with some newer offerings such as baked potatoes and corn on the cob and ... hamburgers. That’s right, burgers have long been verboten at Summerfest, for the simple reason that they’re so widely available. The committee that chooses vendors for the 25 available slots favors unique items, along with the classics (defined as those vendors that traditionally

draw long lines of customers). “You can get a hamburger anywhere,” said Summerfest food coordinator Ann Parrish. “We try to do something a little different every year, but we always bring back the crowd favorites.” One of the can’t-miss treats at this outdoor arts fair for about a decade is the Navajo taco. Even before she set up shop at Summerfest, Laura Andrade was selling the popular items at the Cache County Fair for 20 years. She still sets up at those two events, although unlike many of the vendors, this is not a full-time business for her. “I always tell people, I cook for Logan twice a year,” Andrade said, “and if they miss out they have to wait until next year.” Andrade picked up her authentic recipe growing up in the Four Corners area, and starting cooking for the fair some 30 years ago, when she lived in Logan. She now lives in Pleasant View, and although selling Navajo tacos is a part-time gig for her, it did give her enough confidence that when she tried — and loved — Zeppe’s Italian Ice, she became a

franchise owner. Her son will run the Zeppe’s booth at Summerfest this year. The food, Parrish said, is a big part of the allure of Summerfest, which draws up to 30,000 visitors each year. “It’s very important because it brings a crowd in,” she said. “Even for people who can’t afford to buy the art, they can come eat.” For those who think they’ve tried everything at Summerfest, Andrade has one more challenge: “The Indians say that you’re not a real man unless you can eat a Navajo taco and then eat a fry bread.” Of course, anyone who’s not up for that amount of deep-fried dough can find plenty of other options, from crepes to pizza to chicken wings. “It’s a great event,” said Parrish, who is in her final year as food coordinator of this feast for the senses. “Come down and try some of this wonderful food. You name it, we have it.” ———— For a complete list of food vendors and Summerfest events, go to www.logansummerfest.com.

Caramel apples from Forbidden Fruit Sweet Shoppe, cinnamon roasted almond nuts from Totally Nuts and Navajo tacos from Laura’s Navajo Tacos are just some of the treats available at Summerfest.


There is citrus in the air this summer. Not literally, of course, since we live in zone four growing conditions, but figuratively, there is definitely citrus in the air. People are puckering over sour lemon wedges squeezed over their plank-grilled trout. Sweet pulpy orange juice is added to pans of sizzling chicken. Fat cross-sections of lime, undulating green and white, are suspended in sugar water in icefogged glass pitchers. Sugared curls of candied grapefruit zest are eaten straight up. Orange zest is being tossed haphazardly over orange chiffon cake and drizzled with powdered sugar glaze. Citrus seems to be in the collective conscience. Not counting the 29 lemonade stands that popped up in our neighborhood since the end of the school year, I know three people who have been talking to the citrus muse. Number one is Staci, my sister-in-law and talented home cook. She sent me a recipe for key lime bars she made for a Sunday afternoon treat. These bars are the adorable child of lemon bars and key lime pie. Number two is my friend Gay whose delectable orange blondies I tried at a potluck — they were rich, satisfying and bright. And finally number three is my son Gabe, who recently became obsessed with the above-mentioned orange chiffon cake — actually entitled “Big Bird’s Orange Chiffon

Cake” from a “B is for Baking” cookbook we got at the library. He pestered me like only a 9-year-old can until we could give the recipe a test run. Some irresistible force also drew me to revisit a recipe for lemon meringue pie that I’ve long adored. It is adapted from the book “Great Pies and Tarts” by Carole Walter. Outside some good, tart lemonade, there is no better citrus fix than lemon meringue pie. Here it is: Lemon Meringue Pie • One nine-inch pie crust, baked. It cracks me up when recipes start out like this — as if a homemade pie crust were so easy, it hardly warrants a mention. Mind you, I am a huge advocate of homemade crusts, made with butter. They are much tastier, flaky and full of flavor. That said, I know how maddening it can be after 45 minutes of work and a kitchen counter covered in flour, when you only end up with a mediocre crust. If necessary for your psychological well-being, buy one. If you are feeling adventurous, break out the rolling pin. • Three ginger snaps, finely crushed These are certainly optional, but if you want to make the pie special, use them. Ginger and lemon are a great flavor combination. Filling • 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar

• 5 large egg whites at butter, lemon zest and room temperature lemon juice. • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla Preheat your oven to extract 325 degrees. • 1/2 teaspoon cream And now for the of tartar meringue. Mix the I’ll bet you didn’t other sugars (superfine know that cream of and powdered) in a tartar is a byproduct of small bowl. Using an wine-making. I looked electric mixer, beat the it up one time, because egg whites until frothy. I wondered where tarAdd the cream of tartar tars were grown and and beat the heck out how to cream them. of them until they form Cream of tartar is firm peaks. The recipe slightly acidic, and is says not to let them get • 6 tablespoons cornan ingredient in baking dry. I’m not sure what starch powder. It stabilizes this means, honestly, • 1/4 teaspoon salt the proteins in the egg but don’t let it happen. • 1 1/2 cups cold whites so they don’t Add the sugar mixwater “weep.” ture as you beat, one • 5 large egg yolks Combine the 1 1/4 tablespoon at a time. (Don’t panic, we use cups granulated sugar, Add the vanilla and the whites below.) corn-starch and salt in beat until thick and • 2 tablespoons a pot. Stir in the water. glossy ... about 30 secunsalted butter Cook over medium onds more. • 1 tablespoon grated heat, stirring constantly, When I first made lemon zest until it boils. Reduce this recipe I was living • 1/3 cup fresh lemon the heat and cook for in a trailer at a national juice one minute longer, stir- park. There were miniWhen I use bottled ring. Turn off the heat. mal kitchen gadgets lemon juice, I generally Lightly beat the egg within a 100-mile radidouble the lemon juice yolks in a small bowl. us. An electric mixer and compensate with Stir a small amount of was not to be had. I another tablespoon the hot stuff into the beat the egg whites or two or cornstarch, egg yolks to temper old-school, by hand, since I like my slice them so you don’t get with a whisk. It of pie pucker-worthy. scrambled egg pie. was surIf you are using fresh Gently stir the yolk prislemons, you get that mixture into the pot. ingcitrus kick with less Cook over low heat ly juice. until is comes to a slow boil. Cook and stir Meringue for one minute • 7 tablespoons sugar, more. Turn off superfine if you have it the heat and • 3 tablespoons conadd the fectioners’ (powdered) sugar • pinch of salt

Bread and Butter LAEL GILBERT

Page 10 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 15, 2012

When summer gives you citrus, make pie hard, sweaty work. I have great gratitude for the inventor of the electric mixer. Thanks, buddy. Sprinkle the ginger snap crumbs over the baked crust. Pour the warm filling into the pie shell (briefly rewarm it if necessary). With a spoon, drop mounds of the meringue in rings around the edge of the filling, then fill in the center. Spread the meringue to cover the filling completely, and make sure it touches the crust all the way around the side (this will prevent it from shrinking away and leaving big, naked, yellow holes after it cools). I like to make lots of peaks and valleys, so the peaks get toasty brown in the oven, just because it looks cool. Bake the pie for 15 to 18 minutes until golden brown. Cool and serve.


PHOTOS BY YOU

Robert Womack of Smithfield captured dark clouds moving past the Wellsville David Bee of North Logan captured this photo of a squirrel in Green Canyon. Mountains.

C A

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Presented by special arrangement with SAMUEL FRENCH, INC

COLLEGE of theARTS

opens June 21

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matinee: $15–$21


Page 12 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 15, 2012

MUSIC For Tomorrow We Die selected for Warped Tour By Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

Playing with their high school idols — The Used, Senses Fail, Yellowcard, New Found Glory and Taking Back Sunday — local post-hardcore band For Tomorrow We Die will perform Saturday during the Vans Warped Tour at the Utah State Fairgrounds in Salt Lake City. Rex Davis, who screams for the band, said playing with musicians who inspired them to play makes this gig a unique experience. “The fact that we are playing with The Used and Senses Fail and Taking Back Sunday and bands like that, it’s pretty dang cool to us,” Davis said. “Bands we saved our money for in high school to go watch, we’re actually playing with.” This will be the second year in a row For Tomorrow We Die will play at Warped Tour. The group was selected as one of four bands from Utah to play at the Salt Lake City show through a public online voting contest and judges’ choice. Members Allen Robbins (guitar/vocals), Tycen Sigler (bass/keyboard), Spencer Nielson (drums) and Davis submitted their music on www. battleofthebands.com in March and were able to generate more than 9,000 votes, enough to place them in the top 100 bands in Utah. From there, four judges chose four bands to play Saturday based on musician-

Clockwise from top: Rex Davis, screamer for local band For Tomorrow We Die, performs at the End of Year Bash at USU in April (Photo courtesy Ty Coleman). Allen Robbins, lead vocalist and guitarist for the band, performs at the same show where For Tomorrow We Die opened for Anberlin (Photo courtesy Ty Coleman). The whole band performs at the 2011 Warped Tour in Salt Lake City (Photo courtesy Jake Chesley).

ship, originality, ability to draw, songwriting and vocal ability. The same process is done for every city the tour stops. For Tomorrow We Die has been together for about three years and has performed several shows locally, in Salt Lake City and Rexburg, Idaho. All

members are self-taught musicians who decided it would be fun to start a band just to jam and see what could happen. Davis said he would practice with Linkin Park, Senses Fail and The Used albums until he developed a scream. After the band formed,

he was able to expand his range which compliments Robbins’ vocals. Together, Davis and Robbins write the band’s song lyrics, then Robbins, Sigler and Nielson get together to figure out the rest of the parts. Sigler said when the four members started For

Tomorrow We Die, they did it for fun with no real plans to become famous or perform too far away from home. While that’s still basically the case, the band has been pleasantly surprised with their fan base, exposure and experiences playing with bigger, well-known

bands. Sigler said last year at Warped Tour he was “star-struck to be there.” The band also opened for Anberlin on the Utah State University campus during the End of Year Bash in April. As for this year’s Warped Tour, Nielson said he’s almost as excited to meet people and make connections as he is to play the show. All of the band members are from Cache Valley and attended Mountain Crest High School. They are now 24 and 25 years old. Davis said the band’s influences include Of Mice and Men, Senses Fail and Story of the Year. The band also credits Blink 182 for inspiring them to be musicians in the first place, though they don’t sound like the group now. The band is currently recording its first album which is slated for release this summer. “We’re not like trying to be rock stars, we’re not trying to make it to Hollywood or anything, we’re just doing this because it’s fun,” Davis said. “We love it and it’s gotten further than we ever thought it would. We never thought we’d be playing at the Warped Tour two years in a row, but ... we just do it for fun and it’s a genuine passion of all of ours.” To listen to For Tomorrow We Die, check out www.reverbnation.com/ ftwdie or www.battleofthebands.com and search for them. For more information about upcoming shows, like the band on Facebook.


Novel shares Mormon War heartbreak By Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

As a child, William R. Jensen had a hard time understanding why early members of his Mormon religion were driven from pillar to post. So, he did what most kids would do. He asked his dad. “He told me because they were the chosen people and that because they were the true church, the devil inspired others to drive them out,” Jensen said. “And I grew up and didn’t buy that.” Jensen, of Logan, studied history at Utah State University, then went to Kansas State University to earn an advanced degree. While there, he wrote a major paper on the Mormon War in Missouri and became so fascinated with the subject and discovering both sides of the story, that he completed countless hours of research and eventually decided to write a book. Using fictional characters to tell the history of the war, Jensen wrote about the struggles and heartaches of people on both sides. His novel, “Adder in the Path,” was recently published by Brandy Lane books and Belle Isle. “I’ve had the book reviewed by several local historians and others and they haven’t found it to be anti (Mormon), but it’s not a pro-Mormon book either,” Jensen said. “I tried to get the truth.” Jensen, who considers himself a non-practicing Mormon, originally wanted to write a straight history of the war, but the more he thought about it, the more he felt people would have a hard time reading it. “A lot of people, when they get into history, it becomes dull, if you will. You get dragged down,” he said. “So, I thought, you know, maybe

new york times best-sellers HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “The Storm,” by Clive Cussler and Graham Brown 2. “11th Hour,” by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro 3. “Stolen Prey,” by John Sandford 4. “Calico Joe,” by John Grisham 5. “Deadlocked,” by Charlaine Harris

I’ll write a novel, follow as closely as I possibly can what actually happened, and if someone reads it, they know what caused the war. They know what the basic issues of the war were. They know the events of the war, but it’s told through the eyes of fictitious people.” “Adder in the Path” tells the story of two families caught in the middle of the war in 1838. Jake, who is not Mormon and raised by an abusive father, loves the woods, nature and his dog. He ends up falling in love with a Mormon girl, Jenny, whose father feels caught between his religion and the Missourians who endorse violence. John feels some of the ideas, principles and behavior of the Mormons cause part of the war because they feel the state of Missouri was given to them by God and constantly tell Missourians if they don’t join the church, God will drive them out. They also vote in blocks and Missourians feel they threaten local economies. “The story is [John’s] struggle to stand up for his own beliefs,” Jensen said. Eventually he makes a pact with himself that he will speak out and try to avoid a bloodbath.

HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “The Amateur,” by Edward Klein 2. “It Worked for Me,” by Colin Powell with Tony Koltz 3. “Unbroken,” by Laura Hillenbrand 4. “Killing Lincoln,” by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard 5. “The Passage of Power,” by Robert A. Caro

Eli Lucero/Herald Journal

William Jensen holds a copy of his novel, “Adder in the Path.” The book was written as historical fiction to tell the story of the Mormon War in Missouri.

In doing so, he pays the ultimate price, Jensen said. It’s not a happy story, as Jake loses almost everything, but Jensen said he did try to write the novel with a moral and several themes. Be true to yourself, Jensen said, find God in your own way, and intolerance and bigotry are not OK. He feels the novel may help Mormons see both sides of the story. “Mormons are usually taught to read only faith-promoting and a lot of times faith-promoting is written to, well, reflect

only in Mormons’ belief and ideas,” Jensen said. “I think you need to look outside of that into Mormon history and see that yes, there are some things in Mormon history that not complimentary to the church, but you need to know those things because it opens your mind.” For more information about the novel, visit www.adderinthepath.net. Copies can be purchased at www.barnesandnoble.com and www.amazon. com.

Paperback MassMarket Fiction 1. “Big Sky Country,” by Linda Lael Miller 2. “Explosive Eighteen,” by Janet Evanovich 3. “A Game of Thrones,” by George R. R. Martin 4. “A Night Like This,” by Julia Quinn 5. “Summer Days,” by Susan Mallery Paperback Nonfiction 1. “In the Garden of Beasts,” by Erik Larson 2. “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,” by Rebecca Skloot 3. “Heaven is for Real,” by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent 4. “Outliers,” by Malcolm Gladwell 5. “The Glass Castle,” by Jeannette Walls

Page 13 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 15, 2012

Books


Page 14 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 15, 2012

CrossworD By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. It gets reported 7. Organic fertilizers 13. Sophocles tragedy 20. Member of right-wing faction 21. Not injured 22. Married ladies, in Tijuana 23. X factor: Separation of powers in government 26. Vultures were sacred to him 27. Global warming guru 28. Empty promises 29. Golfer Michelle 30. G and me ending 31. Military show 32. Box office blockbuster 36. Church recesses 38. Scrooge portrayer 39. Madison Square Garden, e.g. 40. Philatelist’s purchase 42. X factor: Acted at personal risk 49. “The Age of ___” (science fiction series) 50. Rabbit-like rodent 51. South American monkey 54. Knight mare? 55. Couturier Ricci 58. Purchased additional coverage 60. Field worker 61. ___ del Sol 64. Conical homes 65. X factor: Getting things out of the way 70. Workplace area 74. Some courtyards 75. Gloomy Gus 79. Free pardons 82. Vogue editor Wintour 84. Male counterpart of 22-Across 85. Ruler until 1917 86. The Discus Thrower, for one 89. Cousin of 85-Across 91. X factor: Oscars for

roles of Atticus Finch, etc. 95. What the nose knows 96. Editorialize 97. Wrigley Field flora 98. Introduction to economics? 101. Traversed a river, perhaps 103. Word with box or pick 104. Lagasse catchword 107. Strong furniture wood 108. Milldam 110. Elbow-wrist connection 112. Visored cap 113. X factor: Emulate John of the Beatles 120. In rows 121. Bad-smelling flower? 122. Jim Palmer, once 123. Recluse 124. Plane, e.g. 125. Gordon ___ Down 1. Pre-Columbian 2. ___ jackets, worn by Beatles 3. Helmsmen of a racing crew 4. Tuber source in the high Andes 5. Back-to-work time: Abbr. 6. Final stages of extended negotiations 7. Gum plant 8. Discard, as an old habit 9. “I get it!” 10. Order member 11. Mythical monster 12. Grave marker 13. Latin 101 word 14. Pastures 15. U.S.N.A. grad 16. Red Cross supply 17. Tight fitting trousers 18. Asian perennial herb

19. Pack animals 24. Slough 25. “Yes, ___!” 31. Islamic holy war 33. Ruffle 34. Straight-horned buffalo 35. Beverage of astronauts 36. Black cuckoo 37. Repressed 38. Channel 39. It’s used to treat bruises 40. Clothing size 41. Synchronized 42. Word on a door 43. “...the Lord said ___ Moses” 44. Peach or beech 45. Euripides play 46. Rock outcrop 47. Peach or plum 48. Cork’s country 52. Three-way joint 53. Tags 56. Part of Scand. 57. China setting 59. “___ and the City” 62. Cable channel 63. Indian tourist city 65. Radios 66. “Get a move on!” 67. Copy ___ 68. Roofing material 69. Name for a user of 65-Down 70. Work with a shuttle 71. Type widths 72. Unexpected difficulty 73. Brat 75. Labor leader George 76. Cognizant of 77. Inept 78. Miscalculates 80. Wax collector 81. Slop spot 83. Deadeye’s forte 84. Hot spot 87. “___ my word!” 88. Montreal player 90. Mexicans 92. Nigerian language

93. “A pox on you!” 94. Mollycoddle 98. Billiards shot 99. In accordance with 100. To-do list item 101. The Company 102. Spring up 103. Place to stay 104. Stupefy 105. Big Mac makers 106. Coke, sometimes 108. Samuel Beckett novel 109. Bladed weapon 111. Sinister look 112. Put in stitches? 114. Canyon feature 115. Clavell’s “___-Pan” 116. King’s title: Abbr. 117. Get behind 118. Buff 119. Load from a lode

answers from last week

Herald Journal one to two days prior to the event. Calendar items can be submitted Deadlines inbyThe email at hjhappen@hjnews.com. Any press releases or photos for events listed in the Cache Magazine calendar items are due Wednesday by 5 p.m. They will also run for free

first half of Cache Magazine can be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com. Poems and photos can also be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com and run on a space-available basis if selected.

www.ThemeCrosswords.com


Friday Come sample old-fashioned candy at Pioneer Valley Lodge’s candy fair at 3 p.m. Friday, June 15, at 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. For more information, call 435-792-0353. Marsha Herron, director of Cache County Library in Providence will retire in June after 16 years of service to the community. The public is invited to attend an open house in her honor on June 15 from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Cache County Library, 15 N. Main St., Providence. Falk will perform from 4:45 to 6:45 Friday, June 15, at Caffe Ibis. Free. This country sister duo opened for Secondhand Serenade. Spencer Jensen will perform from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, June 15, at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza, at 99 E. 1200 South. The Cache Chamber of Commerce will celebrate 100 years of helping businesses grow at an open house from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, June 15, at 160 N. Main St. Tour the historic building and visit with chamber and business leaders. New chamber membership discounts will be available during the open house.

SATURDAY Michael Robinson will perform music, humor and poetry at 3 p.m. Saturday, June 16, at Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. For more information, call 435-7920353.

Acoustic rock performing artists RacecaR RacecaR will perform live from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday, June 16, at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza. No cover charge. The Bear River chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will meet at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, June 16, at the Mendon Pioneer Park on 100 West. A flag retirement ceremony induction of the 2012-14 officers and tree planting will be part of the program. A potluck luncheon will follow.

SUNDAY A Cache Symphony pops concert will be at 7 p.m. Sunday, June 17, at the Kent Concert Hall. Highlights include “Memory” from “Cats,” themes from “Titanic,” and more. Sundays at the Park will continue at 1 p.m. June 17 on the lawn adjacent to the Old Main Building on the USU campus. The guest speaker will be Dennis Hassan, artistic director at the Lyric Theater. Bring a lawn chair. In the event of rain, the group will meet in the Family Life Building, Room 206. For more information, call Norman Palmer at 435-787-1406. Rock/reggae musician Tim Pearce will perform from noon to 2 p.m. Sunday, June 17, at Caffe Ibis. Free.

MONDAY Cache Pilates Studio will have a five-week summer session June 18-July 18 at the Whittier Community Center in Logan. Cost is $50. Classes will be Mondays and Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. and Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. For more information, call Tora at 787-8442 or 760-4433.

The Cache Humane Society will have a party for the groundbreaking of a new dog park from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, The Logan Library will show June 16. Please bring work “Beowulf” at 6:30 p.m. Monday, gloves, shovels and/or pliers. June 18, in the Jim Bridger Come make a difference in the Room for Monday movie night. lives of homeless animals.

Free. For a schedule of upcoming Monday movies at the Library, visit http://library.loganutah.org/MovieNight/.

be held from 10:10 to 11 a.m. every Tuesday at the North Logan Library, 475 E. 2500 North.

Swimming lessons will take place at the Mountain Crest High School pool throughout the summer. Upcoming sessions are June 18-28, July 9-19 and July 23-Aug. 2. Times are 9:15 a.m., 10:25 a.m. and 11 a.m. The July 9-Aug. 1 sessions (Mondays and Wednesdays only) will be at 5:30 and 6:05 p.m. Sign up at the Mountain Crest High School pool. For more information, call Erin at 435-760-8616.

Children are invited to watch “Ramona and Beezus” at 2 p.m. Tuesday, June 19, at the North Logan Library, 475 E. 2500 North.

This week’s schedule for the Hyrum Senior Center is as follows: Monday, Fit Over 60 at 10 a.m., free breakfast buffet at 11 a.m., board meeting at 1:15 p.m.; Tuesday, chair yoga at 10:30 a.m., games at 12:30 p.m.; Wednesday, Zumba Gold at 10 a.m., Phil Harrison will sing at 12:30 p.m.; Thursday, the center will be closed for a trip to Hogle Zoo; Friday, Bingo at 12:30 p.m. The center is open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday. Lunch is served at noon for a suggested $2.75 donation. To reserve a spot, call 245-3570 by 10 a.m.

TUESDAY Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will host an art activity at 4 p.m. Tuesday, June 19. Cost is $3. To sign up for this activity, request transportation or to learn about other activities, call 435-713-0288 or visit www.cgadventures.org. The Food Sen$e girls will teach a free cooking and community class on whole grains at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 19, at Macey’s Little Theater. Little Barefoot will perform indie/acoustic music with Underdog at 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 19, at Why Sound. Cost is $5. Children’s story time will

The North Logan Library will have sleep time at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 19, at 475 E. 2500 North. Wear pajamas and enjoy stories followed by cookies and milk. The Cache Chamber will have its monthly luncheon at noon Tuesday, June 19, at the CopperMill Restaurant. Julie Hollist from the Cache Valley Tourism office will present a variety of valley activities happening during this summer in the area. Register at www. cachechamber.com or pay at the door. Cost is $14.

WEDNESDAY Becky Yeager will offer a soapmaking class at The Spirit Goat (28 Federal Ave., Logan) from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 20. The class will cover the basics of making lye soap using modernday techniques. Each participant will create their very own log of soap ($36 value). The cost of the class is $120 with $100 going to the American Cancer Society. Only 10 spots are available. Call 757-6283 to sign up or email blyeager@ comcast.net.

THURSDAY Dennis Hassan, assistant department head in the theater department at USU, is the speaker at Kiger Hour on Thursday, June 21, at 5:15 p.m. at Hamiltons Steak and Seafood. Cost is $6.95 for an appetizer buffet. For more information, contact Natalie Archibald Smoot at 435-797-2796. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will travel to the City of Rocks from June 21 to 23. Enjoy climbing, hiking and biking on one of our many destination trips this summer. Cost is $235; scholarship pricing is available for those who qualify. For more information, call 435713-0288, visit www.cgadventures.org or stop by 335 N. 100 East, Logan. A Carly Rae Jepsen dance class will be at 11 a.m. June 21-23, at the Sports Academy, 1655 N. 200 North in Logan. Cost is $10 per child for members or $25 for non-members. For more information, call 435753-7500 ext. 115.

Dawna Webb will teach a free cooking and community class on how to make homemade Snickers and Twix candy bars at 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 20, at Macey’s Little Theater.

Utah State University Extension is offering a researchbased course, “How to Avoid Falling for a Jerk.” Whether participants are single, dating, engaged, or single again, this class offers information about how to pick a partner and develop a relationship in a healthy way. This threesession program is offered free of charge. Classes will be on Thursdays June 21, 28 and July 5 from 6 to 8:15 p.m. at the FCHD West Building: 670 E. 500 North, Logan. Dinner is provided each evening. Please call 435-232-6022 or email k.anderson@usu.edu to register.

Scott Bradley will teach a free Constitution class, “To Preserve the Nation,” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 20, at the Book Table. For more information, call 753-8844.

Teen Book Club will be at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, June 21, at the North Logan Library, 475 E. 2500 North. The group will discuss “The Westing Game” by Ellen Raskin.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 15, 2012

calendar


Page 16 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 15, 2012

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Cache Magazine  

June 15-21, 2012

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