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Youth Take on shakespeare’s ‘The Tempest’ The Herald Journal

June 3-9, 2011


Page 2 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 3, 2011

Cache The Herald Journal’s

Magazine

Arts & Entertainment Calendar On the cover: Sam Anderson, 15,

and Jessica Lewis, 14, act out a scene as the characters Ferdinand and Miranda in William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” on Wednesday. (Jennifer Meyers/Herald Journal)

From the editor

A

h, the summer movie season is upon us. Two weekends ago I went to Arizona for the ultimate girls’ vacation. It was full of food, pedicures, shopping, swimming, and frequenting the movie theater three times. It was the first time in my life I went to movies three days in a row, and it was pretty much amazing. We started out with “Something Borrowed” on Friday, “Bridemaids” on Saturday, and finished off the weekend with “Water for Elephants” on Sunday. I told you it was a girls weekend. I must say “Bridesmaids” is the best movie I’ve seen this year. I loved the themes in “Water for Elephant” dealing with abuse, and “Something Borrowed” was pretty much fluff. But sometimes fluff is all you want. I love getting excited for a good movie. I’m still wanting to see “Pirates of the

What’s inside this week See what’s next for noon music

(Page 4)

Warm weather and sunny skies may be here ‘X-Men’ tops all in series

mnewbold@hjnews.com

Caribbean,” bad reviews or not, and for the next couple of months I have the final chapter of “Harry Potter” to look forward to. But a movie that wasn’t really on my radar was “X-Men: First Class.” Although I enjoy all the “X-Men” movies, especially “Wolverine,” I hadn’t seen previews for the latest installment so I didn’t think much about it. That is, until now. Our movie critic Aaron Peck says with full confidence that the movie will be one of the best this summer (page 7) and I believe it. As of yesterday it had an 88 percent on www.rottentomatoes.com. I still haven’t watched a trailer for “X-Men: First Class” and I refuse to. Movies are usually better that way. But you can bet I’m going to find a way to see it this weekend, even if it means standing in a line that wraps around the outside of the theater. And I’ll be buying popcorn and M&Ms. Mmmmm, movie theater popcorn. Bring on the summer movies, and bring on “X-Men.” — Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

(Page 11)

(Page 7) Books .......................p.13 Crossword.................p.14

Cute

pet photo of the week

This cat is available for adoption! Pet: Luna From: Four Paws Rescue Why she’s so lovable: Luna is a very sweet little brown tabby. She is about 6 months old. She is very friendly and affectionate. Luna is a little bit shy in new situations, but a wonderful girl to have around once she warms up. If you would like to meet Luna or learn more about her, please call Sheri at 435-787-1751. The adoption fee for most Four Paws cats is $75.

Slow Wave Slow Wave is created from real people’s dreams as drawn by Jesse Reklaw. Ask Jesse to draw your dream! Visit www.slowwave.com to find out how.


Page 3 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 3, 2011

All mixed up

The Bullen Center to be filled with blues he Cache Valley T Center for the Arts presents Corky Siegel Chamber

Blues Friday, June 3, at 7:30 p.m. in the Bullen Center. Is it blues, is it classical? Walking the line between Beethoven and B.B. King, and armed with the creative genius and instrumental prowess that have defined his career for nearly four decades, Corky has pioneered an original, genrebusting Chamber blues – a fresh, innovative sound capturing the sparkling qualities of classical music merged with the emotional melodic style of blues, all within an intimate chamber setting. “Corky Siegel has merged together a blues musician, a classical string quartet, a jazz percussionist with an East Indian tabla player to create an original awardwinning sound,” said Wally Bloss, executive director for the Cache Valley Center for the Arts. “This combination

of music appeals to blues and classical fans alike. It’s so diverse in its sound that you will not be able to stop yourself from dancing right out of your chair.” Under Corky’s lead, The West End String Quartet and percussionist Frank Donaldson complete the Chamber Blues Band. Corky Siegel has earned an international

reputation as one of the world’s great blues harmonica masters. The Chamber Blues players include Corky Siegel, harmonica and piano; Chihsuan Yang, violin; Aurelien Fort-Pederzoli, violin; Doyle Armbrust, viloa; Jill Kaeding, violin; and Frank Donaldson, percussion.

Speaker to talk archaeology at USU museum tah State University’s Museum U of Anthropology presents another Utah Humanities Council speaker at its next “Satur-

days at the Museum” activity. Joel Janetski is the featured guest Saturday, June 4, at the museum, presenting “Archaeology and the Early Human History of Utah.” Janetski, the 2010 recipient of the Great Basin Anthropological Conference Founders Lifetime Achievement, will discuss Utah’s earliest inhabitants as they moved from hunter/gatherer lifeways to an agriculture lifestyle and how archaeologists use their skills to retell Utah’s unique history. At the museum, two Great Basin exhibit tours on ancient Utah lifeways will be offered at 11 a.m. and again at 3 p.m. Following the tours, guests can try their hand at atlatl (spear) throwing. Rock art and cordage bracelet activities are

available throughout the day. “Utah has such a long and fascinating early history,” said Melissa Allen, Saturday’s program coordinator. “We are very excited to offer the community an opportunity to understand how ancient people used and moved about the Utah landscape through time.” Community members, as well as Utah State students, can visit the museum during its operating hours, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The USU Museum of Anthropology is on the USU campus in the south turret of the historic Old Main building, Room 252. Admission is free. For more information about this event, call museum staff at (435) 797-7545 or visit the museum website (anthromuseum.usu.edu).

From front: Molly Tobin played by Lindsay Williams of North Ogden, .Molly’s brothers played by Greg Christensen of Brigham City, Nick Walker of Perry, and Brian Lofthouse of Pleasant View.

Perry theater presents Molly Brown musical

he Unsinkable “T Molly Brown” will be performed at Heritage Theatre,

2505 So. Hwy 89 in Perry. The play, is directed by Dee Pace, starts tonight and runs through June 25 on Mondays, Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. Matinees will be June 11 and 18 at 2 p.m. Adults are $9 and seniors and children are $8. Call (435) 723-8392 for reservations on Mondays, or Wednesday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. This musical is a fictionalized account of the life of Margaret Brown, who survived the sinking of the RMS Titanic, and her wealthy miner husband. In the early 1900s, feisty tomboy Molly Tobin wants to learn to read and write and find

a rich husband. She ends up in Leadville, Colo., and meets J.J. Brown who, after they marry, provides all the money she needs for whatever she wants. Snubbed by those she wants to impress, Molly and J.J. travel to Europe and are welcomed and accepted by royalty. There Molly finds what she really wanted in life. “It’s a great show, with great appeal,” says Director Dee Pace. “It’s not so much the different parts, as it is the ensemble that is most important. I feel that I have a great cast filled with versatile performers who can sing, dance, and perform multiple roles.” For more information visit www.heritagetheatreutah.com.


Page 4 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 3, 2011

Rhythm and theater

Summer noon music The following performances will all be held at the tabernacle at noon. Admission is free and everyone is welcome.

Friday, June 3

Tuesday, June 7

oon Music is proud to present N Utah State University’s Old Lyric Repertory Company (OLRC) on June 3.

Returning to Northern Utah this summer with four entertaining stage productions at the historic Caine Lyric Theatre, the OLRC, led by artistic director Dennis Hassan, is a professional theater program based in the Theatre Arts Department in the Caine College of the Arts at Utah State. “We are looking forward to the 2011 season and there is no better way to start than with the Noon Music series at the Tabernacle,” said Hassan. “We’ll be showcasing our upcoming musical ‘Little Shop of Horrors.’” The musical is based on the book and lyrics by Howard Ashman and music by Alan Menken.

Wednesday, June 8

ounded in Chicago in 1997 F under the mentorship of Marc Johnson, cellist of the renowned

Vermeer Quartet, Fry Street received rave reviews as prizewinners at the Yellow Springs Competition and the Banff International String Quartet Competition. The quartet traveled to Israel to participate in the International Encounters Chamber Music Seminar in 2000, where they studied with Isaac Stern. He invited the quartet to the Isaac Stern Chamber Music Workshop in New York City and sub-

sequently arranged for the quartet’s Carnegie Hall debut in 2001. “ Fry Street Quartet has held the position of faculty quartetin-residence at the Caine College of the Arts at Utah State University since 2002. The quartet enjoys frequent visits to Harrisburg, Penn., as Market Square’s artists-in-residence, as well as the Mozart Gemeinde chamber music series in Austria. Fry Street Quartet has reached audiences from Carnegie Hall to Sarajevo and Jerusalem.

eremy Threlfall has been perJ forming since he was 5 years old. He is an acclaimed tenor, as well as, a

composer, arranger, orchestrator and songwriter. Threlfall’s voice is known for its clarity. He graduated in vocal performance and is trained in sound and video design. Threlfall has performed all over the West including Cal Am Resorts, Hawaii Polynesian Cultural Center, BYU TV, Tuacahn Theatre, LDS Conference Center and is now performing in many new musical TV shows. He is currently preparing to launch his 2012 Cal Am Resorts tour to Arizona. He recently co-authored a song called “I am Free,” with pianist and composer Kevin Kula. Threlfall entertains in many genres including: Broadway, opera, country, inspirational, Christmas and children’s

music. For more information about Threlfall visit www.ThrelfallsMusic.com.

Thursday, June 9

onathan Rose began piano J lessons at age 7 with organ lessons following at age 11. He studied

piano with Maryetta Sampson and Frank Chiou, and organ with R. Shane Fellows and James M. Drake at USU. He has also received instruction from Dame Gillian Weir, Sophie-Véronique Choplin at St. Sulpice in Paris, and in improvisation from Naji Hakim at Église de la Trinité in Paris. Rose has performed with numerous ensembles including the American Festival Chorus and Orchestra under the baton of Craig Jessop and now sings baritone in the AFC choir. Rose has recently joined the musical staff of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Logan as organist and choirmaster and he participated on the dedicatory recital of the church’s new organ featuring advisory board of the AGO Bonneville Richard L. Elliott, principal organdistrict. In March 2010, Rose joined ist of the Mormon Tabernacle in Salt the USU Chamber Singers to record Lake. “Show Me Thy Ways,” a CD of Daniel He currently serves as dean of the Gawthrop’s choral works with organ Cache Valley Chapter of the Amerimastered by noted recording engineer can Guild of Organists and sits on the Bruce Leek.


‘Sons of Perdition’ to be featured at Logan Arthouse next week By Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

F

eeling lost as a teenager is easy enough without leaving family, friends, religion and a fiercely controlling atmosphere to be the person you really want to be. In the documentary “Sons of Perdition” three teenage boys, Sam, Joe and Bruce, run away from “The Crick” a religious compound in Colorado City, Ariz., headed by Warren Jeffs, prophet of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The documentary, directed by Tyler Measom of Salt Lake City and Jennilyn Merten of Brooklyn N.Y., shares the story of the boys’ struggles and achievements as they take on “Sons of Perdition” will the world they knew nothing about. play at Logan Arthouse Measom says the film sold out at the June 9-11 at 7 p.m. A 2010 Tribeca Film special guest will be in Festival and has been screened in Brazil, attendance for a Q&A Poland and theaters after the film on June 9. across the nation. It was also chosen to Cost is $6. be part of the Oprah Winfrey Documentary were hesitant to say the least. Club. We told them we were not Next week the film will be just there to steal their story. screened in Logan for three We were there to tell their nights. Here are a few things story. We shot for two and Measom says about the maka half years and we’ve been ing of the documentary and working on this film for over the public’s reaction to it: five years now. We’ve been thorough and careful. More Was it hard to get the than the boys’ stories (the boys to talk and participate film) also goes into what in the documentary? goes on in (The Crick). How “It was hard. It was very Warren Jeffs ruled, what it’s difficult. They are told that like to be a girl in that comeveryone from the outside is evil and that they are not sup- munity.” posed to be trusted, especially Were you able to film the press. It took us about six “The Crick?” months to get integrated in “We got in the community the community. Then we met Sam, Bruce and Joe, and they but only when driving around

This photo shows Sam and Joe, two teenagers who participated in the documentary “Sons of Perdition” by directors Tyler Measom of Salt Lake City and Jennilyn Merten of Brooklyn, N.Y. Sam and Joe left Colorado City to escape an FLDS community controlled by Warren Jeffs’, who is now in prison for arranging underage marriages.

with the boys. We were also able to show the community by acquiring very, very rare photographs from Warren’s collections that I got from unknown sources. We also got sermons of Warren Jeffs. He recorded everything. They are downright creepy.” Where do the boys usually go when they leave Colorado City? “They would kind of move all over the place. When kids leave Colorado City, they don’t have any education, and very little experience in the outside world, and they are no longer going to see their families anymore. They kind of run like wild dogs together. There would be 20 of them living together

sleeping on couches. One of the things they fight for the most, is they miss their family. They miss their moms more than you can possibly imagine. When they leave, the first couple weeks they have all this freedom and they now have girls, and movies and beer, and they kind of overdose like kids in a candy store. Then they realize they are lonely and they hurt and they want to be part of a family. They mostly stick together because people don’t understand them, and they are a little bit afraid of other people. They don’t know music, movies, clothes or sports, and they really can’t relate.” How are the boys doing

now? “They are doing great. They have their struggles just like anyone else. They get a little lost in the world they are two steps behind in.” What do you want people to get out of this movie? “Ultimately the film is about family. It is about how important family is to you. It’s more important than anything else – religion, sports, whatever it may be. I’ve had people watch it and come up to me and say, ‘I’ve never been closer to my mother than I am now,’ or ‘I haven’t talked to my father in 10 years and I’m going to call him up.’ It’s amazing to see how moved and affected people are by this story.”

Page 5 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 3, 2011

Film depicts lives of FLDS escapees


Page 6 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 3, 2011

Film Still playing “Bridesmaids” Rated R ★★★1⁄2 This takes the typically cliched wedding movie genre and completely upends it and reinvents it into something surprisingly daring and alive. But it also takes the Judd Apatow-style buddy comedy, with its mixture of raunchiness, neurosis and sentimentality, and tailors it to female experiences and sensibilities. That the film achieves both of these ambitious goals simultaneously while remaining (mostly) hilarious is a testament to the power of Kristen Wiig as cowriter and star, and to the awesomely eclectic ensemble cast of strong comedians who surround her. Wiig stars as Annie, a Milwaukee woman who’s recently lost her bakery and her boyfriend. The one bright spot in her life is her best friend Lillian (Maya Rudolph), who’s just announced that she’s getting married and wants Annie to be her maid of honor. But Annie ends up competing with Lillian’s new BFF, the perfect and passive-aggressive Helen (Rose Byrne). 125 minutes. “The Hangover Part II” Rated R ★1⁄2 It’s hard to imagine a worse attempt at cashing in a second time. Seriously, it feels like the script was pieced together with the help of Mad Libs, with only slightly different and raunchier details replacing those that helped the original “Hangover” from 2009 become the highestgrossing R-rated comedy of all time. But so much of the allure of that first film was the novelty of the premise, the unpredictability of the adventures, and the sense that we, too, were wandering in a daze, helping solve the mystery of the debauched night before. Giving the people what they want is one thing. Making nearly the exact same movie a second time, but shifting the setting to Thailand, is just ... what, lazy? Arrogant? Maybe a combination of the two. That’s essentially what director Todd Phillips has done. This time,

“Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides” Rated PG-13 ★1⁄2 The fourth film in the ridiculously successful Disney franchise is the shortest in the series, but it still feels overlong and overstuffed: needlessly convoluted yet, at the same time, phoned-in. And the fact that this one’s in 3-D does nothing to liven up the action. Those three-dimensional digital effects mainly consist of various swords and snakes and such being flung at our faces. Boo! Did you jump? That’s not to say this summer behemoth doesn’t have Ed Helms’ mild-mannered dentist, Stu, is the one getting married at a resort in Thailand, his fiancee’s family’s home country. Although he insists he doesn’t want a bachelor party, he, Phil (Bradley Cooper) and Alan (Zach Galifianakis) still manage to wake up in a stupor in a squalid Bangkok hotel. 101 minutes. “Jane Eyre” Rated PG-13 ★★★ There’s been no shortage of film versions of Charlotte Bronte’s classic tale of romance and woe. Now, yet another take on the 1847 novel has come to the screen, with Cary Joji Fukunaga directing Moira Buffini’s script, which shakes things up by messing with the narrative structure. It

its thrilling moments. Rob Marshall (“Chicago,” ‘’Nine”) takes over for Gore Verbinski, who directed the first three “Pirates” movies, and his knack for choreography comes shining through in individual set pieces. It’s everything in between that makes this such a repetitive bore. Johnny Depp’s performance as the randy Capt. Jack Sparrow, which seemed like such a free, goofy, inspired bit of work when the first film came out back in 2003, now feels so dialed-down and obvious, it’s as if he could do it in his sleep.

begins with Jane fleeing the imposing Thornfield Hall in hysterics and is told mainly in flashback, which creates tension from the start — even if you know the story. Fukunaga may seem like an odd choice to direct such revered literary material; his last film, “Sin Nombre,” was a contemporary and violent tale of Central Americans making their way through Mexico on their way to the United States. But both are about people searching for a place to belong, and they share a visceral immediacy. The pacing might even be a bit too low-key, but because it is, and because the attraction between Jane and Rochester simmers for so long, it makes the passionate bursts stand out even more. The relationship

between these two guarded people is at the heart of the story and Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender challenge and beguile each other beautifully. 121 minutes. “Kung Fu Panda 2” Rated PG ★★ The roly-poly Po is back with high energy, some lovely visuals and peppy, playful voice work, as always, from star Jack Black. But the freshness and novelty that made the original film such a kick back in 2008 has been, well, kicked to bits. And the story line of this sequel feels overstuffed with plotlines and characters. Parents also should be aware of some violent, frightening imagery that may be too much for the littlest kids. Everyone

else will probably delight in the animated spectacle from director Jennifer Yuh Nelson, which is bright and tactile, bold and subtle. The 3-D is generally unobtrusive but doesn’t really add anything, either. The most beautiful parts actually come from the other kinds of visual styles that are worked in, including a delicate segment that features paper-style animation. “Delicate” probably isn’t the first word that comes to mind when pondering the portly Po, who’s gone from the underdog dreaming of kung-fu greatness to the Dragon Warrior himself. He must protect the Valley of Peace with the help of The Furious Five, the various animal species who fight alongside him and happen to come with celebrity voices. He begins to wonder about his past just as a megalomaniacal peacock named Lord Shen (Gary Oldman) is hell-bent on dominating the future. These two story lines run parallel to each other and eventually collide but never truly gel. 90 minutes. “Something Borrowed” Rated PG-13 ★1⁄2 Directed by Luke Greenfield (“The Girl Next Door”) and based on the novel by Emily Giffin, “Something Borrowed” introduces us to Goodwin’s character, Rachel, on the night of her 30th birthday. She’s quietly freaking out about the passage of time because she’s still hopelessly single, the clichéd trademark of so many chick-lit heroines. Meanwhile, her closest pal since childhood, the blonde party girl Darcy (Kate Hudson), is about to marry Dex (Colin Egglesfield), Rachel’s good friend from law school. Rachel introduced the two of them six years ago and encouraged them to get together, even though she was secretly in love with Dex. But after a few drinks at her surprise party, she and Dex end up sleeping together — and that inspires them to revisit feelings they’d both suppressed. 113 minutes.

— All reviews by The Associated Press


T

The Reel Place

he “X-Men” franchise seems to have a bottomless reservoir of different film variations that can By Aaron Peck be filmed. We’ve already gone through three “X-Men” movies, and a movie about the origins of Wolverine. With “X-Men: First Class” we’ve circled all the way back around. This is a prequel to the trilogy of “X-Men” movies, and I just might be so bold to say that it’s the best “X-Men” feature to date. The franchise needed a reboot after the soulless Bret Ratner flick “X-Men: The Last Stand.” Leave it up to Ratner to run a successful, beloved franchise ent factions. This deep straight into the ground. friendship is something Instead of continuing that is hinted at in the on with the story that previous “X-Men” movRatner and his crew left ies, but isn’t fully realhanging lifeless and ized until this movie. dead, new director MatLike any good period thew Vaughn (“KickAss”) decided that doing piece, “X-Men: First Class” sucks in the feela prequel made more ing of that time period. sense. Boy, does it ever! Here the beginning of Most of these superhero movies we’ve been the X-Men find themselves facing the posinundated by are based in modern day. “X-Men: sibility of World War III, along with the rest of the First Class” makes a human race. The Cold bold move by creating a period piece at the same War is at its height, and time as an action-packed the Cuban Missile Crisis is becoming a real and superhero movie. It’s imminent threat to total a fine line to walk, but Vaughn and his crew nail global nuclear war. How “First Class” weaves its it perfectly. way in and out of real “First Class” attempts history is something of a to set up the beginning marvel. Vaughn and his of the discovery of team of screenwriters mutants on earth and are able to take the sheer how Charles Xavier dread of the real threat (James McAvoy) and of nuclear annihilation, Erik “Magneto” Lehnwhich was prevalent in sherr (Michael Fassbender) searched out and the early ’60s, and inject it into their screenplay. recruited mutants from The results end up being around the globe. What “First Class” does so well a mixture of a really good “Bond” movie couis paint the portrait of pled with the action and Xavier and Lehnsherr’s intensity of an energetic relationship before superhero movie. they split up into differ-

Page 7 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 3, 2011

‘X-Men’ will be one of summer’s best films

Sebastian Shaw sequences and thrilling (Kevin Bacon) is the CG-laden fight scenes, ★★★ 1/2 big, bad villain here. but at its core its simply Like any good villain, a good movie. Its char“X-Men: First Class” Shaw rides around in acterization is top-notch. Rated PG-13 his own personal subVaughn leaves nothing marine plotting world out when dissecting domination. Shaw is a the inner workings of mutant, and has different of our past here in the we have with these types Xavier and Magneto. I ideals. He believes that hate to wax hyperbolic, United States. Racism of issues and the differhumans will end up hatbut “X-Men: First Class” and bigotry are, unforent schools of thought ing mutants, and will at truly is one of the best tunately, still alive today. that go with it. some point try to destroy “X-Men” does a wondermovies you will end up “X-Men” isn’t just a them all. His plan is a seeing this summer. That, ful job showcasing the good superhero movie preemptive attack on the real-world problems that with fantastic action I’m sure of. human race – wipe them out before they know PLAYING JUNE 3-9 Action! what mutants are capaMOVIE HOTLINE 435-753-1900 ble of. So, he personally UNIVERSITY 6 tries to create a scenario STADIUM 8 1225 N 200 E., BEHIND HOME DEPOT 535 W. 100 N. PROVIDENCE MIDNIGHT SHOW FRI/SAT $6.00 that will bring about a 2297 N. Main HANGOVER II (R) X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) MOVIE HOTLINE 753-6444 nuclear holocaust. 1:15 4:05 6:50 9:25 WWW.WALKERCINEMAS.NET BRIDESMAIDS (R) ALL SEATS ALL TIMES $3.00 “X-Men” has always THOR in 2D (PG-13) OpEN SuNdAy AT 3:45pM PRIATES OF THE CARIBBEAN 4 12:30 3:30 6:30 9:30 been good at definin Digital 3D (PG-13) OpEN MON-SAT 11:30AM FOR OuR MATINEES HANGOVER II (R) SuMMER CHILdREN’S MATINEE TICKETS ON SALE NOW ing ideals that seem X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) 1:10 3:20 5:30 7:40 9:50 MEGAMINd MON-THuRS 12:00 & 2:00 PIRATES OF THE CARRIBEAN 4 in to become lost in the ALL SEATS ONLy $1.00 AT THE dOOR KUNG FU PANDA 2 in DIGITAL 3D (PG) 2D (PG-13) rock’em-sock’em action 12:45 3:35 6:25 9:15 HOp (pG) WATER FOR THOR in 2D (PG-13) of other superhero mov4:30 & 6:45 KUNG FU PANDA in 3D (PG) ELEpHANTS Mon-Sat Mat 11:45 & 2:15 1:30 3:30 5:30 7:30 9:30 (pG-13) 5:05 & 7:30 ies. It raises questions MOVIES STADIUM 5 Fri & Sat Mat KUNG FU PANDA in 2D (PG) 2450 NORTH MAIN of social tolerance, and 12:55 2:55 4:55 6:55 8:55 LIMITLESS 11:50 & 2:45 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES in 2D (PG-13) (pG-13) 9:30 JANE EYRE (PG-13) acceptance. Will we as 1:30 4:00 6:30 9:00 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) SOuRCE COdE a human race embrace CONSPIRATOR (PG-13) AdjuSTMENT (pG-13) 4:15, 7:00 & 9:00 SOMETHING BORROWED (PG-13) 1:15 4:05 7:00 9:25 people who are different Fri & Sat Mat BuREAu FAST FIVE (PG-13) 12:10 & 2:00 (pG-13) 9:50 than ourselves, or will SUPER 8 MIDNIGHT SHOW THURSDAY SOUL SURFER (PG) 3:05 9:35 we shun them? DismissRANGO (pG) RIO in 2D (G) 5:15 7:25 at UNIVERSITY 6 pRIEST al of groups of people 4:45 GIFT BOOKS AND CARDS AVAILABLE (pG-13) 7:15 & 9:15 Mon-Sat Mat 12:15 & 2:30 have, sadly, been part BUY TICKETS ONLINE AT WWW.MOVIESWEST.COM 10:20 12:30 2:40 4:50 7:00 9:10 10:00 12:30 3:30 6:30 9:00

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TAKING ON ‘THE TEMPEST’ VALLEY YOUTH LEARN TO UNDERSTAND AND ACT OUT SHAKESPEARE

“The Tempest” remaining performances are tonight at 7 p.m. and Saturday, June 4 at 2 p.m. at the Logan Arthouse and Cinema, 795 N. Main St. in Logan. Cost is $5 for adults and $3 for kids. No children under 5 please.

D

on’t tell a kid William Shakespeare’s treatment of the human condition is too much for him to comprehend. Logan Youth Shakespeare founder and director Mary Jackson-Smith says the youth actors in her troupe are finding ways to connect with characters hundreds of years in the making, and can often do a better job at sharing Shakespeare’s stories compared to adult performers. Wrapping up their final two performances of “The Tempest” today and Saturday, the Logan Youth Shakespeare players got a chance to stage one of Shakespeare’s most intricate plays — uncut, and in the original 400-year-old prose. “There’s nothing quite like this in the valley for kids who really want a challenge,” said Jackson-Smith. “The kids can do it and I think it’s important to know we’re not dumbing things down for them.” The Logan Youth Shakespeare, or LYS, players didn’t audition for their parts, nor

are they cast based on gender or age. The 27 actors aged 9 to 19 — so many, that the show has three different casts — simply showed up and agreed to the months-long commitment to produce the play. To help them learn and understand their parts, Jackson-Smith produces audio training CDs for each member of the cast. “The key to Shakespeare is the actor has to know every single thing they’re saying, not just how to say the words but they need to know the meaning of the words,” she explained. “Otherwise the audience has no hope of knowing what it means.” The cast has been together since February, memorizing lines, developing their characters and learning from their peers who play the same parts. Jackson-Smith says the actors don’t mind tackling more complex plays because difficult subject matter, she says, engages the actors and keeps them motivated. “They learn in different ways,” she said. “Some of them learn by looking at the page, and some of them learn by watching

the other kids do it, others learn by having a gesture to go with every line.” Jessica Lewis of Smithfield plays the parts of Miranda and Alanzo. The 14-yearold said learning the backstory of Miranda helped her understand how to portray the woman — the daughter of the protagonist. “She’s not like a normal Shakespearean female,” said Lewis. “She’s very unique and different. She’s lived on an island her whole life and grown up in a very different situation.” “The Tempest” is 16-year-old Jayme Warner’s second LYS production. She plays Prospero — a magician and wizard faced with the option to exact revenge on his enemies or grant them forgiveness. “The shipwreck brought Prospero’s enemies to the island where he hopes to seek revenge on his enemies for everything they’ve done to him,” she said. “In the end he ends up forgiving everyone.” Actor Sam Anderson, 15, of North Logan, says the theater is a place to make friends and have fun. The actors even

share lines with their castmates on Facebook and use theater as a social outlet. “Everyone just seems to get along,” he said. “It’s a place where I can tell people about myself and be open minded.” Jackson-Smith says she sees something new in each performance — something she attributes to the youth actors’ ability to fully understand the play and be comfortable with it. “I think the kids have a blast doing this and a lot of times they have no idea what they’re taking from it,” she said. “This is a supportive place for them. It’s noncompetitive and an opportunity for them to delve into the best art we have in our language. “Shakespeare gives us these characters that are absolutely timeless. These kids are finding connections to even the most obscure characters, and it’s not just the characters, it’s the situations, and the way the characters react to things.” – By Matthew K. Jensen

Photos by Jennifer Meyers/Herald Journal

From left to right: Jayme Warner, 16, right, and Jessica Lewis, 14, perform lines from William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” at Logan Arthouse Wednesday. Sam Anderson and Jessica Lewis practice lines for the play that ends this weekend. Jessica Lewis, 14, left, and Jayme Warner, 16, act out a scene from “The Tempest.” Amy Jackson-Smith applies makeup to Daniel Anderson.


TAKING ON ‘THE TEMPEST’ VALLEY YOUTH LEARN TO UNDERSTAND AND ACT OUT SHAKESPEARE

“The Tempest” remaining performances are tonight at 7 p.m. and Saturday, June 4 at 2 p.m. at the Logan Arthouse and Cinema, 795 N. Main St. in Logan. Cost is $5 for adults and $3 for kids. No children under 5 please.

D

on’t tell a kid William Shakespeare’s treatment of the human condition is too much for him to comprehend. Logan Youth Shakespeare founder and director Mary Jackson-Smith says the youth actors in her troupe are finding ways to connect with characters hundreds of years in the making, and can often do a better job at sharing Shakespeare’s stories compared to adult performers. Wrapping up their final two performances of “The Tempest” today and Saturday, the Logan Youth Shakespeare players got a chance to stage one of Shakespeare’s most intricate plays — uncut, and in the original 400-year-old prose. “There’s nothing quite like this in the valley for kids who really want a challenge,” said Jackson-Smith. “The kids can do it and I think it’s important to know we’re not dumbing things down for them.” The Logan Youth Shakespeare, or LYS, players didn’t audition for their parts, nor

are they cast based on gender or age. The 27 actors aged 9 to 19 — so many, that the show has three different casts — simply showed up and agreed to the months-long commitment to produce the play. To help them learn and understand their parts, Jackson-Smith produces audio training CDs for each member of the cast. “The key to Shakespeare is the actor has to know every single thing they’re saying, not just how to say the words but they need to know the meaning of the words,” she explained. “Otherwise the audience has no hope of knowing what it means.” The cast has been together since February, memorizing lines, developing their characters and learning from their peers who play the same parts. Jackson-Smith says the actors don’t mind tackling more complex plays because difficult subject matter, she says, engages the actors and keeps them motivated. “They learn in different ways,” she said. “Some of them learn by looking at the page, and some of them learn by watching

the other kids do it, others learn by having a gesture to go with every line.” Jessica Lewis of Smithfield plays the parts of Miranda and Alanzo. The 14-yearold said learning the backstory of Miranda helped her understand how to portray the woman — the daughter of the protagonist. “She’s not like a normal Shakespearean female,” said Lewis. “She’s very unique and different. She’s lived on an island her whole life and grown up in a very different situation.” “The Tempest” is 16-year-old Jayme Warner’s second LYS production. She plays Prospero — a magician and wizard faced with the option to exact revenge on his enemies or grant them forgiveness. “The shipwreck brought Prospero’s enemies to the island where he hopes to seek revenge on his enemies for everything they’ve done to him,” she said. “In the end he ends up forgiving everyone.” Actor Sam Anderson, 15, of North Logan, says the theater is a place to make friends and have fun. The actors even

share lines with their castmates on Facebook and use theater as a social outlet. “Everyone just seems to get along,” he said. “It’s a place where I can tell people about myself and be open minded.” Jackson-Smith says she sees something new in each performance — something she attributes to the youth actors’ ability to fully understand the play and be comfortable with it. “I think the kids have a blast doing this and a lot of times they have no idea what they’re taking from it,” she said. “This is a supportive place for them. It’s noncompetitive and an opportunity for them to delve into the best art we have in our language. “Shakespeare gives us these characters that are absolutely timeless. These kids are finding connections to even the most obscure characters, and it’s not just the characters, it’s the situations, and the way the characters react to things.” – By Matthew K. Jensen

Photos by Jennifer Meyers/Herald Journal

From left to right: Jayme Warner, 16, right, and Jessica Lewis, 14, perform lines from William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” at Logan Arthouse Wednesday. Sam Anderson and Jessica Lewis practice lines for the play that ends this weekend. Jessica Lewis, 14, left, and Jayme Warner, 16, act out a scene from “The Tempest.” Amy Jackson-Smith applies makeup to Daniel Anderson.


Page 10 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 3, 2011

The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board “Upon My Horse’s Back” by Chris Mortensen I walked into the auction barn, my expectations high I got a number, took a seat, and wondered if I’d buy I’d spent some time before the sale, all during the preview Compiling notes, comparing mounts, I’d narrowed it to two A big and strong young lineback dun had spirit, speed and flash The tobiano bay paint colt seemed worthy of my cash The sale began, the gavel fell, the first horse soon was bought For twenty-seven-hundred, man, it sure seemed like a lot The lineback dun was fifth in line, he sold for seven grand I hung my head and wondered how much more that I could stand I knew the paint was kinda green, and just a three year old But had a stellar pedigree, and soon he would be sold Someone who had deeper pockets was sure to outbid me I knew well what my limit was; I’d have to wait and see But one thing in my favor that I hoped would work out fine Was that the bay paint gelding wore the number twenty nine My thinking was that most of the big spenders would be gone And maybe I could really get what I was bidding on He pranced into the ring and all the cowboys turned to look A real eye-catcher, better than the picture in the book

With perfect composition, and, the way he held his head Was proud and strong, with soft kind eye, and flawlessly well bred The bidding started at a grand, and quickly raised up higher My hand went up repeatedly, so did another buyer’s And then I had an unforeseen occurence of sheer luck The beautiful paint gelding changed his trot into a buck The other buyer chickened out, he sat on his right hand I bought a green young buckin’ horse for just under two grand I took him home and tried to ride him each and every day We had some disagreements and some stress along the way But soon I had a partner who would rarely give me flack And I loved every moment spent upon my horse’s back We scouted alpine basins, far above the summer heat Finding all the secret places big muley bucks retreat Fall would come and sometimes there were fresh elk quarters to pack Tied up in the saddle panniers upon my horse’s back Sometimes there were cattle to push; we’d go and ride with Jay And play the role of cowboy from a distant bygone day And herd the dogies through the sage and up the quakie draws Or just take in the scenery when on a ridge we’d pause

GET YOUR STUFF PUBLISHED! The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board is a place for our local community to share, well ... anything! From short stories to poems to recipes to photos to unique tips when it comes to rearranging your closet, Cache Magazine wants your stuff! Send it all to mnewbold@hjnews.com, or mail it to Cache Magazine, 75 W. 300 North, Logan, UT 84321. We’ll be waiting!

He packed me through the Wind Rivers; adventure at it’s best And sky-high in the Uintas, up almost to their crest He’d drag a dry old fallen log to feed our nightly fire He’s always willing to go on, he never seems to tire He doesn’t mind it when some pals of mine he gets to pack And they too loved the time they spent upon my horse’s back Now, at twenty, he will stand still while grandkids climb aboard And walk real slow in the round pen; he’s patient, never bored I still can always trust his calm when we’re in a tight spot And he trusts me, a welcome change from other nags I’ve fought And sometimes I think of that day, and of the bid I won And can’t help wonder how it might have turned out, with the dun There’s no use dwelling on the past, considering what-if’s It’s better to be thankful for life’s never-ending gifts Of all the memories that I own, and I’ve got quite a stack It seems the very best were made upon my horse’s back

Logan” n i e m i t g n i “Spr ohapatra M . P u h b a r by P y Cache valle g comes to r n te ri in sp w n y e w h o W dy and sn u o cl y g sk n e lo lu a After erfect b ater bright in a p Sun shines melts down to chilled w w o sn e And th . er is born .. s ... Logan Riv Canyon over the rock Juniper h d g n u a ro d o th o s Flow ottonw by Willow, C ow trout Shadowed arkling rainb ater ... Filled with sp ir luck in knee deep w e th y Anglers tr


Here’s hoping spring has finally sprung

Clockwise from left: Wellsville mountains by Helen Bee; Logan LDS Temple by Chris Eyres; sunny day at Green Canyon by David Bee; Green Canyon by David Bee; heading south by Melissa Youngberg.

Want to get in on the action? Send your photos to mnewbold@hjnews.com. Also, follow Cache Magazine on Facebook for theme photo submissions like these!


Page 12 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 3, 2011

USU invites community to read novel together tah State University U extends an invitation to the Cache Valley community to partici-

pate in the 2011 Common Literature Experience. This year’s selection is “Zeitoun” by Dave Eggers. The book tells the true story of a New Orleans man who decides not to evacuate during Hurricane Katrina, and instead watches over his business and helps where he can. “The university and local community will find much to discuss from the book,” said Noelle Call, director of USU’s Office of Retention and Student Success. “There are strong themes about identity and perspective, how we see ourselves and others, how our impressions of another can affect his or her identity and how our identity can change over time.” For eight consecutive years, the USU common literature book selections have given readers the opportunity to expand their knowledge of cultures and philosophies that might differ from their own. The community is also invited to attend the Connections Convocation which is held in conjunction with the Common Literature Experience. Pulitzer Prize winner Chris Rose of

the New Orleans Times-Picayune will reflect on “Zeitoun” and postKatrina New Orleans at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 27. Rose was part of the Times-Picayune team that won the 2006 Public Service Pulitzer for their Hurricane Katrina coverage. “Zeitoun” is available at the USU Bookstore. More information is online (www.usu.edu/connections/ literatureexperience). 

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‘Fire and Rain’ detailed account of year of music By Michelle Wiener For The Associated Press

music histories. As the account of a single year in music, Browne weaves the narratives of four bands and artists who each released an album of lasting influence in 1970: The Beatles’ “Let It Be”; Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young’s “Deja Vu”; James Taylor’s “Sweet Baby James”; and my favorite, Simon and Garfunkel’s “Bridge Over Troubled Water.” What emerges is a scrutiny of a significant year of transition — the ‘60s counterculture

is rapidly receding in the coun- course of a single year. Bands try’s rearview mirror, that are fighting in February the singer-songwriter are still fighting in November, focus of the ‘70s has and over pretty much the same he first album I fell yet to take hold — things. But the nuanced account in love with was Simon that holds its own of the struggles inherent in and Garfunkel’s “Bridge Over against any other making music is more than Troubled Water.” I was about 7 year in terms of its enough to satisfy, as are the years old; the album had been dramatic tensions delightful surprise connections out for eight years. and creative outand asides scattered throughout I didn’t know it would be put, not to mention the book. their last album, and I wouldn’t increasingly trauBrowne’s detailing of Simon have cared. Only the music matic national events mattered to me. It would be like the shootings at much later that I would acquire Kent State Univeran interest in musicians as actusity and the governal people with actual lives and ment’s response to a turn to journalists and chroniseries of bombings clers to tell me their stories. perpetrated by radical fringe David Browne’s “Fire and anti-war groups. Rain: The Beatles, Simon The one problem with orga& Garfunkel, James Taylor, nizing such a detailed account CSNY, and the Lost Story of By The Associated Press is there tends not to be extreme 1970” is a worthy addition to personal changes over the anyone’s collection of such nybody can write a memoir. Everyone has a story, after all. But would you write one that makes you look bad? Steve Friedman does just that in his new book, “Lost on HARDCOVER FICTION Treasure Island: A 1. “Dead Reckoning,” by Charlaine Harris Memoir of Long2. “10th Anniversary,” by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro ing, Love, and 3. “Buried Prey,” by John Sandford Lousy Choices 4. “The Jefferson Key,” by Steve Berry in New York 5. “The Sixth Man,” by David Baldacci City.” Raised in the Midwest, the HARDCOVER NONFICTION memoir begins 1. “In the Garden of Beasts,” by Erik Larson when he’s already 2. “Does the Noise in My Head Bother You?” by Steven Tyler an adult and mov3. “Lies that Chelsea Handler Told Me,” by Chelsea Handler, ing to Manhattan Glen Handler, Roy Handler and others for an editing 4. “Seal Team Six,” by Howard E. Wasdin and Stephen Templin job at GQ. What Keep your reading list updated 5. “Bossypants,” by Tina Fey follows is an at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/ often funny but PAPERBACK TRADE FICTION always depress1. “The Help,” by Kathryn Stockett ing chronicle of 2. “Water for Elephants,” by Sara Gruen his efforts to find 3. “Room,” by Emma Donoghue “Mrs. F.” Nothing 4. “Cutting for Stone,” by Abraham Verghese seems beneath him. He sleeps 5. “Something Borrowed” by Emily Giffin with the “high-heeled, silkyhaired public relations junior Hardcover Advice & Misc. powerhouses” who want their 1. “The Dukan Diet,” by Pierre Dukan product mentioned in the mag2. “The 17 Day Diet,” by Mike Moreno azine. He’s a willing partner 3. “Love Wins,” by Rob Bell with adulterers, and he attends 4. “A Place of Yes,” by Bethenny Frankel “meetings” (Alcoholics 5. “20 Years Younger,” by Bob Greene with Howard Lancer, Anonymous, perhaps, though Ronald L. Kotler and Diane L. McKay he never offers specifics) all

T

* This week’s New York Times Best-seller List *

and Garfunkel’s dissolution is poignant, and while the sections about CSNY verge on tabloid gossip, I couldn’t help but be riveted by the account of this group of immensely talented people who also, when they weren’t at each other’s throats, seemed like they’d be cool to hang out with. And that’s basically why we read books about musicians, right?

‘Treasure Island’ not worth finding

A

around town to pick up women when they’re vulnerable. To be fair, Friedman does learn a thing or two along the way — like how to score free adventure trips, workouts and cruises all in the interest of filling magazine pages. He seems to have a productive relationship with his therapist, whom he manages never to sleep with and who runs a fortunetelling business on the side (he refers to her as “Psychic Rose”). But he never lets himself get too introspective. Moments of clarity or insight are mentioned or hinted at but soon give way to the next “lousy choice” in the book’s title. Perhaps he thought it would make for a lousy read if he bared too much of his soul. What we get instead is a memoir filled with funny characters and anecdotes that leaves us wondering what the writer learned about life along the way.

Page 13 - The Herald Journal, Logan,

Books


Page 14 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 3, 2011

Answers from last week

Calendar Friday Acoustic performing artists Kinnen Hawes and Brett Mathews will perform live Friday, June 3, at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza. Kinnen will play starting at 6 p.m. and Brett will follow at 7. There is no cover charge. Pier 49 is located on 1200 South, across the street north of Maceys, near Stadium 8. Logan’s classic co-ed softball tournament will be held June 3 and 4 at the Willow Park Sports Complex, 500 W. 700 South in Logan. Contact

Dan Blakely at 716-9247 or Larry Jacobsen at 752-3631 for more information. A lecture by Dr. C. Fergus Lowe, Bangor University, Wales, on changing children’s eating habits will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Friday, June 3, at 650 USTAR building, Innovation Campus. Dr. Lowe is the co-creator of the Food Dudes program — an empirically supported healthy eating program used in more than 1,000 primary schools in Europe. Food Dudes is recognized by the World Health Organization and was the 2010 recipient of

Crossword

the Royal College of Physicians’ Gold Medal Award. Stokes Nature Center invites curious toddlers, ages 2-3, to join them for Parent Tot from 10 to 11 a.m. on Friday, June 3. Explore animals, plants and nature through music, crafts and games. This program is parent interactive, and all toddlers must have a parent present to participate and explore along with their child. The program fee is $3 ($2.50 for SNC members). For more info, call 435-755-3239 or visit www.logannature.org.

www.ThemeCrosswords.com

By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Strikes 6. Conclusion starter 10. New Deal proj. 13. Overshadow 18. High-tech blower 20. Mail Boxes ___ 21. Hardly Mr. Nice Guy 22. “___Nest” (Kesey novel) 25. Loyal, in Scotland 26. Poi source 27. Egyptian deity 28. Grub 29. Ship deck 31. Charles or Romano 32. Jerk 33. Recipe abbr. 35. Like some candy bars 37. Place to be picked up? 39. ___ Buayan, city in the Philippines 44. Kind of wheel 47. Notes after dos 48. “The ___ Eunuch,” Greer tome 51. Llama relative 52. Container leakage during shipment 54. News source 55. Clothes, in the Bible 57. “The Lady with the Lamp” 61. Rips along 62. Alfresco 63. Head 64. Obsessed with 65. Dilettantish 66. O’Reilly of M*A*S*H* 68. Brought into play 72. Neuter

74. Earthshaking? 76. Budget rival 77. Be organized 80. Dessert wine 82. Logan postings 83. Has coming 84. Silvery white 85. Schwarzenegger film 88. Mayan language 89. Bishop’s jurisdiction 90. Hollow rock 91. Crime fiction writer Johansen 92. “The Unknown ___” of ‘70s TV 94. Pinch 96. Sp. simoleon 98. Didn’t straphang 99. Ann ___, Mich. 103. A shot 107. ___ maid 109. Plagiarize 111. “___ For Going,” Joni Mitchell tune 112. Prepared to exploit 116. Him or her enders 117. Kan. neighbor 118. Mingled with others 119. Ethyl acetate, e.g. 120. Online magazine 121. British cape 122. Speed ___ Down 1. Convex molding 2. One who goes for the gold? 3. Standard 4. Non-stick material 5. Light source 6. Frustrates 7. Victory cheer

8. Representative 9. Franco-Spanish botanist 10. Greek wine 11. Aboveboard 12. Maple genus 13. Datebook abbr. 14. Vigil 15. Dwarf buffalo 16. Funny one 17. Own (up) 19. “___ Sounds” (Beach Boy title) 21. Disorder 23. Break down 24. Ticket 30. Rids of impurities 34. ___ therapy 36. High-schooler 38. Persian spirit 40. Lifeless, probably 41. 6, written out 42. Fire ___ 43. Undergoes 44. Civilian clothes 45. Wrench type 46. Be a bad winner 48. Adroitness 49. Mythological monsters 50. Prefix with store 51. Energy 53. Claimed 54. Broke down 56. Historical records 58. Separate, in a way 59. Fuzzy 60. Mine transport 65. It may be red 67. East Indian trees 69. Agra attire 70. Play too broadly 71. Sop

73. Made square 75. March time 76. Opposite of 51-Down 77. Justice Black 78. Literary adverb 79. Prayer leader 80. Hollywood org. 81. Live and breathe 86. Came of age? 87. Type of herb

88. They may be ulterior 91. Footnote note 92. Weight units 93. Expedient 95. Saloon selections 97. “Gimme ___!” (start of an Iowa State cheer) 98. Public spat 100. Kind of force 101. Fairy tale baddies 102. Swamp plants

103. To be, in old Rome 104. Terrifies 105. Farm newborn 106. English Channel resort 108. Trattoria order 110. Sticker 113. See 103-Across 114. Certain connections 115. Anita Brookner’s “Hotel du ___”


Saturday

Jazz electric guitar artist Linden Olson will perform at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza at 6 p.m. He will be followed by acoustic singer and guitarist Tyson Oswald at 7. Everyone is invited. No cover charge. Celebrate Providence this Saturday, June 4, at Zollinger Park. There will be a Fun Run (5K at 8 a.m. 1-mile at 9 a.m.) with registration beginning at 7 p.m. A motorcycle parade and show will be at 1:30 p.m. Registration is at 12:30 p.m. Cost is $15. A kids bike parade will begin at 2 p.m. Youth Council will run carnival games, inflatables and a rock climbing wall from 1:30 to 7:30 p.m. Cost is $5 for an all-day pass for games and rides. Vendor booths will be open from 1 to 7 p.m. Wolverines vs. Aggies baseball game will be at 4 p.m. A concert with the Simmons Brothers will be at 7 p.m. The movie “Yogi Bear” will be featured at 8:45 p.m. or when it gets dark. Richmond Harvest Market opens Saturday, June 4, at Rockhill Creamery with farm fresh produce, eggs, cheese, bread and much more. The season opener will feature the Dry Lake Band and Jack’s Woodfired Oven. Amano Chocolate, Bees Brothers Honey, Crumb Brothers Artisan Bread, Buncher’s Bunches jams as well as local artists all have items available for sale inside the farm stand at Rockhill Creamery. Anyone interested in selling or performing at the market should visit Richmond City’s website

(www.richmond-city.com) for contact information, guidelines and applications. The market will be open every Saturday through Oct. 15 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Located at 563 S. State Street.

day, June 4, to raise money for tournament fees. The car wash will be held at Master Mechanic in Providence (142 N. Spring Creek Parkway) from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Donations will be accepted.

Bridgerland Literacy will be having a garage sale Saturday, June 4, from 7 a.m to 3 p.m. at the Baugh Motel, 153 S. Main Street, Logan. We would love to take your donations for the event (call us 208-339-5549 or 435-245-2151) and we will arrange pickup. You can also drop off items to the BATC parking lot at 600 W. 1400 North on June 2 or 3 between 5 p.m. and 9 p.m. Or, bring them to the Baugh Motel the morning of the event and enjoy donuts while you shop.

Sunday

The Plymouth Queen contest will be held Saturday, June 4, at Plymouth’s rodeo arena.. Sign up at 10 a.m. The contest starts at 11. Age divisions are 14 and up for queen, 9 to 13 for junior queen and 8 and under for sweetheart. Contact Kellie (435)279-4759 or Jamie (435)230-5024 for rules, patterns and more information. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will participate in free fishing day at Willow Park from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Contact Carey Hendricks at carey@ cgadventures.org or call 435713-0288 for more details. Logan’s outdoor doubles volleyball tournament (men’s/ women’s) will be held Saturday, June 4, at Willow Park, 500 W. 700 South in Logan. Contact Jodi Coats at 716-9250 or Dan Blakely at 716-9247 for more information. Volunteers are being sought to help with cleanup and maintenance at Ryan’s Park Place in River Heights from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 4. The group will be adding new fiber mulch to the playground, painting and other work. Volunteers are invited to bring wheelbarrows and rakes. The STORM girls soccer team is hosting a car wash Satur-

Cache Symphony Orchestra announces the first of three summer pops concerts Sunday, June 5. The concert will be held at 7 p.m. in the Kent Concert Hall in the Chase Fine Arts Center on the USU campus. Other concerts in the series will be held in the same venue and at the same time June 19 and July 3. Admission is free. Music Director Robert Frost will lead the orchestra in a program of light classics, Broadway tunes and popular songs.

Monday The schedule for this week at Hyrum Senior Center is as follows: Monday, Fit Over 60 at 10 a.m., pinochle at 12:30 p.m.; Tuesday, chair yoga at 10:30 a.m., Bunco and cards at 12:30 p.m.; Wednesday, Jason will be back to entertain us at 12:30 p.m.; Thursday, chair yoga at 10:30 a.m.; Friday, Bingo at 12:30 p.m. We are open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Please call 2453570 before 10 a.m. to reserve a place for lunch. Remember our “Guys are Great Party” with singer Kelly Warren from Ogden on June 15 at 10 a.m. Everyone is invited. Common Ground will hold a canoeing activity on Monday, June 6, from 4 to 6 p.m. Meet at Common Ground, 335 N. 100 East in Logan. Cost is $3. A Jaycee Carroll basketball camp will be held Monday, June 6, at the Sports Academy and Racquet Club. Cost is $60. Each player will receive a comprehensive daily shooting workout, shootking keys, a T-shirt, prizes and personal basketball instruction. Call 753-7500 for more information.

Tuesday House Speaker Becky Lockhart will address the Cache Republican Women on Tuesday, June 7, at noon at Hamiltons Restaurant. Give reservations to Karen Petersen 435-245-6801. Lunch is $12. The Cache Carvers Woodcarving Club will meet Tuesday, June 7, at 7 p.m. in the Senior Citizen Center located at 236 N. 100 East in Logan. The public is invited. Contact Roger Lincoln at 435-563-6032 for information. The UFO Opera Guild will hold their kick-off meeting for Summer Citizens and all other guild members Tuesday, June 7, at 7:30 p.m. at the Dansante Building. Membership applications will be available for new members. All are invited to join in the guild activities and serving in the UFO opera guild boutique. For more information call Kurt Smith at 752-4526. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will hold a rock climbing activity at the Rock Haus on Tuesday, June 7. from 1 to 3 p.m. Cost is $8. We will also have our Green River pretrip planning meeting the same night at 5 p.m. Elaine from Macey’s deli will share an Alfredo lasagna recipe with us at a free cooking and community class at Macey’s Little Theater on Tuesday, June 7, from 7 to 8 p.m. Seating is limited. To reserve a spot visit the service desk or call 7533301.

Wednesday Local easy listening group “City Heat,” featuring Bill Gabriel on guitar, performs each Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza, located on 1200 South across the street north of Maceys. Everyone is welcome. Scott Bradley will teach a free Constitution Class, “To Preserve the Nation,” on Wednesday, June 8, at 7 p.m. at

the Book Table (upstairs). For more information call 753-2930 or 753-8844. Come learn how to store your important files (data, information, photos, etc.) on the Internet at a cloud computing class held Wednesday, June 8 from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the tabernacle. Pay sites and free sites will be discussed. Limited seating. For a priority seat call 755-5594. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will hold a cycling activity Wednesday, June 8, from 4 to 6 p.m. Meet at Common Ground, 335 N. 100 East, Logan, and we will do a great ride in Petersboro. Cost is $8. Come Join the Women’s Council of Realtors and The United Way for their second annual Eat and Retreat Fundraiser event. It will be held on June 8 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at a beautiful 8000 sq. ft. home, 1580 N. 1200 East, North Logan. Come and enjoy a light lunch with shopping and pampering of all kinds. Tickets can be purchased at the door or call Lanis at 435-770-8605. OPTIONS for Independence will hold a barbecue in Logan Canyon on Wednesday, June 8, from 5 to 6 p.m. Cost is a $2 food donation and $2 for transportation. OPTIONS serves people with disabilities. Come out and enjoy one of our activities. RSVP to Manid at 7535353.

Thursday Learn how to create a video of yourself, friend or loved one to share with family members and future generations at an oral history class Thursday, June 9, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the tabernacle. We will look at preparing for the video, listing questions and topics to be explored, some important do’s and don’t’s, as well as different types of recordings. We will also look at the recording studio at the Logan Family History Center that is available for your use. Limited seating. For a priority seat call 755-5594.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 3, 2011

Heritage Theatre’s “The Unsinkable Molly Brown” will play at Heritage Theatre, 2505 S. Hwy 89, Perry. The show is directed by Dee Pace and runs June 3 to 25 on Mondays, Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m.; matinees will be June 11 and June 18 at 2 p.m. Adults are $9 and seniors and children are $8. Call for reservations Monday, or Wednesday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 723-8392.


Page 16 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, June 3, 2011

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Delicious Food at Reasonable Prices

Charbroiled Gourmet Burgers • Gyros • Souvlaki BBQ Pork • Kababs •Calamari Salads Seafood Dinners • Falafel coupon

$1.00 oFF ANy coMbo MeAL Not valid with any other offer. coupon

Teriyaki Swiss Burger (with fries & soda) Only $4.99 coupon

Grilled Lemon & Chicken Sandwich (with salad & soda) Only $5.99 coupon

Fish n Chips Dinner

(with salad, fries & garlic toast) Only $6.99

Offer Expires 6/10/11 • Must Present Coupon • Limit 4

1085 North Main, Suite 130, Logan

435-752-1215 • Mon-Sat 10:30-7:00pm

Cache Valley’s favorite for over 20 years! NOW Serving Frozen Yogurt With Probiotics Mon-Thurs: 11AM - 11PM

Fri-Sat: 11AM - 12 MIDNIGHT 1219 North Main • Logan 753-4355

For information about advertising on this page please call Danalin Preece at 792-7263 Monday – Friday 9:00 am – 1:00 pm


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