Page 1

Cache

Magazine

E-volution How e-books have made publishing easier for local authors

Then The Herald Journal

Now

May 13-19, 2011


Page 2 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 13, 2011

Cache The Herald Journal’s

Arts & Entertainment Calendar

On the cover:

Magazine

Photo illustration by Alan Murray/Herald Journal

From the editor

T

he “Back to the Future” series never gets old to me. I feel like I’ve seen those movies dozens of times, and can picture Marty McFly on his skateboard, Doc getting struck by lightening on the clock tower and George McFly punching Biff in the face. Classic. I really love the second movie though, with the flying cars, hover boards, the futuristic café and 3-D Jaws coming out of movie theaters. If you watch this movie though, you’ll never see a smart phone, tablet computer, or hear anything mentioned about the Internet. E-reader? No way. We just couldn’t imagine that big back then. Back then no one could have dreamed up that people wouldn’t even have to hold a book to read their favorite novel, and that it would all be as easy as a

Slow Wave

What’s inside this week William Moore suggests wines for May

(Page 10)

(Page 4)

Crumb Brothers hosting concert tomorrow

mnewbold@hjnews.com

10-second download and a huge hard drive built into a tiny device. It’s all pretty amazing. Local authors in Cache Valley are getting their books out using avenues like the Internet and publishing companies specializing in e-books. While this isn’t new necessarily, it’s definitely becoming more popular. What if Marty McFly could have been implanted in our future, instead of the one created by Steven Spielberg created more than two decades ago? Can you imagine what he could have done? Instead of just buying one almanac that had the potential to make him rich when he returned to the ’80s, he could have downloaded hundreds of sports history books and made millions! It’s awesome we live in a world where we can carry dozens of books in our palms, that authors can create websites to promote their work and there’s no need for publishers to pay for printing costs if they don’t want to. As Marty McFly would say, “this is heavy.” — Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

‘Jumping the Broom’ may make you cringe

(Page 7) Books .......................p.13 Crossword.................p.14

Cute

pet photo of the week

This cat is available for adoption! Pet: Stardust From: Cache Humane Society Why she’s so lovable: Stardust is a gorgeous and affectionate patch tabby (tortoiseshell/ tabby mix). She has a luxurious medium length coat and beautiful tortie marks mixed in with stripes. She loves to crawl into your lap and be pet.

Slow Wave is created from real people’s dreams as drawn by Jesse Reklaw. Ask Jesse to draw your dream! Visit www.slowwave.com to find out how.


Page 3 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 13, 2011

All mixed up

Kids explore, play and create art at summer camps

tokes Nature S Center will host summer camps for kids ages 4 and up. Space is limited and registration is required for all camps. For more information or to register, call 435-755-3239 or visit www.logannature. org. Half-day Camps cost $25 for SNC members and $30 for non-members.

Play with your food! Ages 4-7 and 8-12 Use fruits and vegetables to play games, create art and, of course, eat! Campers will learn about where food comes from, how seeds grow into plants, and will take home a fun plant to watch grow (and eventually eat). Camps will be held Tuesday, June 21, 9 a.m. to noon (ages 4-7) and Thursday, June 23, 1 to 4 p.m. (ages 8-12). Knee-high Naturalist Ages 4-7 Crawl, splash, dig,

and search your way through the wonders of nature. Be inspired by stories, laugh your way through games, and create nature-themed art during this fun outdoor learning time. Three sessions will be held with a different focus each time. Come to one or all: Thursday, July 7, 9 a.m. to noon, Tuesday, Aug. 2, 1-4 p.m., and Thursday, Aug. 4, 9 a.m. to noon Totally Trees Ages 4-7 and 8-12 Get to know these incredible plants, some of which can grow hundreds of feet tall and live for thousands of years. Find out why they are important to your every day life, get to know our local species and make tree-inspired art including homemade paper. Camps will be held Tuesday, July 19, 1 to 4 p.m. (ages 4-7) and Thursday, July 21, 9 a.m. to noon (ages 8-12).

Music and magic show tomorrow

ollowing the sold-out F success of the debut performance April 9, the Hatch

Academy of Magic and Music will present a second “Matinée Enchantée,” an enchanted afternoon of magic and music in the historic 1878 Thatcher-Young Mansion on Saturday, May 14, at 2 p.m. Deceptionist Richard Hatch and violinist Rosemary Hatch, co-owners of the Hatch Academy, will again be joined by their son, pianist Jonathan

Hatch in a 75-minute program featuring the music of Camille Saint-Saëns, Johann Sebastian Bach, Michio Miyagi and Fritz Kreisler and magic created by Johann Nepomuk Hofzinser, Axel Hecklau, Dai Vernon and Punx, among others. A unique feature of the program is the ensemble aspect with magic and music performed simultaneously. While the performance includes numerous magical and musical solos, it is the ensemble pieces, with

Glee Club performing spring show

ache Valley’s historic C men’s chorus, The Imperial Glee Club, will perform its 95th

annual spring concert Thursday, May 19, at 7 p.m. in the Logan Tabernacle. With Memorial Day fast approaching, the club will present a special patriotic program honoring those who have served in the Armed Forces of the United

States and remember those who have fallen in defense of our country. Special guest artists, Tami Pyfer and daughters Karren and Kim, will also perform songs from the World War II era. Everyone is invited, but especially the members of the local Army Reserves and National Guard and members of the local

American Legion Posts, the Marine Corp league, and veterans of foreign wars, and their families. The Glee Club will perform this same concert at the Assembly Hall at Temple Square in Salt Lake City on Memorial Weekend. Built upon the principles of fellowship and public service, the Imperial Glee Club is one of the oldest male choruses in America.

the magic choreographed to the music, that give this program its special character. Tickets are $10 for adults, and $7 for children under 12. As only 56 seats are available, advance purchase is strongly advised to avoid disappointment. Tickets may be purchased online at the Hatch Academy website www. HatchAcademy.com or by calling 435-932-0017. The ThatcherYoung Mansion is located at 35 W. 100 South in Logan.


Page 4 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 13, 2011

All mixed up

Singing and playing Cache Children’s Choir offers summer music camps The Cache Children’s Choir is offering summer music camps for kids ages 5-11 years old. All sessions will be held at the USU Fine Arts Center July 11-15. Children will be divided into three age groups: 5-6, 7-8 and 9 to 11-year-olds. The 9 to 11-year-olds will spend the camp learning from Rick Steadman who has been teaching music for the last 32 years in Utah and the UK and is currently teaching secondary choral and orchestra in the Sandy, area. Steadman attended Adams State College in Colorado studying music education, then earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Brigham Young University. He also studied at the University of Cambridge and University

Songwriter playing at Crumb Brothers he Bridger Folk T Music Society presents a concert with Danny Sha-

fer on Saturday, May 14, at 7:30 p.m. at Crumb Brothers Bakery, 291 S. 300 West in Logan. Tickets are $13 and are available by calling 7573468, or take your chances at the door. Seating is very limited, so advance purchase is recommended. The concert is sponsored by Import Auto and Utah Public Radio. A songwriter album in the

tradition of Townes Van Zandt, John Prine and Willie Nelson, Shafer’s songs vary from raw solo acoustic to troubadour fingerstyle picking to country blues, to his full Americana band, The Red Glory Ramblers. Shafer’s songs are about real everyday life – about our pains, our sorrows, our joys. Shafer writes honest songs filled with heart and soul. His songwriting weaves through various generations and appeals to both young and old.

Cost is $60 per child. Sesof Utah. He is currently a member of the Mormon Tab- sions run from 9 a.m. Space is limited. Parernacle Choir. ticipants may register for The camp centered around the camp at the USU Chase 5 to 8-year-old children will Fine Arts Center. For more be a positive, fun, creative information call Lori Robmusical experience through erts at 435-563-0618 or visit vocal instruction, instruour website www.cachechilments (xylophones, glockenspiels, drums, etc.), dance, drenschoir.org and click on “Camps.” art, drama and games.

‘Meet Me in St. Louis’ It’s St. Louis 1903. The well-off Smith family has four beautiful daughters. Esther Smith is in love with “the boy next door,” and when she discovers that the World Fair is coming to her town, everyone in St. Louis is thrilled. But then her father announces that the family is moving to New York, which means that the family has to leave St. Louis, the fair and the romance. This musical is playing Mondays, Fridays and Saturdays through May 28 at Old Barn Theater.For reservations visit www.oldbarn.org.


Music Theatre West

I

t only took participating in one play as a seventh grader for Debbie Ditton to get hooked on theater. She sang through high school and graduated from Brigham Young University with a BFA in music dance theater in 1988, and now works as assistant to the executive producer for Logan’s Music Theatre West. The community theater company puts on two shows a year and Ditton is always involved as the music director, assistant director and/ or director. Also a full-time wife, mother and part-time voice teacher, Ditton says her life is full of family, music and, of course, theater. • Music Theatre West formed in 2006 by Jay Richards of Logan. Ditton has been along for the ride since the beginning, working as the music director for the company’s premier of “Little Women” that year. • “I love the chance to provide a positive performance experience for members of the community. For many of them, it is their first time on the stage and their first taste of the bond that is enjoyed by members of a cast.” • Ditton’s first show in Cache Valley was in the chorus of “Kismet” with Cache Regional Theatre Company. She has also been in “Hello Dolly,” “Scarlet Pimpernel,” “Ragtime” and “Crazy For You.” • Her favorite role she ever played was Ado Annie in “Oklahoma” at BYU. • Growing up Ditton says she and her sister used to perform Christmas shows for their family. That was the beginning of a life-long love of music. • “In the sixth grade we dreamed of singing on the ‘Gong’ show. I guess that means I have been singing most of my life. I still love the opportunity to sing as part of the Noon Music in the Tabernacle.” • Ditton, 44, teaches voice lessons to 40 students each week in her studio. Officially she’s been teaching for 20 years. • “I love everything about teaching voice; the look of accomplishment a student has when they have sung at their first recital, the ‘ah ha’ look when they have made a sound they didn’t know they could make, the improvement I can hear in a young student and the nuances that make an experienced student give a performance that is both beautiful and meaningful.”

Broadway camps especially for kids

egistrations are R now being accepted for Music Theatre West’s Summer Broadway Workshop. Workshops will be held for children ages 5-11 and teens ages 12-18. Participants will learn musical numbers, involving singing, acting, and dancing, which will be presented at the end of the workshop in a show for family and friends in the beautiful Morgan Theatre at USU. Rehearsals will be held in the Bullen Center, adjacent to the Ellen Eccles Theatre. The first session, June 6-10, will feature halfday (9 a.m. to noon) workshops for youth and teens. The second session, July 18-22, will also have a half-day workshop for youth, but will feature a full-

day (9 a.m. to 4 p.m.) workshop for teens with special classes taught by local professionals. Start your summer off right in an exciting, positive atmosphere that builds confidence and friendships. See you there! Tuition for half day workshops is $90 and the full-day teen workshop is $150. Each participant will also be required to purchase a white MTW T-shirt (unless they already have one) to wear for the performance. More information, as well as registration forms are available at www. musictheatrewest.org. For questions, please contact Debbie Ditton at 750-8994 or by email: debbie@musictheatrewest.org.

For Information and the location of your nearest Troop, Pack or Team Call; Photo by Jennifer Meyers

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA

752-4278

Page 5 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 13, 2011

Meet DEBBIE


Page 6 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 13, 2011

Film New this week “Bridesmaids” Rated R ★★★1⁄2 This takes the typically cliched wedding movie genre and completely upends it and reinvents it into something surprisingly daring and alive. But it also takes the Judd Apatow-style buddy comedy, with its mixture of raunchiness, neurosis and sentimentality, and tailors it to female experiences and sensibilities. That the film achieves both of these ambitious goals simultaneously while remaining (mostly) hilarious is a testament to the power of Kristen Wiig as co-writer and star, and to the awesomely eclectic ensemble cast of strong comedians who surround her. Like the comedies Apatow has directed — and here he serves as a producer — “Bridesmaids” drags on longer than it should. It also features a ridiculous gross-out scene that was unnecessary. “Bridesmaids” is too smart, too clever and too inspired to fall back on formula. The presence of Wiig, front and center, ensures that. She stars as Annie, a Milwaukee woman who’s recently lost her bakery and her boyfriend. The one bright spot in her life is her best friend Lillian (Maya Rudolph), who’s just announced that she’s getting married and wants Annie to be her maid of honor. But Annie ends up competing with Lillian’s new BFF, the perfect and passive-aggressive Helen (Rose Byrne). Meanwhile, Melissa McCarthy steals the whole film as Lillian’s wildly inappropriate future sister-in-law. 125 minutes.

Still playing “Fast Five” Rated PG-13 ★★1⁄2 If the filmmakers had thrown in giant,

of them six years ago and shape-shifting robots, encouraged them to get talking apes and some together, even though she vampires, the fifth installwas secretly in love with ment in “The Fast and the Dex. But after a few drinks Furious” franchise would at her surprise party, she hardly have been more and Dex end up sleepoutlandish. That said, the ing together — and that movie will get you where inspires them to revisit you’re going. Opting for a feelings they’d both supblowout of a movie with pressed. 113 minutes. no restraints whatsoever, director Justin Lin wisely “Soul Surfer” adds former wrestling Rated PG superstar Dwayne John★1⁄2 Watching “Soul Surfer,” son as a relentless federal agent to go toe-to-toe the story of Bethany Hamwith Vin Diesel’s driving ilton’s comeback after a ace, who’s again on the shark attack, makes you run along with his sister long for a vivid documen(Jordana Brewster) and tary on the subject instead his cop-turned-outlaw pal — preferably one of those (Paul Walker). Any thwack excellent “30 for 30” offerfrom the inevitable Dieselings from ESPN. HamJohnson slugfest might kill ilton’s tale is, of course, an ordinary human, but inspiring. In 2003, when these characters basically she was just 13 years old, are comic-book figures, she lost her left arm to a so they’re able to wail the 14-foot tiger shark while innards out of each other surfing near her Hawaiian and come through with home. An up-and-comer only a cosmetic bruise or in the sport, she wanted to two. It’s nonsense, but get back on her board as when Hollywood does soon as possible. A month nonsense right, it can be later, she was in the water a lot of fun. Lin now is far again. Now, at 21, she more assured as an action continues to compete prodirector, crafting stunts and fessionally. chases that zip along so “Soul Surfer” takes that recklessly you won’t much story of complex emotions, care how utterly imposdetermination and faith sible they are. 130 minutes. and turns it into overly simplistic mush. Director “Something Borrowed” and co-writer Sean McNaRated PG-13 mara’s film is an uncom★1⁄2 Directed by Luke fortable combination of pat, feel-good platitudes, twoGreenfield (“The Girl dimensional characters, Next Door”) and based cheesy special effects and on the novel by Emily generically idyllic scenery. Giffin, “Something BorAnnaSophia Robb, who rowed” introduces us stars as Hamilton, cuts to Goodwin’s character, through some of the gooey Rachel, on the night of her tedium with a naturally 30th birthday. She’s quiathletic presence and noetly freaking out about the nonsense attitude (and the passage of time because she’s still hopelessly single, star of “Bridge to Terabithia” and “Race to Witch the clichéd trademark of Mountain” does much of so many chick-lit heroines. her own surfing). But “Soul Meanwhile, her closest Surfer” consistently tries to pal since childhood, the make her transformation blonde party girl Darcy as easily digestible as pos(Kate Hudson), is about sible. 106 minutes. to marry Dex (Colin Egglesfield), Rachel’s good – All reviews by The Assofriend from law school. ciated Press Rachel introduced the two

Logan Reflections

Photographs Then, Now and In Between By Local Historian Darrin Smith 190 pages of full-color photos,

then, now and in-between of Logan’s rich 150 year history.

This is a “Must Have” picture book for anyone interested in the history of Logan. It’s a great “coffee Table” book and would make a wonderful gift for friends and relatives, or anyone who once lived in cache Valley.

28

$

Available at The Herald Journal, the Old Cache County Court House Gift Shop, The Book Table, Hastings, Borders or American West Heritage Center.

Or... We’ll mail it for you.

33

$

Baugh Motel Today

Baugh Motel circa 1949

Please mail a copy of Logan Reflections to Name_____________________________________________________________ Address ___________________________________________________________ City ________________________________ State ________ Zip ____________


By The Associated Press

umping the J Broom” suggests what it might look like

if Nancy Meyers directed a Tyler Perry movie. It’s got all the glossy production values of a Meyers film like “Something’s Gotta Give” or “It’s Complicated”: expensive clothes and expansive houses in the elegantly upscale setting of Martha’s Vineyard. And the ensemble cast, featuring Paula Patton, Laz Alonso and Meagan Good, offers plenty of eye candy. But it also has all the lowbrow humor and high melodrama of a Perry movie, the broad characters and earnest religious fervor, and the same sorts of jarring tonal shifts between those two extremes. The third act alone will make your head spin, with shocking revelations about family history and identity that it would probably take the average person years to sort through in therapy. In “Jumping the Broom,” the forgiveness comes as quickly as the bombshell. And then it’s time to hit the dance floor. The first feature from director Salim Akil, a veteran of the TV series “Girlfriends,” presents the culture clashes that occur between two black families — one old-moneyed, the other blue-collared — when they’re about to be united through marriage. Patton plays Sabrina Watson, a New York corporate lawyer who’s enjoyed a privileged upbringing. She meets

up with a cute Wall Street up-and-comer, Alonso’s Jason Taylor, when she hits him with her car. Instantly, they’re smitten and in no time, they’re engaged. But plot contrivances in the script from Elizabeth Hunter and Arlene Gibbs keep their respective families from meeting until the day before the wedding — a classy affair beneath a tent at the Watsons’ New England compound. Angela Bassett has some withering moments as Sabrina’s mother, Claudine. You know she’s cultured because she likes to drop French phrases throughout her speech and she’s placed wasabi-covered peanuts in the guests’ gift baskets. Loretta Devine gets some laughs as Jason’s mother, Pam. You know she’s down

★ 1/2 “Jumping the Broom” Rated PG-13 to Earth because she’s a Brooklyn postal worker who’s appalled that they’re not serving greens at the rehearsal dinner. These two formidable actresses deserve better characterization and dialogue than they get here; it would be exciting to see how they could tear into each other with smarter, stronger material. One of the first things they fight about is the broom — the one Pam wants her son and Sabrina to jump over at their wedding to carry on a proud tradition that dates to a time in America when slaves weren’t allowed

to marry. Claudine and her husband (Brian Stokes Mitchell) didn’t jump the broom when

they got married; they believe their family is too sophisticated for that, so Sabrina and Jason don’t need to do it, either. But because the Bishop T.D. Jakes is one of the producers (and has a small role as the pastor performing the ceremony, of course),

Action!

and because the film gives great weight to traditional values, you know that those in favor of broom-jumping are the good guys who will probably win out in the end. First, though, there’s plenty of flirting and bickering among the couple’s respective relatives and friends. And every once in a while, Julie Bowen from “Modern Family,” as the wedding planner and lone white character, pops up and awkwardly tries to fit in by asking questions like: “Is sunscreen something that you would use?” Bowen is likable and has strong-enough timing to make these moments less cringeinducing than they might sound. It’s the rest of the movie that’ll probably make you cringe.

Discover Learn Explore Along the River Trail in Scenic Logan Canyon

755-3239 or visit www.logannature.org

PLAYING MAY 13-19

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12:40 2:55 5:10 7:25 9:40

THOR in 3D (PG-13) 1:20 3:45 6:20 9:20

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Page 7 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 13, 2011

‘Jumping the Broom’ marries broad types

12:35 2:40 4:45 6:50 8:55

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Local authors go digital

A

dmit it, you’ve always wanted to write a book. Maybe a novel about a crime-cracking Algebra teacher with a dry sense of humor, or something Huck Finn-serious. A travelogue, a children’s book, a romance ... seems like we all have a story inside us, if we can only figure out how to get it into print. Several local authors have managed to do just that, although in some cases the definition of “in print” has changed. John G. Nelson jumped through the same hoops many first-time writers do — sending queries to publishing houses, enduring rejection notices, finding an interested publisher, plowing through the editing process — for his recently released book, “Against Nature.” Instead of printing thousands of copies, however, Wild Child Publishing is selling Nelson’s thriller online for $6.99 per download. The book may not ever be put on paper.

By Lance Frazier

“You buy it like buying any book online, except instead of it being mailed to you, it’s on your Kindle in about 10 seconds and you have it forever,” Nelson said. That trend toward online publishing and book purchasing is accelerating, Nelson said, noting that “the benefit for the publisher is there’s no overhead costs,” and the company doesn’t get stuck with a warehouse full of novels. It’s working for some — Amanda Hocking’s selfpublished e-books made her a millionaire, and Stephen King and other notable writers are releasing novels over the Internet. Shaunda Kennedy Wenger is a Cache Valley writer who is exploring these opportunities. She has published a cookbook in the national market with Ballantine Books at Random House, as well as five children’s books in the educational market, and has pursued e-book and print-ondemand publishing with createspace at Amazon to release two of her titles, “The Ghost in Me,” and “Little Red Riding Hood, Into the Forest Again.” Wenger said e-book publishing is “different, but it’s not.”

“Both methods reach different segments of the population who are reading,” she said, noting that close to 40 percent of Amazon’s book sales are electronic. “I only see a disadvantage if an author doesn’t publish in both media, given the rising popularity of e-readers and continued popularity of printed books among book lovers.” E-publishing is not without obstacles. Different publishers have different formats, so authors must either re-format their work for each submission or pay to have it done. Likewise, the various e-reader devices are not compatible either, giving the industry a potential VHS vs. Betamax-style battle. Carole Thayne Warburton, one of the valley’s better-known writers, has written four books, two of which are out in e-format. Those two, “A Question of Trust,” and “False Pretenses,” Warburton released herself through Amazon’s createspace. Another of her books, “Sun Tunnels and Secrets,” is also scheduled to be released in e-format. “It’s a little early to tell on how it will change for me personally, but e-publishing adds another

option and one that will open the flood-gates so to speak,” Warburton said. “Now anyone can become published. “I think e-publishing is exciting and writers need to look at it as an opportunity. I think publishers are still a little resistant. And our local publishers, mine included, are being a little slow to jump on the bandwagon.” Another local writer, Judith Torres, went the ink-on-paper route and self-published “Duck Duck Moose,” through a printer in China. The illustrated children’s book will be distributed through Lazy One Pajama company (along with matching pajamas) to more than 300 stores in the United States. It is sold in Logan at The Book Table, Hastings, the Cache Visitors Center and at the Lazy One Outlet. “It has been a dream come true to have my first picture book to have and to hold from this day forward,” Torres said. “It has brought me so much joy to go to schools and libraries and read it to kids and to have it so well received.” See E-BOOKS on 12

Alan Murray/Herald Journal

Carole Thayne Warburton Name of most recent book: “Just Shy of Paradise” Age when completed first book: 43 Book’s genre: Suspense/romance/ mystery I would recommend my book to: Anyone, especially those in Cache Valley Publisher: Walnut Springs Press Best advice I got about writing: Read, read, read, but don’t just read, read as a writer to discover the process of writing.

John G. Nelson Name of most recent book: “Against Nature” Book’s genre: Dystopian Thriller Publisher: Wild Child Publishing Age when completed first book: 48 How long did it take to write first book: About four years from conception to publication. Best advice I got about writing: Get your story from your head to paper. Just start writing and worry about cutting and editing later. If it takes 600 pages to get to a 300 page manuscript, then so be it.

Judy Torres Name of most recent book: “Duck Duck Moose” Age when completed first book: 54 Book’s genre: Picture Book I would recommend my book to: Children ages 2 to 8 years Publisher: Self-published and distributed by the Lazy One Pajama Company and local booksellers. How long did it take to write your first book: It took about 6 months to polish up the manuscript and a year from start to finish to get it printed. Favorite book you’ve read: My all time favorite book is “The Education of Little Tree” by Forrest Carter

Shaunda Kennedy Wenger Name of most recent book: “The Ghost in Me” and “Little Red Riding Hood, Into the Forest Again” Age when completed first book: Nine. I was in third grade and we had to make an illustrated bound book. I remember we used sticky wallpaper for the cover, and wasn’t very excited about my wallpaper because it looked like something in my grandmother’s house. Book’s genre: “The Ghost in Me” is realistic fantasy. “Little Red Riding Hood, Into the Forest Again,” is a fractured folk tale. Publisher: Essemkay Company Productions, which is my own self-publishing company.

Dianne Meldrum Name of books published: I have actually published four books since July of last year. My first book, “Whispers From Heaven,” was ready in November 2010, then it also became an e-book shortly after. Then within the last two months my last two books were finished. Their titles are: “Sunset Whisperings” and “Love’s Whispers of the Soul.” Book’s genre: Poetry Publisher: Xlibris How long did it take you to write your first book: I’ve been compiling poems for these books since 1996, as well as six poems that came to me when I was a late teenager. These poems are also included in my first book.


Local authors go digital

A

dmit it, you’ve always wanted to write a book. Maybe a novel about a crime-cracking Algebra teacher with a dry sense of humor, or something Huck Finn-serious. A travelogue, a children’s book, a romance ... seems like we all have a story inside us, if we can only figure out how to get it into print. Several local authors have managed to do just that, although in some cases the definition of “in print” has changed. John G. Nelson jumped through the same hoops many first-time writers do — sending queries to publishing houses, enduring rejection notices, finding an interested publisher, plowing through the editing process — for his recently released book, “Against Nature.” Instead of printing thousands of copies, however, Wild Child Publishing is selling Nelson’s thriller online for $6.99 per download. The book may not ever be put on paper.

By Lance Frazier

“You buy it like buying any book online, except instead of it being mailed to you, it’s on your Kindle in about 10 seconds and you have it forever,” Nelson said. That trend toward online publishing and book purchasing is accelerating, Nelson said, noting that “the benefit for the publisher is there’s no overhead costs,” and the company doesn’t get stuck with a warehouse full of novels. It’s working for some — Amanda Hocking’s selfpublished e-books made her a millionaire, and Stephen King and other notable writers are releasing novels over the Internet. Shaunda Kennedy Wenger is a Cache Valley writer who is exploring these opportunities. She has published a cookbook in the national market with Ballantine Books at Random House, as well as five children’s books in the educational market, and has pursued e-book and print-ondemand publishing with createspace at Amazon to release two of her titles, “The Ghost in Me,” and “Little Red Riding Hood, Into the Forest Again.” Wenger said e-book publishing is “different, but it’s not.”

“Both methods reach different segments of the population who are reading,” she said, noting that close to 40 percent of Amazon’s book sales are electronic. “I only see a disadvantage if an author doesn’t publish in both media, given the rising popularity of e-readers and continued popularity of printed books among book lovers.” E-publishing is not without obstacles. Different publishers have different formats, so authors must either re-format their work for each submission or pay to have it done. Likewise, the various e-reader devices are not compatible either, giving the industry a potential VHS vs. Betamax-style battle. Carole Thayne Warburton, one of the valley’s better-known writers, has written four books, two of which are out in e-format. Those two, “A Question of Trust,” and “False Pretenses,” Warburton released herself through Amazon’s createspace. Another of her books, “Sun Tunnels and Secrets,” is also scheduled to be released in e-format. “It’s a little early to tell on how it will change for me personally, but e-publishing adds another

option and one that will open the flood-gates so to speak,” Warburton said. “Now anyone can become published. “I think e-publishing is exciting and writers need to look at it as an opportunity. I think publishers are still a little resistant. And our local publishers, mine included, are being a little slow to jump on the bandwagon.” Another local writer, Judith Torres, went the ink-on-paper route and self-published “Duck Duck Moose,” through a printer in China. The illustrated children’s book will be distributed through Lazy One Pajama company (along with matching pajamas) to more than 300 stores in the United States. It is sold in Logan at The Book Table, Hastings, the Cache Visitors Center and at the Lazy One Outlet. “It has been a dream come true to have my first picture book to have and to hold from this day forward,” Torres said. “It has brought me so much joy to go to schools and libraries and read it to kids and to have it so well received.” See E-BOOKS on 12

Alan Murray/Herald Journal

Carole Thayne Warburton Name of most recent book: “Just Shy of Paradise” Age when completed first book: 43 Book’s genre: Suspense/romance/ mystery I would recommend my book to: Anyone, especially those in Cache Valley Publisher: Walnut Springs Press Best advice I got about writing: Read, read, read, but don’t just read, read as a writer to discover the process of writing.

John G. Nelson Name of most recent book: “Against Nature” Book’s genre: Dystopian Thriller Publisher: Wild Child Publishing Age when completed first book: 48 How long did it take to write first book: About four years from conception to publication. Best advice I got about writing: Get your story from your head to paper. Just start writing and worry about cutting and editing later. If it takes 600 pages to get to a 300 page manuscript, then so be it.

Judy Torres Name of most recent book: “Duck Duck Moose” Age when completed first book: 54 Book’s genre: Picture Book I would recommend my book to: Children ages 2 to 8 years Publisher: Self-published and distributed by the Lazy One Pajama Company and local booksellers. How long did it take to write your first book: It took about 6 months to polish up the manuscript and a year from start to finish to get it printed. Favorite book you’ve read: My all time favorite book is “The Education of Little Tree” by Forrest Carter

Shaunda Kennedy Wenger Name of most recent book: “The Ghost in Me” and “Little Red Riding Hood, Into the Forest Again” Age when completed first book: Nine. I was in third grade and we had to make an illustrated bound book. I remember we used sticky wallpaper for the cover, and wasn’t very excited about my wallpaper because it looked like something in my grandmother’s house. Book’s genre: “The Ghost in Me” is realistic fantasy. “Little Red Riding Hood, Into the Forest Again,” is a fractured folk tale. Publisher: Essemkay Company Productions, which is my own self-publishing company.

Dianne Meldrum Name of books published: I have actually published four books since July of last year. My first book, “Whispers From Heaven,” was ready in November 2010, then it also became an e-book shortly after. Then within the last two months my last two books were finished. Their titles are: “Sunset Whisperings” and “Love’s Whispers of the Soul.” Book’s genre: Poetry Publisher: Xlibris How long did it take you to write your first book: I’ve been compiling poems for these books since 1996, as well as six poems that came to me when I was a late teenager. These poems are also included in my first book.


Page 10 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 13, 2011

Few Beaujolais wines available in Logan and Utah

P

eople ask me if I read the wine articles in other newspapers. I do not read the Wall Street Journal, but friends often give me articles on wine from that paper. I do read the New York Times and their wine journalist will put up wines for tasting by several New York City oenologists. Recently they did wines from the 2009 vintage French Beaujolais, which are rated very high. They tasted 20 and rated 10 Beaujolais wines. I could not find a single one in the Park City Wine store last week. There are many European wines that do not appear in Utah due to shipping costs. The cost of shipping by sea is only pennies per bottle, but the cost soars as land transport is used. Most of the imported wines come here through California ports. The only 2009 Beaujolais in Logan is the 2009 DuBoeuf Morgon Beaujolais at $13.99, but rated 90 by the Wine Advocate. I also purchased the 2009 Fessy Moulin-a-Vent Beaujolais at $16.99 that was rated 90

Cache Wines By William Moore

in the Park City store. I must say that while I liked these fruity wines I would not rate them at 90. The Rosé wines from France are a different story. I purchased two in Park City that are from Southern France. These are

Recommended F 2009 DuBoeuf Morgon Beaujolais at $13.99 F 2009 Chateau de Segries Tavel Rosé at $17.99 F NV Tio Pepe Fino Sherry at $14.99 F Lustau Almacenista Amontillado at $16.51 F 2009 Tapena Garnacha at $11.01 F 2009 Cupcake Cabernet Sauvignon at $11.99 F 2007 Guigal Cotes du Rhone at $15.99 F 2008 Villa Maria Marlborough Riesling at $14.95 F 2009 Jacob’s Creek Riesling at $12.99. fruity, dry and luscious made from Grenache and Cinsault grapes. I especially liked the 2009 Chateau de Segries Tavel Rosé at $17.99. We never see Tavel Rosé wines in Logan and I find that sad. I have been hooked on Spanish Sherries this winter. I know that these are not popular wines

in Logan since they have been relegated to a shelf over by the beer supply. I still remember 50 years ago going to the famous Simpson’s-in-the-Strand in London to have a traditional English dinner. This restaurant has been in business for 170 years. While waiting for a table in the lounge I had my first Tio Pepe Fino Sherry. This Sherry is available here for $14.99, and I revisited this light and dry sherry last month. Tio Pepe Fino has been made for over 150 years, and is still the most popular dry sherry. The special Lustau Almacenista Amontillado at $16.51 that I wrote about several months ago was gone, but now there are several more bottles only in the Logan store. Last week I was offered a glass of this Sherry as an aperitif at a friend’s house. This wine is rated 92 by the Wine Advocate, and I heartily agree. I bought the Lustau Almacenista Palo Cortado Sherry in the Park City store. The average age of this solera beauty is about 15 years. All of the Lustau Sherries in our Logan store are highly

rated, and they range from the dry aperitif to sweet dessert Sherries. Part of the beauty of wines is that they bring back memories of nice dinners and wonderful friends. My son in Florida asked me to try the 2009 Cupcake Cabernet Sauvignon at $11.99. Light on the tannins, this is an easy drinking Cabernet from the Central coast of California. Highly rated is the 2007 Guigal Cotes du Rhone at $15.99 from France. This is a red with great dark berry flavors made from a blend of 50 percent Syrah and 40 percent Grenache and 10 percent Mourvedre. From Spain there is the 2009 Tapena Garnacha at $11.01 with flavors of dark berries. For white wines I like the 2008 Villa Maria Marlborough Riesling at $14.95 from New Zealand, and the 2009 Jacob’s Creek Riesling at $12.99 from Australia. These are dry wines with delicate citrus flavors. Feedback for William Moore can be sent to wmoore26@gmail. com.


Rewriting your parents young Slightly I C Off Center

generally run from nostalgia like a hippie from a shower, partially because I mostly believe in that mantra “live in the now” and partially because it’s too painful. Take a look at old pictures of yourself. The bad news is that you are never going to look that young again. The good news is you are never going to wear those stupid clothes and hairstyles again. In the days in between Mother’s and Father’s Days I’ve decided to cautiously wade into the shallow end of the nostalgia pool being careful not to get sucked in to the deep. I’ve been going through a couple boxes of inherited photos not to laugh at myself but to re-imagine my parents. Photos are great for this because they allow you to imagine what your parents were thinking and feeling in those frozen moments without all the emotional baggage that goes with actually having them in the same room with you. I created the back story for the photo that accompanies this column. On some undetermined day in 1958 my mom and dad went out on a glowing springtime Friday night in St. Louis when they spontaneously popped into the drug store where all those photo booths were in that era. Mom’s rockin’ the pearls and Dad’s wearing the suit he bought the day he got out of the Navy. It cost the ridiculous price of $1.75 to use this magic machine that gives you photos almost instantly and it only takes quarters so Dad has to go to the cashier to get change. The cashier thinks briefly about requiring him to

COMMON GROUND DESTINATION TRIPS

By Dennis Hinkamp

buy something to get change but she can see he is so nervous and giddy that she just smiles and puts eight quarters on the counter. She’s seen all sorts of weirdos use the privacy of these booths for who-knows-what, but this couple is too well dressed to be considering any monkey business. Dad blushes and slides the quarters off the counter into his hand and meets Mom back at the photo booth. These things aren’t really made for two people so Mom sits on Dad’s lap making her appear to be taller than him. Where am I? They either left me out in the car because you could do that back then without worrying about crazies in every parking lot. Or, more likely, I was at Grandma’s house while they were out on this date. In the first photo Mom is more concerned that someone might be spying on them outside the booth so she forgets to look at the camera. In the second photo they get it right and in the third they loosen up. The final photo is just candid bliss. Remember a

time when you were that happy. Search around in your own dusty boxes of photos. Or, I suppose for the modern era, ancient hard drives and assorted types of discs. You really need to see your parents as young and silly in love. It will melt all your petty angst. I need to think of my dad as the guy who missed a couple important free throws, rather than the tough-guy policeman. I need to think of my mom as the attractive young woman fighting off creepy bosses in her many secretarial jobs, rather than just the nurturing mother and wife. I need to think of them as young and stupid and just trying to figure it all out. I was a baby of that boom and the country was young and drunk with power and possibilities. You can see it in the photos. My parents really were happy and enjoying that American Dream that has become both cliché and epitaph today. They liked TV dinners, Pontiac convertibles and big, stupid dogs. On a spring evening in 1958, life was good and all things were possible. You can rewrite your own parents without creating a complete work of fiction. Just try to think of them as your age; whatever that age is.

ommon Ground Outdoor Adventures has planned several trips for people with disabilities this summer. For cost, to register, or for any other questions contact 713-0288.

Dennis Hinkamp’s parents died in 2007 and 2008 this was meant to be a tribute of joy, not of sadness. He is among a number of freelance writers whose columns appear in The Herald Journal as part of an effort to expose readers to a variety of community voices. He is not an employee of the newspaper. Feedback at dhinkamp@msn.com.

Fontenelle Reservoir Aug. 16 – 18 On this trip we will be visiting the little known Fontenelle Reservoir in Wyoming, where we will be able to canoe the lake and canoe the calm water that floats out of the dam.

SanRafael Swell May 18 – 21 Come check out the petroglyphs in this spectacular land. Wind and water have carved fantastic and unique goblin-like sculptures out of rock, creating an outdoor playground that inspires the imagination. Yellowstone June 1 – 4 June is when all the baby animals come out to play and we will be covering the whole park trying to find the cute little guys and girls. We will also be visiting Old Faithful along with the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone. Green River Rafting June 15 – 18 We will be rafting through the Green River below the Flaming Gorge Dam. Red Fish Lake July 20 – 23 Redfish lake is one of the best kept secrets of Idaho. We are heading up there to enjoy the scenery, the lake and all the natural hot springs that are along the river. Snake River day trips July 26 and Aug. 12 We will be leaving early for a day rafting on the beautiful Snake River. It has class III rapids and beautiful scenery. Jackson Hole rafting for people with multiple sclerosis Aug. 4 – 6 We will be staying at Teton science school. The first night we will be boating on Jenny Lake and the second day rafting down the Snake River at the base of the Tetons.

Arches National Park Aug. 30 – Sept. 2 On this trip we will be hiking and sightseeing throughout Arches National Park.


Page 12 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 13, 2011

Culture

Chicago prepares for life without Oprah Winfrey By The Associated Press

efore Oprah Winfrey B looks west to Los Angeles and her new cable station the

talk show queen finds herself saying goodbye to her beloved Chicago. “It feels like Scarlett leaving Tara,” Winfrey told The Associated Press in December before the Oprah Winfrey Network’s launch. “When I first flew into Chicago on Labor Day 1983 to audition for ‘A.M. Chicago,’ I remember thinking when I left the city that if I don’t get the job I’m gonna find a way to get back because I just love the city,” she said. There will be two difficult moments when “The Oprah Winfrey Show” ends, she said, saying goodbye to her viewers and saying goodbye to Chicago. “Because it couldn’t have happened without Chicago,” she said. “It couldn’t have happened without Chicago.” Winfrey came to Chicago in 1984 to WLS-TV’s morning talk show, “A.M. Chicago.” A month later the show was No. 1 in the market. A year later it was renamed “The Oprah Winfrey Show.” During those early days Winfrey had a small corner office with two rows of desks where her producers sat, remembers Joel Daly, a retired longtime news anchor for the ABC affiliate. “You’d go down after her show and she’d be walking around in a bathrobe and slippers,” Daly said. Winfrey outgrew those quarters, getting more studio space until she opened Harpo Studios on Chicago’s West Loop neighborhood in 1990. “We moved here 10 years ago to a section of Randolph Street that was pretty desolate, but it always felt safer because

AP Photo

In this photo taken May 11, fans applaud as talk-show host Oprah Winfrey is honored with a street named for her outside her Harpo Studios in Chicago by Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, left, and Bobby Ware, commissioner of the Chicago Department of Transportation.

we knew Harpo was down the street,” said Ina Pinkney, who owns the breakfast and lunch restaurant Ina’s. Winfrey is often given credit for transforming the once-gritty industrial enclave to a neighborhood filled with families pushing strollers and walking their dogs. “When I told people I was down the street from Oprah that was enough when you invoke her name you invoke a magic,” Pinkney said. “She took a stand and she made this neighborhood what it is.” Art Smith was once Winfrey’s personal chef, a job he earned after cooking lunches for Winfrey at Harpo. He now is executive chef and co-owns Chicago’s upscale Southern restaurant Table fifty-two. Winfrey brought celebrities, politicians and other famous and interesting people to Chicago, Smith said. He remem-

bers becoming star-struck when Winfrey told him former South African President Nelson Mandela was visiting. “You can’t go any place in the world that doesn’t know who Oprah Winfrey is or Chicago,” Smith said. “She’s been such an important part of the fabric of the city.” Winfrey was visible in Chicago, shutting down Michigan Avenue in September 2009 to film her season premiere with the Black Eyed Peas. “Isn’t this the most fabulous city in the world?” Winfrey yelled to more than 20,000 fans who crowded Chicago’s Magnificent Mile. Winfrey walked outside a Gap store with U2’s Bono and brought more than 170 American Olympians to the city’s Millennium Park. She lobbied for Chicago in the city’s unsuccessful bid to host the Olympics.

“Only Oprah can close down Michigan Avenue and make it not feel like a local event,” said

E-books Continued from 8 Wenger has learned enough about the publishing process that she and a group of other Utah writers hope to form a publishing cooperative of sorts to “pool our strengths and help each other out as far as navigating the new digital world.” “Marketing opportunities for both types of publishing remains the same on both fronts, in my opinion,” she added. “It just depends on how much money an author/ publisher is willing to invest, and how much attention a

Melody Spann-Cooper, president of WVON and WRLL radio stations in Chicago. “She really put a spotlight on us in a way that nobody else could.” Winfrey didn’t have to do give Chicago the exposure, said outgoing Mayor Richard Daley. “She could have went to L.A, she could have went any place but she’s in Chicago,” he said during a news conference this month after his last city council meeting. “She’s a wonderful citizen of our city we’re very proud of, and proud of her contribution.” Those contributions include $150,000 to sponsor a room for dogs at the animal shelter PAWS Chicago after Winfrey’s beloved cocker spaniel Sophie died. “I don’t think of her of leaving Chicago,” PAWS founder Paula Fasseas said. “I just think her universe is expanding. She’s so much the heart and soul of Chicago, how she came here as unknown and became one of the most successful women in our world today.”

blog or newspaper or magazine or radio show wants to give to the new authors being published as compared to the established ones that are continuing to produce great material. “Both methods have their pluses,” Wenger continued. “I think there will definitely be more e-book users. The way classrooms are today, digital is part of the curriculum. Year by year, there will definitely be more people reading e-books, although a lot of people like print too. But I think e-books will definitely win out.” Of course for that to happen, consumers must have e-readers, but those are becoming cheaper and more prevalent.


‘Floor of Heaven’ strikes gold with its true tale By The Associated Press

ith the West givW ing way to civilization, tough old birds who

disdained progress and younger roosters longing for a frontier of their own looked north. Way, way north. Alaska and the Yukon offered all comers a chance for adventure, riches and a cold, lonely death. “The Floor of Heaven: A True Tale of the Last Frontier and the Yukon Gold Rush” relies on diaries and memoirs in revisiting one of the final chapters of American history in which firearms had to back up grit and determination. Nature, not to mention the avarice of others, was a formidable opponent for prospectors in the late 1800s. Setting out to discover gold could mean carrying hundreds of pounds of supplies, literally crawling up steep ranges, building boats in the wilderness and praying that winter would neither come too early nor stay too late. In narrative nonfiction, casting is everything. Author Howard Blum burdens his real-life characters with packs of facts essential for bringing significance to his subject. They carry their loads well, thanks to Blum’s fine sense of storytelling. Among the principals is George Carmack, a California sheepherder and Marine Corps deserter who found a new life among Tagish Indians. Yet he could not shake the belief that he could still strike it big if he just kept trying. Missing the adventure that came on cattle drives from Texas to Kansas, Charlie Siringo left his thriving ice

* This week’s New York Times Best-seller List * HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “The Sixth Man,” by David Baldacci 2. “The Land of the Painted Caves,” by Jean M. Auel 3. “Bel Air Dead,” by Stuart Woods 4. “A Turn in the Road,” by Debbie Macomber 5. “The Fifth Witness,” by Michael Connelly HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “Bossypants,” by Tina Fey 2. “Unbroken,” by Laura Hillenbrand 3. “Stories I Only Tell My Friends,” by Rob Lowe 4. “Kaboom!” by Darell Hammond 5. “Liberty Defined,” by Ron Paul Paperback Mass-Market Fiction 1. “Water for Elephants,” by Sara Gruen 2. “Savage Nature,” by Christine Feehan 3. “Worth Dying For,” by Lee Child 4. “The Search,” by Nora Roberts 5. “Moonlight Cove,” by Sherryl Woods

cream and oysters shop to become a top undercover operative with the Pinkerton detective agency. He set off for Alaska to figure out who was stealing from a gold mine — and to distance himself from a personal tragedy. Then there’s Jeff Smith, nicknamed “Soapy” for having sold nickel bars of soap with the phony promise that a $100 bill might be inside the wrapper. He, too, went north, but with the goal of fleecing prospectors of their hard-earned gold rather than dishing for his own. Dramatic and colorful with touches of humor and poignancy, “The Floor of Heaven” has the spark of a television miniseries and the depth of a novel. That Blum’s tale of adventure is tall but true makes it all the more enjoyable, particularly because its heartbeat is so keenly American. Douglass K. Daniel is the author of “Tough as Nails: The Life and Films of Richard Brooks” (University of Wisconsin Press).

Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/

Paperback Nonfiction 1. “Heaven is for Real,” by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent 2. “The Immortal ... Henrietta Lacks,” by Rebecca Skloot 3. “Born to Run,” by Christopher McDougall 4. “The Internet is a Playground,” by David Thorne 5. “Inside of a Dog,” by Alexandra Horowitz

Novel offers fast ride, plenty of twists By The Associated Press

onway Sax is a hasC been racing driver, an ace auto mechanic, a recovering

alcoholic and a refreshing new character solving hardcore crimes. Sax is trying to put his life back together after boozing himself off the racing circuit and out of a moneymaking repair shop specializing in fine cars. These days his concern is rehabilitating a house on the wrong side of Framingham, Mass., and establishing a relationship with a woman and her daughter who are becoming increasingly important to him. Sax has another overriding loyalty — to the Barnburners, an Alcoholics Anonymous group that helped him get straight. Sax would do anything for a Barnburner, even a lowlife blowhard like Tander

Phigg. So when Phigg asks him to retrieve his beloved MercedesBenz and the money from the repair shop that was supposed to fix it, Sax reluctantly steps up. A selfdescribed grease monkey, Sax uses that ability to size up the shop that has Phigg’s car, and the people running it. After that, things turn complicated and bloody. Sax is very much a bluecollar hero — hardworking and down-to-earth — who finds himself in an increasingly dangerous situation that eventually has him fighting

for his life. Ulfelder, a race car driver and co-owner of a race car building company, doesn’t overload the book with technical jargon or inside information. Non-racing and non-car fans will appreciate his hero as well as his crisp plotting, hardboiled style and realistic dialogue. In his debut novel, Ulfelder deftly solves a mystery, and explores how family ties are established and what they mean. “Purgatory Chasm” is a book that holds interest on many levels.

Page 13 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 13, 2011

Books


Page 14 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 13, 2011

Answers from last week

Calendar Friday Public Aggie Ice Cream tours will be held Friday, May 13 and 27 at 2, 3 and 4 p.m. Come learn about how we make Aggie Ice Cream. Free True Blue Cheese tours will be held from May 16 through Aug. 25 Monday through Thursday at 1:30 p.m. Racecar Racecar with Paul Christiansen and Sarah Olsen will perform acoustic music Friday, May 13, at 8 p.m. at Why Sound. Cost is $5.

Crossword

Two of the valley’s talented young

musicians will perform at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza in Logan on Friday, May 13. Starting at 6 p.m., Keiyana Osmond, winner of last year’s Cache County Idol contest, will play. She will be followed at 7 by Tyson Oswald. Both of these Mountain Crest students are incredible singers and guitarists. Pier 49 is located on 1200 South, north of Maceys. Come enjoy some great pizza and wonderful music. There is no cover charge, but generous tips are encouraged. Travis Bunker, a former Division 1 and European professional basketball player,

has recently been hired by RACE Rx to develop a basketball club and basketball specific training program. He will offer a free basketball skills clinic at RACE Rx (286 N. 850 West, Logan) on Friday, May 13, for youth basketball players ages 7-17. The clinic for 7 to 12 year olds will be from 4 to 5 p.m.; kids ages 13 to 17 can come from 5 to 6 p.m. The clinic will cover fundamentals including shooting, ball handling, passing and defense. It will also include some agility and footwork drills that kids can do on their own. For more information, email Travis at travis.racerx@gmail.com.

www.ThemeCrosswords.com

By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Labyrinth 5. Western blue flag, e.g. 9. Common alias 14. Line-crosser? 18. ___ clock 19. Airport in Portugal 20. 1988 Olympics locale 21. Ore remover 22. Paradise 26. Is down with 27. Grosse ___, Mich. 28. Albanian currency 29. Recompense 30. The opposition 31. Panegyrize 33. Bluecoat 34. Tend rose bushes 37. Actor Jeremy 39. Sky box? 41. Cobbler’s tool 44. Very excited 49. Dr. Pavlov 50. Gulf of ___ 51. Seventh anniversary gift 52. Keystone State port 53. Unwanted, in a way 55. Waggish 57. More inclined 58. Inn intake 59. Routing word 60. Sign up 62. Exhausted 63. M-1, for one 65. Promise to pay 66. “Beetle Bailey” character 68. Deep interior 71. Weapon-toting hoodlum 74. Extinct ostrichlike bird 75. Midwest Indian 78. Wet nurses, overseas 79. What the sun also

does? 80. Schedule 83. It’s a long story 84. Cheek 85. Heavy blow 86. Tolkien creatures 87. Accepts both the good and bad side of things (with “Takes”) 93. ___ muff 94. “Anything ___” (Cole Porter musical) 95. Not chronic 96. English university city 97. “___ Together Now” (Beatles tune) 98. Staff leader 99. Elbow grease 102. Old World bird 105. Go over 106. Carpentry and masonry, e.g. 108. Plaintive cry 111. “Just ___ ...” (from “The Sound of Music” soundtrack) 115. Disparages 116. American chameleon 117. Cultural counterpart of a gene 118. Expression of mild surprise 119. Publicize 120. Ask for more Time? 121. Call to attention 122. Honor partner Down 1. ___ orchid 2. Eastern military rank 3. Wye followers 4. Unagi, at a sushi bar 5. “___ For You” (Dylan tune) 6. Spokes 7. Nickname for Oliver

Cromwell (with “Old”) 8. ___ money, in politics 9. Word with mask or doo 10. Shellfish 11. Galled 12. Tropical hardwood 13. Solo in space 14. South African verandah 15. N.Y. neighbor 16. Made like 17. Turkish titles 21. Jerks 23. Sleep ___ 24. Deep pink 25. Finger or toe 30. With regard to 32. Gasteyer of “Mean Girls” 34. Folded muscle part 35. Competitor 36. Edict of a Russian tsar 38. Flush 39. Hummocks 40. Golden calf, e.g. 41. Line from the heart 42. More ironical 43. Circumspect 45. Muslim leaders 46. Something to shoot for 47. M.P.’s quarry 48. Home of the brave 54. Malignancies 55. Rubbish 56. Debauchee 57. Pool problem 61. ___ Inch Nails 62. Family of poets and novelists 63. Post-op time 64. Endorsements (sp var.) 67. Simple folk 68. Dress down

69. Creighton University site 70. Stake 72. Its parts included an Arm. and a Lat. 73. Word with bulb or house 75. It’s a wrap 76. Rainbowlike 77. Dermatologist’s concerns 79. First ___ 81. Charges

82. Crew member 84. Like some glances 88. Domed homes 89. First Earl of Orford 90. Cube material 91. Bunches of feathers 92. Walk in mud 97. To the left, at sea 98. List preceder 100. Monroe’s successor 101. Special Forces cap 102. Door fixture 103. ___ Fjord

104. Big production 105. Tommy of Broadway 107. Beef cut 108. “The ___” (1958 horror film) 109. “Spirit” rock band 110. White 112. See 113 down 113. ___ and ___ between (with 112-Down) 114. Bruisable thing


The Cache Valley Stargazers is holding their monthly meeting Friday, May 13, at 7:30 p.m. in room 244 of the Science-Engineering-Research (SER) Building on the USU campus (free parking in the lot adjacent to SER, behind the Performance Hall). The meeting will feature a talk by Dr. Stacy Palen from the Ott Planetarium and Department of Physics at Weber State University. Stacy will talk to us about “The Death of Sun-like Stars.” Get that dusty telescope out of the closet or the binoculars out from under the car seat and join the fun. Everyone is welcome to join us, experts and beginners alike. For information visit www.cachestargazers. org or email cache.stargazers@ gmail.com. Discount tickets for the annual Health Days Pancake Breakfast will only be available until Friday night (May 13) at Lee’s Marketplace in Smithfield. The breakfast is 6:30 to 9:30 a.m. Saturday, May 14, at the Smithfield fire station, 325 W. 100 North, Smithfield. Proceeds from the breakfast will benefit the fire department. The discount tickets are $5 for adults and $3.50 for children 12 and under. The cost goes up to $5.50 for adults and $4 for kids at the door on the day of the event. A community health recognition night will be held Friday, May 13, at 7 p.m. in Room 1901 of the CBRC, 1410 N. 1000 West in Logan. There will be a special guest appearance by two former contestants from “The Biggest Loser.” Everyone is invited.

Saturday A Cache Valley Art Mixer (Japan fundraiser) with Dut Dut,

Dj Moon Tzu, Loo Jean and Swamp Donkey will perform acoustic, hip-hop and metal music on Saturday, May 14, at 8 p.m. at Why Sound. Cost is $5. Salt Lake City-based acoustic duo Melody and Tyler will perform live from 6 to 8 p.m. on Saturday, May 14, at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza. Melody and Tyler combine a perfect use of country, rock and pop genres to spark a new expectation of acoustic music. More info at melodyandtyler.com. Everyone is invited. Wilson Elementary P.A.W.S. will hold a 1-mile/5k Fun Run on Saturday, May 14, at 9 a.m. Cost is $5 for 1-mile race and $15 for the 5k. The event will help fund Wilson’s summer school program. T-shirts will be given to all participants that pre-register up until May 12. Register online at www.wilson.loganschools.org. Registration the day of is also available. The run will begin and end at Wilson Elementary and laps the Island area. All donations welcome. For more information contact Sara at 755-2340 or Sara.Shaffer@loganschools.org. A multi-family yard sale with all proceeds donated to the American Cancer Society will be held Saturday, May 14, from 8 a.m. to noon at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 930 N. 400 West in Logan. Cache Valley LDS Single Adults 31+ group will hold speed dating Saturday, May 14, from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Willow Park church, 340 W. 700 South, Logan. Come join us for food and fun. To RSVP or for a ride, call/text/email Joel Stewart at 801-953-7999, or Joel@ztron.com. World Fair Trade Day is a day of celebration around the world. The goal is to increase awareness and educate others about the importance of fair trade. Join 100,000 people in the U.S. and take a Fair Trade Break with Global Village Gifts and Aggie Blue Bikes at Merlin Olsen Park, Saturday, May 14 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be off-site sale, Zumba dance instruction and Fair

Trade Expo. Jeremy Threlfal will be performing a free concert at 3 p.m. at the Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. Please come and join us for this performance that is open to the public. For more information please call 792-0353. What’s new at the zoo? Come find out May 14 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Willow Park Sports Complex, 500 W. 700 South. Come explore animals from around the world and participate in crafts, activities, a magic act and more. Contact Dan Blakely at 716-9247 or Larry Jacobsen at 752-3631 for more information. The Western Singing Duo Tumbleweeds will perform at the Cracker Barrel Cafe in Paradise this Saturday, May 14, from 6 p.m. to closing. A car wash will be held for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital on Saturday, May 14, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 650 N. Main. $5/car. Other donations gladly accepted. All proceeds will go to St. Jude’s, a children’s research hospital located in Tennessee that specializes in finding cures and saving children. St. Jude is the only pediatric cancer research center where families never pay for treatment not covered by insurance. No child is ever denied treatment because of the family’s inability to pay. Take a full moon hike with Stokes Nature Center and naturalist Kayo Robertson from 8-10 p.m. Saturday, May 14. Meet at Stokes Nature Center, 1 mile into Logan Canyon, east of Logan, Utah. No registration required. For more information, call 435755-3239 or visit www.logannature.org.

vides outdoor recreational opportunities for youth and adults with disabilities. We provide adaptive equipment and support. For more information call 713-0288. William Hyde Camp Daughters of Utah Pioneers will meet Monday, May 16, in the Hyde Park Civic Center at 1:30 p.m. A luncheon will be served. The Wm B Preston camp DUP will meet Monday, May 16, at 1 p.m. at the Mt. Logan Stake Bowery. The lesson will be given by Blanch Astle.

Tuesday Skyler Smith with Amy Nguyen and Layne Orr will perform acoustic music Tuesday, May 17, at 8 p.m. Cost is $5. Pintech Computers will be offering free computer classes each Tuesday night at 6 p.m. On May 17, the subject is: “Improving Your Computer’s Performance.” Classes are held at 270 N. 400 West Suite C, Hyrum. Call Don Pinkerton at 435-245-8324 for more information. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will be hosting canoeing for people with MS May 17 at 3:30 p.m. For more information call 713-0288. The Cache Valley Gluten Free Group will be meeting Tuesday, May 17, at 7 p.m. at the Logan Regional Hospital classrooms 2 and 3. Kaylene Chalmers will present, “Living Gluten Free.”

Wednesday

Monday

Scott Bradley will teach a free Constitution class, “To Preserve the Nation,” on Wednesday, May 18, at 7 p.m. at the Book Table (upstairs). For more information call 753-2930.

Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will be holding at canoe activity at Benson Marina on Monday, May 16, from 4 to 6:30 p.m. Cost is $3. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures is a nonprofit organization that pro-

Local easy listening group “City Heat,” featuring Bill Gabriel on guitar, performs each Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza, located on 1200 South across the street north of Maceys.

Those interested in an early college program and/or STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) at InTech Collegiate High School, may attend an information meeting Wednesday, May 18, at 6:30 p.m. at 1787 N. Research Parkway (1800 N. 450 East). Find out if InTech Collegiate High School is the right place for you. Rosa Marie Jackson will teach us how to make Albonditas (meatballs), one of her husband’s favorite dishes from El Salvador, at a free cooking and community class at Macey’s Little Theater on Wednesday, May 18, from 7 to 8 p.m.

Thursday Summit, Sunrise, and Birch Creek Elementary schools in Smithfield will be having a second Kindergarten registration session Thursday, May 19, and Friday, May 20, from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. We urge everyone with a child age 5 before Sept. 1 to come register. Please bring your child with you for a brief prekindergarten assessment. Please also bring your child’s birth certificate and immunizations record. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will be rock climbing at the Rock Haus on Thursday, May 19 from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Cost is $8. For more information call 713-0288. Join us for a free “Living Well Workshop” presented by Bear River Health Department. This is a fun, interactive five-week workshop beginning May 12 for anyone with an ongoing chronic condition (arthritis, heart disease, diabetes, joint pain, etc.). The course continues May 19, 26, June 2 and 16 at 2:30 to 4 p.m. at the Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. For more information contact Kim at (435) 792-6521 or Julie at (435) 792-0353. Kiger Hour featuring Glenda Cole will be held Thursday, May 19, at 5:15 p.m. at Hamilton’s Steak and Seafood, 2427 N. Main St., Logan.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 13, 2011

Curves of Cache Valley is hosting a community event in conjunction with National Womens Health Week on May 13, from 7 to 10:30 p.m. at the Cache Business Resource Center, 1410 N. 1000 West in Logan. Guest appearances by Kalee and .LeAnn, contestants from “Biggest -Loser.” Health and fitness information will be presented. Join us for an informative and fun-filled evening.


Page 16 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 13, 2011

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Profile for The Herald Journal

Cache Magazine  

May 13-19, 2011

Cache Magazine  

May 13-19, 2011

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