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Logan’s Fry Street Quartet named

Utah’s ‘Best Instrumental Group’

The Herald Journal

June 10-16, 2011


Page 2 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 10, 2011

Cache The Herald Journal’s

Magazine

Arts & Entertainment Calendar On the cover: Bradley Ottesen of the Fry Street Quartet performs dur-

ing the noon music series at the Tabernacle in Logan Wednesday afternoon. (Eli Lucero/Herald Journal)

From the editor

A

few weeks ago I was given some old copies of Cache Magazine from July 1996 to look through. I’ve started working on a redesign for the magazine and wanted to see how some of the old designs looked. It was fun to flip through and read some of the stories. My managing editor and I talked about how certain fonts and designs that seem pretty simple now must have been really innovative then. I was going to enter the 6th grade in 1996 and remember going to movies like “Phenomenon,” “Independence Day,” and “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” – all movies advertised in the magazine that summer. One thing that popped out at me right away, however, was William Moore’s

mnewbold@hjnews.com

wine column. I had no idea he had been writing so long and it was cool to see the column was very similar to how it runs today, with personal stories and opinions on the wines he tried. Around the office William is known at “the wine guy.” In his column this month (page 10) he gives a brief history of how the column started and how it’s continued for about 18 years. For the first time since William began writing for Cache, he is taking a break for at least the summer, and maybe longer. In an email he sent me this week, William says he’s enjoyed his experiences with wine with his readers, and I know he’s got a following out there. A few weeks ago his column was retweeted on Twitter several times. I wanted to thank William for his work here and wish him the best this summer and beyond. – Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

What’s inside this week Dennis Hinkamp suggests keeping an eye on your neighbors

(Page 11)

(Page 5) Noon Music weekly calendar

Aaron Peck gives ‘Super 8’ four stars

(Page 7) Books .......................p.13 Crossword.................p.14

Cute

pet photo of the week

This dog is available for adoption! Pet: Bo From: Cache Humane Society Why he’s so lovable: Bo

is a “big boy” who requires an active and energetic owner to keep up with him. He appears to like friendly and playful children and other dogs. He does not have experience with cats. Bo will require lots of exercise every day to be a good family pet. Meet this handsome dog and see if you are the perfect family for him.

Slow Wave Slow Wave is created from real people’s dreams as drawn by Jesse Reklaw. Ask Jesse to draw your dream! Visit www.slowwave.com to find out how.


Two shows opening at Old Barn next weekend Accomplished musicians recognized with memorial scholarship for piano

‘Guys and Dolls’ Running June 18, 24, 27; July 2, 8, 11, 16, 22, 25, 30; Aug. 5. Shows begin at 7:30 p.m. There will be a matinee July 30 at 2:30 p.m. For more information visit www.oldbarn.org.

Set in Damon Runyon’s mythical New York City, this oddball romantic comedy is considered by many to be the perfect musical as it introduces us to a cast of vivid characters who have become legends in the canon.

Anita Ream

n February 2010 the IMusic Bridgerland Chapter of Utah Teachers Association (UMTA) lost one of their own due to brain cancer. Anita Ream, a charter member of the chapter, taught piano for 40 years in Brigham City. Her comprehensive music program, inclusive of theory, technique, history, sightreading and performance, was innovative and thorough. She offered group and private instruction, creative activities

Emily Durrant

LaeKin Burgess

and performance opportunities to hundreds of piano students over the years. Shortly after her death, Anita’s colleagues formed the Anita Ream Bridgerland Chapter Memorial Scholarship, which is dedicated to helping piano students obtain post high school piano instruction. The annual $500 award, based on piano performance, musical goals and service was awarded this year to Emily Durrant, a piano teacher in

Brigham City. Emily holds a Bachelor of Music from BYU, operates a home teaching studio, and currently studies with Professor Yu Jane Yang of Weber State University. Honorable mention was given to LaeKin Burgess, a student of Liz Sampson. Burgess, who graduated this year from Mountain Crest High School, accompanied the musical, “Bye, Bye, Birdie.” She participated in the Young Artist Cup and the state solo ensemble program.

Kids day at the market

he Cache Valley Gardeners MarT ket will be holding their annual Kids Day on Saturday, June 11, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at

‘Into the Woods’ Running: June 17, 20, 25; July 1, 9, 15, 18, 23, 29; Aug. 1, 6 Shows begin at 7:30 p.m. There will be a matinee on July 23 at 2:30 p.m. For more information visit www.oldbarn.org.

An ambivalent Cinderella? A blood-thirsty Little Red Ridinghood? A Prince Charming with a roving eye? A witch who raps? They’re all among the cockeyed characters in James Lapine and Stephen Sondheim’s fractured fairy tale.

a “junk” parade. Music can be played on anything! Take this opportunity to play on something different, old or recycled. Whether you have an old tin jug, a metal satellite dish, or a Merlin Olsen Park (100 S. 200 East). There couple random buckets, anything goes. Let your will be a variety of kid-oriented businesses and child’s imagination go wild with the idea of organizations participating in addition to many making music and magic with junk. In addition, year-round market vendors. During the market you can stop by booths for from 9 to 11 a.m., come to the CVCA booth to craft an instrument using recyclable materials. Cache Children’s Choir (CCC), Cache Valley Authors Shaunda Wenger and Judy Torres Center for the Arts (CVCA) and many more. This year’s Kids Day will have a nice mix of art will be doing a storytime and book signing and music as both CCC and CVCA plan to pro- event at the gardener’s market at 9:30, 10, 10:30 and 11 a.m. vide opportunities for the public to craft instruFor a list of vendors and more information ments and play (limited to art supplies on hand). about the Cache Valley Gardener’s Market visit The CVCA has partnered up with Todd http://sites.google.com/site/cachevalleygardenMilovich to create another “Junk Jam” opporersmarket/. tunity. Come to the market at from 11 a.m. to noon to make the rounds around the park in

Page 3 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 10, 2011

All mixed up


Noon Music FREE CONCERTS FOR EVERYONE

Tuesday, June 14

Saturday, June 11 At the tabernacle

At logan high auditorium

Liz Sampson’s piano students

Friday, June 10

Hayden Datwyler is 18 years old and recently graduated from Mountain Crest High School. He has studied piano for 11 years. Hayden enjoys mountain biking, skiing and rappelling in Southern Utah. He is the son of Todd and Kim Datwyler and lives in Providence.

At the tabernacle

Westminster Bell Choirs Brandon Lee and Sisters: Piano Brandon Lee and Sisters are a trio from a musical family. They enjoy performing a fun variety of pieces together.

In their final concert of the 2010-2011 season, the Westminster Bell Choirs will focus on telling stories about music with their bells. Included will be a traditional Swahili melody that begs for audience participation, the lively spiritual “Down by the Riverside,” Leroy Anderson’s “Jazz Pizzicato,” a quartet arrangement of Dmitri Kabalevsky’s “The Horseman,” familiar hymn tunes, and one or two surprises. The choirs’ 17 ringers will be joined by other talented musicians for a special number. The choirs are sponsored by Logan’s First Presbyterian Church.

ties such as piano, cello, Cache Children’s Choir, Westminster Bell Choir, and will be involved this summer in the Children’s Chorus of the Russian Opera Boris Godunov, performing with Utah Festival Opera Company.

Austin Dykstra, son of Mark and Janene Dykstra, 18, has been studying piano for 14 years and enjoys playing classical and jazz.

James R. Conger is the son of Sherman and Rebecca Conger. He has studied piano with Liz Sampson for five years. He also plays the violin and performed with the honors orchestra this year.

Heather Hopkins participates in many activi-

Mandy Smedley has been playing the piano

Summer speaker series begins next week he Cache Valley T Visitors Bureau kicks off its fourth annual free

speaker series June 15 at 7 p.m. in the historic Cache County Courthouse. Leading off is well-known local historian and author Kenneth W. Godfrey presenting “Logan, the Athens of the West: Highlights of Its First 150 Years.” Godfrey’s most recent book “Logan, Utah: A One Hundred and Fifty Year History” was released late last year and is the basis for his talk. Godfrey has plenty of fun stories to share, and his presentation will include highlights of the city’s

history, and anything from its famous residents, to criminals, sporting events, educational institutions, religions and the arts scene. To research his 445page book Godfrey read the news in every local newspaper he could get his hands on from 1880 until the present. His book is available for sale in the gift shop at the Visitors Bureau. He holds a Ph.D. in the history of religion, has authored all or part of 32 books, published more than 800 articles and served as president of the Mormon History Association and of the Cache Val-

ley Historical Society. Five additional talks round out the summer speaker series. “Our major goal is to find uniquely Cache Valley topics that are appealing to local residents, visitors and summer citizens,” said series organizer Mike Bullock. “Last year, we had a dynamite season and the bar has been set high.” Future speakers include Victor Hogstrom, general manager of Utah Public Radio on June 22, “Utah Public Radio: Its Importance to Cache Valley;” Dr. Ross Peterson, professor emeritus from Utah State University on June 29,

“The Oregon, California and Mormon Trails;” Dr. Jeff Muhs, director of the USU Energy Dynamics Lab on July 13, “Electric Cars: Present and Future;” Keri Larsen, icon of Logan’s theater scene July 20, “Winnie the Pooh and Theater Too!” and Alan Murray, chief photographer for the Herald Journal on Aug. 3, “Dynamic Travel Photography.” All presentations are free to the public and held at 7 p.m. at 199 N. Main St. Seating is limited. For more information, call 755-1890 or log on to www.visitloganutah.com.


since the age of 8. She participated in orchestra for three and a half years and has been in band for four. Jake Whitney is the son of George and Julie Whitney of College Ward. He is 17 years old and will be a senior at Mountain Crest High School in the fall. He has been taking piano from Liz Sampson for five years. Kenzie Gomm is the daughter of Scott and Stacie Gomm of Providence. She has taken piano from Liz Sampson for almost 11 years. She will be a senior at Mountain Crest High School next year where she participates in cross country and the school choir, Magic. Savannah Knight is

the daughter of Gerald and Trudy Knight. Savannah is the youngest of four siblings. She is 12 years old and will be going into the eighth grade at South Cache. Savannah has been taking piano from Liz Sampson for five years.

Wednesday, June 15 At logan high auditorium

At logan high auditorium

Hatch family If you were unable to attend the sold out April, May and June performances of “Matinée Enchantée” at the Thatcher-Young Mansion, deceptionist Richard Hatch, violinist Rosemary Hatch and their son, pianist Jonathan Hatch, will present highlights from these programs as part of the Noon Music concert series. This 45-minute program will feature music of Saint-Saëns, Bach, Miyagi and Kreisler and magic created by Robert-Houdin, Hecklau, Vernon and Punx, among others. A unique feature of the program is the ensemble aspect with magic and music performed simultaneously.

Catherine Whitney is the daughter of George and Julie Whitney of College Ward. Catherine has studied piano for 10 years and has been with Liz for three years. LaeKin Burgess is 17 years old. She has been playing piano for nearly 10 years and teaching piano for three. She also enjoys singing. She has performed in several vocal and piano recitals and competitions throughout her high school years.

Thursday, June 16

Willow Valley Players and Singers The Willow Valley Singers and Willow Valley String Band will join forces for another entertaining and informative program at the Noon Music concert series. The groups take their name from the early name of Cache Valley, Willow Valley, when the abundant stands of willow trees dotted the valley and lined the streams. Their program includes a variety of historic religious songs, folk and American spirituals and cowboy and celtic favorites. Willow Valley Singers is made up of 13 local singers under the direction of Bonnie Slade. Guitarist Larry Slade, Steven Haderlie, Kathryn Hadfield, fiddle players Don Bragg and Bonnie Slade, and percussionist Randy Thunell make up the Willow Valley String Band.

‘The 39 Steps’ starts Old Lyric summer season online in the calendar) at 2 p.m. asten your seatbelts its best, complete with slamming The 2011 Old Lyric Repertory F for Utah State University’s doors, mistaken identities and, of Company season also features Old Lyric Repertory Company’s course, missing trousers. “Little Shop of Horrors,” “See How (OLRC) adaptation of Alfred They Run” and “Amadeus.” Hitchcock’s classic spy story “The Led by artistic director Dennis 39 Steps” this summer at the hisHassan, the OLRC is a profestoric Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 W. sional theater program based in the Center Street in downtown Logan. The production opens the OLRC Department of Theatre Arts in the Caine College of the Arts at Utah 2011 summer season June 16 with State. a 7:30 p.m. curtain time. “We are looking forward to the In “The 39 Steps,” Richard Han2011 season because each producnay, falsely accused of murder tion was selected for its excitement and entrusted with a deadly secret, level and appeal for all crowds,” leads a mad chase to save the free said Hassan. world, alternately helped and hin“Little Shop of Horrors,” is this dered by the breathtakingly beautiyear’s comedy-horror musical. The ful Pamela. main character, Seymour Krelborn, Four actors portray dozens of hits a streak of luck when he discharacters in multiple locations covers a strange and interesting in “The 39 Steps.” The show runs plant that takes him on an exciting June 16, 17, 18, July 7, 9, 20, 29 and dangerous adventure. and Aug. 4. Evening performances “See How They Run,” written begin at 7:30 p.m. with matinee performances on select dates (noted by Philip King, is British farce at

Fitting the theme of the Caine College of the Arts Summer Music Institute featuring works by Mozart, The Old Lyric Repertory Company presents “Amadeus,” written by Peter Shaffer. Tickets for OLRC productions can be purchased Monday through Friday, 10 am. to 5 p.m. at the Caine College of the Arts Box Office at Utah State University in room 139-B of the Chase Fine Arts Center, by calling 435-797-8022 or online (arts.usu.edu). Tickets are also available at the Caine Lyric Theatre from 1-5 p.m., Monday through Friday and an hour prior to curtain on show nights. Individual ticket prices range from $18-$25 for adults, $15-$21 for seniors and USU faculty and staff and $12-$18 for USU students and youth.


Page 6 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 10, 2011

Film Still playing “The Hangover Part II” Rated R ★1⁄2 It’s hard to imagine a worse attempt at cashing in a second time. Seriously, it feels like the script was pieced together with the help of Mad Libs, with only slightly different and raunchier details replacing those that helped the original “Hangover” from 2009 become the highestgrossing R-rated comedy of all time. But so much of the allure of that first film was the novelty of the premise, the unpredictability of the adventures, and the sense that we, too, were wandering in a daze, helping solve the mystery of the debauched night before. Giving the people what they want is one thing. Making nearly the exact same movie a second time, but shifting the setting to Thailand, is just

... what, lazy? Arrogant? Maybe a combination of the two. That’s essentially what director Todd Phillips has done. This time, Ed Helms’ mild-mannered dentist, Stu, is the one getting married at a resort in Thailand, his fiancee’s family’s home country. Although he insists he doesn’t want a bachelor party, he, Phil (Bradley Cooper) and Alan (Zach Galifianakis) still manage to wake up in a stupor in a squalid Bangkok hotel. 101 minutes. “Kung Fu Panda 2” Rated PG ★★ The roly-poly Po is back with high energy, some lovely visuals and peppy, playful voice work, as always, from star Jack Black. But the freshness and novelty that made the original film such a kick back in 2008 has been, well, kicked to bits. And the story line of this sequel

feels overstuffed with plotlines and characters. Parents also should be aware of some violent, frightening imagery that may be too much for the littlest kids. Everyone else will probably delight in the animated spectacle from director Jennifer Yuh Nelson, which is bright and tactile, bold and subtle. The 3-D is generally unobtrusive but doesn’t really add anything, either. The most beautiful parts actually come from the other kinds of visual styles that are worked in, including a delicate segment that features paper-style animation. “Delicate” probably isn’t the first word that comes to mind when pondering the portly Po, who’s gone from the underdog dreaming of kung-fu greatness to the Dragon Warrior himself. He must protect the Valley of Peace with the help of The Furious Five, the various animal species who fight

alongside him and happen to come with celebrity voices. He begins to wonder about his past just as a megalomaniacal peacock named Lord Shen (Gary Oldman) is hell-bent on dominating the future. These two story lines run parallel to each other and eventually collide but never truly gel. 90 minutes. “X-Men: First Class” Rated PG-13 ★★★The prequel to the “X-Men” trilogy is one of the best Marvel Comics adaptations, packed with action, humor, retro 1960s style that’s both campy and sexy and a revisionist history lesson that puts the super-powered mutants at the center of the Cuban missile crisis. Bryan Singer, who directed the superior first two “X-Men” flicks, returns as a producer and idea man, and Matthew Vaughn,

another filmmaker adept at blending smarts and action (“Stardust,” ‘’Kick-Ass”), was wisely recruited as director and co-writer. The young cast led by James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender is no match for Patrick Stewart, Ian McKellen and the rest of the grand ensemble Singer enlisted for the first “X-Men” in 2000. Yet McAvoy’s playful energy and unshakable nobility and Fassbender’s slowburning wrath and unflinching pragmatism nicely prefigure Stewart’s august Professor X and McKellen’s dogmatic Magneto. Kevin Bacon’s a blast as a mutant bad guy aiming to start a nuclear war. With January Jones, Jennifer Lawrence, Rose Byrne and Nicholas Hoult. 130 minutes. — All reviews by The Associated Press

New this week

LYRIC REPERTORY C O M P A N Y OLD

“Judy Moody and the NOT Bummer Summer” Rated PG ★Here’s the kindest thing we can say: The kids sure do work awfully hard. They mug and they mope. They run around and jump up and down. They throw themselves headlong into pratfalls and vomit gags with equal elan. If only the material were worthy of such dedication. Instead, director John Schultz’s adaptation of the popular children’s book series by Megan McDonald is a shrill, shallow cacophony of individual antic moments without much narrative momentum. Little kids — we’re talking really little kids — might find it a pleasant diversion, with all

that perky noise and incessant motion. For everyone else, it’ll be death. Australian newcomer Jordana Beatty stars as the title character, a young girl in idyllic suburbia who’s psyched to share the summer with her closest friends. But then, one by one, they get dragged away to more exotic destinations. So she’s left with her younger brother, Stink (Parris Mosteller), and their Aunt Opal (Heather Graham), whom they’ve never met. But hey, what do you know? Aunt Opal is one of those wacky aunts, the kind who like to do art projects in the middle of the living room and make elaborate feasts that destroy the kitchen. The kind you only see in movies. 91 minutes.

Opening Date: June 16

arts.usu.edu _________ 435.797.8022 C

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COLLEGE of theARTS


emember watchR ing Spielberg movies in the ‘80s? That unnerv-

ing feeling you got while watching “Jaws,” or the wonderment that washed over you during your first viewing of “ET.” How about the first time you watched “The Goonies?” Those kids cussed like sailors, but that movie has gone down as one of the perennial classics from that time period, and even though Spielberg didn’t direct that one, he did have a hand in writing it. So why do I mention these things while discussing the movie “Super 8?” Well, you’re about to have those feelings brought back in a wave of nostalgia the first time you sit down and watch it. J.J. Abrams, with the help of Spielberg working as a producer, has crafted a movie that works on its own merits, but it’s certainly bolstered by the strong wistfulness that comes along with it. The movie is set in the small town of Lillian, Ohio. A group of kids from this small town are making a homemade zombie movie to enter into a state film festival. Using their parents’ super 8mm cameras the kids set about recreating a hilarious depiction of zombies taking over and a detective trying to stop it. Joe Lamb (Joel Courtney) is the main focus of the movie. Joe is the son of the town’s Sheriff Deputy, Jackson Lamb (Kyle Chandler). Joe and his father are grieving after the loss of his mother in a tragic factory accident. In Joe’s group of friends is a domineering overweight kid named Charles (Riley Griffiths) who steals every scene he’s in. Even though you

The Reel Place By Aaron Peck

know that this movie is going to be packed full of that feel-good summer action that we’ve come to expect from big blockbusters like this, believe me when I say the interaction between this group of youngsters is the very best part of the movie. Abrams and crew has found these two young actors in Courtney and Griffiths that have had no previous feature film experience. You wouldn’t be able to tell though. They’re fresh faces and natural demeanor do wonders for the movie. These kids converse like the well-oiled group of Goonies who go in search of buried pirate treasure. There’s more than enough clever adolescent humor to go around. On to the plot ... well, at least what I can divulge of the plot. It isn’t giving anything away to say that “Super 8” is a monster movie of sorts. You can tell that much from the preview. There’s a large train wreck, and something emerges from

the train. The kids accidentally catch a distorted view of it on their camera. Weird events begin taking place in the town and no one can explain what’s happening. An ominous military force moves in to control the situation, all the while this group of kids become deeply involved in what’s really going on. The train wreck is an absolutely jaw-dropping moment. I haven’t felt that surprised by a scene since the first time I saw the rotating hallway scene in “Inception.” Train cars fly everywhere. Continuous explosions almost force you to the edge of your seat wondering if the madness will ever end. It’s a scene where you’re able to just sit back and bask in its pure popcorn feel. This is a movie that knows how to film action and it’s squeezing out every last drop of excitement possible. Watching “Super 8” is a unique experience. Abrams plays the movie

★★★★ “Super 8” Rated PG-13

much like “Jaws” where he doesn’t reveal the creature until the third act. I’ve always wondered why more creature features don’t go this route.

It’s a surefire way to build suspense while still driving the story forward. However cool the creature and the action may be, the kids are who

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Page 7 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 10, 2011

‘Super 8’ is this generation’s ‘Goonies’

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Fry Street Quartet named Utah’s ‘Best Instrumental Group’

t’s no secret the Fry Street Quartet has won its share of awards. But being named “Best Instrumental Group” in the Utah Best of State awards for the third year is still a special accomplishment. “It makes us feel like we make a difference in our home state, our home town,” said Anne Francis, the group’s cellist. In addition to Francis, the group includes William Fedkenheuer and Rebecca McFaul on the violin, and Bradley Ottesen on the viola. The four come from all around the U.S. and Canada but have converged in Logan as the professional string quartet in residence as faculty at Utah State University. In 2000, three years after Fry Street Quartet formed, the group received the Millennium Grand Prize at the Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition — the largest chamber music competition in the world. The following year, Fry Street performed at Carnegie Hall, and in 2002 began an international career in the Balkan states. As the string quartet in residence at USU since 2002, Fry Street continues to travel and perform — especially during summer months. But Logan is home now. Unlike other colleges with quartets that simply show up once or twice a semester to speak or perform, Fry Street Quartet members live in Cache Valley and consider a major part of their job mentoring and teaching the many USU string majors. McFaul, the only original member of the quartet — which was founded in Chicago, said the “real sense of community” within the program keeps her passionate about her work. “It’s rare to end up with the right people,” she said. But it’s not just the music community she loves, adding that she’s made “vibrant connections with different people across dif-

ferent disciplines.” “The level of engagement is really stimulating,” she said. On Wednesday, the group performed at the Logan LDS Tabernacle as part of the “Noon Music” series. It’s usually the first concert of the summer that allows the quartet to see old friends and acquaintances for the first time in awhile. From a presto piece by Ludwig Beethoven to something more “ominous and scary” by Dmitri Shostakovich, Fry Street wowed the audience. “Even just watching them — even if you couldn’t hear the music — is amazing,” one concert-goer whispered to a friend as they stood clapping toward the end. “They are so passionate.” Francis said it was chamber music that made her know at age 8 she wanted to do this sort of thing. “The music is just so great,” she said following Wednesday’s mini-concert. Francis got her start early, first picking up the cello at 4 years old, debuting at 10 at the Inaugural World Cello Congress, and later becoming one of the youngest members of the Kalamazoo Symphony in Michigan. She received her bachelor’s from the Cleveland Institute of Music and a master’s from the Shepherd School of Music at Rice University. Like Francis, the other three members have prestigious histories. Fedkenheuer studied at the Conservatory of Music at Mount Royal College in Calgary at age 4. By 7, he was the youngest member of the Calgary Fiddlers, performing all around the world. He first soloed in the Calgary

Philharmonic in 1994 and then went on to obtain his bachelor’s of music from Shepherd School of Music at Rice University. McFaul began working with famous musicians as a teenager. She received a bachelor’s in violin performance at Oberlin Conservatory and a master’s in the same study at Northwestern University. Ottesen began training at the Preucil School of Music in Iowa City, Iowa, and went on to get a bachelor’s degree from Northwestern and a master’s from the New England Conservatory. Prior to his move to Logan, he was the assistant principal violist with the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra for four seasons. Still, the Best of State award sticks out to these four artists. In its ninth year, the program honors excellence in a variety of sectors, including business, entertainment, education, hospitality, retail, technology and sports. Winners were rated or judged on their impact on the community, excellence and achievement, and innovation and originality. Craig Jessop, dean of the Caine College of the Arts at USU, said in a USU media release that it is an honor to have such a “dynamic resident quartet.” “Working in both the professional and academic world, the Fry Street Quartet adds immense value and recognition to our music program and students,” he said. Ottesen said the group is happy to provide its talents with those who live nearby. “Within Utah, it’s nice to raise the awareness that there are wonderful arts going on,” he said.

Story by Emilie Wheeler • Photos by Eli Lucero The Fry Street Quartet performs during the Noon Music series at the Tabernacle in Logan on Wednesday afternoon. Bradley Ottesen plays the viola, William Fedkenheuer plays violin, Rebecca McFaul plays violin and (inset) Anne Francis plays cello.


I

Fry Street Quartet named Utah’s ‘Best Instrumental Group’

t’s no secret the Fry Street Quartet has won its share of awards. But being named “Best Instrumental Group” in the Utah Best of State awards for the third year is still a special accomplishment. “It makes us feel like we make a difference in our home state, our home town,” said Anne Francis, the group’s cellist. In addition to Francis, the group includes William Fedkenheuer and Rebecca McFaul on the violin, and Bradley Ottesen on the viola. The four come from all around the U.S. and Canada but have converged in Logan as the professional string quartet in residence as faculty at Utah State University. In 2000, three years after Fry Street Quartet formed, the group received the Millennium Grand Prize at the Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition — the largest chamber music competition in the world. The following year, Fry Street performed at Carnegie Hall, and in 2002 began an international career in the Balkan states. As the string quartet in residence at USU since 2002, Fry Street continues to travel and perform — especially during summer months. But Logan is home now. Unlike other colleges with quartets that simply show up once or twice a semester to speak or perform, Fry Street Quartet members live in Cache Valley and consider a major part of their job mentoring and teaching the many USU string majors. McFaul, the only original member of the quartet — which was founded in Chicago, said the “real sense of community” within the program keeps her passionate about her work. “It’s rare to end up with the right people,” she said. But it’s not just the music community she loves, adding that she’s made “vibrant connections with different people across dif-

ferent disciplines.” “The level of engagement is really stimulating,” she said. On Wednesday, the group performed at the Logan LDS Tabernacle as part of the “Noon Music” series. It’s usually the first concert of the summer that allows the quartet to see old friends and acquaintances for the first time in awhile. From a presto piece by Ludwig Beethoven to something more “ominous and scary” by Dmitri Shostakovich, Fry Street wowed the audience. “Even just watching them — even if you couldn’t hear the music — is amazing,” one concert-goer whispered to a friend as they stood clapping toward the end. “They are so passionate.” Francis said it was chamber music that made her know at age 8 she wanted to do this sort of thing. “The music is just so great,” she said following Wednesday’s mini-concert. Francis got her start early, first picking up the cello at 4 years old, debuting at 10 at the Inaugural World Cello Congress, and later becoming one of the youngest members of the Kalamazoo Symphony in Michigan. She received her bachelor’s from the Cleveland Institute of Music and a master’s from the Shepherd School of Music at Rice University. Like Francis, the other three members have prestigious histories. Fedkenheuer studied at the Conservatory of Music at Mount Royal College in Calgary at age 4. By 7, he was the youngest member of the Calgary Fiddlers, performing all around the world. He first soloed in the Calgary

Philharmonic in 1994 and then went on to obtain his bachelor’s of music from Shepherd School of Music at Rice University. McFaul began working with famous musicians as a teenager. She received a bachelor’s in violin performance at Oberlin Conservatory and a master’s in the same study at Northwestern University. Ottesen began training at the Preucil School of Music in Iowa City, Iowa, and went on to get a bachelor’s degree from Northwestern and a master’s from the New England Conservatory. Prior to his move to Logan, he was the assistant principal violist with the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra for four seasons. Still, the Best of State award sticks out to these four artists. In its ninth year, the program honors excellence in a variety of sectors, including business, entertainment, education, hospitality, retail, technology and sports. Winners were rated or judged on their impact on the community, excellence and achievement, and innovation and originality. Craig Jessop, dean of the Caine College of the Arts at USU, said in a USU media release that it is an honor to have such a “dynamic resident quartet.” “Working in both the professional and academic world, the Fry Street Quartet adds immense value and recognition to our music program and students,” he said. Ottesen said the group is happy to provide its talents with those who live nearby. “Within Utah, it’s nice to raise the awareness that there are wonderful arts going on,” he said.

Story by Emilie Wheeler • Photos by Eli Lucero The Fry Street Quartet performs during the Noon Music series at the Tabernacle in Logan on Wednesday afternoon. Bradley Ottesen plays the viola, William Fedkenheuer plays violin, Rebecca McFaul plays violin and (inset) Anne Francis plays cello.


been writing a IThehave monthly wine column in Herald Journal for almost

18 years. According to my numbering I have missed one month in all that time. Occasionally, writing my article has been therapeutic and taken my mind off other concerns. I am going to finally take a summer break, and then see if I have the will to continue in the autumn. I have been most appreciative of the comments and compliments. I cannot believe how many non-drinkers have told me that they enjoyed reading my article, especially when I have traveled or reflected on old experiences. It all started in 1993 when Tim Vitale was editor of Cache Magazine. He printed a wine article written by an expert back east. It was a nice article, but none of the wines mentioned could be purchased locally. I did not know Tim at that time, but called him and said that I could write about wines that could be purchased locally. He said that it was a good idea, but did not know

Left: Smithfield Canyon river; photo taken by Lyle Stephens. Right: The south end of Smithf ield ; photo taken by Ashley Mumford Nelson.

Cache Wines By William Moore

the feelings of the managing editor. A couple of days later he called me and said that we could try running the article. There were so few bad letters that we never stopped publishing wine articles. There have been many editors of the Cache Magazine, and they have all supported the wine article. The editors have

Recommended F 2009 Seghesio Sonoma Zinfandel at $20.99 F 2004 Vinosia Taurasi at $23.99 (Park City) F 2009 Crios de Susana Balbo Rosé at $11.99 F 2008 Villa Maria Dry Riesling at $14.99 F 2009 Ste. Michelle Pinot Gris at $11.99 F 2009 Ste Michelle Gewurztraminer at $7.99 always produced the headline, and many have been very clever. There has been very little editing of content, but I often make grammatical errors which they correct. I had great wines at three dinners this past month. At the first, a 2008 Hartford Fanucchi Woods Zinfandel was served with tender bison steaks from Colorado. The closest Zinfandel in quality available here is the 2009 Seghesio Sonoma Zinfandel at $20.99. The second dinner was roast lamb served with 2003 Chateau St. Jeans Cinq

Cepages. I had been keeping this wine for several years for such an occasion. The 2004 Vinosia Taurasi at $23.99 from Southern Italy is a huge red wine made from Aglianico grapes, and this was served at the third dinner of the month. The wine was aged for 14 months in oak, and my wine book says that a Taurasi will store for over 10 years. I had never tasted this varietal before and I was delighted by the wonderful aromas and flavors of this wine. After drinking this superb wine, we opened a bottle of the 2009 La Carraia Sangiovese. On another occasion I would have said this was a nice wine, but it was overwhelmed by the residual flavors of the Taurasi. This combination of wines reinforces my belief that you should not mix different varietals at dinner. Both of these wines were purchased in the Park City store. Here are a few wines for summer drinking if the warm weather arrives. You cannot go wrong with a rosé, and the only one I like in the Logan

store is the 2009 Crios de Susana Balbo Rosé at $11.99. This is dry with more body than most rosé wines. While I like the Australian Rieslings, the 2008 Villa Maria Dry Riesling at $14.99 from New Zealand is something special. For an American white wine I like the 2009 Ste. Michelle Pinot Gris at $11.99. This wine contains 6 percent Viognier which gives more body and makes the wine more like an Alsace Pinot Gris. A pleasant surprise for me is the 2009 Ste. Michelle Gewurztraminer at $7.99. This wine has wonderful fruit flavors like pear with a hint of honey. Any of these wines will make for a pleasant summer evening. Have a great summer. William Moore is among a number of freelance writers whose columns appear in The Herald Journal as part of an effort to expose readers to a variety of community voices. He is not an employee of the newspaper. Feedback for William Moore can be sent to wmoore26@gmail.com.

Want to get in on the action? Send your photos to mnewbold@hjnews.com.

Page 10 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 10, 2011

Long time ‘wine guy’ takes summer break


Coming up

Art on the Lawn

Garden tour

Art on the Lawn’s seventh annual event will be Saturday, June 25 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 1491 E. 2300 North. Art on the Lawn is a nonprofit organization under Dean F. & Bessie C. Peterson Foundation for Cache Valley Arts. This is their only fundraiser and is held on an old homestead property in North Logan. The event is an interactive art event featuring nationally known Northern Utah artists. Entertainment will feature the Dry lake Band, Sasafrass, Speakeasy and Sathom. More than 40 artists and artisans will be participating.

Cache Children’s Choir camp The Cache Children’s Choir 2011 music camp, “Carnival of Animals,” will be held July 11 through 15 for 5 to 11 year olds. Children can attend from 9 a.m. to noon or 1 to 4 p.m. Cost is $60. The camp offers a creative musical experience through vocal instruction, instruments (xylophones, glockenspiels, drums, etc.), dance, art, drama and games. For questions call Lori Roberts at 563-0618 or visit www.cachechildrenschoir.org.

Painting by Trent Gudmundsen

The Alterniscapes Garden Tour will be held Saturday, June 25, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. This year’s self-guided Alterniscapes garden tour features seven gardens in Providence, Millville and Nibley. The focus this year is on gardens with native and waterwise plants. Tickets can be purchased for $5 for the tour at Cache County Extension (179 N. Main Street, Suite 111, Logan) Monday through Thursday, The Master Gardener’s booth at the Cache Valley Gardener’s Market (75 S. 200 East, Logan) on Saturday mornings, and June 25 at the Alterniscapes Tour information center at Zollinger Park. Maps to the gardens are only available June 25 at Zollinger Park. For more information contact the Cache County Extension office at 752-6263. The event is sponsored by the Cache Valley Master Gardeners and the Native Plant Society.

Be your brother’s keeper; it’s for your own good

his country runs T on gossip, snooping and being judgmental; or at least

it did. Lately we have become so entranced with minding our own business and letting everyone follow their respective bliss that we are no longer in touch with anything beyond our respective noses; if that. True, I don’t want a sinister John Ashcroft big brother peeping through my bedroom window, but I do condone just enough neighborly snooping to keep me safe and alive. Several recent events have brought this to my attention. Closest to home are three broad daylight home robberies. Another was the story of a fully clothed man committing suicide by walking into the ocean near San Francisco; nobody tried to stop him or rescue him while he stood out in freezing neck-deep water for 50 minutes. Next was the story of an aging actress found in her own home apparently

Slightly Off Center By Dennis Hinkamp

nearly a year after she died. Yes, she had neighbors nearby. It has become a cliché that in the aftermath of some lunatic-sex-crime-murdering-madman’s arrest he is described by neighbors as “a quiet guy who mainly kept to himself.” Well,

in many cases, it’s because nobody tried to figure out what he was doing. Maybe someone should have noticed that substantially more people were going into the house than coming out. Oh and what about those raised bed gardens planted at night? Heck, I notice people’s patterns on Facebook and if they don’t post something for a few weeks, I ping them and ask what’s up? At work people start fuming if you don’t answer an email in 48 hours. Maybe we can learn a little from our virtual neighborhoods and let it carry over to our real-life 3D high definition neighborhoods. Make a pledge to do this. I’ll go first. If you see people moving stuff out of my house into a van in the middle of a work day, please take a moment to see if I’m one of them. True, I might be moving or making a trip to the thrift store on

any given Tuesday, but it’s unlikely. Besides, you know if I were to move I’d ask to borrow your truck and your teenage kids. If I’m lying face down by the side of the road, there’s a slight chance that I might be taking a nap and don’t want to be disturbed, but it’s more likely that something is wrong. Please take a moment to tap me on the shoulder or lift my head by my hair to determine for sure. I promise not to throw up on your shoes. If you notice a steady stream of cars coming to my house and only staying a few minutes each, it could be that I have friends with short attention spans, but it’s more likely that I’m either selling drugs or have set up a drive through burger window on the side of my house; both which would be illegal. Please call the police; I deserve it. If newspapers and mail are piling up on the porch, I may

have fallen behind on my reading or I may have fallen down the stairs, broken my neck and become kibble for my starving dog. Please knock on the door or knock it down. Don’t blame my dog; it was not her fault. I was glad to be of service. If you see me walking fully clothed into the ocean, please save me because if I’m ever really set on killing myself this way I’d prefer it to be while naked and swimming at full speed. Dennis Hinkamp would like emphasize that being a good neighbor and following someone on Twitter is not the same thing. He is among a number of freelance writers whose columns appear in The Herald Journal as part of an effort to expose readers to a variety of community voices. He is not an employee of the newspaper. Feedback for Dennis Hinkamp can be sent to dennis.hinkamp@usu.edu.


Page 12 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 10, 2011

The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board t Shine” h g i L r u o Y “Let umphrey H m a i l l i W by t shine, Let your ligh may see. s lk fo r e th So o life eternal, The road to r you and me. fo That’s there e, ur light shin Then may yo rld will know. wo That all the Lord’s example, e th g in w . Follo y we need so Brings the jo e, ur light shin We can let o is good. t a By doing wh commandments, is If we keep H we should. t a th y a w y e Th our Savior, Let’s follow is right. at h w ness In doing world of dark is th in n e Th t. h lig r u up o We will hold

“Sestet” by Gene Washington the ground, With my soft shoe I caress , round, round. And turn me thrice around crowned, ons ribb and With new flowers bound, tly ligh I bs lam n nto wa the Like , und aro ps ste t tes Dancing the def gown. r’s me sum in joy for d sse Dre

“Sounds of Shade” by Bruce Steinmeyer of Shade, I think it’s called the Sounds e, cad cas firs as winter wanes and , hue ing turn s bud ing ten their sof enish blue. from deafening gray to gre perfect as is ... it’s lily; the gild n’t But, I sha

“Modern Day Alice” by Maddi Radford there are so many ways to get lost now when we forget how to walk on ground and instead to tread upon the clouds there are so many ways to get lost now within lucid dreams or the grasp of a shadow prying you loose from reality’s cold grip for you are a modern-day Alice an Alice lost in her wonderland wandering wondering if she will ever come home you are taken yet free you have things still to be you are awake and unstable all the same

ou?” “How Will I Know Y by Terri Barnes seen you, Although I’ve never e there. u’r yo ow kn I In faith, me, e lov u I also know yo u care. yo ch mu w ho t And jus color Now, I don’t know the , es ey Of your hair or st be I only know they mu lize. rea we Brighter than soft and smooth, Your skin must be so Like petals of a rose, re as silk And it must be as pu to your toes wn do ad he ur yo From strands of gold Your hair must be like n, su the Glistening in with you, Nothing can compare e. on en os You are the ch ets I see you in the suns faces, ’s ren ild ch r ou in And y erl eld I see you in the ces pla of ds kin all in And n not see you, So for those who ca t you are there tha ve lie And don’t be mercy I pray you show them tear. a ed sh I’ll And for them

you live in a world of “eat me’s” and “go here now’s” and when you open your eyes you ache to escape so act now, Alice relinquish your dream forget that you’re afraid and remember to breathe tease your imagination to bring you back to your soil sphere and give you up to the masts of the blue and cold act now, Alice.

ne 5. nday in the Park on Ju A group gathers for Su


‘La Seduction’ gives tips on French life By Will Weissert For The Associated Press

ne Saturday afterO noon in Paris, a New York Times correspondent was

baking cookies in her running clothes and ran out of butter. Dashing to a convenience store, she ran into a French foreign ministry official who invited her for coffee — rumpled appearance and all. The official pointed out that her street, the impossibly stylish rue du Bac “is not the Upper West Side” of New York, where it might be acceptable to traipse about in sweats. The American shot back that this was her neighborhood and she should be able to wear whatever she wants.

“You can,” he replied, “but you shouldn’t.” In France, you see, dressing sloppily is not only an insult to yourself but also to anyone and everyone you interact with. Times Paris correspondent Elaine Sciolino’s “La Seduction” is crammed with such anecdotes, illustrating how the secrets and subtleties of seduction drive all aspects of French life — from food to social faux pas, fashion to foreign policy. She explains, however, that French seduction is not simply sexual: “The excitement comes less from gratification than desire.” The verb “seduce” has a softer connotation in France — indeed the rather sinister sounding diplomatic term “operation seduction”

Concert and Lecture series presents two authors tonight uthors Chris and Ted A Stewart will be in the Logan Tabernacle Friday, June

10, at 7 p.m., to tell their stories about the research behind their books “Seven Miracles That Saved America” and “Seven Tipping Points that Saved the World.” The program is sponsored by the Concert and Lecture Series Committee at the Tabernacle and is free to the public. Chris is a best-selling author who has published more than a dozen books, has been selected by the Book of the Month Club, and released titles in muliple languages in seven countires. He is a world-record setting Air Force pilot (fastest non-

stop flight around the world) and CEO of The Shipley Group, a national consulting and training company. Ted was appointed as a United States District Court Judge in 1999 by President Bill Clinton. Prior to that he served as chief of staff to Governer Mike Leavitt, as executive director of the State Department of Natural Resources, as a member and chairman of the Public Service Commission, and as chief of staff to Congressman Jim Hansen. He is a visiting professor at Utah State, teaching courses in law and public policy.

translates to “charm offensive.” Still, a writer tells Sciolino that seduction is like breathing for the French, and Alain Baraton,

gardener at the palace of Versailles, calls it “the essence of life.” Yes, the book will make you want to fly to France to sip champagne — maybe even find some stranger to seduce — among the wondrous gardens of Versailles; to stroll past the Eiffel Tower and its carefully layered paint job so that its color appears uniform in any light; or attend a power dinner party where risotto with scallops is the first course and the conversation is at once headswimmingly sophisticated and seemingly effortless. It’s a nice read just for the Frenchness that rubs off as you turn the pages and learn that some schoolchildren in France are required to use fountain

pens and are graded on the beauty of their handwriting; that professional women take classes to shed the chirpiness in their voices; and that entire seminars are offered on table settings and dining habits. Who knew that kissing a woman’s hand must only be done indoors, or that asparagus is to be eaten with your fingers but sorbet with your fork? Sciolino falls into the trap, however, of too frequently comparing France and America. The book gets bogged down in excess us-versusthem-isms, which detract from its strengths, offering tips for surviving life in France as an outsider, for embracing haughty yet exquisite French quirkiness.

* This week’s New York Times Best-seller List * E-Book Fiction 1. “Water for Elephants,” by Sara Gruen 2. “Something Borrowed,” by Emily Giffin 3. “10th Anniversary,” by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro 4. “The Help,” by Kathryn Stockett 5. “Buried Prey,” by John Sandford E-Book Nonfiction 1. “Heaven is for Real,” by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent 2. “In the Garden of Beasts,” by Erik Larson 3. “Bossypants,” by Tina Fey 4. “Unbroken,” by Laura Hillenbrand 5. “Those Guys Have All the Fun,” by James Andrew Miller and Tom Shales

Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/

Paperback Advice & Misc. 1. “The Five Love Languages,” by Gary Chapman 2. “The Happiness Project,” by Gretchen Rubin 3. “What to Expect When You’re Expecting,” by Heidi Murkoff and Sharon Mazel 4. “Crazy Love,” by Francis Chan with Danae Yankoski 5. “Hungry Girl 300 Under 300,” by Lisa Lillien Children’s Chapter Books 1. “The Throne of Fire,” by Rick Riordan 2. “What Happened to Goodbye,” by Sarah Dessen 3. “The Red Pyramid,” by Rick Riordan 4. “The Lost Hero,” by Rick Riordan 5. “Tales From a Not-So-Popular Party Girl,” by Rachel Renée Russell

Page 13 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 10, 2011

Books


Page 14 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 10, 2011

Answers from last week

Calendar Friday

on 1200 South, across the street north of Maceys, near Stadium 8.

Demolition Bio will perform metal with Autostigmatic and Nescience on Friday, June 10, at 8 p.m. at Why Sound. Cost is $5.

John and Karen Carter, local pianists and composers, will be performing an anniversary concert in the recital hall of the Book Table Friday evening, June 10, at 6:30. The event is free and all are invited.

Acoustic performing artist Austin Mullens will perform live Friday, June 10, at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza, starting at 6 p.m. He will be followed by an acoustic set from the talented sibling duo Tom & Alli Durrant of the band “The Hop-Ons” at 7 p.m. Pier 49 is located

A book drive sponsored by Best Buy will be held Friday, June 10, and Saturday, June 11, from 12 to 7 p.m. Drop off your books and magazines in front of Best Buy, 1475 N. Main, Logan. We welcome any books or

Crossword

magazines in good condition. Donations will be distributed to United Way Organizations (Centro de la Familia, CAPSA, Child and Family Support Center). Please clean out your bookshelves and help us make a difference. The Logan Iris Society invites all to their annual iris show this Friday at the First Presbyterian Church, 12 S. 200 West in Logan from 1 to 7 p.m., and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Those who attend this free event will see a display of modern iris varieties and award winners, plus learn how to order, plant and grow iris. Contact

www.ThemeCrosswords.com

By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Union’s odd man out 5. Mexican neighbor (abbr.) 8. Ice cream thickener 12. Garbage 17. By way of, briefly 18. “Volver” star 20. Dispense with 21. Swollen-trunked tree of Australia 24. “___ on a Grecian Urn” (Keats poem) 25. Leisurely walk 26. Encumbrances 27. Soldier armed with a long spear 30. Motown’s county 32. Face-to-face exams 37. Big name in games 38. Classic yo-yo maker 42. Tucked away 44. Spurt 45. Ed.’s request 47. Sisters’ daughters 49. Notoriety 51. Nomadic African bird 54. Hoopla 56. Roll out the red carpet for 57. S-shaped moldings 58. Danced, in a way 61. Supplement 64. High-fives 69. Beluga and Sevruga 70. Not irreverent 71. Particular 73. Flexible Flyers 74. Trattoria offering 75. Fighter for a cause 76. Oil of wintergreen, e.g. 79. Nothing, legally 81. Mandela’s org. 82. Written bailment of

personal property as security for a debt 90. Two-wheeler 91. Navajo structures 92. Promulgate 93. Brake part 94. ___ sequencing core 96. George Armstrong ___ 98. Hard seed coat 102. Electronics pioneer Nikola 104. Spring 106. Palin, for one 108. Atomic no. 86 110. Obloquy 113. Worldwide workers’ grp. 114. Seattle is its largest city 121. No-brainer? 122. Mountain beaver 123. It’s quite a stretch 124. Knuckleheads 125. One taking a bow? 126. Like some wines 127. Kind of wire Down 1. ___ 54 (‘70s hotspot) 2. Brash 3. Live and breathe 4. Dog holder 5. High ground 6. Wet septet 7. Last of the Stuarts 8. Sleeved vestment 9. Schmaltz 10. With precision 11. Focal point 12. John Irving’s “A Prayer for ___ Meany” 13. String bean’s opposite

14. Cone bearer 15. Mad. ___ 16. Author Harper 19. Old Tokyo 21. Hebrew letter 22. Vacation spot 23. It moves in the direction of the wind 28. “Nothing ___ Matters” (Metallica song) 29. Square ___ 30. City on the Brazos 31. Avon anti-aging brand 33. Makes calls 34. Nanking nanny 35. Star car 36. Kind of aerobics 39. Single 40. Riviera city 41. Positive 43. Hamburg’s river 46. Knighted composer 48. Personae non gratae 50. Supple 51. “___ Lost that Lovin’ Feelin’” (Righteous Brothers hit) 52. They come out at the seams 53. Bruisable thing 54. Spherical triangle sides 55. Spicy stew 59. Prefix with night or day 60. Most immoral 62. Mafia boss 63. Female chaperones 65. Trim branches 66. One of 3.5 billion 67. V.I.P.’s opposite 68. Lip-___ 70. Capital of Western

S

Australia 71. À la mode 72. Quashes 74. Kind of talk or rally 75. “The Paper ___” (1973 movie) 77. Exuviate 78. Transport to Oz 80. Does not exist 82. Snoop Dogg CD 83. Anguish 84. Courts 85. “O Sanctissima,” e.g. 86. Fabled fliers

87. Fluish feeling 88. Theta-kappa gobetween 89. Must pay 95. Whet 97. Headlong 99. It might bring you to the verge of a steep decline 100. Grippers 101. Later 103. Shoptalk 105. Private 107. Island chain

109. Follower of John 110. Hole-making tool 111. Shiny on top? 112. Mouse manipulator 114. Little butter? 115. Nuptial agreement 116. Bubkes 117. ___-faced 118. Word on a Ouija board 119. Photographer Goldin 120. It precedes aitch


The second annual Moonlight Diesel Cache Valley Truck and Tractor Pull will be held June 10 and 11 from 7 to 10 p.m. at the Cache Valley Fairgrounds in Logan. Stop by Moonlight Diesel in Logan to pick up your advance tickets. Cost is $12 for adults and $6 for children. Find us on Facebook for more info!

The annual used book sale for the Cache County Library will be held at the library, 15 N. Main in Providence, on Friday, June 10, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday, June 11, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Summer reading programs begin Monday, June 13, and run through July 15. Call 752-7881 for further information.

Saturday Deceptionist Richard Hatch, violinist Rosemary Hatch and pianist Jonathan Hatch will present “Matinée Encantée,” an enchanting afternoon of magic and music Saturday, June 11, at 2 p.m. at the Thatcher-Young Mansion, 35 W. 100 South, Logan. The 75-minute program features music of Camille SaintSaëns, Johann Sebastian Bach and magic created by RobertHoudin, Axel Hecklau and others. Tickets are $10 for adults and $7 for children under 12. Only 56 seats are available and advance purchase of tickets is recommended. They can be purchased at www.HatchAcademy.com or by calling 435-9320017. Becoming Everest will perform hardcore/metal music with Our City Skyline and The Trial Reform on Saturday, June 11, at 8 p.m. at Why Sound. Cost is $5.

The western singing duo Tumbleweeds will perform from 6 to 8 p.m. at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza. Everyone is invited. No cover charge. Come enjoy some fun western music and pizza!

Craig Mortenson will be entertaining with cowboy music at 3 p.m. Saturday, June 11, at the Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. Please come and join us for this free event that is open to the public. For more information please call 792-0353. The annual used book sale for the Cache County Library will be held at the library, 15 N. Main in Providence, on Friday, June 10, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday, June 11, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Summer reading programs begin Monday, June 13, and run through July 15. Call 752-7881 for further information. The U13 STORM soccer team is hosting a car wash Saturday, June 11, to raise money for tournament fees. The car wash will be held at Master Mechanic in Providence (142 N. Spring Creek Parkway) from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Donations will be accepted. The Tueller School of Dance presents “Tuelleretes in Concert 2011- Party Rock!,” on Saturday, June 11, at Logan High School Auditorium at 7 p.m. Tickets are on sale at the studio, 521 1/2 N. Main, Logan for $8. Tickets at the door will be $10. Come enjoy an evening of local dance and entertainment. For more information call 752-9154. An annual car show with a pulled pork lunch will be Saturday, June 11, from noon to 5 p.m. at the Providence Macey’s. A Tennis Block Party will be held at the USU tennis courts Saturday, June 11, from 9 a.m. to noon. Come enjoy fun, free lessons for juniors and adults. Lots of games and healthy snacks. The Hyrum City Triathalon will be held Saturday, June 11. For more information visit www. triutah.com. The Utah Fibromyalgia Association will hold it’s monthly education/support meeting at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 11, in Room 5 at the

Logan Regional Hospital. Free to anyone who is interested. Physical therapist Sharik Peck from Maximum Function will be discussing and teaching stress managment techniques. Come unwind with us! The Museum of Anthropology at USU presents “Shoshone Tales” with guests from the Northwestern Band of Shoshone on Saturday, June 11, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event is free. The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Sunday Sundays in the Park will continue June 12 at 1 p.m. on the lawn adjoining the Old Main Building on USU campus. Michael Ballam will be our guest. Bring your own chairs. For questions call Norman Palmer at 787-1406.

Monday Michael Ballam, general director of the Utah Festival Opera and Musical Theatre, will be hosting an opera and musical theater seminar from June 13-17 at Logan High School Little Theatre. Cost is $50. The seminar runs from 3:30 to 5 p.m. each day. For more information call 750-0330 or email Pamela Gee at pamgee@ufoc.org. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will be hosting “Bike’n Ice” on Monday, June 13, at 6 p.m. For more information call 713-0288. Celebrate the rollout of Road Respect, Utah’s new public education car and bicycle safety campaign. This family-fun event will be held Monday, June 13, from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at the Historic Cache County Courthouse. The Cache County event will mark the kickoff for the Road Respect Campaign and start a promotional bicycle ride across the state of Utah. Activities include a helmet giveaway and free refreshments and safety information will be provided to promote safe driving and riding on Utah’s roads. For more information visit RoadRespect. utah.gov.

Al’s Sporting Goods tennis tournament will be held June 13-25 at the Logan Community Recreation Center, 195 S. 100 West in Logan. Contact Shelley Compton at 716-9246 for more information. Stokes Nature Center will host Wild Art Camp for ages 7 and up. This camp runs June 13-17 with an overnight from Thursday to Friday. Campers will get inspired through outdoor exploration and get creative with plein air drawing and painting, handmade paper and natural object art. The cost is $150 for SNC members, or $180 for nonmembers. Registration required. For more information, call 435755-3239 or visit www.logannature.org.

Tuesday Eliza Rickman will perform acoustic music with Polygamy and Loki Trickster God of LoGan on Tuesday, June 14, at 8 p.m. at Why Sound. Cost is $5. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will host water skiing for people with MS on Tuesday, June 14, at 10 a.m. For more information call (435) 713-0288.

Wednesday Richard Hatch, owner of the Hatch Academy of Magic and Music in Logan, will be part of this year’s “Picnic in the Park” event as part of Nibley Heritage Days, performing close-up magic for families at Old City Park (294 W. 3200 South) from 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. This will be followed by “Concert in the Park” featuring the acappella group Vocalocity. Fire in the Skies will perform metal music with Deicidal Carnage and Swamp Donkey on Wednesday, June 15, at 8 p.m. at Why Sound. Cost is $5. Local easy listening group “City Heat,” featuring Bill Gabriel on guitar, performs each Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sour-

dough Pizza, located on 1200 South across the street north of Maceys. Everyone is welcome. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will host a canoeing activity Wednesday, June 15, at 4 p.m. For more information call 713-0288. Jamie Sagers will teach us how to make sidewalk chalk, slime, body glitter and many other fun summer concoctions at a free cooking and community class at Macey’s little theater Wednesday, June 15, from 4 to 5 p.m. A free seminar entitled, “Natural Approaches to Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis” will be hosted by Dr. Dee Stevens and Dr. Chad Cannon on Wednesday, June 15, at 7 p.m. at Stevens Chiropractic, 1635 N. 200 East (in front of Sports Academy). The seminar is limited to the first 20 callers. Please call 755-7654 to reserve your place now. Free Love and Logic Parenting classes for parents of children 1-6 years will continue Wednesdays, June 15 and 22, from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Logan Family Center 50 S. 400 East, Logan. Some babysitting available by pre-arrangement. All participants must pre-register. Call 755-5171 for more information.

Thursday Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will host a fishing activity Thursday, June 16, at 5 p.m. For more information call 713-0288. Join us for a free “Living Well Workshop” presented by Bear River Health Department. This is a fun, interactive fiveweek workshop beginning May 12 for anyone with an ongoing chronic condition (arthritis, heart disease, diabetes, joint pain, etc.). The course finishes up June 16 from 2:30 to 4 p.m. at the Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. For more information contact Kim at (435) 792-6521 or Julie at (435) 792-0353.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 10, 2011

Bryan at 797-3107 for more information.


Page 16 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 10, 2011

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Cache Magazine  

June 10-16, 2011

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