Page 1

Cache Magazine

The Herald Journal

MAY 25-31, 2012


contents

May 25-31, 2012

ART 3 Kristi Grussendorf’s art on display until Tuesday

10 Summerfest coming up in June

theater 5 ‘A Comedy of Errors’

takes stage at the Arthouse

PROFILE 5 Meet Todd Milovich

MOVIES 7 ‘Men in Black 3’ better than expected

MISC. 4 First-ever Culture Fest to take place at Willow Park

4 USU museum looks at natural disasters

COLUMN 10 Dennis Hinkamp’s dog returns with commonly asked questions

CROSSWORD 14 Can you complete this week’s puzzle?

CALENDAR 15 See what’s happening this week

Herald Journal reader Randy Christian Lee took this photo in Smithfield on Sunday, bringing the camera back to show the contrast of the bright sky and the viewing glass. On the cover: Sa Saengthongaram created a self portrait for an end-of-year art project assigned by Michael Bingham at Mountain Crest High School.

FROM THE EDITOR

T

he necklace I wear the most has a sterling silver pendant dangling from a simple silver chain. The word peace is inscribed on one side of the circular pendant, and imagine is inscribed on the other. My mom purchased the necklace a few years ago in California and it quickly became my favorite thing to wear. In its simplicity, the necklace matches everything I own and I usually have it fastened around my neck at least once a week or more. Every time I put it on, I decide which message I want to represent that day, or

which one I need the most. Some days I could use a little more peace in my life, and other days I want to remember to share it with others. I also like remembering to imagine, because with imagination, anything is possible from art, to music, to climbing Mount Everest. Before anything becomes a reality, someone has to imagine it first. Throughout history, we’ve had wonderful examples of people with imagination. Dr. Seuss imagined a cat in a hat, the Lorax and Whoville, colorful characters and places we’re all familiar with. Eric Carle created a very hungry caterpillar and a brown bear who told us what he saw. These images of watercolor animals are still clear in my head.

Beethoven wrote beautiful, timeless and complicated symphonies even though he was deaf. The Beatles changed music in America. Helen Keller was the first deaf and blind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree in American and went on to become a prolific writer. Some of the people with the best imaginations went through a great deal of hardship. Perhaps their afflictions are what taught them to dream. At Mountain Crest High School, art students shared some of what they imagine and why they believe creativity is important in schools. See what they came up with on page 8. — Manette Newbold


Local artist on display at gallery The watercolors of Kristi Grussendorf are on display through May 29 at the Logan Fine Art Gallery, 60 W. 100 North. Grussendorf lives in North Logan with her husband Jon and their golden retriever (both appearing often in her watercolors). Grussendorf was encouraged by her mother who studied art and art education. She was fortunate to grow up in a very creative environment. She received her BFA (with some post graduate studies) from the University of Utah with an emphasis in drawing and painting and was especially influenced by Doug Snow, Paul Davis, Dave Dornan, Ed Maryon and George Dibble. Her focus was the figure and she keeps her drawing skills current with continued weekly model sessions. Before moving to Cache Valley, Grussendorf was employed by Waterford School in Sandy as an art specialist. Although no longer teaching full time, long-term opportunities have presented themselves at Edith Bowen Laboratory School on the Utah State University campus and she is on the teaching roster for the Utah Arts Council. Grussendorf is a signature member of the Utah Watercolor Society and serves on the state board as the chair of membership. She teaches workshops and does presentations for both students and teachers and has been given the opportunity to be a juror/judge. She has won numerous state and national awards;

“Look at anybody in history who’s done anything useful, cured a disease or solved any sort of problem. And you look at each story individually, you see that imagination always plays a big part.” – Michael Bingham, Mountain Crest High School art teacher

PET OF THE WEEK Available for adoption

Pet: Chloe From: Cache Humane Society Why she’s so lovable:

last year her “Red Rock Reverie” piece received Best of Show in the 26th annual Watercolor Wyoming National Exhibition,

and the same piece was included in Watercolor Artist magazine’s “The Year’s Best Paintings” article in February 2012.

Grussendorf continues to take workshops from the masters in her field, believing in lifelong learning and striving for excellence.

Chloe is a best friend waiting to happen. She’s very interested in people and will follow her owners around the house keeping them company. She’s ready for petting at any time. She has short fur that should be easy to groom. Chloe is only 1 year old, she is adaptable and should do well in just about any family situation.

Page 3 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 25, 2012

ALL MIXED UP

Quotable


Page 4 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 25, 2012

all mixed up Culture Fest to provide family fun at Willow Park The Multicultural Center will host the first Culture Fest; a family friendly event to be held from 12 to 9 p.m. Saturday, May 26, at Willow Park in Logan. The event was planned to provide a venue for the culture and diversity found in Cache Valley and the state of Utah. The Culture Fest will host a variety of performers ranging from Irish Dancers, Mexican Folklore and many other cultural surprises.

The event will also have a children’s game and craft area, various food booths, representation from the non-profit sector, Luchadores from Salt Lake City and plenty of music. The event will provide plenty of fun for the entire family. For more information, contact Norma at 753-8486 or norma@mccutah.org. The Multicultural Center is a non-sectarian, non-denominational institution founded in 1994 in Logan.

Learn about natural disasters and human impacts at USU Natural disasters and how humans affect the environment are the topics of the next “Saturdays at the Museum” activity at Utah State University. The museum invites everyone to learn how, as humans, we affect the environment. Tips for adjusting to natural disasters are also offered at the May 26 activities. Throughout the day, the museum will host members of the U.S. Forest Service, as well as representatives from USU’s Outdoor Recreation Program, who will offer insights on the

impact humans can have on the natural areas in Cache Valley. They will also provide information about minimizing the human impact on the world. Many people are unprepared for natural disasters, and do not know what steps to take to prepare for such events, program organizers said. During Saturday’s activities, visitors can learn about natural disasters that could occur in our area and how to respond and react when they occur. Visitors will also learn what basic items should be included in a survival

kit. A number of survival skills will be outlined. In addition to the Saturday activity series, community members and USU students alike can visit the museum during its operating hours, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. Funding for the Saturday events is provided by a grant from the United States Institute of Museum and Library Services. More information about the IMLS is available at www.imls.gov. The USU Museum of Anthropology

is on the USU campus in the south turret of the historic Old Main building, Room 252. Admission is free. For Saturday activities, free parking is available in the adjacent lot, south of the building. For more information about museum events, call museum staff at 435-7977545 or visit the museum website anthromuseum.usu.edu. The Museum of Anthropology is part of the anthropology program at USU in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.


F

or Todd Milovich, playing the guitar isn’t just about making music. As a guitar teacher and mentor to students in the valley, he hopes to not only help create more guitar players, but musicians who connect with their communities. Several of his former students form Uncommon Collective, a group of musicians who perform benefit concerts and work with kids in elementary, middle and high schools. He also works in education outreach for USU which provides after-school clubs in local schools. Looking ahead, Milovich says he has plenty more ideas and is proud to work with talented people in the valley. • Originally from Price, Utah, Milovich began playing guitar in elementary school. His teacher would often take him to bars where they would perform polka songs together. • He earned his degree at Utah State University in guitar performance. From there, he moved to California and began taking lessons from well-known guitar teacher, Duke Miller. • “(Duke Miller) kind of formed the basis of my future. He was a really holistic kind of teacher. He was more about creating good people as much as good guitar players.” • Milovich currently teaches about 25 guitar students. • With Uncommon Collective, Milovich plans several fundraisers each year. In its 12th year, the group’s Smile on Your Brother fundraiser earned funds for students who couldn’t pay ACT fees, admissions applications fees or graduation cap and gown fees. • This year he and a group of students from Logan High School and Fast Forward put on a Speak Easy to raise money for the cancer support group at Logan Regional Hospital. • “Through music, you can do so many things. You can connect to so many people. You can contribute to your community, you can give people a place to be and belong and all these many million things you can do with music as opposed to just being a great musician.” • Milovich also works with the America Reads program in the valley. He currently has 125 USU students working as mentors and tutors in 22 schools. They help students with homework for one hour after school, then provide an hour-long activity. More than 1,000 local kids are served each day with this program.

• This summer, Milovich and his students hope to offer drumming, yoga, pilates, meditation, belly dancing and activities for children every Tuesday evening at Willow Park. He says they’re getting a permit right now. Once that is finalized, he’ll start a Facebook page where the public can get more information. • As for the future, Milovich plans to stick around and expand the programs he’s involved with. • “There’s so much talent and so many creative people and so much possibility for some really cool community things to happen. It just takes people to push them forward.”

Text by Manette Newbold Photo by Jennifer Meyers

• On Saturday, Milovich and students from Logan High and Fast Forward will perform from 1 to 4 p.m. at Citrus and Sage as part of a fundraiser for Stokes Nature Center. Families are invited to listen to music and make kids crafts. For more information about Uncommon Collective and other various programs Milovich is involved with, email todd.milovich@usu.edu.

Emma Wardle as Nell, Ember Bradbury as Dromio of Syracuse, and Ru Wood as Antipholus of Ephesus perform in Logan Youth Shakespeare’s production of “A Comedy of Errors.”

‘A Comedy of Errors’ opens tonight at Logan Arthouse Antipholus and his servant Dromio long to find their lost identical twin brothers, from whom they were separated at birth. In a classic case of “be careful what you wish for,” mishaps pile up and confusion ensues when they land in the wild town of Ephesus. Three different casts of energetic Logan Youth Shakespeare actors proudly present “A Comedy of Errors,” Shakespeare’s lightning-fast zany romp, at 7 p.m. Friday, May 25, Monday, May 28, and Friday, June 1 at the Logan Arthouse and Cinema, 795 N. Main St. Matinees will be at 1 p.m. Saturday, May 26, Monday, May 28, and Saturday, June 2. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for children and will be available at the door. No children under 5 will be admitted.

Cache Humane Society offering camps and more • Adopt a cat from the Cache Humane Society during the month of May and get a second one free. Alteration fees not included. • Cache Humane Society is having a spring fling from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 26, at Logan Pointe Apartments, 1320 N. 200 East. Come for animal fun, games and food. •Off Leash Youth Camps begin in June. Register at cachehumane.org. Three different camps are available for kids.

• Cache Humane Society will hold May Spay Day on Wednesday, May 30. Cost is $25 for cats and $45 for dogs up to 75 pounds ($1 extra per pound after that). Space is limited. Go to cachehumane.org to print off a coupon. • Cache Humane Society is getting ready for its Neuter-Mania on June 6. Cost is $25 for cats and $40 for dogs up to 75 pounds ($1 extra per pound after that). Space is limited. Go to cachehumane.org to print off a coupon.

Page 5 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 25, 2012

Meet TODD


Page 6 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 25,

movies If only the entire movie had focused on the dad's group and didn't just drop in on them a handful of times, we might have been onto something here. Chris Rock, Thomas Lennon and Rob Huebel are among the dudes who meet regularly to push their kids in trickedout strollers, tote them in high-end carriers and talk guy stuff in a confidential setting away from the wives. Their no-nonsense banter livens up what is a rather predictable and cliched depiction of pregnancy. A likable, good-looking cast of popular actors can only do so much with material that's superficial and sitcommy. This is "inspired by" the advice book of the same name, one that every single pregnant woman on the planet surely has read since its initial publication in 1985. But similar to 2009's "He's Just Not That Into You," director Kirk Jones' film merely uses the title of a familiar non-fiction book as a leaping-off point to explore

Reviews by The Associated Press

★★ ‘What to Expect When You’re Expecting’ Director // Kirk Jones Starring // Cameron Diaz, Matthew Morrison and J. Todd Smith Rated // PG-13 for crude and sexual content, thematic elements and language various relationships, ostensibly for hilarious comic effect. More often, we get the kind of contrived, unbelievable wackiness that breaks out when all the pregnant women whose stories we've been following just happen to give birth Lionsgate at the same hospital on the same night. Matthew Morrison, left, and Cameron Diaz are shown in a scene from “What to Expect When 110 minutes. You’re Expecting.”

Taylor and YAMAHA

presents:

Songwriting Competition

GUITARS

SIGN UP FOR FREE!

Come into the store to sign up before May 19th. Be sure to get a list of the contest rules!

$25 OFF

Round 1: Saturday May 12 @ 1:00PM

First Group. Store-wide/all-day Electric Guitar and Amp Sale!

Any guitar $150 to $200

Round 2: Saturday May 19 @ 1:00PM

Second Group. Store-wide/all-day Free steel restring day (excluding floyd rose, one guitar restring per person) and all accessories on sale! (Planet Waves, Pro Mark, Evans.)

$50 OFF

Round 3: Monday May 28 @ 1:00PM

Finalists. Store-wide/all-day Outrageous Teton Sale day!

Any guitar over $200

PRIZES AND GIVEAWAYS 1st 2nd

3rd

•Free T-shirt for every contestant. •First place: STG100NT Teton acoustic guitar. •Second place: $100 KSM Gift Card. •Third place:$50 KSM Gift Card.

Held at KSM Music. Free to enter. Free to watch.

STG100NT

DOOR PRIZES, RAFFLES PRIZES, FREE GIVEAWAYS FOR EVERYONE! KSM MUSIC | 435.753.6813 | 50 WEST 400 NORTH LOGAN, UT | KSMMUSIC.COM

7 days ONLY!

YOUR FAMILY STORE 29 SOUTH MAIN ST.

Bring in Coupon for discount.


Page 7 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 25, 2012

‘Men in Black 3’ surprisingly enjoyable

“Men in Black 3” is everything you’d expect from an “MIB” movie, except unlike the second movie, this one is actually enjoyable. I admit being apprehensive to a third “MIB” simply because churning out sequels is the Hollywood summer go-to. In the summer of 2002, the sequel curse struck this franchise creating a painfully unfunny second film. Hence the tepid excitement I had where slight variations for this film. have huge consequencIt’s the year 2012, es. It’s a clever way Agent Jay (Will Smith) to deal with the time and Agent Kay (Tommy traveling paradoxes that Lee Jones) are still partarise. ners. They’re still savAbove all, “MIB 3” ing the world from alien is simply funny. Will invasions, escaped alien Smith spouts fast lines fugitives and even alien of clever dialogue withSony Pictures restaurant health code out overdoing it. After Tommy Lee Jones and Will Smith are shown in a scene from “Men in Black 3.” violations. They do the travesty of the seceverything and no one ond film, I didn’t have knows they do it. Lee Jones. It’s uncanny fun. The most enjoyable much hope for this one, This time the big badhow much Brolin looks part of the movie is a but it exceeded all of die is Boris the Animal like he could be Jones’ character named Grifmy expectations. You’ll (Jemaine Clement) who son. He’s even got fin (Michael Stuhlbarg) have fun with this one, Director // Barry Sonnenfeld is a Boglodite. The Jones’ cadence and way who is explained to the too. It’s a much more Starring // Will Smith, Tommy Lee Jones and Boglodites are all but of speaking down peraudience as being a enjoyable alien movie Josh Brolin extinct, but Boris has a fectly. fifth-dimensional being. than “Battleship” could Rated // PG-13 for sci-fi action violence and brief plan to right that little Even though “MIB He can see past, presever hope to be. suggestive violence wrong. After a daring 3” has an utterly unsusent and future all at the escape from the maxitainable premise, one Feedback can be sent same time. Not only mum security prison to aaronpeck46@gmail. that crumbles under the succeeds. Kay is wiped succeed in taking over that, but he can also see com. which has been contime traveling paradox, from existence and the Earth because Kay every possible timeline structed on the moon, it’s still a whole lot of before Jay knows what’s isn’t there to stop him? Boris vows revenge happening, there’s a If Kay died, wouldn’t PLAYING MAY 25-31 Action! against Agent Kay, the huge Boglodite army that create a reality MOVIE HOTLINE 435-753-1900 MIB member who blew about to take over the where Jay never became UNIVERSITY 6 his arm off. planet. Jay figures out an MIB agent thereSTADIUM 8 1225 N 200 E., BEHIND HOME DEPOT 535 W. 100 N. PROVIDENCE MIDNIGHT SHOW FRI/SAT $6.00 “MIB 3” is a time how Boris traveled in fore creating an entire 2297 N. Main MEN IN BLACK 3 in Digital 3D (PG-13) MEN IN BLACK 3 2D (PG-13) MOVIE HOTLINE 753-6444 travel movie, so you time and decides to go conundrum where Jay 1:00 3:10 5:20 7:30 9:40 WWW.WALKERCINEMAS.NET AVENGERS in Digital 3D (PG-13) ALL SEATS ALL TIMES $3.00 just have to know that back a day before Boris’ knows nothing about MIRROR MIRROR (PG) OpEN SuN-FRI AT 3:45 pM BATTLESHIP in Digital (PG-13) 12:40 2:50 5:00 7:10 9:20 you can’t think too hard original date in order the organization and has SATuRDAY & MONDAY OpEN AT 11:30 AM CHERNOBYL DIARIES (R) SuMMER CHILDREN’S MATINEE TICKETS NOW ON SALE WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN about it or the plot will to kill the past Boris no reason to go back in 12:45 2:35 4:25 6:15 8:05 9:55 YOU'RE EXPECTING (PG-13) AMERICAN collapse in on itself. before the current Boris the past to rescue his 21 JuMp STREET WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU'RE REuNION DARK SHADOWS in Digital (PG-13) EXPECTING (PG-13) (R) 6:45 & 9:20 Boris has figured out travels back in time. younger partner? See (pG-13) 9:30 12:35 2:50 5:05 7:20 9:35 THE DICTATOR in Digital (R) how to time jump and is Now, if you think what I mean? You can’t DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 2D WRATH OF THE TITANS 1:00 4:00 6:45 9:10 going back to kill Agent too much about it, one really think about this MOVIES STADIUM 5 (pG-13) 4:45, 7:00 & 9:50 THE AVENGERS 2D (PG-13) 2450 NORTH MAIN Kay in 1969, which will would probably say, movie’s time travel plot Sat & Mon Mat 12:00 & 2:30 12:30 3:30 6:30 9:30 prevent Kay from ever “Now, if Kay is dead too much or it’ll get you BATTLESHIP (PG-13) DR. SEuSS: THIS MEANS WAR 1:00 3:40 6:20 9:00 defeating the past Boris doesn’t that render the down. THE LORAX (pG-13) 4:15, 7:15 & 9:40 DICTATOR (R) and will create a new first two movies null Jay soon meets the (pG) 5:00 & 7:30 Sat & Mon Mat 12:30 1:15 3:15 5:15 7:15 9:15 Sat & Mon Mat 11:45 & 2:00 world where the Bogand void?” If that’s the younger Kay, played by EVERY TUESDAY IS PEPSI DISCOUNT NIGHT THE THREE STOOGES lodite army can invade case doesn’t the giant Josh Brolin who plays a ALL SEATS MATINEE PRICE ALL DAY (pG) 4:30 Earth and thrive. He bug from the first movie perfect younger Tommy GIFT BOOKS AND CARDS AVAILABLE Sat & Mon Mat 12:15 & 2:15

The Reel Place Aaron Peck

★★★

‘Men in Black 3’

12:00 12:30 2:40 4:50 7:00 8:10 9:10 12:00 2:10 3:00 5:10 6:00 9:00 12:15 3:15 6:15 9:15

12:20 4:20 6:50 9:40 12:05 2:40 6:30 2:30 5:00 9:10

NOW AT MOVIES 5: ADULTS $6.00 CHILDREN/SENIORS/MATINEES $4.00 NO LATE SHOWS ON SUNDAY

MEN IN BLACK 3 2D 4:20

6:50

5:15

8:15

6:45

(PG-13)

SAT/SUN 2:15

LUCKY ONE 4:15

(PG-13)

9:00 SAT/SUN 2:00

THE AVENGERS 2D 9:00

(PG-13)

SAT/SUN 2:05

DARK SHADOWS

(PG-13) 5:00 8:00 SAT/SUN 1:30

THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) 5:50 PIRATES: BAND OF MISFITS (PG) 4:00

8:50

SAT/SUN 1:30

BUY TICKETS ONLINE AT WWW.MOVIESWEST.COM


By Courtney Bowers

By Kourtney Cooper

By Krecia Jessop

Imagine.

Why students believe creativity is needed in today’s classrooms

I By Sarah Patch

By Brennen Madsen

By Nicholas Stuaffer

magination. What exactly is it? According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, it is the “act or power of forming a mental image of something not present to the senses or never before wholly perceived in reality.” And if you ask Mountain Crest art teacher Michael Bingham, there is not enough imagination in schools these days and he’s doing his best to change that. “Our education system, I think it’s safe to say they pretty much ignore the kids’ imaginations and maybe even worse than that, I think our education system now, the way it is, actually damages kids’ imaginations and destroys them,” said Bingham, who is in his fourth year teaching at Mountain Crest. “Look at how imaginative kindergarten students are and then into first grade. By the time they get into second grade and third grade, it starts to die out and they get more worried about what other people think, they get more worried that they don’t have the one right answer, that there’s one right way to do a piece of artwork and they start worrying about that. “By the time I get them in high

school,” Bingham continued, “their own imaginations a lot of times are almost completely gone.” Krecia Jessop, a senior in Bingham’s AP art class, agreed with her teacher. “I think imagination is kind of lost sometimes,” Jessop said. “I actually teach my cousins art lessons — I go and tutor them, just for free and for fun. But, it’s the craziest thing because they’re home-schooled and compared to public education, they are so creative. “I’ll go over there and they just whip stuff out on the spot. I think kids in general can do that really well. They aren’t afraid to be the artist, they aren’t afraid to try new things, where you come to school sometimes, I think it gets lost a little bit amid all the other subjects. I don’t think it’s intentional, but I think it does get lost, so it’s nice to come to art class and have that restored a little bit.” As an end-of-year project, Bingham assigned his students to create square images — drawings, designs, water color and other mediums — focusing on imagination and why it’s important. “I would hope that this project we’re doing will kind of remind everybody that imagination is a really important element in being able to solve prob-

lems, in being able to go out into the world and make a difference,” said Bingham, who has been a professional artist for 27 years, including 12 spent at Hallmark Cards. “Look at anybody in history who’s done anything useful, cured a disease or solved any sort of problem, and you look at each story individually, you see that imagination always plays a big part. “Nobody ever does anything useful in society without some imagination — or anything new without some imagination.” Several of the students’ images were selected to appear in today’s Cache Magazine, including the front cover designed by Sa Saengthongaram, a foreign exchange student from Thailand. “I’m so excited,” said Saengthongaram, when he learned his design would be on the front cover. “... I’m so happy right now.” Saengthongaram chose to do a selfportrait. The design features 100 square blocks. “I just wanted to do (a portrait of) myself and then Mr. Bingham told me, ‘You should do that with the ‘We Need Imagination,’ so I did it,” Saengthongaram said. “The thing on top of my head

is an accident, so I adapted my accident to be one part of the piece.” When he was done with the project, Saengthongaram accidentally spilled paint on it. “I was so mad,” said Saengthongaram, who is a 16-year-old junior. “... I think it’s a cool accident, though. ... It’s a texture.” Courtney Bowers, a senior, enjoyed taking part in the project and knows just how significant it is to have imagination. “It’s really important, especially in school, because where you go to math or English or science, we all learn the same thing — what’s right is right,” Bowers said. “But then you come to art class and he gives us an assignment like this where everybody’s is different and there’s no wrong. It’s really important.” Bowers’ final piece — like Jessop’s — was considered for the front cover. “I decided to have a person with just this crazy background in a world full of different colors and weird shapes, maybe like a way of looking at things differently — a world that is more interesting than what you see every day,” Bowers said. A world with imagination.

By Wade Denniston By Sa Saengthongaram

By Alivia Vernon

By Zac Baird


By Courtney Bowers

By Kourtney Cooper

By Krecia Jessop

Imagine.

Why students believe creativity is needed in today’s classrooms

I By Sarah Patch

By Brennen Madsen

By Nicholas Stuaffer

magination. What exactly is it? According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, it is the “act or power of forming a mental image of something not present to the senses or never before wholly perceived in reality.” And if you ask Mountain Crest art teacher Michael Bingham, there is not enough imagination in schools these days and he’s doing his best to change that. “Our education system, I think it’s safe to say they pretty much ignore the kids’ imaginations and maybe even worse than that, I think our education system now, the way it is, actually damages kids’ imaginations and destroys them,” said Bingham, who is in his fourth year teaching at Mountain Crest. “Look at how imaginative kindergarten students are and then into first grade. By the time they get into second grade and third grade, it starts to die out and they get more worried about what other people think, they get more worried that they don’t have the one right answer, that there’s one right way to do a piece of artwork and they start worrying about that. “By the time I get them in high

school,” Bingham continued, “their own imaginations a lot of times are almost completely gone.” Krecia Jessop, a senior in Bingham’s AP art class, agreed with her teacher. “I think imagination is kind of lost sometimes,” Jessop said. “I actually teach my cousins art lessons — I go and tutor them, just for free and for fun. But, it’s the craziest thing because they’re home-schooled and compared to public education, they are so creative. “I’ll go over there and they just whip stuff out on the spot. I think kids in general can do that really well. They aren’t afraid to be the artist, they aren’t afraid to try new things, where you come to school sometimes, I think it gets lost a little bit amid all the other subjects. I don’t think it’s intentional, but I think it does get lost, so it’s nice to come to art class and have that restored a little bit.” As an end-of-year project, Bingham assigned his students to create square images — drawings, designs, water color and other mediums — focusing on imagination and why it’s important. “I would hope that this project we’re doing will kind of remind everybody that imagination is a really important element in being able to solve prob-

lems, in being able to go out into the world and make a difference,” said Bingham, who has been a professional artist for 27 years, including 12 spent at Hallmark Cards. “Look at anybody in history who’s done anything useful, cured a disease or solved any sort of problem, and you look at each story individually, you see that imagination always plays a big part. “Nobody ever does anything useful in society without some imagination — or anything new without some imagination.” Several of the students’ images were selected to appear in today’s Cache Magazine, including the front cover designed by Sa Saengthongaram, a foreign exchange student from Thailand. “I’m so excited,” said Saengthongaram, when he learned his design would be on the front cover. “... I’m so happy right now.” Saengthongaram chose to do a selfportrait. The design features 100 square blocks. “I just wanted to do (a portrait of) myself and then Mr. Bingham told me, ‘You should do that with the ‘We Need Imagination,’ so I did it,” Saengthongaram said. “The thing on top of my head

is an accident, so I adapted my accident to be one part of the piece.” When he was done with the project, Saengthongaram accidentally spilled paint on it. “I was so mad,” said Saengthongaram, who is a 16-year-old junior. “... I think it’s a cool accident, though. ... It’s a texture.” Courtney Bowers, a senior, enjoyed taking part in the project and knows just how significant it is to have imagination. “It’s really important, especially in school, because where you go to math or English or science, we all learn the same thing — what’s right is right,” Bowers said. “But then you come to art class and he gives us an assignment like this where everybody’s is different and there’s no wrong. It’s really important.” Bowers’ final piece — like Jessop’s — was considered for the front cover. “I decided to have a person with just this crazy background in a world full of different colors and weird shapes, maybe like a way of looking at things differently — a world that is more interesting than what you see every day,” Bowers said. A world with imagination.

By Wade Denniston By Sa Saengthongaram

By Alivia Vernon

By Zac Baird


Page 10 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 25, 2012

Your Stuff “Memorial Day” By Ba Vi Chau Oh God! Please bless those named on the Wall. They are the heroes who served and died in the wars, For peace on the world, freedom of humanity, For independence of countries, they were ready, They spiritedly left their school, family and friends, To become courageous warriors, they were trained, After months under the heat of the training field, They were sent to the jungle and battlefield, Facing the poisonous creatures, dangerous enemies, Trying to bring back people’s hopes for peace, Their blood, sweat and tears spilled on this soil, Through their days in the deep jungle of toil, And finally, they returned to their homeland, In coffins with honored flags draping on them, Family and friends surrounded them with tears, As farewell to the persons they love for years, They died for freedom but were never free, Coming generations will continue to make history, Please, God, stop the evil we endure in war, Let the tears for the sacrifices no more.

“My Friends” By Terri Barnes I really don’t think, I can remember a time When I had truer friends That I could call mine You were always there When I needed to cry You were both always there And I didn’t know why With my heart full of sorrow I couldn’t go on any longer But you were always there Just making me stronger I needed forgiveness My heart had to mend I went through some healing So I turned to my friends I’m on the right track now And I want you to know Just how much you mean to me And how I love you so Thank you For Nancy Burr and Debbie Lundgreen of the Providence 8th Ward Send your poems and stories to mnewbold@hjnews.com.

Something humans can chew on: Why dogs put up with your tricks While Dennis is still on vacation busily stuffing his useless snout with pizza and beer for another few weeks, I thought I’d take this opportunity to fill you in on dogs. This is not just my opinion; I’m huge on Facebook and Twitter and combined answers from all my canine followers and BFFs. These are the FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions): Q: What kind of music do dogs like? Opera, banjos and bag pipes are the closest to the sounds of our ancestral wolves howling in either joy or pain. We still get a kick out of that Jiggle Bells Dog thing every Christmas even though I’m pretty sure it was computer generated. Q: Why do dogs hang their heads out the windows of moving cars? We hang our heads out of car windows pleading for help from the police or anyone nearby because you humans are so stupid driving while talking on cell phones, eating and brushing your teeth. Please stop and

just drive. Thanks for leaving the tasty food wrappers on the floor, though. Q: Why do dogs always fall for the fake fetch throw trick? No, we’re not really fooled by the pretendingto-throw-the-ball trick or faking one direction and throwing it the other. We are just humoring you like your spouse who laughs at that same joke you have told at every dinner party for the last 10 years. We always like to say “you can’t teach an old human a new trick.” Q: Why are dogs always napping? It makes perfect sense to take a nap in the morning right after you get up; that is the time of day when you most wish you could sleep. And, don’t you always feel a little sleepy after you eat? So yes, that is the rhythm of our day; snack, nap, snack, nap; repeat until bedtime. You overlyserious bi-peds are just jealous. Q: Why do dogs like to chew on bones?

This reminds me though, Dennis and many of your ilk run, swim and go to the gym and then are too tired to take us for a measly walk around the block. If we try to go for a walk on our own, the city actually pays someone to pick us up and throw us in a truck. You are so mean sometimes; that’s why we occasionally lose our tempers and bite you. Q: Are dogs really man’s best friend? It reminds us of when This is such a silly we ruled the Earth. You question. I always answer don’t really believe “compared to what?” I it was the ice age that don’t see zebras, carp or caused the woolly mamlemurs putting up with moth to disappear do the stuff we dogs do. But you? I look at elephants sure, we are best friends on Animal Planet and forever because we are think “yum.” codependent in our need Q: Do dogs get tired of eating the same thing for acceptance. As Mr. T used to say “We pity every day? Why would we? That’s the fools” ... umm ... the fools being you. a human trait; you are                                                                    so fixated on experiencLuba would like to thank ing new things that you you for reading and Dennis forget that every day for finally taking her for a is new and wonderful. walk after proofreading this. Every meal is a banquet, Dennis is taking an unspecevery walk is a parade. ified leave of absence and Yeah, I know, sort of a will have guest columnists cross between Zen and fill in while he’s gone. being in the Marines.

Slightly Off Center

Mapleton Chorale to perform June 1 The Mapleton Chorale will perform at 7 p.m. Friday, June 1, at the Logan Tabernacle. Mapleton Chorale is an auditioned mixed-voice community choir, founded in 1994 by a small group of Mapleton, Utah, residents with a love for choral music and a desire to perform a broader repertoire than generally found in a traditional church setting. The Chorale enjoys singing from the classical canon, as well as a variety of spirituals, folk songs, hymns, sacred music and popular tunes. The group cultivated its unique style and repu-

WHAT: Mapleton Chorale When: 7 p.m. Friday, June 1 WHERE: Logan Tabernacle

tation for audience-pleasing musical selections under the skilled direction of Ryan Murphy, now Associate Conductor of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. Now in its ninth year with conductor Cory Mendenhall, the Chorale has grown to a group of 110 singers from throughout Utah Valley. Under Mendenhall’s leadership, the Chorale has further refined its

sound and expanded its repertoire. Mapleton Chorale has been enthusiastically received as part of the Temple Square Performances Concert Series, in performances with the Utah Valley Symphony, and in multiple Christmas and spring concerts throughout Utah County. The Chorale has enjoyed successful concert tours to southern Utah, Salt Lake City, and to New York City in June 2011, where the group performed at the Statue of Liberty, St. Paul’s Chapel, Trinity Church, St. Patrick’s Cathedral and the Lincoln Center.


Photos by you

1

2

Sun gazing Images from the solar eclipse Sunday, May 20 Dennis Briscoe of Providence drove to Cove Fort and set up a 15 X spotting scope with a filter of the right density over the objective. He got this seven-shot sequence by experimenting with a Panasonic Lumix point-and-shoot camera held up to the eyepiece.

4

5

3

6

7


Page 12 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 25, 2012

Books ‘Flat Spin’ has riveting plot and fine prose By Bruce DeSilva Associated Press

“Flat Spin,” the title of this debut thriller, is the name of a complex and risky flight maneuver that only the most accomplished pilots should attempt, so it’s no surprise that the hero of the story, Cordell Logan, is a first-rate aviator. He’s also a former assassin for a top-secret military squad that specializes in making terrorists disappear. As the story opens, Logan is living in a converted garage in Rancho Bonita, Calif., where he is scraping out a living by giving flying lessons to spoiled rich kids. He’s haunt-

ed by his past, longing for his beautiful ex-wife, Savannah, and failing miserably — and hilariously — to find peace through his recent conversion to Buddhism. When Savannah’s new husband, another former assassination squad member, is gunned down, Logan has a very un-Buddhist reaction: He’s elated. But his mood quickly evaporates when he finds himself a suspect. So Logan sets out to solve the case himself. He takes to the air in “The Ruptured Duck,” his Cessna 172, following the killer’s trail from Oakland, Calif., to the Las Vegas Strip, from the Arizona

desert to Russian Mafia haunts in West Los Angeles.

Eventually, he gets too close to the surprising truth and is targeted for murder. The way Logan sees it, being in danger and suspected of murder are the least of his troubles. He is consumed by his longing for Savannah, the pain made so real that your own heart will ache. When you write your first thriller, it’s wise to stick with what you know, and Freed knows this turf. He covered police for the Los Angeles Times, where he shared in the Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the Rodney King riots. He reported from Kuwait and Iraq during Operation Desert

Storm. He wrote computerized training simulations for the Defense Intelligence Agency. He holds a security clearance from the Department of Defense. And he’s a pilot who owns his own airplane. Unlike some novelists with technical expertise, Freed is a superb writer. His prose is at once muscular and musical — and sometimes verges on poetry. And he mixes a hard-boiled attitude with flashes of wry humor. The riveting plot and fine prose are sure to make “Flat Spin” one of the best debuts of 2012.

‘Cliff Walk’ is a chilling murder mystery new york times best-sellers By Jonathan Lopez Associated Press

In his Edgar Awardwinning first novel, “Rogue Island,” published in 2010, retired AP writing coach Bruce DeSilva introduced readers to the affable Liam Mulligan, a crime-solving Rhode Island metro reporter for the fictional Providence Dispatch. Mulligan, an old-school newspaperman with a taste for whiskey, cigars and irreverent humor, returns in the chilling murder mystery “Cliff Walk,” whose sometimes violent plot is tempered by the hero’s wry observations on print journalism’s seemingly inexorable decline. Recent staff consolidation and cutbacks have forced Mulligan to churn out light stories on topics such as highsociety parties. But a charity gala in posh Newport turns into real news when a guest is murdered atop the rocky Cliff Walk separating the area’s

Gilded Age mansions from the sea. Police believe the victim to be Sal Maniella, a millionaire pornographer and strip-club owner, but mysteries abound as none of Maniella’s friends or family will consent to identify the body. Mulligan teams up with Maniella’s beautiful, brainy female attorney to unravel the case, whose scope widens to include prostitution, child

abuse, multiple homicides and an enduring vendetta. Along the way, he receives help from a colorful cast of supporting characters, including a no-nonsense state attorney general nicknamed “Attila the Nun,” loosely modeled on real-life Rhode Island politician Arlene Violet, who left the Sisters of Mercy religious order to pursue public office. Despite the book’s sexually charged situations and graphic crime-scene descriptions, DeSilva’s narrative style ensures that any shocking details remain firmly in service of the plot, and the tone never turns exploitative. You can count on Mulligan to reappear in the next installment of this series from DeSilva, but be prepared for changes. When Mulligan learns that bookmakers are taking bets on how long the Dispatch will remain in business, he begins to consider a tempting job offer — from a private detective agency.

HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “11th Hour,” by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro 2. “Deadlocked,” by Charlaine Harris 3. “Bring Up the Bodies,” by Hilary Mantel 4. “The Road to Grace,” by Richard Paul Evans 5. “In One Person,” by John Irving HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “The Passage of Power,” by Robert A. Caro 2. “Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake,” by Anna Quindlen 3. “Screwed!” by Dick Morris and Eileen McGann 4. “Most Talkative,” by Andy Cohen 5. “Prague Winter,” by Madeleine Albright with Bill Woodward PAPERBACK TRADE FICTION 1. “Fifty Shades of Grey,” by E. L. James 2. “Fifty Shades Darker,” by E. L. James 3. “Fifty Shades Freed,” by E. L. James 4. “The Last Boyfriend,” by Nora Roberts 5. “State of Wonder,” by Ann Patchett Paperback Mass-Market Fiction 1. “The Lucky One,” by Nicholas Sparks 2. “Buried Prey,” by John Sandford 3. “A Game of Thrones,” by George R. R. Martin 4. “The Fifth Witness,” by Michael Connelly 5. “Vision in White,” by Nora Roberts Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/


Summerfest is gearing up for their annual Arts Faire to be held June 14-16 on the Tabernacle Grounds, 50 N. Main St., in Logan. The 2012 juried festival is a free event that features more than 140 fine artists, fine craft artists, live music, food, children’s activities and a variety of annual contests. Local and nationally known artists from across the country come to show their art at Summerfest as well as participate in their Plein Air Paint Out and Photography Contest in beautiful Northern Utah. New this year, the festival will offer a Found and Recycled Art contest that encourages community members to create something beautiful out of junk. Cash prizes will be awarded in three categories. Visit www.logansummerfest. com for details. “We have so many talented artists living and working in Utah, the Summerfest contests are the perfect opportunity to share in the excitement, inspire new work, and celebrate the creative process,” said Amanda Castillo, contest coordinator for Summerfest. “All the entries will be on display throughout the festival and items for sale can be bid on at the silent auction tent. We are so excited to welcome Sheryl Gillilan from Art Access and Lisa Sewell from the Utah Arts Festival to jury the 2012 entries. It’s going to be a fantastic festival.” Summerfest kicks off the week with their Plein Air Paint Out registration and canvas stamping from 8 to 11 a.m. Monday, June 11. All artists are invited to participate in the 5th Annual Paint Out by creating original art around Cache Valley June 11-13. Entrance fee for the Paint Out is $40. Artists will need to return their paintings to the festival grounds silent auction tent between 10 a.m.

to noon Wednesday, June 13. Plein Air means “in the open air” and artists are encouraged to do just that, get out of the studio and make some paintings in the beautiful landscapes of Cache Valley. Each artist can enter up to two paintings, but can get more canvases stamped, so if they sell a painting

at the Silent Auction, they can replace it with another stamped painting. Photographers can join the Annual Summerfest Photography Contest by taking photos between June 11 and June 13. Framed entries can be submitted between 10 a.m. to noon June 13. All of the entered photos will be

juried and displayed through June 16 and can be available for sale at the silent auction tent. Photographers can enter two photos if they are from different categories. Categories include: landscape, still life, portrait, action, wildlife and digital art. To register in advance, download the pdf form online and send it

with your $25 payment to the Summerfest offices, or register when you submit your framed photo June 13 at 10 a.m. Photographs must be taken between 12:01 a.m. June 11 and 10 a.m. June 13. EXIF data is required. This is the first year Summerfest has offered a Found and Recycled Art contest. Artists of all ages and skills are invited to participate in this special contest. Put together art out of everyday objects, junk or items found in nature. Bring your finished piece to the Summerfest grounds with your $25 entrance fee on Wednesday, June 13, from 10 a.m. to noon. An artist reception and award ceremony will take place at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 13, with invited judges. To register in advance, please visit the Summerfest office at 69 E. 100 North in Logan, call 435-213-3858 or email info@logansummerfest.com. Visit the silent auction tent June 14-16 to view or purchase art from the Plein Air, Photography, and Found and Recycled Art contest. The silent auction begins at the reception and continues through 7 p.m. Saturday, June 16. Summerfest hours will be from noon to 10 p.m. Thursday, June 14, and 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday June 15-16. For more information, call 435-213-3858, or visit the historic Champ House across the street from the tabernacle grounds at 69 E. 100 North in Logan. Admission to the festival is free. This project is supported in part by the Utah Division of Arts & Museums, with funding from the State of Utah and the National Endowment for the Arts and generous support is provided by the Cache County RAPZ fund.

Page 13 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 25, 2012

Summerfest committee calls for contest entries


Page 14 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 25, 2012

CrossworD By Myles Mellor and Sally York P.S. I Love You

Across 1. Quits 7. Having a tail 14. Large deer 20. Open, in a way 21. Election loser 22. Threatening words 23. “The Earth is flat,” for one 26. Bit of paronomasia 27. Sharp quality 28. Hit bottom? 29. Son of Rebekah 30. It’s used to ferment whiskey 33. Bluefins 36. U.S.N. officer 37. Time of life 38. Hardly refined 40. Collectors’ items 43. Strait of Dover port 46. Growing room 47. Gather whelk 52. Howard University group founded in 1911 57. Articulated lorry 58. Force out 59. Son of a son 60. Magazine unit 61. Go down 63. Flogged 64. Divided 66. Strait-laced 67. Chichi 69. It’s just for openers 71. Fighting force 74. “The Real ___ Shady”: Eminem song 78. “Going ___: An American Life” (Palin book) 81. English satirist 85. Kind of jack 86. Stink 87. Fingerprint patterns 89. Animation 90. 23rd 95. Slender African spear 96. Oodles and oodles 97. Annie 98. Cover, in a way

Deadlines

101. Hell’s Angel Barger 103. Mountain lakes 107. Ed.’s request 108. Spiked 110. Waste conduit 114. Polo grounds? 115. Sound of frustration 117. Handwriting on the wall 119. It often follows you 120. They’re developed by the FBI 126. Showy bird’s mate 127. Journey delay 128. Emulate Scorsese 129. Inclined 130. Marksman 131. Makes an effort Down 1. Full of small depressions 2. Flow from 3. “Gladiator” setting 4. Not worth a ___ 5. Geezerhood, old way 6. Oscar, for one 7. Sticker 8. Little green man 9. World govt. in TV’s “Futurama” 10. Quixote of La Mancha 11. PBS matters 12. Chiang Kai-shek’s capital 13. ___ terrible 14. Wind sleeve 15. Electric ___ 16. Free-for-all 17. Indifferent 18. One of 3.5 billion 19. “Song of the South” uncle 24. Prepares to be shot? 25. Take a firm stand 31. Destroy disk data

32. Simple chord 34. Like some passageways 35. It takes several yards of material to make 37. Relating to a defunct ruler 39. Facet 41. Put back together 42. Needle point? 43. Part of a parachute 44. Certain chieftain 45. ___-mutton 46. ___ line (major axis of an elliptical orbit) 48. Marching together 49. Actress Bonet 50. Ornamental bag 51. Turned blue, maybe 53. Neuters 54. Lithium-___ battery 55. Duran Duran single 56. ___ France 62. Conditional release 65. Pacific island 68. Goes back on 70. Wrestling hold 71. ___ Gooding, Jr. 72. French cordial flavoring 73. Claim of rights 75. Indochinese language 76. Driver’s lic. and others 77. Shibboleth 78. Central African republic 79. Resistance units 80. Sentimentality 82. Like an oxeye window 83. Bundle 84. Prize since 1949 88. Crosses over 91. Gabriel, for one 92. Prayer book 93. Unfair? 94. ___ terrier 99. Novelist Pinter 100. It originated in the West Indies

101. Throughout, in music 102. River of Brandenburg 103. Paperlike cloth 104. Nincompoops 105. Saudi Arabian money 106. Kind of chip 109. Edible fish 111. Saddle horse 112. Pitch 113. Doesn’t play 115. Top-notch 116. Informal greeting 118. Connecting point 121. In the know 122. Atlantic catch 123. Mad. ___ 124. Pickle 125. It makes one hot

Cache Magazine calendar items are due Wednesday by 5 p.m. They will also run for free in The Herald Journal one to two days prior to the event. Calendar items can be submitted by email at hjhappen@hjnews.com. Any press releases or photos for events listed in the first half of Cache Magazine can be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com. Poems and photos can also be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com and run on a space-available basis if selected.

answers from last week

www.ThemeCrosswords.com


FRIDAY The Old Ephraim Mountain Man Association will present the 38th annual Cache Valley Rendezvous May 25-28 up Left Hand Fork of Blacksmith Fork Canyon east of Hyrum. Admission is $2 per person or $10 for a family of five or more. There will be raffles, muzzleloader shoots, candy cannons for the kids, traders row with food vendors and merchandise. Gates will be open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, contact Chris Ashby at 435-5126708 or knflyfisher08@yahoo. com. Matt Gomez will perform from 4:45 to 6:45 p.m. Friday, May 25, at Caffe Ibis. Free. Register by May 25 for the womens 6v6 soccer tournament to be held Saturday, June 9. This is a fast-paced tournament on smaller fields with full-size goals. For more information, visit adultsoccertourney. blogspot.com. Cost is $250 per team

SATURDAY Stokes Nature Center will host Kids’ Crafternoon and Music Jam throughout the day Saturday, May 29, at Citrus and Sage, 130 N. 100 West in Logan. Kids can make bird feeders and participate in puppet play while the family sits back and enjoys the creative tunes of local philanthropic band Uncommon Collective. Bird feeders are $3. Donations are much appreciated. For more information, call 435-7553239 or email nature@logannature.org. Trombone choir Cache Bones will perform Saturday, May 26, at 6 p.m. at the Nibley Amphitheater. Free. The CAche Practical Shooters (CAPS) will hold its monthly pistol match at 9 a.m. Saturday, May 26, at the Cache Val-

ley public shooting range, three miles west of Logan on the Valley View Highway. A required new shooter orientation class will begin at 7:45 a.m. and join the match at 9. The match is free to first time shooters or those who have not shot with CAPS previously. Match fees are $12 for members and $17 for non- members. Eye and ear protection are required and spectators are welcome. For more information, visit www. utahshooters.org or contact Rich Meacham at 435-787-8131 or drmeacham@comcast.net. A new dog 4-H program begins Saturday, May 26. Youth can bring their own dogs to class and train them in obedience, showmanship and agility. They will be able to take the dogs in the show ring at the county and state fairs, go on field days, participate in fundraisers and enjoy community service. For more information or to sign up, contact Jill at 435754-7475 or the Cache County Extension Office at 435-7526263.

SUNDAY

Newfolk Revival will perform from noon to 2 p.m. Sunday, May 27, at Caffe Ibis. Free.

MONDAY The Hyde Park Lions will have their annual all-you-caneat Memorial Day breakfast from 7 to 10 a.m. Monday, May 28, at the city offices, 113 E. Center. Cost is $4 for adults and $3.50 for children younger than 12.

TUESDAY Free True Blue Cheese Tours will be held at 1:30 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays May 29 to Aug. 16 (except on holidays and dates of ice cream tours: June 23, July 14 and Aug. 11) at 750 N. 1200 East in Logan. For more information, visit aggieicecream.com.

A free introduction class to essential oils and aroma touch technique will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, May 29, at The Book Table (recital room), 29 S. Main St., Logan. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will host a fishing activity from 1 to 3 p.m. Tuesday, May 29. Cost is $3. Fishing license required. To sign up for this activity, request transportation or to learn about other activities, call Lauri at 713-0288 or visit www.cgadventures.org. The Infinity Soccer Club will hold tryouts for the 201213 season for all teams (boys and girls, U9 through U18) from May 29 to June 5. Visit www. infinitysc.com for a complete listing of age groups, dates and times. Infinity Soccer Club’s mission is to facilitate individual player development through high quality training, coaching, team work and competition. Tryouts for Valley Blast State Girls U14 season will be from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. May 29-31 at the Blackhawk Top southwest field (top right). Registration will be from 5 to 5:30 p.m. each night. All girls need one parent or guardian to sign necessary forms. For more information, contact Kari Godfrey at kari.cherrypeak@gmail. com or 435-760-4062, Bonnie Fuhriman at bonniefuhriman@ yahoo.com or 435-757-5171, or Whitney Gibbons at nightmarealice01@gmail.com or 435-9940823. Coaches are Toni Doney, Jason Gibbons and Chad Griffin.

WEDNESDAY OPTIONS for Independence will visit the Tremonton nurseries and have breakfast at 10 a.m. May 30. Breakfast prices will vary and transportation is $2. RSVP to Mandie at 435753-5353, ext. 108. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will host a hiking activity Wednesday, May 30, from 3 to 5 p.m. Cost is $3. To

sign up for this activity, request transportation or to learn about other activities, call Lauri at 713-0288. The Cache Humane Society will hold May Spay Day Wednesday, May 30. Cost is $25 for cats and $45 for dogs (up to 75 pounds). Space is limited. Call for appointment. Additional surgical fee may apply. No office visit charge. Tryouts for the U13 Girls State competitive team will be from 6 to 8 p.m. May 30 and 31 at the Hyrum Soccer Complex. Bring water, a soccer ball and come dressed to play. A short parent meeting will be held Wednesday at the beginning of tryouts.

THURSDAY A Living Well with Chronic Conditions class will take place from 6:30 to 8 p.m. May 31 at OPTIONS for Independence (1095 N. Main, Logan). For more information or to sign up for the workshop, contact Anna at 435-753-5353 or Deanna at 435-723-2171.

ONGOING The Cache County 4-H Aggie Adventure camps will take place every week through June and July. Kids can reserve spots in Courageous Warriors, Kitchen Explosion, Call of the Wild and Lallapalooza camps. Registration is due the Friday before each camp. Register at the Cache County Extension Office located at 179 N. Main St., Suite 111, in Logan. Call 435-752-6263 for details. Dr. Michael Twohig and the psychology department at Utah State University are seeking individuals with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder to participate in a study for a psychological intervention for OCD. Some examples include: checking, hand washing, need for symmetry, cleaning and excessive moral thoughts.

The study is free and will take approximately 37 hours over eight months. There will be no compensation for your participation. For more information, contact 435-797-8303. The Mountain Crest High School Class of 2002 will have a reunion at 6 p.m. July 28 at Hamiltons Steak and Seafood, 2427 N. Main St., Logan. Cost is $40 per couple in advance, or $45 at the door. Visit mchs2002. blogspot.com to register. Email mcmustangs02@gmail.com for any questions, or find Mountain Crest 2002 High School Reunion on Facebook. Some lawn space is available for artists, artisans and vendors for Art on the Lawn to be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday June 30. If interested, call Lucy at 752-4749 or visit www. artonthelawn.net for more information. Sky View High School swimming pool has swimming lesson sign-ups going on now. Sessions run for 10 days Monday through Friday for 40 minutes a day. Cost is $35 per session. For more information or to sign up, call 435-563-5625. The South Cache Soccer League will host British Challenger Soccer Camps from June 25-28. Registration is required 10 days before camps begin. For more information, call Tanya Mathys at 787-1767. The South Cache Soccer League, the largest recreation soccer program in Cache Valley, will accept registration for fall recreation online from June 20 to Aug. 1. Real Salt Lake ticket vouchers will be available to all registered SCSL rec players for $6. Visit www.southcachesoccer.com for more information.  Join the Cache County 4-H for its annual sewing camp June 11-13 at the Hyde Park Civic Center. Contact the Cache County 4-H office at 752-6263 for more information.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 25, 2012

CALENDAR


L

B S

Logan Burgers & Sandwiches

VoteD BeSt BurGerS & SaNDwicheS iN LoGaN Gourmet Burgers • Gyros • Souvlaki • BBQ Pork Kababs • Salads • Seafood Dinners

Pastrami Cheeseburger (with fries & soda)

Only $5.99 Reuben

(with fries & soda)

Only $5.99

Full Service Dinner

Chipotle Turkey Bacon Swiss Wrap

Not Just For Lunch Anymore

(with fries & soda)

Only $5.99 Chicken Souvlaki

(with salad, fries & soda)

Only $7.99

Offer Expires 6/1/12 • Must Present Coupon • Limit 4

1085 North Main, Suite 130, Logan • 435-752-1215 • Mon-Sat 10:30-7:00pm

Page 16 -

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 25, 2012

CACHE MAGAZINE DINING GUIDE

Buy One Dinner Entree Get The Second Dinner Entree

1/2 Off

M-T 11–10 • F-S 11-11 • Sun 12-10 1079 N. Main • Logan • 753-4084

One Coupon Per Table Coupons May Not Be Combined With Any Other Offer Valid M-Thurs Only

Effective until 6/1/12

For information about advertising on this page please contact Angie Duncombe at

792-7263

Monday – Friday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Breads • Great Sandwiches • Soups 78 East 400 North, Logan 981 South Main St., Logan 755-0262 charbroiled753-6463 Gourmet Burgers • Gyros • Souvlaki • BBQ Pork Kababs • calamari Salads • Seafood Dinners

633 S. Main • Logan • 750-6555 Mon-Sat 11:30am - 9:30pm www.mygauchogrill.com

20% OFF 10% OFF Menu Full Rodizio AnyItem Must present coupon at time of service. Not valid with any other offer. EXP. 6/1/12 Holidays excluded.

deals

Must present coupon at time of service. Not valid with any other offer. EXP. 6/1/12 Holidays excluded.

HJNews.com

Register at: deals.hjnews.com

Gift Cards are available

24/7

Buy One Get One Free Equal or lesser value. Expires 6/1/12

18 East Center St. Logan • 227-0321 Mon-Fri 9:30am - 9pm Sat 7am - 10pm

2.00 OFF

$

Any MeAl

Coupon may not be combined with any other offer. Must present the coupon at time of purchase. Offer expires: 6/1/2012

690 North Main, Logan • 752-9252

Open Sun- Thurs 6am - 10pm • Fri & Sat 6am - 11pm

Cache Magazine  

May 25-31, 2012

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you