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Cache

Magazine

The Herald Journal

May 6-12, 2011


Page 2 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 6, 2011

Cache The Herald Journal’s

Arts & Entertainment Calendar

Magazine

On the cover:

The photo is from a marketing poster for the film, “Off the Rez,” which was entered in the Tribeca Film Festival. The film was produced by USU employee Nelson Hernandez.

From the editor

A

s a seventh grader I was obsessed with everything “Titanic.” I saw the movie in the theater four times, was in love with Leonardo DiCaprio, and had to watch the Oscars when “Titanic” won Best Picture along with a bunch of other awards. And then in eighth grade my best friend Jenny and I decided to make our own version of the movie. I filmed the show and also played the role of Rose’s mother. Jenny was Rose and my brother played Captain Edward Smith, his only line being “Take us to sea Mister Murdoch.” All other parts, including Jack and Cal, were played by stuffed animals. My dad’s fishing boat was supposed to be the Titanic from the outside, my house was the ship from the inside. My deck was used for the famous sunset scene where Kate Winslet says she’s flying. Too bad you could hear roosters in the background,

mnewbold@hjnews.com

and where there was supposed to be an ocean, there was grass, trees and flowers. Our entire list of props included an afghan and other assorted blankets for dresses, a hat decorated with Christmas bows and a clarinet case. We used a piano for sound effects in one scene, and all other music came from my “Titanic” CD. Let’s be honest, our movie was pretty pathetic, and we laugh at it every time. I’ve enjoyed making movies over the years; however, most of them are slide shows, and the others are as low-budget as our version of “Titanic.” It’s a good thing there are plenty of other people out there making movies that are actually worth seeing. Local film maker Nelson Hernandez recently produced a film that debuted April 26 at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York and he’s hoping to get it in other festivals as well. Making the film has been a journey, and so far, reviews are positive. Someday it may even be featured at USU. You can read more about the film and Hernandez on page 8. — Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

What’s inside this week

(Page 4) ‘Meet Me in St. Louis’ debuts at Old Barn

(Page 5) Take a trip with Common Ground

Get to know the story behind ‘Thor’

(Page 7) Books .......................p.13 Crossword.................p.14

Cute

pet photo of the week

This dog is available for adoption! Pet: Mister From: Four Paws Rescue Why he’s so lovable: Mister is super sweet and loves to play. He loves attention and will follow you everywhere. He is great with kids and other dogs. He is not good with cats. Mister is crate trained and house trained and is about 3 to 4 years old. He is a Chocolate Lab/Hound mix. Mister’s adoption fee is $125 which included his neuter surgery and vaccinations.

Slow Wave Slow Wave is created from real people’s dreams as drawn by Jesse Reklaw. Ask Jesse to draw your dream! Visit www.slowwave.com to find out how.


“It’s beautiful.” The children seemed excited about the drawing and were able to take home cophen a pen and ink ies of their own. While holddrawing of former ing them in their arms they Judge Cheryl Anne Russell mentioned a few things they was unveiled at the Logan miss about their mom, Chey Municipal Justice Court adding, “she was the funnest Monday, it was enough to mom ever.” bring some friends and famMike Van Horn, who was ily to tears. a dear friend of Russell for The drawing was com13 years, said the drawing pleted by local artist Grant really got to him, and that he L. Lund and will hang in the building lobby with a plaque misses her very much. Russell’s influence went as a tribute to a woman many beyond her family, friends say influenced their lives. and coworkers though, and “Her number one priority Al-Imari said she still gets was not to punish people. It phone calls from people was not to make them feel Russell helped throughout bad, or to impose anything the years. on them. Her number one “This morning I got a priority as a judge was phone call. For all of us our to teach people and help lives go on and work goes people,” said Jen Al-Imari, on and even when we have senior clerk at the justice a void, we learn to deal with court. it,” she said. “Six, seven Russell was diagnosed months later we think we’re with aplastic anemia and doing fine until we get a passed away last August. Two months before her death phone call where an individual says, ‘I was in that court she had a successful bone and I made a good friend marrow transplant, but was there. Her name was Judge later faced with complicaRussell.’” tions. Court Administrator Ryan Judge David Marx of Casperson said working with the justice court planned the judge allowed him to see to honor her Monday in her in a different light than conjunction with Law Day, many who stand before her which was Sunday. He conwith citations. He said she tacted Lund about the drawalways made sure she was ing a few months ago and calm before handing out a organized the presentation sentence, and people would where Russell’s children, come back years later thankclose friends and the public ing her for changing their were invited to attend. Since lives. Russell was a woman who In an artist statement by hated having her photo taken, Lund, he said he considered and was known for being how to show the interaction matter-of-fact, Al-Imari of the different branches of joked that if she could see government and the interaceveryone gathering for her, tive spirit of city, state and she would have told them, federal government. He drew “you people have got to get overlapping rectangles to a life. create a feeling of organiza“She told us that, I don’t tion where each individual know how many times,” Alshape plays a part in the Imari said. piece as a whole, much like Russell’s children, Jenlin, individual branches make Tai and Chey, all agreed the the organization of the govdrawing looked like their ernment. mother, with Tai adding, By Manette Newbold editor

W

Eli Lucero/Herald Journal

Chey Russell looks at a portrait of his mother after it was unveiled Monday afternoon in the Logan City Courtroom.

Lund said he never knew Russell, but was glad to be a part of recognizing her influence in the community. Russell was appointed as judge in 1992 to help estab-

lish Logan’s first municipal court and served as the city’s only judge until she died. “Seven months later we’re still getting phone calls and seven months later I’m still

thinking of her every day,” Al-Imari said. “And seven months later there are still people out there whose lives are changed by Judge Russell.”

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Former judge honored with pen drawing


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‘Meet Me in St. Louis’ Directed by Audrey Mason Playing May 6 to 28 at Old Barn Theater Mondays, Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m.. Matinees on the 14th and 21st at 2:30 p.m.

For reservations visit www.oldbarn.org or call 435-458-BARN (2276). It’s St. Louis 1903. The well-off Smith family has four beautiful daughters. Esther Smith is in love with “the boy next door,” and when she discovers that the World Fair is coming to her town, everyone in St. Louis is thrilled. But then her father announces that the family is moving to New York, which means that the family has to leave St. Louis, the fair and the romance. This musical has classic songs like the “Trolley Song” and “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas.”

Crumb Brothers hosts songwriter Danny Shafer he Bridger Folk Music Society T presents a concert with Danny Shafer on Saturday, May 14, at 7:30 p.m. at

Crumb Brothers Bakery, 291 S. 300 West in Logan. Tickets are $13 and are available by calling 757-3468, or take your chances at the door. Seating is very limited, so advance purchase is recommended. The concert is sponsored by Import Auto and Utah Public Radio. A songwriter album in the tradition

of Townes Van Zandt, John Prine and Willie Nelson, Shafer’s songs vary from raw solo acoustic to troubadour fingerstyle picking to country blues, to his full Americana band, The Red Glory Ramblers. Shafer’s songs are about real everyday life – about our pains, our sorrows, our joys. Shafer writes honest songs filled with heart and soul. His songwriting weaves through various generations and appeals to both young and old.

Music and magic show coming up Hatch in a 75-minute prothe magic choreographed ollowing the gram featuring the music to the music, that give F sold-out success of of Camille Saint-Saëns, this program its special the debut performance on

April 9, the Hatch Academy of Magic and Music will present a second “Matinée Enchantée,” an enchanted afternoon of magic and music in the historic 1878 ThatcherYoung Mansion on Saturday, May 14, at 2 p.m. Deceptionist Richard Hatch and violinist Rosemary Hatch, co-owners of the Hatch Academy, will again be joined by their son, pianist Jonathan

Johann Sebastian Bach, Michio Miyagi and Fritz Kreisler and magic created by Johann Nepomuk Hofzinser, Axel Hecklau, Dai Vernon and Punx, among others. A unique feature of the program is the ensemble aspect with magic and music performed simultaneously. While the performance includes numerous magical and musical solos, it is the ensemble pieces, with

character. Tickets are $10 for adults, just $7 for children under 12. As only 56 seats are available, advance purchase is strongly advised to avoid disappointment. Tickets may be purchased online at the Hatch Academy website www. HatchAcademy.com or by calling 435-932-0017. The Thatcher-Young Mansion is located at 35 W. 100 South in Logan.


his summer Common Ground Outdoor Adventures has planned several trips for people with disabilities. All trips are open and available to anyone with any disability as well as for folks who would like to come as a volunteer, except the MS Jackson Hole trip in August. For cost of individual trips, to register, or for any other questions contact 713-0288. Volunteers are asked to pay the scholarship price for trips.

SanRafael Swell May 18 – 21 Come check out the petroglyphs in this spectacular land. Wind and water have carved fantastic and unique goblin-like sculptures out of rock, creating an outdoor playground that inspires the imagination.

Yellowstone June 1 – 4 June is when all the baby animals come out to play and we will be covering the whole park trying to find the cute little guys and girls. We will also be visiting Old Faithful along with the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone. This is one of America's treasures and we are lucky enough to be there for four days.

Green River Rafting June 15 – 18 We will be rafting through the Green River below the Flaming Gorge Dam. It will be great! White water rafting trips on the Green River offer unique geology, landscape important to America's frontier and outlaw history, plus American Indian ruins and rock art.

Red Fish Lake July 20 – 23 Redfish lake is one of the best kept secrets of Idaho. We are heading up there to enjoy the scenery, the lake and all the natural hot springs that are along the river. You will be able to swim, hike, canoe and sit in the warmth of the hot springs while on this trip. Snake River day trips July 26 and Aug. 12 We will be leaving early for a day rafting on the beautiful Snake River. It has class III rapids and beautiful scenery. Jackson Hole rafting for people with multiple sclerosis Aug. 4 – 6 This trip is only for People with MS. We will be staying at Teton science school. The first night we will be boating on Jenny Lake and the second day rafting down the Snake River at the base of the Tetons. The last day we will be headed on home to brag about our adventure. Fontenelle Reservoir Aug. 16 – 18 On this trip we will be

visiting the little known Fontenelle Reservoir in Wyoming, where we will be able to canoe the lake and canoe the calm water that floats out of the dam. You can just come and play, look for arrowheads and enjoy the

company of others on this trip. Arches National Park Aug. 30 – Sept. 2 Come escape the fall weather as we visit one of the most picturesque places

in Utah. On this trip we will be hiking and sightseeing throughout Arches National Park we will be staying right in the heart of the park at the amazing Devils Garden Campground. This is one trip you won't want to miss!

Stokes Nature Center offering kid camps

tokes Nature S Center is happy to present our week-long

summer camp program schedule for 2011. Space is limited and registration is required for all camps. For more information or to register, call 435-7553239 or visit www.logannature.org. Cost is $150

for SNC members, $180 for non-members. Wild Art (Ages 7 and up) June 13-17 Let the wilderness be your canvas as you create art inspired by and created with natural objects. Make paper decorated with seeds, leaves, and

flower petals. Hike to places with spectacular scenery and draw or paint what inspires you. Trailblazers (Ages 7 and up) June 27 – July 1 Explore a new part of Logan Canyon every day while learning important outdoor skills such

as tracking, plant and animal identification, shelter-building, map and compass use, wilderness safety and much more. Critter Camp (Ages 7-10) July 26 – 29 Focus on a different type of animal every day – mammals, birds, reptiles,

and amphibians, and insects – then bring it all together to understand how they all interact to create our wonderful world. Get up close and personal with SNC’s fabulous critters. (*This camp will be 4 days long. Cost is $120 for SNC members, $150

for non-members.) Eco Explorers (Ages 7 & up) August 8-12 Interpret the landscape through clues that Mother Nature leaves behind. As eco explorers, we will investigate Logan Canyon, learning about geology, plants and animals.

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Destination trips with Common Ground T


Page 6 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 6, 2011

Film Still playing “Fast Five” Rated PG-13 ★★1⁄2 If the filmmakers had thrown in giant, shape-shifting robots, talking apes and some vampires, the fifth installment in “The Fast and the Furious” franchise would hardly have been more outlandish. That said, the movie will get you where you’re going. Opting for a blowout of a movie with no restraints whatsoever, director Justin Lin wisely adds former wrestling superstar Dwayne Johnson as a relentless federal agent to go toe-to-toe with Vin Diesel’s driving ace, who’s again on the run along with his sister (Jordana Brewster) and his cop-turned-outlaw pal (Paul Walker). Any thwack from the inevitable DieselJohnson slugfest might kill an ordinary human, but these characters basically are comic-book figures, so they’re able to wail the innards out of each other and come through with only a cosmetic bruise or two. It’s nonsense, but when Hollywood does nonsense right, it can be a lot of fun. Lin now is far more assured as an action director, crafting stunts and chases that zip along so recklessly you won’t much care how utterly impossible they are. Past “Fast and Furious” rowdies such as Tyrese Gibson, Chris “Ludacris” Bridges and Sung Kang join Diesel and company for an “Ocean’s Eleven”-style heist romp. 130 minutes. “Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil” Rated PG ★ Red Riding Hood needs a better agent. Months after being refashioned in a werewolf tale, she’s back in this computer-animated sequel to the mostly forgotten 2005 original. The fractured fairy tale has

returned with 3-D graphics, more polished animation and less wit. There was some madcap charm to the earlier “Hoodwinked!” which reinterpreted the story of Red Riding Hood as a “Rashomon”-style detective story. This sequel, directed by Mike Disa, takes the same characters and instead of refashioning a fairy tale, casts them in an action film plot. Red (Hayden Panettiere assuming Anne Hathaway’s role), Wolf (Patrick Warburton), Twitchy (an overcaffeinated squirrel voiced by Cory Edwards) and Granny (Glenn Close) are now special agents in the Happily Ever After Agency. Led by the dapper, long-legged frog Nicky Flippers (David Ogden Stiers), they pursue the kidnapped Hansel (Bill Hader) and Gretel (Amy Poehler) when they’re taken by a witch (Joan Cusack). The frame is more “Mission: Impossible” than Brothers Grimm. The result is a more professional-looking film with less comedy. If only the talented voice cast had written it, too. 85 minutes. “Prom” Rated PG ★★1⁄2 It’s not just prom, it’s Disney’s “Prom.” And so no one smokes, no one sneaks in peach schnapps in a flask and no one gets lucky in the back of a limo. This is all about that magical night when everyone gets together, regardless of the social hierarchy that had been firmly in place the past four years, and dreams come true. Wholesome, earnest dreams for wholesome, earnest kids — except for the resident bad boy, that is. But naturally, he’ll turn out to have a heart of gold. Yes, director Joe Nussbaum’s film, from a script by Katie Wech, is chock-full of high-school movie cliches — sometimes knowingly and amusingly so. There’s

AnnaSophia Robb, who stars as Hamilton, cuts through some of the gooey tedium with a naturally athletic presence and nononsense attitude (and the star of “Bridge to Terabithia” and “Race to Witch Mountain” does much of her own surfing). But “Soul Surfer” consistently tries to make her transformation as easily digestible as possible. 106 minutes. “Water for Elephants” Rated PG-13 ★★ There are times you should just keep on ignoring the elephant in the room, and this is one. Reese Witherspoon and Robert Pattinson’s adaptation of Sara Gruen’s bestselling novel about romance and intrigue in character, Rachel, on the night of her “Something Borrowed” a Depression-era circus 30th birthday. She’s quietly freaking Rated PG-13 plods along at a pachyout about the passage of time because ★1⁄2 This romantic drama poses the derm’s pace. Witherspoon she’s still hopelessly single, the cliquestion: What happens when you and Pattinson are a threechéd trademark of so many chick-lit realize you’re in love with your best ring snooze-fest together, heroines. Meanwhile, her closest pal friend’s fiance? But the characters are bringing little passion to a since childhood, the blonde party girl either so ill-defined or unlikable, it’s love story supposedly so Darcy (Kate Hudson), is about to marry hard to care whether they get out of fiery, it blows the roof off Dex (Colin Egglesfield), Rachel’s good this tricky situation with their emotions the big top. Pattinson’s a and relationships intact. And that’s odd, friend from law school. Rachel introdestitute ex-veterinary studuced the two of them six years ago and unfortunate, because “Something dent who falls in with circus and encouraged them to get together, Borrowed” stars the ordinarily adorfolks, where he and the even though she was secretly in love able Ginnifer Goodwin as a New York show’s star (Witherspoon) with Dex. But after a few drinks at her attorney who finds herself in that prefall in love while making surprise party, she and Dex end up dicament. Directed by Luke Greenfield friends with an elephant. sleeping together — and that inspires (“The Girl Next Door”) and based on The movie’s star attraction them to revisit feelings they’d both supthe novel by Emily Giffin, “Something is Christoph Waltz, who pressed. 113 minutes. Borrowed” introduces us to Goodwin’s won an Academy Award as a gleefully psychotic Nazi in “Inglourious Basterds” out that perfect dress — a tall, misfit character surfing near her Hawaiian and here delivers another this will be a safe, enjoynamed Lloyd (Nicholas home. An up-and-comer wicked performance as able and validating little Braun) who resembles in the sport, she wanted to Witherspoon’s hubby, the diversion. 103 minutes. “Say Anything ...”-era John get back on her board as cruel, jealous circus ringCusack — a tall, misfit soon as possible. A month leader. Waltz commands character named Lloyd. Of “Soul Surfer” later, she was in the water every moment that he’s on Rated PG course, the straight-arrow again. Now, at 21, she screen, highlighting how ★1⁄2 Watching “Soul Surfer,” good girl (Aimee Teegarcontinues to compete produll fellow Oscar-winner den) will get stuck working the story of Bethany Hamfessionally. Witherspoon and “Twilight” with the motorcycle-riding ilton’s comeback after a “Soul Surfer” takes that heartthrob Pattinson are. rebel (Thomas McDonell), shark attack, makes you story of complex emoDirector Francis Lawrence and they will see through long for a vivid documentions, determination and (“Constantine,” ‘’I Am Legtheir respective prejudices tary on the subject instead faith and turns it into overly end”) throttles down from to not only get along but — preferably one of those simplistic mush. Director action flicks and sputters fall for each other. Still, the excellent “30 for 30” offerand co-writer Sean McNathrough this treacly love sweetness and guilelessings from ESPN. Hammara’s film is an uncomtriangle (or love quadness of “Prom” is actually ilton’s tale is, of course, fortable combination of pat, rangle, if you throw in the strangely charming, and inspiring. In 2003, when feel-good platitudes, twoelephant). 121 minutes. for its target audience — she was just 13 years old, dimensional characters, girls who are several years she lost her left arm to a cheesy special effects and — All reviews by away from having to pick 14-foot tiger shark while generically idyllic scenery. The Associated Press

New this week


T

he summer movie season seems to start earlier and earlier ” every year, with studios pushing tent pole releases into the beginning of May, instead of waiting until Memorial Day Weekend. We started last week with the huge box office hit “Fast Five” and now this week we get the first big comic book movie of the summer in “Thor.” We all know that Marvel Studios is trying to release its big name character movies in order to prepare for the upcoming “The Avengers” movies. So from now until 2012 we’ll be getting origin stories of some of our favorite Marvel superheroes. Here we find out where Thor comes from, why he’s so full of angst, and how he winds up on earth. We may remember the stories of Thor and Odin, gods who were worshipped by the Vikings, from childhood. Here we find out that Thor is actually an alien, much in the same way that Superman is an alien. He comes from a different planet altogether. At some point in time Thor and his father visited earth to help defeat a race known as the Frost Giants, and that’s where the stories come from. People began worshipping these alien beings as gods. Thor (Chris Hemsworth) is arrogant, unpredictable, and is the rightful heir to the throne of Asgard. Thor’s father, Odin (Anthony Hopkins) is just about ready to

The Reel Place By Aaron Peck

relinquish his throne to his son, but realizes that Thor still has some learning to do. See, Thor is pretty impulsive. So impulsive that on a whim he travels to the planet of the Frost Giants and singlehandedly starts a war with them. This doesn’t bode well for Asgard, and so Thor is banished by his father, to earth. It’s a good thing that all Asgardians speak English though. Actually, everyone including the Frost Giants speak English. The spread of the English Empire apparently wasn’t just global, it was universal. Just to make sure we know Thor is from a different place though, he speaks in old English. Like he’s from the middle ages. Asgard is a peculiar place. This is a place that uses powerful light beams to transport beings light years away through the galaxy, but they still ride around on horses and wield

swords and shields. In all seriousness much of it doesn’t make any sense, but neither did “Fast Five” and that movie was bucket loads of fun. On earth Thor meets Jane Foster (Natalie Portman) who is a scientist who’s been studying atmospheric pressure disturbances in the New Mexico desert. It’s easy to see that this is going to be the movie’s love story. Thor meets Jane. Thor falls for Jane. Thor saves Jane. “Thor” doesn’t really distance itself from the various other superhero films out there, but it is exciting. However, may I recommend not seeing it in 3D. I’ve never been a fan of the technology, but here it’s utterly distracting. Much of the film is dark by nature,

much of anything when Thor and his buddies visit the Frost Giant’s home. It’s frustrating. All this movie does is serve as an origin story for Thor, prepping him for “The Avengers.” Still, for summer movie fare, it’s a fun enough ride.

★★★ “Thor” Rated PG-13

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Page 7 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 6, 2011

‘Thor’ tells story of classic Marvel hero

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Nelson’s journey Local film producer shines light on basketball in reservations

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everal life-altering experiences in the last decade have had a profound influence on Nelson Hernandez. First, there was the day he went to work early nearly 10 years ago in New York City. His place of employment as a retail manager had been right between the Twin Towers at the World Trade Center, until a recent transfer to a store across the river in New Jersey. However, he still had to go through the World Trade Center to catch a train, but on Sept. 11, 2001, he was asked to come in several hours earlier than the usual 9 a.m. which proved to be life saving. “I was outside with a delivery truck, and I saw everything go over my head,” Hernandez said. “It took me 15 hours to get home that day. I lost a lot of friends that day.” After the terrorist attacks, he and his wife, June, and young son, Justin, packed up and moved west. He decided on the Beehive state after “randomly applying” to the University of Utah. “I’ve been in Utah ever since,” Hernandez said. “I had never been out here, but I did have a buddy (Fontaine Saltes) from New York that played (basketball) at Weber State.” The second life-changing experience came when he visited a reservation in Nebraska at the urging of Saltes, who had married an American Indian who had attended Utah State University and became a teacher on a reservation in South Dakota. The native New Yorker

of Puerto Rican and Spanish descent had no idea that visit would cause him to take up the cause he presently is heavily involved in. “At first I told him (Saltes) he was crazy, that I was not going to a reservation,” Hernandez said. “He was pretty persistent. If it wasn’t for him, I wouldn’t be here.” Hernandez wasn’t able to visit the reservation in South Dakota, but ended up near Omaha, Neb. “It’s just really weird,” Hernandez said. “When I went to the reservation, it was one of those moments that changed my life forever. ... I didn’t know anything about the reservation. I was thinking “Dancing with Wolves,” Kevin Costner. I was pretty ignorant. I met with the people and what I saw changed my whole perspective. “I went home and cried. I couldn’t figure out why I was crying and depressed. ... Something happened there that to this day I can’t really explain. It took me a while to get things going, I didn’t know how I was going to help.” Helping Native Americans through basketball became a passion for Hernandez, who now calls Cache Valley home. The 33-year-old is a graduate assistant for USU head men’s basketball coach Stew Morrill. He has many duties, from flipping the play cards during games to gathering and breaking down film of upcoming opponents the Aggies will face. While the inner-city of New York and

the more than 100 reservations across the U.S. and Canada he has visited over the past 10 years seem to be worlds apart, there is a similarity — basketball. That stunned Hernandez at first, who has been involved in the game at various levels for years. “People don’t understand how big basketball is on the reservation,” Hernandez said. “The only thing I can equate it to is like soccer for Europeans and Latin Americans. It’s a fanatical thing. I have seen schools on the Navajo Reservation with 5,000 and 8,000seat gyms.” After his first visit to a reservation, Hernandez went to work to try and help those less fortunate by using basketball to spread a message of hope. He has brought players and sports gear to the reservations, even getting clothing donated by Magic Johnson. “It kind of snowballed and took over my life for a bunch of years,” Hernandez said. After hundreds of camps, clinics and youth conferences, he wondered what else he could do to get the message out and help American Indians. Then he met the Schimmel family on the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon. Hernandez actually went to watch a teenager that was drawing national attention in junior high near Pendleton, Ore. Shoni Schimmel would end up being the center of a more than twoyear film project. See FILM on page 10

Story by Shawn Harrison • Portrait by Jennifer Meyers

Top photos show Shoni Schimmel and her family, who were documented in the film “Off the Rez.” The film recently debuted at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York. Above: Nelson Hernandez at the Spectrum at USU. Hernandez was one of the producers of the film and works with the USU basketball team.


Nelson’s journey Local film producer shines light on basketball in reservations

S

everal life-altering experiences in the last decade have had a profound influence on Nelson Hernandez. First, there was the day he went to work early nearly 10 years ago in New York City. His place of employment as a retail manager had been right between the Twin Towers at the World Trade Center, until a recent transfer to a store across the river in New Jersey. However, he still had to go through the World Trade Center to catch a train, but on Sept. 11, 2001, he was asked to come in several hours earlier than the usual 9 a.m. which proved to be life saving. “I was outside with a delivery truck, and I saw everything go over my head,” Hernandez said. “It took me 15 hours to get home that day. I lost a lot of friends that day.” After the terrorist attacks, he and his wife, June, and young son, Justin, packed up and moved west. He decided on the Beehive state after “randomly applying” to the University of Utah. “I’ve been in Utah ever since,” Hernandez said. “I had never been out here, but I did have a buddy (Fontaine Saltes) from New York that played (basketball) at Weber State.” The second life-changing experience came when he visited a reservation in Nebraska at the urging of Saltes, who had married an American Indian who had attended Utah State University and became a teacher on a reservation in South Dakota. The native New Yorker

of Puerto Rican and Spanish descent had no idea that visit would cause him to take up the cause he presently is heavily involved in. “At first I told him (Saltes) he was crazy, that I was not going to a reservation,” Hernandez said. “He was pretty persistent. If it wasn’t for him, I wouldn’t be here.” Hernandez wasn’t able to visit the reservation in South Dakota, but ended up near Omaha, Neb. “It’s just really weird,” Hernandez said. “When I went to the reservation, it was one of those moments that changed my life forever. ... I didn’t know anything about the reservation. I was thinking “Dancing with Wolves,” Kevin Costner. I was pretty ignorant. I met with the people and what I saw changed my whole perspective. “I went home and cried. I couldn’t figure out why I was crying and depressed. ... Something happened there that to this day I can’t really explain. It took me a while to get things going, I didn’t know how I was going to help.” Helping Native Americans through basketball became a passion for Hernandez, who now calls Cache Valley home. The 33-year-old is a graduate assistant for USU head men’s basketball coach Stew Morrill. He has many duties, from flipping the play cards during games to gathering and breaking down film of upcoming opponents the Aggies will face. While the inner-city of New York and

the more than 100 reservations across the U.S. and Canada he has visited over the past 10 years seem to be worlds apart, there is a similarity — basketball. That stunned Hernandez at first, who has been involved in the game at various levels for years. “People don’t understand how big basketball is on the reservation,” Hernandez said. “The only thing I can equate it to is like soccer for Europeans and Latin Americans. It’s a fanatical thing. I have seen schools on the Navajo Reservation with 5,000 and 8,000seat gyms.” After his first visit to a reservation, Hernandez went to work to try and help those less fortunate by using basketball to spread a message of hope. He has brought players and sports gear to the reservations, even getting clothing donated by Magic Johnson. “It kind of snowballed and took over my life for a bunch of years,” Hernandez said. After hundreds of camps, clinics and youth conferences, he wondered what else he could do to get the message out and help American Indians. Then he met the Schimmel family on the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon. Hernandez actually went to watch a teenager that was drawing national attention in junior high near Pendleton, Ore. Shoni Schimmel would end up being the center of a more than twoyear film project. See FILM on page 10

Story by Shawn Harrison • Portrait by Jennifer Meyers

Top photos show Shoni Schimmel and her family, who were documented in the film “Off the Rez.” The film recently debuted at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York. Above: Nelson Hernandez at the Spectrum at USU. Hernandez was one of the producers of the film and works with the USU basketball team.


Page 10 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 6, 2011

Film Continued from page 8 “I thought this would be a good movie,” Hernandez said. “I thought this story would kind of symbolize my journey over the last six or seven years.” “Off the Rez” recently debuted at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York City. Hernandez was one of the producers, along with wellknown producer Kelly Ripa. The director for “Off the Rez” was Jonathan Hock, who made “Through the Fire,” the story of Sebastian Telfair, who now plays in the NBA. Hernandez called the film “Through the Fire” part two, Indian version. The documentary-style film follows the Schimmel family for two years as they make the difficult decision to leave the reservation for better opportu-

nities. It ends with Shoni graduating from high school and announcing she is going to go play Division I basketball at Louisville, where she actually just completed her freshman season and made the all-Big East freshman team as well as being named to the Freshman All-American team. The Schimmels miss the closeness on the reservation, compared to living in a big city like Portland where they moved. Shoni is one of the best high school basketball players in the country and dreams of being the first from her tribe to get a college scholarship. A line by Shoni is used on the film’s poster and in a trailer: “You can’t take the rez out of the girl.” An explanation of the film read: “In ‘Through the Fire,’ Hock used basketball as a point of entry into a poor African-American neighborhood in Brooklyn, N.Y. There he found not just a sports story but a human story, a multi-

generational drama about a family fighting to shake off centuries of oppression and seize its moment of destiny. With ‘Off the Rez,’ Hock turns his cameras to America’s forgotten ‘hood,’ the Indian Reservation, where another unique family drama is playing out. “Shoni Schimmel was a high-school junior living on the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon, the star basketball player on the local team. Then Shoni’s mother, Ceci Moses, took a job coaching a high school team in Portland, and against the wishes of her own mother and grandmother on the “Rez,” Ceci brought Shoni and her seven other children with her. Now, Shoni’s senior year has become the most important year of their lives as mother and daughter fight to prove that Native American women can become champions off the Rez.” During the filming and edit-

ing process, Hock leaned on Hernandez because of his vast experience in working with American Indians. “It was my baby,” Hernandez said. “It was a story I wanted to tell. ... I feel good about it overall. I think many people will be able to relate to it. I’m not Native American and I’ve had struggles and made it through. ... It tells a story of an American family. I hope a kid will see this and realize they can make it. The one thing you take away from this movie is it is about love and family.” Several reviews of the 89-minute film have been positive. It was first shown on April 26, at the Tribeca Film Festival, which was founded in 2001 by Robert De Niro, Jane Rosenthan and Craig Hatkoff. “Feedback has been pretty good,” Hernandez said. “I talked to the family, and they liked it. I can’t complain for the first time out, first-time

producer.” “Off the Rez” will air on television on TLC on May 14, at 7 p.m. Hernandez is working on getting it shown at USU in the fall. He is also trying to get it in some more film festivals, including Sundance. There is an eight-minute trailer that was featured on ESPN. It can be found at: http://espn.go.com/video/ clip?id=4021529. There is also a Facebook page for the film. Hernandez is already working on another film, but didn’t want to reveal any details yet. For now, he is focusing on his job at USU and getting the word out about “Off the Rez.” “I love it here, I love the school,” Hernandez said. “I tell my wife all the time, I love Logan and Utah State. ... Coach Morrill, (Tim) Duryea, (Chris) Jones, (Tarvish) Felton and (Lance) Beckert have really been good to me. I feel blessed to be here and working with this staff.”

Both photos taken by Liz Hunsaker of Providence. Left: The sunset over the sand dunes at Little Sahara Dunes. Right: Geese at First Dam.


Culture

Donny and Marie release new studio album together By The Associated Press

Getting a head start ear River Head Start is a B non-profit program that serves families with children ages 0-5 and

and health care. Parents are encouraged to work actively with teachers to develop and carry out classroom activities, use those activities at home pregnant mothers. BRHS offers three and practice preventative health stratdifferent program options. Preschool egies with their children. Parents lead Head Start serves home-based and and serve on policy center-based council and parent preschool committees that services for Bear River Head make decisions on children ages budgets, curricu3-5; Early Head Start Family Night lum development, Start serves Join us for our “Get A Head Start health services, pregnant mothFamily Night” to learn more about setting goals, and ers and children our program or to fill out an appliimplementing ser0-3 with homecation vices. based or centerThere will be community booths, Parents influence based options; free books, food, family activities, their programs by and Child Care and prizes. working as volunConnection that Date: May 12 teers in the centers serves children Time: 6 to 8 p.m. and classrooms. ages 3-5 in Location: 852 S. 100 West, Logan This includes home child care helping teachers, centers. accompanying Bear River children on field Head Start trips, planning and conducting parent works with families to assess needs meetings, developing and reviewing and strengths to set goals toward self program plans, hiring staff, helping sufficiency, literacy, employment and with meal preparation and performing education. Family Advocates meet with families monthly to support fam- office tasks and custodial work. BRHS also supports families in proilies in these goals. moting and maintaining the complete Our Parent Involvement component health and wellness of every child in acknowledges parents as responsible the program. Bear River Head Start guardians and primary educators works with parents to ensure that all of their children. Activities supchildren have a source of health care port parents' understanding of child that is available even after the child is development, parenting skills, and no longer in the Head Start Program. involvement in their child's education

LAS VEGAS — On the final track of their new album — their first together in 30 years — Donny and Marie Osmond give a nod to difficult times. “Sun follows rain, strength follows pain,” the duo sings before echoing the song’s title. “We will find a way.” It’s a motto that Marie Osmond has taken to heart over the past year. She’s still grieving after her son Michael Bryan committed suicide in Los Angeles in February 2010. “Some days are harder than others, and you take it one day at a time,” she said recently. “Yeah, those anniversaries are tough — it’s coming up, his birthday, here in a few days.” But while Marie Osmond, 51, is still mourning the loss of her

son, she is also marking a period of rebirth. She wed her first husband, Stephen Craig, on Wednesday, on what is the birthday of Michael and her late mother Olive. Craig and Osmond were originally married in 1982 and have one son, Stephen. Also this week, she and her brother Donny released “Donny & Marie,” which has them revisiting their country roots. Marie Osmond rose to her own fame as a country artist in the 1970s, with her hit “Paper Roses”

reaching No. 1 on the country charts in 1973. Marie said the timing felt right for a new album because fans were asking, and they found good songs and collaborators. The album was produced by Buddy Cannon, a country producer known mainly for his work with Kenny Chesney. “He’s so good to work with in terms of the selection of the songs and finding the songs that work with our voices,” Donny, 53, said. “It was a pleasure to work with him.”

Jewelry Sale for Mother’s Day All Silver Jewelry 50-75% Off We are back!

With new CLOTHING and ACCESSORIES

At the Thatcher Young Mansion 35 W. 100 S. Monday-Friday 2-6 Saturday 10-4

Maya’s Corner


Page 12 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 6, 2011

The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board man:

her s i F y l F t a Grea o T d e t a c “Dedi glass” u o D n n e Gl lass g u o D l u By Pa

ore cast no m hen I can hat it’s for. w d ro y fl g up my nd hide, ch him w Don’t han grandson and tea d how they feed a t your side. a an ea Give it to about noble trout od may b s edge G cts start to soar, r’ im e h v h ri c e a e th T se you’re on d more. ght and in And when hen the time is ri bring him joys an our, l w h il Show him tion right on drift w joy the river every r Nature’s power. e n ta e th n o d e n M s a out s, ent A pre to be pati not active, search re secondary thing im h h c a e a re T a g in h s d fi n e la th e s. And when ge, the hooking, th happiness it bring lds o e en The chall on the river with th the mysteries it h nd bold. d a n n g a ig in r b e b te w Just e wa t gro resentatio s loved th make trou nd make a good p I’ve alway on of insects that a w to use ti n The evolu ge of what and ho sherman’s list tha an, n fi ertainly c e n ll ure one c The cha more important o s m . I’ n o d ti n a a s e gging sen learn these things Should b g and bra ld The landin if a grandson cou eone will say, om be And may n a river s fisherman.” ewhere o That som other DOUGLASS n “There’s a

he Lord” t h t i W d n a “St umphrey H m a i l l i W by uth, Who is for tr t. gh ri r fo Who is ure, d n e ill w o Wh f the fight o d n ’Til the e charity, Those with need now. Are what we ness, nd Stand for ki ow. b a ke ta ’t n o D e Lord, Stand with th e long night. th t u o h Throug r ry and hono There is glo do right. ho For those w ord first, So put the L ays. w r In all of you e blessed, b ill w u And yo your days. The rest of

“Mother ’s Day” by Terri Barnes God gave us mot he to teach us and ca rs, re to love us, to guide , us, when no one els e was there

“A Thousand Te ars” by Trevor O. La rsen You’ve shed a th ousand tears Over and over Memories so sad and clear Agony stabs your heart Breaks in two Cracks along the outer ring Sing your song Hum your hymn Pain still stays Inside it hurts Blackness fills yo ur No need to die in heart sin Now wipe your te ars Cause, now I’m ... here Take my hand Slowly towards Your warmth neve r felt So tender Now look at my ey es Deep inside I’m by your side Pain will go away Once you release Its ways Still deep inside My eyes ... your eyes You know that, th at Will stay with you I ... Til you die

Restore your hear t In time ... it will cu re Smile towards I Smile back at yo u We both know The spark in each others’ eyes Time has passed Years have gone Now you’re gone Passed on Your soul Toward s Another world I’m still here My passion Still burns for yo u Tear drops fall On my hands Now that you’re gone Now I cry For those times You’ve cried I’ll cry your Pain away For all those A thousand tears You’ve cried

They go without things, when there isn’t enough, they work and th ey suffer when times get re al tough. They are the first to be there, if a friend needs a hand, always caring fo r others, to do what she ca n, She loves you, sh e to care for her to needs you. o so don’t forget yo ur mother she counting on you Happy Mother’s Day, from one mother to another.

GET YOUR STUFF PUBLISHED! The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board is a place for our local community to share, well ... anything! From short stories to poems to recipes to photos to unique tips when it comes to rearranging your closet, Cache Magazine wants your stuff! Send it all to mnewbold@hjnews.com, or mail it to Cache Magazine, 75 W. 300 North, Logan, UT 84321. We’ll be waiting!


Former New York Times sportswriter pens memoir By Ann Levin For The Associated Press

more than 50 years INewncovering sports, the longtime York Times columnist

Robert Lipsyte prided himself on being a sportswriter who wasn’t a fan. A fat, brainy kid who got beat up in grammar school, Lipsyte majored in English at Columbia University and wanted to be a novelist. “Truth was in the sweep of fiction, I thought, not in a string of little facts,” he writes. But after college, he lucked into a summer job as a copyboy in the Times sports department and fell in love with daily journalism as it was practiced at the Times. There, with Gay Talese as his mentor, he developed a singular voice that, by temperament and life experience, invariably sided with the underdog. Alert to the social and political changes convulsing the era, he befriended Dick Gregory, eventually collaborating with him on his autobiography. Gregory’s scabrous humor about the corrosive affect of racism left a lasting mark. When Lipsyte was rewarded with a column after 10 years of chasing daily news, including his biggest story, Muhammad Ali, he gravitated to stories with a sharp racial or political edge: lacrosse on an Indian reservation, gay athletes coming out. “I could enjoy the Kentucky Derby ... as a great horse race, a splendid party and a vignette of Americana only the first couple of times I covered it before issues of class, race and equine exploitation became impossible to ignore,” he writes. Even though he interviewed

* This week’s New York Times Best-seller List * COMBINED PRINT & E-BOOK FICTION 1. “Water for Elephants,” by Sara Gruen 2. “The Sixth Man,” by David Baldacci 3. “Something Borrowed,” by Emily Giffin 4. “The Help,” by Kathryn Stockett 5. “A Game of Thrones,” by George R. R. Martin COMBINED PRINT & E-BOOK NONFICTION 1. “Heaven is for Real,” by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent 2. “Bossypants,” by Tina Fey 3. “Unbroken,” by Laura Hillenbrand 4. “The Immortal ... Henrietta Lacks,” by Rebecca Skloot 5. “Liberty Defined,” by Ron Paul

Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/

HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “Bossypants,” by Tina Fey 2. “Unbroken,” by Laura Hillenbrand 3. “Liberty Defined,” by Ron Paul 4. “She Walks in Beauty,” selected and introduced by Caroline Kennedy 5. “I’m Over All That” by Shirley MacLaine

the greatest sports stars of his era — Ali, Mickey Mantle, Billie Jean King, Lance Armstrong — he never wanted to “god up” the players. He perceived a bigger story beyond the game scores — something he dubbed Jock Culture, which he saw as a defining aspect of American society. That might sound like a good thing because aren’t professional athletes known for hard work and sacrifice? Yes, but people get old and bodies fail, and although athletes may be able to postpone the inevitable with performanceenhancing drugs, eventually they, too, will be used up and discarded. Jock Culture glorifies the young, the strong and the beautiful, and Lipsyte, the would-be Chekhov, gets the tragic implications. That’s why his columns, and this marvelous memoir, “An Accidental Sportswriter,” are so affecting. When readers would hector him about why his work was always so political, at first he put it off on his liberal parents. “Then I thought — now I always think — why isn’t everyone else’s work more political?”

Paperback Nonfiction 1. “Heaven is for Real,” by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent 2. “The Immortal ... Henrietta Lacks,” by Rebecca Skloot 3. “Born to Run,” by Christopher McDougall 4. “Inside of a Dog,” by Alexandra Horowitz 5. “Have a Little Faith,” by Mitch Albom

Narrative of WWI focuses on war resisters By Ann Levin For The Associated Press

ven today, people are E killed in northern France by unexploded shells left over

from the 700 million artillery and mortar rounds fired on the Western Front during World War I. The fighting between 1914 and 1918 left at least 8.5 million soldiers dead worldwide, including half of all Frenchmen ages 20 to 32, and more than 21 million wounded. Volumes have been devoted to the “war to end all wars.” Now Adam Hochschild has contributed a riveting narrative history that broadens the focus beyond generals and heads of state to include the lesserknown stories of war resisters willing to risk prison or worse for their pacifist beliefs. A veteran journalist whose previous books include “King Leopold’s Ghost,” about Bel-

gium’s brutal colonial rule in the Congo, Hochschild well knows a cardinal rule of the trade: Tell your story through people. In “To End All Wars,” he has assembled an irresistible, unforgettable cast of characters, including a mother and three daughters radicalized by the women’s suffrage movement; a fiery union organizer who went to work in the mines as a boy; a clergyman’s daughter whose first crusade was on behalf of civilians interned by the British during the Boer War; and the eminent philosopher and mathematician Bertrand Russell, briefly jailed for his anti-war writing.

In the end, Hochschild must decide whether the vast and unprecedented carnage of the Great War was worth it. The prevailing view has been that it was a “needless tragedy,” he says, at least for Great Britain, which was not directly attacked. But in recent years, he notes, some British military historians have argued that it was necessary to keep Germany from overrunning Europe. Although Hochschild acknowledges that humans may very well have devised other ways to maim and kill each other had the First World War not happened, he argues eloquently that the world is far worse off because of it.

Page 13 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 6, 2011

Books


Page 14 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 6, 2011

Answers from last week

Calendar Friday

Crossword

Bear River Charter School will be holding our first Annual Green Science Fair for kindergarten through grade four on Friday, May 6, from 5:30 to 8 p.m. This event will be an evening of celebration combined with a fundraiser dinner, games, and a native plant sale, all in aid of establishing an environmental education program for grades K–4 at our school. Stokes Nature Center has custom designed its educational program to fit with Utah Core Curriculum, and BRCS will be the first elementary school in Cache Valley to sign up for a whole

year! For questions regarding their environmental education program, contact Andrea Liberatore at Stokes Nature Center at aliberatore@logannature.org.

Church, 340 W. 700 South, Logan. Dance instruction will be held from 8 to 9 p.m., with the dance following until midnight. Cost is a $3 donation.

An early Mother’s Day ice cream bar will be held May 6 at 2 p.m. at Cache Valley Assisted Living, 233 N. Main St., Providence. Come and help us honor your mother and mothers all over the world. If you have any questions please call Josie at 435-792-4770.

Come join us for an evening of music with the Box Elder Symphonic Choir, Lake Bonneville Community Symphony and Memorial Handbell Choir. These three groups are combining for the first time to present the community with a gift of traditional, popular and classical selections. The program will be held at the Historic Garland Tabernacle in Garland, at 7 p.m., Friday, May 6. Admission is free.

A dance for Cache Valley LDS single adults ages 31 and up will be held Friday, May 6, at the Willow Park

www.ThemeCrosswords.com

By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Turkey club? 5. Priestly wear 8. Maureen or Nancy 14. Subjoins 18. Like some agreements 20. Bob, e.g. 21. Laughfest 22. Performed a private investigator’s task 25. Baby or house follower 26. One of 100 in D.C. 27. “Won-der-ful!” 28. Oil type 29. Elevator ___ 30. Brim 32. Boosts 35. Clear of blame 37. Sun, e.g. 40. Unmissable 43. Operates 44. See 22-Across 51. Inventor 52. Musket’s end? 53. Habit 54. Choose 55. ___ cow 57. Pokes, in a way 60. Palindromic title 63. Celtic girl’s name 65. Have a bug 66. Zig or zag 67. Relating to a part of speech 69. Actress Singer of “Footloose” 70. Pink waders 73. Ring 74. Cooling-off period? 77. Ladies’ bag 78. Econ. yardstick 79. Habitation at a high

altitude 80. Small amount 81. Weakens 83. Rode a bike 85. In the style of 86. Manage 87. Day ___ 89. Milliner 91. See 22-Across 96. Tree trunk 97. Defective development of tissue 98. Daw’s cousin 99. Players for prayers 103. Duckling type? 105. Porgy and bass 109. Had 110. Do magazine work 111. Dinghy propeller 113. Berlioz’s “Les nuits d’___” 116. Untilled tract 117. See 22-Across 123. Donald Duck’s nephews, e.g. 124. Exaggerate 125. South Carolina, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi and Georgia 126. Shut up 127. Light cotton cloth 128. Kind of pad 129. Some are slippery Down 1. Female water-elf 2. “___ Walk” (Frost poem) 3. ___-o’-shanter 4. Miss in a 1934 song 5. Mellon ___ 6. Stripling 7. Counter offer? 8. Three-toed bird

9. “___ and All” (Emerson poem) 10. Word with line and force 11. More filthy 12. Corporate dept. 13. Interminably 14. Not go straight 15. Molded, as metal 16. Gifts 17. Cordwood units 18. ___ Buy 19. Chemical suffix 23. Bothered 24. Make tracks? 31. Depeche ___ 33. Threatened 34. Double header? 35. Sign of a winner? 36. Street feature 38. Cream ___ 39. Second in a series 41. Connect 42. Hide 44. Highlighted 45. Soup thickener 46. Pronounced 47. Joltless joe 48. It can be fragile 49. Instrument 50. Roughly 56. Carry away 58. Long-shanked 59. Pneumonia type 60. Heavy jackets 61. Israeli region 62. Very attentive 64. Routing word 66. XXI - XIV, in ancient Rome 68. Adaptable truck, for short 71. Marine bivalve 72. Water balloon sound

75. Gates started as one 76. River to Donegal Bay 79. Commercial makers 82. ___ man out 83. Pause in a line of verse 84. Sight from Taormina 86. Kind of collar 88. Myanmar monetary unit 90. “Dream on!” 91. Agonize 92. “The Plague” setting

93. Told on 94. Wife of Saturn 95. Top secret? 96. Crows 100. Franco-Spanish botanist 101. Expression 102. Forest trees 104. Nods 106. It’s between the jejunum and the cecum 107. Shakers and others 108. Biblical verb

111. City in Norway 112. Book after Joel 114. Ram, in the UK 115. They, in Trieste 118. Tennessee athlete, abbr. 119. Wander 120. Dog tags 121. Prefix with linguistics 122. Demagogue, for short


May Day in Mendon will be celebrated Friday and Saturday, May 6 and 7. Friday night a community dance will be held at 8 p.m. at Mountainside Elementary school. Community youth will present a floor show at 8:30 p.m. Saturday’s festivities begin at 10 a.m. with the traditional braiding of the Maypole and crowning of the queen on the city square followed by a program. Kid’s games, tug of war, flag football and more activities for everyone will take place in the afternoon.   Third Strike will perform rock/ alternative music with Nescience and Stankbot at Why Sound on Friday, May 6 at 8 p.m. Cost is $5.

Saturday

Latter-day Voices from the Utah State Institute will be performing “In Defense of God.” The concert begins at 7 p.m. May 7. Tickets are $5 per person or $20 per family. Tickets are on sale at Stokes Marketplace in Preston, Woodwards Country Store in Weston, Papa Jays in Clifton, and West Side High School. For more information call 747-3502. Do you like to have fun and meet great people? Singles and couples ages 14 through 99 years old are welcome to attend square dance lessons Saturday, May 7 from 7:30 to 10 p.m. at the LDS church, 1650 E. 2600 North, North Logan. For questions email jerryanda1@live.com or call Jerry at 435-890-2397. The Multicultural Center of Cache Valley will be holding a Cinco De Mayo Festival on Saturday, May 7, at the Cache

County Fairgrounds from 12 to 8 p.m. The event is free and will be held rain or shine. Fifteen musical groups will perform in several musical genres from folk to rock. There will be food vendors representing at least five different cultures and an activities center for children. Carvin Anderson will be singing “oldies but goodies” music at 3 p.m. at the Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. Please come and join us for this free event that is open to the public. For more information please call 792-0353. Common Ground will host a cycling activity Saturday, May 7 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. We will leave from Common Ground, 335 N. 100 East, Logan, and the ride will be on the tour loop which is a dirt/gravel road. We will start at the refuge maintenance shed and proceed around the 10-mile loop. You choose how far you go. A support vehicle will be following picking up those who do not wish to finish the entire tour route. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures is a nonprofit organization that provides outdoor recreational opportunities for youth and adults with disabilities. For more information call 713-0288. Poor Ophelia will perform with Buffalo, Utah and Jake Ballentine at Why Sound on Saturday, May 7, at 8 p.m. Cost is $5. “Walk to Cure FM,” a 5-mile walk to raise money for the National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association, will be held Saturday, May 7 at 1 p.m. at the Logan River Trail at Willow Park. Cost is $20 for adults and $15 for children under 12. All participants will receive a T-shirt, lunch and post-race program. Visit www. redlineraces.com to register. On Saturday, May 7, Macey’s meat department will host “Seafood Roadshow,” the floral department will host “Pick-a-Posie for Mom” and the Little Theater will host “Decorate-a-card for Mom.” The events will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Cache Valley Gardeners’ Market opens for the 2011

season Saturday, May 7, with an abundance of vendors offering local produce and gifts. Located on the southwest corner of Merlin Olsen Park, at 100 S. 200 East, the market is free and open every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. until mid-October.

Monday

Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will be hosting a Mother’s Day art project on Monday, May 9, from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at 335 N. 100 East, Logan. Cost is $3. For more information call 713-0288. Come and listen to Shaunda Kennedy Wenger, author of five children’s books. She will be speaking at the Hyrum Library on May 9 at 7 p.m. She will be speaking about writing her five books and answering your questions on how to get published. Phil Cowley, pharmacist at Cache Valley Specialty Hospital, will speak at the Parkinson’s Support Group meeting, Monday, May 9 at 10 a.m. Anyone interested in learning more about PD medications is invited to attend this meeting.

Tuesday All ages are invited to take a tour with Stokes Nature Center to Golden Spike National Historic Site on Tuesday, May 10, from 8:45 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 10 marks the 142nd anniversary of the “Joining of the Rails,” and a celebration is planned every year which includes a reenactment of this historic event. Then in the afternoon, visit the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge and view the birds of spring, including American avocets, Yellow-headed blackbirds, Cinnamon teal, and American white pelicans. Cost is $25. Lunch and transportation are provided; meet at Macey’s parking lot. Space is limited; registration is required. Call 435755-3239. The UW-CVC May general membership meeting and closing social will be held Tuesday, May 10. Critique will begin at 6:30 p.m., with the meeting fol-

lowing at 7 at the Logan Library Jim Bridger Room. Guest artist Jeannie Millecam will be demonstrating the use of Pigma Pens in watercolor. If you want to join in, bring a pigma pen and watercolor supplies. We will also do Artist Trading Cards (ATC’s). It would be great if all members would make five ATCs to trade at the meeting. ATCs are classified and strictly measured at 2 1/2” X 3 1/2” and in our case will be a “One of a Kind” original mini watercolor. You can round or square the four corners. Refreshments: A-K salads; L-Z desserts. For more information visit us at http://uws-cvc. blogspot.com/ or http://cachevalleywatercolorsociety.com/.

Wednesday The speaker for the May meeting of the Cache Historical Society will be Jay L. Nielson. Jay, has served as campus planner at Utah State University and was director of community development for the City of Logan. He will present “A History of Community Development in Logan and Vicinity.” The meeting will be held in the Historic Cache County Courthouse, on Wednesday, May 11, at 7 p.m. Common Ground will be having a pre-trip meeting for our destination trip to San Rafael Swell on Wednesday, May 11, at 5 p.m. For more information call 713-0288. Watch “Tangled” at OPTIONS for Independence and enjoy treats with friends on Wednesday, May 11, at 6 p.m. Transportation costs will vary. RSVP to Mandi at least 24 hours in advance. OPTIONS is located at 1095 N. Main St. in Logan. OPTIONS for Independence quilting group will meet Wednesday at 10 a.m. at the center, 1095 N. Main St. in Logan. Scott Bradley will teach a free Constitution class “To Preserve The Nation” on Wednesday, May 11 at 7 p.m. at the Book Table (upstairs). For questions call 7532930 or 753-8844.

Thursday The Cache Far South Company will hold their jubilee luncheon and program Thursday, May 12 at 1 p.m. at the Hyrum Civic Center. All members are invited. Come play community bingo with us May 12 from 2 to 3 p.m. at Cache Valley Assisted Living, 233 N. Main St., Providence. We have cookies, fun, laughs and great prizes. If you have any questions please call Josie at 435-792-4770. Shauna Flammer will share some wonderful brunch ideas at a free cooking and community class on Saturday, May 12, at Macey’s Little Theater from 7 to 8 p.m. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will be holding a canoeing activity on Thursday, May 12, from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. Cost is $3. We will try and paddle north to the “Big Lake,” following the marked canoe route. Fishing Poles are encouraged for those who have up-to-date licenses. For more information call 7130288. The USU Extension Office in Cache County will present a cooking demonstration/ nutrition workshop on Cancer Prevention on Thursday, May 12, in the Cache County Administration Building Multipurpose Room at 179 N. Main, Logan, at 11 a.m. This class will focus on the “super-foods” that might help prevent cancer. A light lunch will be served. The cost is $3 at the door or $2 if you pay 24 hours prior to the class. For reservations phone 752-6263. Join us for a free “Living Well Workshop” presented by Bear River Health Department. This is a fun, interactive five-week workshop for anyone with an ongoing chronic condition (arthritis, heart disease, diabetes, joint pain, etc.). Course will be held May 12, 19, 26, June 2 and 16 at 2:30 to 4 p.m. at the Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. For more information contact Kim at 792-6521 or Julie at 792-0353.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 6, 2011

Stokes Nature Center invites curious toddlers, ages 2-3, to join them for Parent Tot from 10 to 11 a.m. on Friday, May 6. Explore animals, plants, and nature through music, crafts and games. This program is parent interactive, and all toddlers must have a parent present to participate and explore along with their child. The program fee is $3 ($2.50 for SNC members). For more info, call 755-3239 or visit www.logannature.org.


Page 16 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 6, 2011

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Cache Magazine  

May 6-12, 2011

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