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Cache

Magazine

Painting outside the box The Herald Journal

May 20-26, 2011


Page 2 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 20, 2011

Cache

What’s inside this week

The Herald Journal’s

Magazine

Arts & Entertainment Calendar On the cover: Cross Number 7 by Jacob Brazell

Local magician puts on family-friendly show

(Page 10)

(Page 4) Logan Arthouse presents Pat Tillman documentary

From the editor

A

t 24, I am still familiar with the lives and interests of kids, thanks to my adorable 8-year-old niece and 4-year-old nephew. I am well versed when it comes to princesses, trains, cars, paper dolls and role playing. To these kiddos, I also owe my renewed interest in Beverly Cleary’s books about Ramona Quimby. In the last couple of weeks, I’ve breezed through “Beezus and Ramona,” “Ramona the Pest” and “Ramona the Brave.” Reading these books have taken me back to my own childhood and the first time I read about the Quimby family. There are some Ramona stories that have stuck with me since a young age, like when Ramona discovers that a quarter of an hour is not 25 minutes. Ramona is probably one of my favorite fictional characters. I admire her spirit,

akirk@hjnews.com

imagination and the exciting world she creates on Klickitat Street. And, perhaps most importantly, we agree on rain boots — there is more to boots than avoiding soggy shoes. What they look like says a lot about the person wearing them. Ramona also likes to color. Thanks to my niece and nephew, this is another activity I’ve had a lot of practice doing in the last several years, and I love it. I’ve mastered doodles including turkeys, dogs, cupcakes, fire trucks and Frankensteins. “Crayoning made her troubles fade away,” Cleary wrote about Ramona Q. I find that this is the case for me, too. Any handiwork that involves colors and paper or fabric, a needle and thread is therapeutic. For me, creativity is calming. Featured in today’s Cache Magazine is someone who is creative in his canvas and his technique. Check out page 8 to read more. And next week, Manette will be back. — Arie Kirk Cache Magazine assistant editor

New ‘Pirates’ director offers nothing new

(Page 6) Books .......................p.13 Crossword.................p.14

Cute

pet photo of the week

This dog is available for adoption! Pet: Vegas From: Four Paws Rescue Why she’s so lovable:

Vegas is a very sweet girl who loves people (including young kids). She is super smart and knows how to sit, shake, lay down, stay and come. She is very food motivated and loves treats. She is crate-trained, house-trained and has good house-manners. Vegas is a purebred Boxer and is about 4 years old.

Slow Wave Slow Wave is created from real people’s dreams as drawn by Jesse Reklaw. Ask Jesse to draw your dream! Visit www.slowwave.com to find out how.


All mixed up

High school art debuts in celebration

ast Forward Charter High F School will be sponsoring the “Church Street TriFecta” on Saturday,

May 21, from 5 to 7 p.m. in downtown Logan. The Iron Gate Grill will host a student art show, a showing of student videos, and a review of the music performed by the Fast Forward Performance class over the past year featuring the works of The Beatles, Pink Floyd, Nirvana, Led Zepplin, and Radio Head. At Caffe Ibis, students will be performing acoustic solo music and duets. Citrus and Sage will present a student art show along with poetry reading and acoustic music.   This exhibition will also celebrate the Arts Ambassador program, a year-long collaboration with USU ArtsBridge, USU’s Access and Diversity Center and Fast Forward Charter High School, pairing a USU ArtsBridge scholar with an arts student from the alternative high school. Six USU ArtsBridge scholars in three arts disciplines (visual arts, video and music) have mentored six high school arts students in the same disciplines throughout the school year with the intention of encouraging retention, graduation and college attendance through the arts. “We invite everyone to join in these celebrations of creativity and to enjoy the wonderful atmosphere of the businesses that support our efforts around Church Street and Federal Avenue,” says Holly Conger, USU ArtsBridge program assistant and Arts Ambassador mentor. Special program support for these exhibitions was provided by the Utah Division of Arts and Museum’s Random Acts of Art seed money grant program –

iz Lemon Swindle L will be signing her paintings at The Book Table

Fast Forward Arts Ambassador Ashley McKinnon puts the finishing touches on her “Giving Tree” sculpture as ArtsBridge scholar Stephanie Southwick Hickey looks on.

promoting active arts engagement as a means to transform society. The students’ work was also on display from May 12-19 at the Twain Tippets Gallery at USU. “At the beginning of the year our Arts Ambassadors were talking about ‘if’ they went to college. Now they are pronouncing ‘when’ they go to college,” ArtsBridge Program Director Laurie Baefsky said. All six students will be graduating high school in May, and several have

been admitted to Utah State University. The mission of Fast Forward Charter High School is to provide a safe nurturing environment where students who may be at risk of not completing high school requirements can be challenged with curriculum presented to accommodate their unique learning styles. Its primary goals are to help students discover their academic potential and furnish them with the tools to promote lifelong learning and civic responsibility.

Renowned magician to stop in Logan

agician Al Lampkin M is scheduled to perform his family show of clean comedy and magic at the Recital Hall of Magical Moon Toys’ new location, 1940 N. Main, North Logan, at 7 p.m. on May 27. The cost of admission is $5 per person and the public is welcome to attend this family event. Advance purchase of the tickets is rec-

Artist finds inspiration in her faith

ommended and are available from Magical Moon Toys (old location, 1451 N. 200 East, Suite 190, Logan) and Peewee’s Sweets (1 N. Main, Logan). After a lifetime based in Southern California, Al relocated to West Valley City in 2008, but has traveled and performed in 25 countries around the world and appeared on

over 100 television shows including the “Tonight Show” starring Johnny Carson. Al’s performance is being hosted by the Cache Valley Conjurers and will last about 45 minutes. Following the performance he will give a special lecture for magicians. For more information about Al, check out his website at www.allampkinmagic.com

tonight from 4 to 6 p.m. She will be speaking at the Tabernacle afterward at 7. Liz Lemon Swindle has a deep, abiding faith that resonates in her art. She studied fine arts at Utah State University and then worked as a set designer for the Osmond television production company. As her family grew (she and her husband Jon have five children), she wanted to be home with her children and changed her focus to oil painting. In the early 1980s she tutored under renowned wildlife artist Nancy Glazier and soon after established her own impressive reputation as a painter, participating in shows at major galleries in the central and western United States. In 1988, she took a chance and submitted a portrait of children to the National Arts for the Parks competition. After receiving the coveted Founders’ Favorite award, she realized then that there was an audience for her portraits and by the early 1990s she had devoted herself to the topic closest to her heart: her faith. A one-woman show of her art has been traveling to cities nationwide since the summer of 1997. Her prints, canvases, books, and cards can be found at galleries and bookstores worldwide.

Page 3 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 20, 2011

BELOW:!Fast!Forward!Arts!Ambassador! Ashley!McKinnon!puts!the!finishing!touches! on!her!“Giving!Tree”!sculpture!as!ArtsBridge! scholar!Stephanie!Southwick!looks!on.!!


Page 4 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 20, 2011

All mixed up

Summer camps at the Center

egistration is open R for all summer camps at the Center. Camps include CVCA

art camp, CVCA ceramics camp, and dance into a story with Valley Dance Ensemble. Find a camp that sparks your interests and skills by visiting www.cachearts.org. The 2011 Summer CVCA Art Camp promises to be a fun way for children to explore their artistic side and a great summer activity. There are three camps for children ages 5-11. Camps are held Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon or 1 to 4 p.m. The cost is $90 per child and includes a camp T-shirt. Art Camp runs: June 6-16, July 11-21, and Aug. 1-11. This summer schedule provides children the opportunity to explore their creativity through visual art, ceramics, music, drama, cooking, drumming and dance. Each camp is slightly different so stop by the Cache Valley Center for the Arts for details and registration info. We are collecting plastic lids and caps, 20 and 24 oz. soda bottles, used magazines, toilet paper rolls, cardboard salt and

cleanser containers, and CDs for recycled art projects. If you would like to donate these items, call 435-753-6518 ext. 15 for details. Ceramics Camp at the Center caters to all ages and all skills, though children under 5 must be accompanied by an adult (adults can take classes too). Ceramic skills are a part of the creative environment of CVCA Art Camp but they are also offered year-round. There are four opportunities to participate in Ceramics Camp: June 13-16, June 20-23, June 27-30 and July 5-8. The adult ceramic classes begin June 15 and run every Wednesday through July 6. Visit the Cache Valley Center for the Arts online for details. Children and pre-teen/teen classes are $46 plus $15 for materials. Adult classes are $51 plus $15 for materials. Space is limited. During the summer, Valley Dance Ensemble will offer a mixed level modern dance class and a special children’s dance workshop. Join VDE every Thursday from 7:15 to 8:45 p.m. through Aug. 4 for their adult mixed-level modern

dance class. Registration is now open. New this year, VDE will provide a children’s creative movement workshop called Dance into a Story. This workshop runs June 21 through June 23 from 9 a.m. to noon and features stories from Eric Carle. This is the perfect workshop for children ages 3 and up. Registration is only $65 and includes warm-up and dance technique class, guided improvisation and exploratory movement, rhythm class, snacks, workshop T-shirt, art projects, and an informal performance. Registration closes June 15 and requires a minimum of 10 students. All children will demonstrate learning exercises, as well as participate in a large group performance piece in an informal performance for parents and friends Thursday, June 23, at 11:30 a.m. These programs at the Cache Valley Center for the Arts are sponsored in part by funds from the Marie Eccles Caine Foundation – Russell Family; Logan City Cultural Arts Grant and Utah Division of Arts & Museums.

Ariel (Emmalee Clark) breaks up a fight between Trinculo (Hannah Ekstrom) and Stephano (Sophie Cutler) in Logan Youth Shakespeare’s upcoming production of “The Tempest.”

Youth take on ‘Tempest’ open Memorial Day weekend tricksy spirit, a disand run for two weeks. Three A gruntled slave, a powerful wizard and his beautiful daugh- different casts will present matiter all enchant this island paradise. But if you are one of the evil nobles who conspired to oust the wizard from his dukedom over a decade ago, you might want to book a different vacation spot. Logan Youth Shakespeare returns to the Logan Arthouse (795 N. Main) with an energetic and fun-filled full-length production of Shakespeare’s final work, “The Tempest.” Shows

nees at 2 p.m. Saturday, May 28, Monday (Memorial Day) May 30, and Saturday, June 4, and evening shows at 7 p.m. Friday, May 27, Thursday, June 2, and Friday, June 3. Tickets at the door, $5 (adults), $3 (children 5-18). No children under 5, please. Logan Youth Shakespeare is a CVCA program. For more information call 753-6518 or go to www.centerforthearts. us.

Choir provides opportunities for kids ache Children’s Choir C announces auditions for its 20112012 performance choir Monday, May

23, and Wednesday, May 25, from 4:30 to 6 p.m. in USU Fine Arts Center’s Room 214. Cantate Choir is for singers ages 10-15; auditioning youth do not need to prepare a song or schedule a time. Founded in 1989, Cache Children’s Choir’s Academy of Singing has a rich history of teaching children to sing in their natural voice with instructors educated in music and voice and certified in the Orff and Kodaly methods. Cantate Choir, founded by Bonnie Slade, has been beautifully directed by Jill DeVilbiss for many years. DeVilbiss will be joined next season by Dr. Sylvia

Munsen, USU’s new Beverly Sorensen Endowed Chair for the Arts and former director of the Ames Children’s Choir. Cantate Choir is often asked to perform at community events, lend their voices to other arts organizations including the American Festival Chorus and the Cache Valley Civic Ballet, demonstrate for music educators, and compete at choir festivals. Next year’s plans include hosting a “Choirfest” with an internationally known guest clinician and invited choirs from around the state. Cache Children’s Choir is a non-profit organization which relies on generous donations and grants to keep its membership accessible to all. For questions, call 435-752-6260 or go to www.cachechildrenschoir.org.


By Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

T

he death of former NFL football player and U.S. soldier Pat Tillman in 2004 was one that earned national attention from the media and public. Tillman’s family was told by the military and government that he was killed by the enemy in Iraq and was awarded a silver star. Soldiers were told to keep quiet about the truth, that Tillman’s death was actually caused by friendly fire. The Tillman family was told lie after lie until Tillman’s mother decided to find out the truth. The film offers emotional and blunt commentary from the family and some soldiers who served alongside Tillman when he was killed. Director Amir Bar-Lev strives to paint Tillman the way he really was, an Atheist who loved his family, who wasn’t shy about cussing, who excelled in football and wanted to serve his country. In the end Tillman was a man who didn’t agree with the war he was fighting, but was determined to finish his commitment with the Army, despite offers from the NFL. Those who view the film will be taken through the process Tillman’s A free screening of family went through to discover the truth about his death — the count“The Tillman Story” will less hours they spent looking at a few years after he died. As documents, asking questions and, be Wednesday, May 25 soon as I began to look into finally, approaching the governit I began to see that there at 7 p.m. at the Logan ment about wrong doing. were so many flaws about Bar-Lev says the film was been Arthouse. Director Amir his death, and also a lot of shown at major film festivals such myths about his life. The Bar-Lev will be in attenas Sundance, the Seattle Internarecords needed to be set tional and Silverdocs. It’s been dance for a Q&A after straight. played across the U.S., in AfghaniWe began contacting the stan, for military communities and the film. Tillmans and trying to conin non-military communities. vince them that we were “We’ve been very gratified that there to collaborate with the response has mimicked the them. Until we arrived I think most of the family had appeal that Pat had across the wide political spectrum to endure a lot of very bad television about Pat and, and cultural spectrum,” Bar-Lev said. in some ways, they felt they lost him twice. Once in In an effort to screen free educational films for the his death and once in all the mytholiziation that came public, Logan Arthouse has teamed up with the SLC to take his place. Cartoon images had come to take Film Center to show documentaries once a month. The first of these films was “Carbon Nation” in April. his place. When we told them we were not going to continue in that, then they said they wanted to work On the night “The Tillman Story” is screened, BarLev will be present for questions. Here are a few we asked:

What was it like talking to the Tillman family? “They are a group of remarkable people and also very human people and don’t allow anyone to put them up on a pedestal. They are an incredible group of people and hopefully they come through in the film.” When did you decide you wanted to document this story? “I didn’t get exposed to this story in any depth until

“These were voices in the wilderness. No one has ever been held accountable for what happened or given anything more than a superficial punishment. “ — Amir Bar-Lev, director

with us.” What will viewers get out of this movie? “Well, I think Pat Tillman is an American hero and I feel very confident that school children will be taught about him for decades to come. He and his family are people we should aspire to be like. That doesn’t mean they are perfect. Far from it. But they challenge us to think about our notions of heroism.” What was it like talking with the soldiers who served alongside Tillman? “This story is a little like stepping into the rabbit hole. When you meet the family and you meet the soldiers who worked alongside Pat it seems pretty clear that there was criminal negligence in his death and that there was a cover up of what happened afterwards. These were voices in the wilderness. No one has ever been held accountable for what happened or given anything more than a superficial punishment. These are voices of a counter narrative. I think people will find it interesting to see how far off the mark the story was in the mainstream media.” Do you think these kinds of coverups happen more often in the military than we know? “This is a shameful story of soldiers used for cheap political stunts. A lot of what we do in the military is dictated by PR campaigns. And this is a case where the military picked the wrong family to screw with, but I’m sure this happens all the time.”

Page 5 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 20, 2011

Pat Tillman documentary coming to Arthouse


Page 6 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 20, 2011

‘Pirates’ take a turn from witty to weird

isney has opted D to completely leave the number four off of

The Reel Place

this latest installment of the “Pirates of the CaribBy Aaron Peck bean” franchise almost like they’re begging us to forget about the disaster of a movie that was number three. While it really isn’t all that easy to forget how dreadful the third movie was, it’s relatively easy to slide into “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides” expecting a whole new story about the swashbuckling escapades of (Captain) Jack Sparrow. This franchise has been lumbering along since 2003, sucking up box office dollars. The first film was dark, witty, and fun. The second had a collection of great action scenes, coupled with some stellar special ★★ 1/2 effects that accompanied Davy Jones and his “Pirates of the Caribbean: crew of lost souls. The On Stranger Tides” third one became too bloated with numerous Rated PG-13 storylines going nowhere and a movie that felt like a complete mess. This movies doesn’t seem like All he has to do is turn fourth film takes on a the best fit for a series around and say, “Oh” and new director and has a that delves in the weird we get the joke. slightly different, carand bizarre. This directoDuring an actiontoonier feel to it. This rial change is immedipacked beginning that isn’t necessarily a good ately evident when we finds Sparrow eluding thing. realize Jack Sparrow isn’t capture of the King’s Even though the as witty or charming as guards, Marshall uses franchise slowly started he has been in movies painfully purposeful spinning out of control, past. His weirdness is camera shots of different Gore Verbinski seemed why we adore him, but objects as foreshadowto hold it together with Marshall has failed to ing about Sparrow’s his darkly humorous capture it here. At one impending escape. Again, take on pirates and their we know Sparrow is a lifestyles. With this year’s point in the movie Sparrow is walking alone on a resourceful improviser. “Rango” you’ll be able to beach talking to himself. Let the movie play out see what “On Stranger He had just been talking rather than showing us Tides” is sorely missing. to a group of pirates, but exactly how everything There’s a wit and charm now he’s all alone. After is going to happen. It’s that has been lost with admiring, out loud, about almost as if Marshall felt Rob Marshall taking the what he’s just found he that he had to reintroduce helm. Marshall directed turns around and says, a character that we’ve all the highly overrated “Chicago” and the cringe- “Oh yeah. No one’s there.” known for three movies We know Sparrow is now. worthy “Nine.” A man weird, he doesn’t have to I’ve gotten this far and who is known for directspell out the joke for us. haven’t even talked about ing musically-themed

the plot. That’s simple enough. Sparrow, Barbossa, pirate newcomer Black Beard, and the Spanish are all after one thing: The Fountain of Youth. That’s what the movie is about. Along the way they run into killer mermaids, supernatural feats of nature, and each other. Sword fights ensue and characters exchange pirate (un)pleasantries. Then we wonder where all this is heading. It’s

starting to feel like an overwhelming number of characters and subplots just like the third film. There’s a completely useless subplot with a priest that seems to be there just to fill in the scenes that Orlando Bloom would have been in had he been in this movie. Every time we cut back to the priest the movie comes to a grinding halt. Yes, “On Stranger Tides” is better than “At

World’s End,” but not by much really. Marshall and the writers mistake walking through the jungle as adventure. Sparrow feels under used, while Barbossa remains a shining beacon in a rather dim movie. Fans of the “Pirates” films may be happy with this latest installment, but the franchise really hasn’t found any new footing.


Still playing

“Bridesmaids” Rated R ★★★1⁄2 This takes the typically cliched wedding movie genre and completely upends it and reinvents it into something surprisingly daring and alive. But it also takes the Judd Apatowstyle buddy comedy, with its mixture of raunchiness, neurosis and sentimentality, and tailors it to female experiences and sensibilities. That the film achieves both of these ambitious goals simultaneously while remaining (mostly) hilarious is a testament to the power of Kristen Wiig as co-writer and star, and to the awesomely eclectic ensemble cast of strong comedians who surround her. Like the comedies Apatow has directed — and here he serves as a producer — “Bridesmaids” drags on longer than it should. It also features a ridiculous gross-out scene that was unnecessary. “Bridesmaids” is too smart, too clever and too inspired to fall back on formula. The presence of Wiig, front and center, ensures that. She stars as Annie, a Milwaukee woman who’s recently lost her bakery and her boyfriend. The one bright spot in her life is her best friend Lillian (Maya Rudolph), who’s

just announced that she’s getting married and wants Annie to be her maid of honor. But Annie ends up competing with Lillian’s new BFF, the perfect and passive-aggressive Helen (Rose Byrne). 125 minutes. “Jane Eyre” Rated PG-13 ★★★ There’s been no shortage of film versions of Charlotte Bronte’s classic tale of romance and woe. Now, yet another take on the 1847 novel has come to the screen, with Cary Joji Fukunaga directing Moira Buffini’s script, which shakes things up by messing with the narrative structure. It begins with Jane fleeing the imposing Thornfield Hall in hysterics and is told mainly in flashback, which creates tension from the start — even if you know the story. Fukunaga may seem like an odd choice to direct such revered literary material; his last film, “Sin Nombre,” was a contemporary and violent tale of Central Americans making their way through Mexico on their way to the United States. But both are about people searching for a place to belong, and they share a visceral immediacy. The pacing might even be a bit too low-key, but because it is, and because the attraction between Jane

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Page 7 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 20, 2011

Film


E

Painting outside the box

mpty cereal boxes line the top shelf in Jacob Brazell’s family room art studio. Some are donations from family and friends; others he’s rescued from the recycling bin. Eventually, the Golden Grahams depicted on the glossy side of the box will be covered with acrylic paint. He’s been using the boxes for his support since last fall, with inspiration coming from a Utah State University graduate art student who did her thesis exhibition on packaging early last year. “It was just all about how we rely on different boxes and containers for everything — for our food, for our clothing, for our computers. Everything’s in a box,” Brazell said. “And I know she was saying more than that, but that really struck me how much we rely on packaging. As I thought about her show, I started wanting to respond to it.” And the idea of painting on cereal boxes was born. Brazell, 37, has been an artist for the past 17 years, and the Logan resident has used a range of other surfaces for support over the years — everything from canvas, to masonite, to paper. “With a cereal box, all of a sudden I had this very economical material

that didn’t require any setup,” he said. “Other than cutting off the sides so I could have the nice flat rectangle in the middle, it was ready to go. It didn’t need any stretching, any taping, any fuss. And it took the paint really well, especially on the glossy side.” But painting on cereal boxes isn’t the only unconventional element to Brazell’s style. Instead of a brush, he mostly paints with a credit card (it’s actually his old insurance card that he cut in half). “I was just working on some paintings a few years ago and got too much paint on a piece, and I needed to take it off,” he said. “I didn’t have anything, so I found a piece of plastic ... and scraped it off. And all of a sudden, the painting was done. You know, that mistake was this beautiful red and black painting that sold a week later at the (farmer’s) market.” But painting with the cards has taken away some flexibility and control over the artistic process. Certain curves, for instance, can’t be done well. “I used to be very controlling as an artist, and everything had to be just right. And this has introduced less control, more flaws, more mistakes, and I’ve kind of enjoyed that,” he said. “That’s more like life, where

you’re not in control and things just happen and you’ve got to deal with it.” Brazell is an abstract artist, sometimes painting motifs such as crosses or Y’s. But he mostly paints landscapes, which often contain horizon lines — a facet of his work that originates from growing up in Oklahoma. “We lived on the edge of town. And because Oklahoma’s such a rolling place — you know, it’s all hills and rolling plains — the horizon’s about a mile to two miles away in any given direction,” he said. Brazell sells his paintings on Etsy (modernshape.etsy.com) and at Violet Hill in Logan. He thinks his work as an artist will continue to evolve. After all, his work now is a lot different from the pencil drawings he did in high school or the structural pieces he experimented with in college at Utah State, which were full of lines and a little bit of color. His work has gotten more abstract over the years. “This all has been a surprise. I didn’t anticipate changing thing after thing after thing. So I’m assuming it’s just going to be more change,” Brazell said. “Based on my track record, I’ll be doing something else in 10 years, except that I will be doing art.”

Story by Charles Geraci • Photo by Jennifer Meyers • Art by Jacob Brazell

Above: Local artist Jacob Brazell works on paintings at his home in Logan on Tuesday afternoon. Brazell, who has been an artist for the past 17 years, paints on empty cereal boxes. He got the idea to use cereal boxes after seeing an exhibit at Utah State University about packaging. He described this canvas as “very economical material that didn’t require any setup.” Brazell mostly paints landscapes using cards, like his old insurance card that he cut in half. Top right: Brazell’s piece called Y Series Number 9. Middle right: Place Number 31. Bottom right: Untitled Number 39.


E

Painting outside the box

mpty cereal boxes line the top shelf in Jacob Brazell’s family room art studio. Some are donations from family and friends; others he’s rescued from the recycling bin. Eventually, the Golden Grahams depicted on the glossy side of the box will be covered with acrylic paint. He’s been using the boxes for his support since last fall, with inspiration coming from a Utah State University graduate art student who did her thesis exhibition on packaging early last year. “It was just all about how we rely on different boxes and containers for everything — for our food, for our clothing, for our computers. Everything’s in a box,” Brazell said. “And I know she was saying more than that, but that really struck me how much we rely on packaging. As I thought about her show, I started wanting to respond to it.” And the idea of painting on cereal boxes was born. Brazell, 37, has been an artist for the past 17 years, and the Logan resident has used a range of other surfaces for support over the years — everything from canvas, to masonite, to paper. “With a cereal box, all of a sudden I had this very economical material

that didn’t require any setup,” he said. “Other than cutting off the sides so I could have the nice flat rectangle in the middle, it was ready to go. It didn’t need any stretching, any taping, any fuss. And it took the paint really well, especially on the glossy side.” But painting on cereal boxes isn’t the only unconventional element to Brazell’s style. Instead of a brush, he mostly paints with a credit card (it’s actually his old insurance card that he cut in half). “I was just working on some paintings a few years ago and got too much paint on a piece, and I needed to take it off,” he said. “I didn’t have anything, so I found a piece of plastic ... and scraped it off. And all of a sudden, the painting was done. You know, that mistake was this beautiful red and black painting that sold a week later at the (farmer’s) market.” But painting with the cards has taken away some flexibility and control over the artistic process. Certain curves, for instance, can’t be done well. “I used to be very controlling as an artist, and everything had to be just right. And this has introduced less control, more flaws, more mistakes, and I’ve kind of enjoyed that,” he said. “That’s more like life, where

you’re not in control and things just happen and you’ve got to deal with it.” Brazell is an abstract artist, sometimes painting motifs such as crosses or Y’s. But he mostly paints landscapes, which often contain horizon lines — a facet of his work that originates from growing up in Oklahoma. “We lived on the edge of town. And because Oklahoma’s such a rolling place — you know, it’s all hills and rolling plains — the horizon’s about a mile to two miles away in any given direction,” he said. Brazell sells his paintings on Etsy (modernshape.etsy.com) and at Violet Hill in Logan. He thinks his work as an artist will continue to evolve. After all, his work now is a lot different from the pencil drawings he did in high school or the structural pieces he experimented with in college at Utah State, which were full of lines and a little bit of color. His work has gotten more abstract over the years. “This all has been a surprise. I didn’t anticipate changing thing after thing after thing. So I’m assuming it’s just going to be more change,” Brazell said. “Based on my track record, I’ll be doing something else in 10 years, except that I will be doing art.”

Story by Charles Geraci • Photo by Jennifer Meyers • Art by Jacob Brazell

Above: Local artist Jacob Brazell works on paintings at his home in Logan on Tuesday afternoon. Brazell, who has been an artist for the past 17 years, paints on empty cereal boxes. He got the idea to use cereal boxes after seeing an exhibit at Utah State University about packaging. He described this canvas as “very economical material that didn’t require any setup.” Brazell mostly paints landscapes using cards, like his old insurance card that he cut in half. Top right: Brazell’s piece called Y Series Number 9. Middle right: Place Number 31. Bottom right: Untitled Number 39.


Page 10 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 20, 2011

Music, magic show at Thatcher Mansion By Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

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ver seen an egg appear in an empty bag? Or a card pulled out of thin air? There’s probably no doubt you’ve watched someone “magically” join rings together, or make balls switch places under cups. But have you witnessed those tricks with a live violinist playing in the background? Or classical piano music setting the mood? Logan deceptionist Richard Hatch, his wife, Rosemary Hatch, and son, Jonathan Hatch, have found a way to combine music, magic and history together in monthly Matinée Enchantée shows at the Thatcher Mansion in Logan, and so far they’re getting a good response. On Saturday, May 14, the trio performed their second sold-out show for a 56-person audience. The act included both solo performances by Rosemary on the violin, Jonathan on the piano and Richard with his tricks using simple objects such as newspaper, bamboo sticks, water and sand. The Hatches also combined their talents in a few acts, with the afternoon performance having a classical feeling to it. There was no fire, bright lights or fierce animals as some magic shows may use on television or in large venues, but something about the simplicity of it all was charming. That’s not to say the audience wasn’t blown away by the magic though. “He’s incredible,” said Joe Larsen, of Hyrum, specifically mentioning a trick Hatch did using an egg. Two children participated on stage as the egg seemed to disappear and reappear, their faces lighting up at the end when the egg finally ended up in a bag they were holding. “The egg with the little kids was so cute. Those were cute little kids.”

Larsen came to the show with Diana Larsen of Hyrum and Virginia Harris of Smithfield. They all agreed they would suggest the event to friends in the future. “This was nice and refreshing,” Diana said. “I’m glad to know he does a good, decent, happy show. The music was a wonderful side note. It was wonderful in its own way and it was great to have it along with the tricks.” Throughout the act Richard told the history behind several of his tricks and magicians who have been passing down their secrets for centuries. The cup and ball trick, for example, is the oldest continuous performed routine, Richard said, and dates back about 2,000 years. Certain hieroglyphs seem to depict the trick and Greek and Roman writers mention seeing magicians doing the same trick with different variations of objects. “I do love the cups and balls and the rings,” Richard said. During his performance he said tricks using metal rings that magically link and unlink date back at least 1,000 years in China. “There is classic music and classic literature and in magic those are classic effects that have been going for a long time. I like studying those.” Richard has been a full time deceptionist since 1983. Although he studied and earned two graduate physics degrees from Yale, magic had been his lifelong obsession. Rosemary earned a master’s degree in music at Yale and has performed with several well-known musicians. She is now teaching violin lessons in Logan. JonaRichard Hatch performs a magic trick using cups and balls Saturday, May 14. He than studied piano at St. Thomas Unisaid this kind of magic dates back 2,000 years. Inset: Rosemary Hatch and Jonathan versity in Houston, Texas, and at the University of Texas in Austin. Together, Hatch play violin and piano music while Richard Hatch performs tricks. the three of them enjoy practicing and experience it through the eyes of the tée show will be Saturday, June 11, at performing as a family. audiences and see how they react and 2 p.m. at Thatcher Mansion. Tickets “For me, what I like about these see them laughing, applauding and are $10 for adults and $7 for children shows is working with my wife and expressing wonder. That’s what makes under age 12. They can be purchased son. There’s some texture, musical it special for us.” at www.hatchacademy.com. solos, magic solos and ensembles,” The Hatches’ next Matinée EnchanRichard said. “The best thing is to


Noon Music

Noon Music at the Tabernacle and Logan High School will begin Monday, May 31. The program lasts until Aug. 3 and is held most Mondays through Saturdays. Admission is free for all performances and everyone is welcome. Here are a few of the first performances: Historic Logan Tabernacle Tuesday, May 31 Wednesday, June 1 Thursday, June 2 Friday, June 3

Banjo Man and Co. Brandon Clayton: organ Cory Christiansen: guitar Old Lyric Theater Preview

Monday, June 6 Tuesday, June 7 Wednesday, June 8 Thursday, June 9 Friday, June 10 Saturday, June 11

Utah Festival Opera Company Jeremy Threlfall: vocal Fry Street Quartet Jonathan Rose: organ Brandon Lee and sisters: piano Westminster Bell Choir

Logan High School auditorium, 100 S. 100 West, Logan Monday, June 13 Tuesday, June 14 Wednesday, June 15 Thursday, June 16 and violin Friday, June 17 Saturday, June 18

Utah Festival Opera Company Piano students of Liz Sampson Willow Valley Players and Singers Richard and Rosemary Hatch: magician/deceptionist

Monday, June 20 Tuesday, June 21 Wednesday, June 22 Thursday, June 23 Friday, June 24 Saturday, June 25

Utah Festival Opera Company Old Lyric Theater Preview Emily Heap: vocal Mark Gibbons: western vocal Krystalee Anderson: vocal Richard and Merrilee Broadbent and family

Crimson Quartet Inishfre Celtic Dancers with Ted Erickson, story teller

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Page 12 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 20, 2011

The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board rance” b m e m e “R eland d n i r G a by Glend ne today y loved o ved one stay m r fo e m Death ca t death to let my lo e I tried to g o, I am now one done? f tw o d a te s this day is In I do when What will r the day we met t e I rememb to be on a date ye day? g g in n d u d o e Too y our w your say member e re v u a o h y to id d D determine You were t the years ur tears u o Through our laughter and o one g d w a o h n e We’v n are our childre ey belong f o e m o S t; where th They wan gh to do at home e to get u o n don’t hav I have e e by so I m o c s d n Frie am eed to go out and ro take me where I n s up with a bow s nd My friend ould wrap our frie c I wish we

“Journey” . by Leena S at one’s life As one looks il and strife, o rm define her. Thru the tu the road will in p m u b Each wns s and the do With the up n w s and to s, her. Thru the citie as been made to refine h e ic o ch Each pe, arn how to co One must le ith much hope, w Look ahead s map, a reminder, r’ le ve a tr Each urs appear, As the deto clear, ly ct hind her. It is perfe e mirr’r is be th in w e vi The

“The Day the W orld Stopped Tu rning (for me anyway )” by Dale Major Somet

imes the world other times it seem turns slowly and it doesn’t seem to change s that happened jus to tumble, while things all rearra nge t the other day, I felt the conseque of the universe in nces disarray, with me lac the world seems so much colder no king in defenses. w, I know ’cause and it started me I to thinking, wher e’s the ‘global wa can feel it. my kids were all rming’ when you confused, they m need it. istook me for my and there was on brot e who did a doub le-take, no less th her my dogs all bark an my own mothe ed and growled at r m they had to sniff me over good, ’ca e, ’til I called to them by name, use my neighbors thou ght I’d seen a crim things just weren’t the same and now was in e and the mafia the was wise little children that witness protection program, and this was my disgu once liked me an d thought me to ise now cried, and wo be th uld but the worst thing n’t look at me, and then hid behin eir brother d their mother that could happen I rode my horse , though some of to move some co you might scoff ws, and that killer I really should ha bucked me off! ve kept my seat wh but I felt all out of en that pony duck ba ed his head I arrived at a conc lance, like a checkbook, in the re d lusion as to why my world’s turned because ya see, we last Sunday, well, that’s the day I sh ird aved my beard

“Poppy A Touch of Love ” by Joan Krame r As a Poppy, I felt a touch of Love, When, with loving ha Made by those Ve nds, I came alive. terans, who show ed their love, When they fought to keep America free. As a Poppy, I felt a touch of Love, When used by th e American Legio n Auxiliary, To tell of the sacr ifice, of those wh o fought and die A story of those, d, who loved freedom , more than life. As a Poppy, I will feel your love, When you wear me with pride, Showing to all, th at To all who keeps you care, giving thanks, your freedom ali ve.

GET YOUR STUFF PUBLISHED! The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board is a place for our local community to share, well ... anything! From short stories to poems to recipes to photos to unique tips when it comes to rearranging your closet, Cache Magazine wants your stuff! Send it all to mnewbold@hjnews.com, or mail it to Cache Magazine, 75 W. 300 North, Logan, UT 84321. We’ll be waiting!

B


Bangalore beckons in ‘Miss New India’ By The Associated Press

agents and sip coffee at Starbucks. A brutal encounter with a sadistic potential suitor — and the encouragement of her English teacher and mentor — push the 19-year-old Anjali out of her small-town cocoon and into the dizzying, often mystifying, sometimes dangerous, streets of Bangalore. In “Miss New India,” Indianborn Bharati Mukherjee portrays a country where old customs co-exist and often clash with new social mores; a country where Anjali tumbles loose from the limitations of

caste and class, even as her anything. I feel I can change father remains trapped by old my life if that’s what I want!” structures and superstitions. declares a newly emboldened njali Bose has a dazIn this India, some girls Anjali. zling smile, near-fluency endure elaborate The novel grew out of in American-accented English, beauty routines Mukherjee’s fascination with and a gnawing hunger for and pose for heav- India-based call centers and life outside her rural Indian ily retouched the dual identities of the worktown of Gauripur, where the marriage portraits ers, who often assume fully dilapidated Pinky Mahal bears — all in pursuit of fleshed-out American personas. witness to stalled progress the perfect mate. Indeed, the descriptions of and her stolidly middle-class Others — like the call-center world, with parents are forcing her into an Anjali — flock its “accent enhancement” and arranged marriage. to the city where “accent neutralization” classes Anjali, who prefers to call they throw off the and lessons in American pop herself by the more modern shackles of conculture, are mesmerizing. In Angie, is torn between a life vention, rename conscribed by traditional rituthemselves Milals and a life of independence lie or Suzie, and in the gleaming metropolis of enjoy the onceBangalore. One future offers forbidden freethe possibility of a handsome doms of single life. husband found through online “I have seen more and matchmaking services; the learned more in Bangalore other promises a place where tah State University than I have from 20 years in young women like herself extends an invitation Gauripur. Here I feel I can do work as call-center service to the Cache Valley community to participate in the 2011 Common Literature Experience. This year’s selection COMBINED PRINT & E-BOOK FICTION is “Zeitoun” by 1. “Dead Reckoning,” by Charlaine Harris Dave Eggers. “A 2. “10th Anniversary,” by James Patterson tale suffering and Maxine Paetro and redemp3. “Water for Elephants,” by Sara Gruen tion,” said Neil 4. “Something Borrowed,” by Emily Giffin Steinberg of 5. “The Help,” by Kathryn Stockett the “Chigaco Sun-Times.” The HARDCOVER FICTION book tells the 1. “Dead Reckoning,” by Charlaine Harris true story of a 2. “10th Anniversary,” by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro New Orleans 3. “The Sixth Man,” by David Baldacci man who decides 4. “Sixkill,” by Robert B. Parker Keep your reading list updated 5. “The Land of Painted Caves,” by Jean M. Auel not to evacuate at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/ during Hurricane HARDCOVER NONFICTION Katrina and instead watches 1. “Bossypants,” by Tina Fey over his business and helping 2. “Does the Noise ... Bother You?” by Steven Tyler where he can. 3. “Stories I Only Tell My Friends,” by Rob Lowe “The university and local 4. “If You Ask Me,” by Betty White community will find much 5. “She Walks in Beauty,” selected and introduced to discuss from the book,” by Caroline Kennedy said Noelle Call, director of USU’s Office of Retention and PAPERBACK TRADE FICTION Student Success. “There are 1. “Water for Elephants,” by Sara Gruen strong themes about identity 2. “The Help,” by Kathryn Stockett and perspective, how we see 3. “A Visit from the Goon Squad,” by Jennifer Egan ourselves and others, how our 4. “Something Borrowed,” by Emily Giffin impressions of another can 5. “Cutting for Stone,” by Abraham Verghese affect his or her identity and

A

* This week’s New York Times Best-seller List *

those scenes, twenty-something Indians who often have never set foot in the U.S. rattle off references to Brad-and-Jenand-Angelina, Seinfeld, Carrie Bradshaw and Hannibal Lecter. “Miss New India” is at its strongest in its examination of a nation caught between past and future, and the struggle of young people straddling the nexus of the two extremes. But, at its core, the novel functions as a bildungsroman — the coming-of-age story of Anjali Bose.

USU invites community to read novel together

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how our identity can change over time.” For eight consecutive years, the USU common literature book selections have given readers the opportunity to expand their knowledge of cultures and philosophies that might differ from their own. The community is also invited to attend the Connections Convocation which is held in conjunction with the Common Literature Experience. Pulitzer Prize winner Chris Rose of the “New Orleans Times-Picayune” will reflect on “Zeitoun” and post-Katrina New Orleans at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 27. Rose was part of the “TimesPicayune” team that won the 2006 Public Service Pulitzer for their Hurricane Katrina coverage. “Zeitoun” is available at the USU Bookstore. More information is online (www.usu. edu/connections/literatureexperience).

Page 13 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 20, 2011

Books


Page 14 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 20, 2011

Answers from last week

Calendar Friday We will be selling clothing and household items donated by students from on-campus housing Friday, May 20 from 7 p.m. to midnight at the USU Nelson Fieldhouse, 800 E. 700 North, Logan. All proceeds will go to benefit Engineers Without Borders and the USU Student Sustainability Council. Liz Lemon Swindle will be signing her paintings at The Book Table on May 20 from 4 to 6 p.m. She will be speaking at the Tabernacle afterward at 7.

Stokes Nature Center invites curious toddlers, ages 2-3, to join them for Parent Tot from 10 to 11 a.m. Friday, May 20. Explore animals, plants, and nature through music, crafts, and games. This program is parent interactive, and all toddlers must have a parent present to participate and explore along with their child. The program fee is $3 ($2.50 for SNC members). For more info, call 435755-3239 or visit www.logannature.org. Friends of the North Logan Library is looking for donations for its annual used book sale Friday, May 20, and Saturday,

Crossword

May 21, on the grassy area in front of Walmart. Please call Linda at 7874108 or 757-3086 for prompt pickup of anything you want to clear out of your library. She’ll even bring the boxes. All funds raised are used to enhance the North Logan City Library. The sale hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Food $ense girls will share rhubarb recipes at a free cooking and community class at Macey’s Little Theater on Friday, May 20 from noon to 1 p.m. Join us for lunch and healthy ideas.

www.ThemeCrosswords.com

By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Group 7. Rotten 13. One is here, in this clue 18. Aimless one 19. Ross Sea sight 21. ___-American 22. Unachieved medical breakthrough 25. Pentecostal evangelist, to friends 26. Looked intently 27. “One who feeds a crocodile--hoping it will eat him last,” according to Winston Churchill 28. Chew the scenery 30. Bands 33. Ascend 34. Hollow feeling 38. Diana, for one 40. Checked things 41. Healthful berry 43. Bean cover 44. “The ___ Daba Honeymoon” 47. Share a hobby, perhaps 54. Half and half 55. Isuzu model 56. Preceded 57. Wavelike design 58. San Antonio landmark 60. On the ___ 63. Lime tree 64. Votes 67. Belts for beatings 68. Closest, in a way 69. Flattened at the poles 70. To the greatest degree 71. Prize money 72. Mariner’s aid

73. Break a Commandment 74. Garcon’s list 76. It often appears to the right of you 79. India and Nigeria, e.g. 85. Cam- or op- suffix 86. Galley need 87. 3:00 88. Bombasts 89. Anthropophagite 92. Thralldom 96. Land on the Strait of Hormuz 98. Actor Wesley 100. Algonquian tribe member 101. Some cats 103. Of an underground railway 105. Letter opener? 109. Sound problemsolvers 113. ___ doozy 114. Examined minutely 115. Mother of Achilles 116. Center 117. Voguish 118. Verb tense, in Classical Greek Down 1. Big oil company 2. See 7-Across 3. Mystery writer Paretsky 4. Brunch order 5. Garden whistler? 6. Colorful tropical bird 7. Swiss hotelier’s family 8. Burn with desire 9. Demands 10. Certain refrigerant 11. United Nations agcy. 12. Orbit 13. Swagger stick

14. De la Renta and Wilde 15. Constriction of the pupil 16. Bull and rooster, for two 17. Auto pioneer Citroën 20. Fellow feelings 23. Size up 24. Quantity, in mathematics 29. Overlook 31. Neighbor of a Laotian 32. Havoc 34. Lingering trace 35. Haunted house sound 36. Make way? 37. Fill to the gills 39. Truncation indication: abbr. 42. Like some music 44. Organic compound 45. Exhausts 46. Respecting 48. Declaim 49. Soccer ___ 50. Tokyo, once 51. Emmy-winning TV comedy 52. Drops 53. Carlo or Cristo 58. Eye-opener? 59. Kind of ticket 61. Rice University mascot 62. Mentally prepares 63. “Two Women” star 64. Ball game 65. Can’t take 66. Wool source 67. Nickname for football coach Bill Parcells 68. Member of a Bantu people 70. Passion

71. ___ forma 73. Silent film star 75. Book before Romans 76. Hokkaido people 77. Post-career abbr. 78. To be, in old Rome 80. ___ compos mentis 81. Spring 82. Raconteur’s offering 83. Barbershop request 84. Endorser 89. Made steady

90. Selves 91. Split 93. Personify 94. Mideast money 95. Relative worth of a currency 96. Philosopher William of ___ 97. Native New Zealander 99. Isaac or Howard 102. Six-shooter

104. Like some bookstores 106. French novelist Pierre 107. A variety of latin liquor 108. Snoop Dogg CD 110. Negative conjunction 111. Grafton or Lyon 112. Lazy man’s “not withstanding”


An LDS mid-singles dance for ages 31-45 will be Friday, May 20 at the Cobblestone church, 420 W. 100 North, Providence. Dance instruction will be from 8:30 to 9 p.m., with the dance following until midnight. Refreshments will be served. Cost is a $3 donation. Age-appropriate photo ID required for admission to the mid-singles dances, no exceptions. Isael Torres will perform live at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza at 6 p.m. Friday. He will be followed by siblings Tom and Alli Durrant at 7 p.m. Pier 49 is located on 1200 South, north of Maceys. Come enjoy some great pizza and wonderful music. There is no cover charge.

Saturday Rhythm Connection, under the direction of Jan Richins will be holding their 26th annual dance recital Saturday, May 21, at 7 p.m. in the Logan High Auditorium. The public is invited and their is no charge at the door. The Western Singing Duo Tumbleweeds will perform this Saturday, May 21, at Fredrico’s Pizza from 6 p.m. to closing. Everyone is welcome to a free community meal Saturday, May 21 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, 12 S. 200 West, Center in Logan. Non-profit organization Global Neighbor, along with the Cache Valley Food Pantry and other local non-profit groups, will be

planning the free meals every month on the third Saturday. If you would like to donate or volunteer, or if you have questions, contact Rachel von Niederhausern at rachel@globalneighbor.org.

and education. You can register online at www.marchforbabies. org or pick up a walker envelope at Kmart. Walkers are encouraged to raise at least $25. For additional information, please call Cindy Duvall at 245-7996.

Rain or shines, the Cache Valley LDS Single Adults ages 31-45 are invited to go hiking Saturday, May 21. Meet by the pavilion at First Dam at 4 p.m. The hike we take will depend on the weather. Come prepared to have a great time. Sponsored by Cache Singles and the Logan 18th Ward. To RSVP or for a ride call/text/email Joel Stewart at 801-953-7999, or Joel@ztron. com.

River Height’s Lion’s Club Annual All-You-Can-Eat Chuck Wagon Breakfast will be Saturday, May 21, at Ryan’s Place Park from 7 to 10 a.m. Cost is $5 for adults/$4 for kids 12 and under.

Banjoman and Co. will perform sing-a-longs, popular tunes, and original compositions for the public and residents at 3 p.m. at the Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. All are welcome to join us for this wonderful entertainment. For more information please call 7920353. Singles and couples ages 14 through 99 are invited to attend square dance lessons Saturday, May 21, from 7:30 to 10 p.m. at the LDS church located at 1650 E. 2600 North in North Logan. For questions email jerryanda1@live.com or call Jerry, 435-890-2397. The Bear River Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution invite you to our meeting May 21 at the Logan Library East Conference Room at 10:30 a.m. with Scott Bradley, local lecturer on the U.S. Constitution. For more information call Marilynne Wright 435-881-0458 or marilynnewright4@msn.com. March of Dimes, March for Babies will be Saturday, May 21, at Willow Park. Registration begins at 9 a.m., walk begins at 10. Come and join us as we walk five miles to help save babies. The mission of the March of Dimes is to raise awareness about both prematurity and birth defects and to help every baby be born healthy. Funds raised will be used for research, advocacy, community programs

All Smithfield women! Come and enjoy a spring morning walk in the fresh air with your friends. We are meeting at the Sky View High School track Saturday, May 21, from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Walk the track at your own pace and catch up on the news with your friends and neighbors. Restrooms will be available. Street Def will present Logan Hip-hop Series #8 Saturday, May 21, at 8 p.m. at Why Sound. Cost is $5. “Oldies Night” at Pier 49 Pizza! Becky Kimball will perform at Pier 49 Pizza on Saturday at 6 p.m. Becky is a great solo guitarist/singer whose set list includes lots of Beatles and other fun oldies. She will be followed by Irv Nelson at 7 who likewise plays guitar and sings songs from the ’60s and ’70s. Everyone is invited.

Sunday President Robert Poll, former mission president and wonderful speaker, will talk about staying faithful to the gospel at a fireside for Cache Valley single adults ages 31 and up on May 22, at 7 p.m.. Poll has extensive experience in the church. Refreshments served afterwards.

Monday All athletes planning on playing a sport in high school in 2011-2012, it is time for your annual physical. Intermountain Logan Regional Sports Medicine with the help of Canyon View Orthopedics and Rocky Mountain Emergency Specialists will be conducting athletic physicals

for Sky View and Mountain Crest athletes Monday, May 23. This date has been chosen to replace the usual August date for physicals at Logan Regional Sports Medicine. The cost for these physicals is $20, cash or check please. Please report to Logan Regional Hospital Physical Therapy (1st floor) at the assigned time for your sport. If you have any questions please call Logan Regional Sports Medicine 7162880. Times are: 4 p.m., MC and SV volleyball; 4:30 p.m., SV soccer; 5 p.m. SV football; 5:45 p.m., MC soccer and MC XC/MC cheer and dance; 6 p.m., MC football; 6:30 p.m. MC/SV cross country; 7 p.m. MC/SV cheer and dance. Loo Steadman will perform acoustic music Monday, May 23, at 8 p.m. at Why Sound. Cost is $5. The schedule for this week at the Hyrum Senior Center is as follows: Monday, Fit Over 60 at 10 a.m.; Tuesday, chair yoga at 10 a.m., Bunco and cards at 12:30 p.m.; Wednesday, Jerry Jensen at 12:30 p.m.; Thursday, chair yoga and foot soak at 10:30 a.m.; and Friday, Bingo at 12:30 p.m. The center is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. We serve lunches at noon Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday with a suggested $2.50 donation. Please call 2453570 before 10 a.m. to get your name on the list. All seniors in the valley are welcome to come and join us. Quilters are always welcome to come in and help. We have bread and rolls here each day to take. Our monthly newsletter and menus are available the first of each month to pick up. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will hold a biking and ice cream activity Monday, May 23, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Cost is $5. Meet at 335 N. 100 East, Logan. We will bike to Aggie Ice Cream. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures is a nonprofit organization that provides outdoor recreational opportunities for youth and adults with disabilities. We provide adaptive equipment and support. For more information call 713-0288.

The Logan Chapter of NARFE will meet Monday, May 23. We will be going to Lewiston to tour the Willard Jessop Pioneer Museum at 311 S. Main in Lewiston. Participants can meet at the Cache Senior Citizens Center in Logan at 1:30 p.m. to share rides or go directly to the Museum where the tour will start at 2 p.m. All retired and active federal employees and their spouses are invited to attend. For questions call Wallace Taylor at 752-7058.

Tuesday Pintech Computers will be offering free computer classes each Tuesday night at 6 p.m. On May 24, the subject is “Networking Your Home Computers.” Classes are held at 270 N. 400 West, Suite C, Hyrum. Call Don Pinkerton at 435-245-8324 for more information. The USU Extension Office in Cache County will present “Mommy and Me!” nutrition workshop and cooking demonstration Tuesday, May 24, at 11 a.m. in the Cache County Administration Multipurpose Room at 179 N. Main, Logan. The classes are free and include samples of recipes demonstrated. Mothers and fathers are encouraged to come learn how to create quick, tasty, healthy, and inexpensive meals for their families while childcare is provided on site. For more information and to register, please phone 752-6263.

Wednesday Pernicious Wishes will perform hip-hop/experimental music Wednesday, May 25, at 8 p.m. at Why Sound. Cost is $5. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will hold a service project Wednesday, May 25, at 4 p.m. We will be doing highway cleanup along Service Road 30. For more information contact Bryce Patten at programs@ cgadventures.org or call 7130288. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures is a nonprofit organization that provides outdoor recreational opportunities for youth and adults with disabilities.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 20, 2011

Utah State University and Cache County Extension are offering a class about grafting apple trees Friday, May 20, at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. at the American West Heritage Center. Cost is $20. Graft your own apple trees (scion wood and rootstock will be provided). Other materials will be supplied. Register at Cache County USU Extension Office, 179 N. Main St. #111, Logan. Grafting techniques apply to many other plants. Several heirloom apple varieties will be provided along with other modern types.


Page 16 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 20, 2011

CACHE MAGAZINE DINING GUIDE “Look here every week for great deals from your favorite restaurants.” L

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Charbroiled Gourmet Burgers • Gyros • Souvlaki BBQ Pork • Kababs •Calamari Salads Seafood Dinners • Falafel coupon

Hawaiian Swiss Burger (with fries & soda) Only $5.99 coupon

Gyro (with fries & soda)

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Teriyaki Chicken Sandwich (with fries & soda) Only $5.99

NOW Serving Frozen Yogurt With Probiotics

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Mon-Thurs: 11AM - 11PM

Offer Expires 5/27/11 • Must Present Coupon • Limit 4

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Fri-Sat: 11AM - 12 MIDNIGHT 1219 North Main • Logan 753-4355

The Heart of Historic Downtown

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Indian Cuisine & Beyond Cooking Classes at Kitchen Kneads

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Belly SHOW

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130 North Main Street • Logan • 787-1757 or 787- 4011

For information about advertising on this page please call Danalin Preece at 792-7263 Monday – Friday 9:00 am – 1:00 pm

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