Page 1

The boy in the

ballet

Luke Anderson performs as lead male with local company

The Herald Journal

MAY 4-10, 2012


contents

May 4-10, 2012

MUSIC 3 Lyceum Philharmonic to perform in Logan

4 Two bluegrass bands to play at Logan Arthouse

5 Westminster Bell Choirs

to end season with concert

12 Meet local metal band Tr3ason

theater 5 Auditions for local

companies coming up

MOVIES 6 ‘Five-Year Engagment’ gets two stars

7 Summer movie season

begins with ‘The Avengers’

MISC. 3 Gardeners’ Market to start up next weekend

13 USU museum to focus on comic book heroes

CROSSWORD 14 Can you complete this week’s puzzle?

CALENDAR 15 See what’s happening this week

Braden Wolfe/Herald Journal

Cache Valley Civic Ballet dancers Karyn Hansen, left, and Luke Anderson rehearse for “Firebird” in March 2010. On the cover: Becky Erickson and Anderson perform in “The Nutcracker” in November 2011 (Eli Lucero/Herald Journal).

FROM THE EDITOR

W

hen Luke Anderson of North Logan first experienced professional ice skating, it inspired him to be a speed skater, which eventually led him to dancing. Now, at age 24, he’s the lead male dancer with Cache Valley Civic Ballet. His story, which Shawn Harrison shares in this week’s main feature, got me thinking about my experiences with ice skating, even though none of them led to a special talent like Anderson. I believe the first time I stepped foot on ice was when I was about 10 years old. I’d just learned to rollerblade, so my

best friend at the time said I would pick it up pretty easily. We had so much fun skating round and round the rink. Since then, I can probably count the number of times I’ve been ice skating on two hands. I remember the time a bunch of friends and I went for a birthday party in seventh grade, and in high school I went with a church group. My mom was a leader at the time and she was so scared of falling, she held on to the edge nearly the entire time. At the end of the night, a couple of us dragged her out, holding her hands and making her skate with us. That’s a good memory. In college, I went on a date with a hockey player who was a fabulous skater. He tried to teach me new things, including skating backwards, but instead of

moving gracefully, I ended up falling on my back and hitting my head. He felt terrible, but it really didn’t hurt that bad. I had to assure him that I was OK about 20 times which made the situation more embarrassing than it needed to be. But, it was nice he was so concerned. And then about a year and a half ago, I had a roommate from India who’d never been ice skating before, so my other roommate and I took her to the Eccles Ice Center. She was so adorable, yet so nervous she used a walker nearly the entire time. My ice skating experiences are pretty normal, I’m sure. But if you want to read a really good story about where skating can lead, turn to page 8. — Manette Newbold


‘Symphony No. 9’ comes to Logan The Lyceum Philharmonic, under the direction of Kayson Brown, will perform Beethoven’s “Symphony No. 9” on May 5 at 7 p.m. at the Ellen Eccles Theatre. Joining the Lyceum Philharmonic are the Sterling Singers and soloists Soprano Melissa Heath, Mezzo Valerie Nelson, Tenor Robert Breault and Baritone Chris Holmes. For Brown, conducting this symphony, particularly in Logan, brings him full circle. “Hearing Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony as a young man at Mount Logan Middle School changed my life,” Brown said. “Coming from humble beginnings, I found inspiration through my music teachers in Logan Schools, and I wanted to find a way to communicate that I appreciate the wonderful community that nurtured me when I needed it. I am bringing this performance to Cache Valley to return the generosity that was extended me.” The American Heritage Lyceum Philharmonic is comprised of talented students, ages 13-18, from across the state of Utah. These musicians come from many different schools to participate in an afterschool music program hosted at American Heritage

WHAT: Beethoven’s “Symphony No. 9” performed by the Lyceum Philharmonic When: Saturday, May 5, at 7 p.m. at the Ellen Eccles Theatre COST: Tickets are $10 to $12 and can be purchased at www.centerforthearts.us. Senior and student discounts are available.

Dallyn Vail Bayles, Jordan Bluth, Steven Sharp Nelson, Alex Boyé and Peter Breinholt. In early 2012, the Lyceum Philharmonic collaborated with cellist Steven Sharp Nelson and The Piano Guys to produce “Beethoven’s 5 Secrets.” In its first three months, the video received more than 2.8 million views on Kayson Brown conducts the Lyceum Philharmonic. The stu- YouTube and remained dent orchestra will perform Beethoven’s “Symphony No. 9” on number one on the iTunes Saturday at the Ellen Eccles Theatre in Logan. charts through April. For more information about the nation as one of the counSchool in American Fork. Lyceum Philharmonic, visit try’s premier youth perTheir mission includes www.LyceumPhilharmonic. forming ensembles. Under performing music that eduorg. the direction of Brown, cates both heart and mind. Tickets for the Saturday these young musicians have show are $10-12 and can The Lyceum Philharperformed alongside some monic was named “Best be purchased at www.cenof the music industry’s Youth Instrumental Group” terforthearts.us. Senior and in 2009, 2010 and 2011, by leading artists, including student discounts are availThe 5 Browns, Jenny Oaks Best of State Utah and has able. Baker, Michael Ballam, been recognized across the

Gardeners’ Market to fill Merlin Olsen Park The Cache Valley Gardeners’ Market will start the 2012 summer season May 12 at Merlin Olsen Park in Logan. Every Saturday morning through Oct. 20, the park will be filled

with vendors selling fruits, vegetables, homemade salsa, artisan bread, freshsqueezed lemonade, locally made cheese, fine pastries and handmade crafts. The Gardeners’ Market

offers a vibrant scene and community of people shopping, listening to music, visiting and having fun. Some of the entertainment on the schedule for this year includes Robert

Linton, Uncommon Collective, Hilary Murray,Who’s Your Daddy Blues Review and more. For more information and a schedule of events, visit www.gardenersmarket.org.

“There was this really cute girl in the class, so I thought I would stick around and see how that worked out. She ended up quitting a week later, so that flopped pretty bad.” – Luke Anderson, on his ballet beginnings

PET OF THE WEEK Available for adoption

Pet: Shya From: Four Paws Rescue Why she’s so lovable: Shya

is looking for a new forever home because her family could no longer take care of her. She is a great dog. She’s really sweet and loves belly rubs. She is house-trained and crate-trained. She’s good with kids, cats and other dogs. Shya is very overweight at the moment and is currently working on losing weight in her foster home. She will need an owner who will continue to give her adequate exercise, feed her a high quality weight management dog food, and cut back on treats.

Page 3 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 4, 2012

ALL MIXED UP

Quotable


Page 4 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 4, 2012

all mixed up Logan Arthouse to host two bluegrass bands Salt Lake City’s Puddle Mountain Ramblers and Waiting on Trial of Durango, Colo., will perform May 5 at 7:30 p.m. at the Logan Arthouse and Cinema, 795 N. Main St. Tickets are $13 advance or $15 at the door. They are available at www.bridgerfolk. org or by calling Dave at 435-881-9076. The Puddle Mountain Ramblers have been playing together for five years and have graced some of the best stages in the Intermountain West. Sometimes described as a merchandising group with a bluegrass problem, they have evolved into one of Salt Lake’s best bluegrass bands. Waiting On Trial has also been together for

Above: Puddle Mountain Ramblers are pictured. Right: Waiting on Trial performs.

five years and hail from the great four corners mecca of beer, bluegrass and outdoor recreation that is Durango. Never having any interest in doing things the standard way, the band plays almost entirely original material, occasionally throwing in the unexpected cover song. You

might hear a song from Social Distortion or an obscure cover stolen from some random ’80s movie soundtrack thrown into the mix at a Waiting on Trial show. For more information, go to www.bridgerfolk. org, www.puddlemountain.com and waitingontrial.com.

It’s time to register for ceramics camps Those wanting to create and explore within the ceramic art form can register for summer ceramic classes. The Cache Valley Center of the Arts offers pottery classes for all ages and abilities. Summer classes begin June 4 and run through July 6. Each four-day kids camp is $50, plus $15 for materials. Sign up for one or all four classes (discount available for multiple class registrations). All completed works will be fired, not glazed. The CVCA ceramics camps will be held at the Bullen Center. Ceramics classes are a fun way for children and adults to explore different pottery techniques from hand-building techniques to wheel throwing essentials. Ceramic classes are a great summer activity and

provide the perfect opportunity to get hands dirty. Children’s camps will be

offered from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., with the pre-teen and teen classes from 1 to 3 p.m. on

June 4-7, June 18-21, June 25-28 and July 2-3 and 5-6. The cost to participate in all four camps is $195. Students can glaze their work July 6 for $14. The adult class will be held Thursdays from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. The cost is $75 for five classes and includes 25 pounds of clay and firing. Additional materials may be purchased as needed. Class sizes are limited, so register early at www.cachearts.org, or stop by the CVCA offices (43 S. Main) between 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Those interested in booking a private lesson or a group ceramic class at the Center can visit the website or call 435752-0026 to check availability.

why sound Why Sound is located at 30 Federal Ave., in Logan. All shows start at 8 p.m. Cost is $5. Cruz Soto will perform hip-hop music Saturday, May 5, at 8 p.m. Corey Walton will perform acoustic music with The Promise Morning, Matt Miles and Once the Lion on Friday, May 11. The Folka Dots will perform folk/country/blues music with Horse Bones and Alarmingly Charming on Saturday, May 12.


Parents trying to decide how to keep their kids busy with this summer can enroll them in an art camp offered by the Cache Valley Center of the Arts. Art Camp is an engaging summer program that offers a wide variety of unique hands-on activities from cooking to ceramics, music to dance, photography to drumming, all for kids 5-11 years of age. CVCA’s Art Camp is a fun and dynamic sion will be held from summer experience that 1 to 4 p.m. The cost is aims to spark creativity, $90 per child per session engagement, exploration and includes a 2012 Art and individual expresCamp T-shirt. Camp one sion. This program welwill be held June 11-21, comes each camper as a camp two runs July 9-19 unique individual with and camp three will be artistic potential. held July 30-Aug. 9. There are three camps Each camp is slightly for children ages 5-11. different, so visit www. Camps are held Monday CacheArts.org for details through Thursday. The or stop by the Cache morning session will be Valley Center for the held from 9 a.m. to noon, Arts for registration and the afternoon sesinformation. The themes

Bell choirs to perform Saturday The Westminster Bell Choirs will present a concert in the Tabernacle Saturday, May 5, at 7 p.m. Come hear everything from jazzy quartet numbers to "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee" rung by two dozen handbell and chime musicians. The groups will also ring at First Presbyterian's 11 a.m. service Sunday, May 6. The Westminster Bell Choirs are interfaith groups sponsored by Logan's First Presbyterian Church. The two choirs ring four octaves of English handbells and four octaves of chimes. This weekend's performances will close the groups' 2011-2012 season.

WHAT: Cache Valley Center of the Arts summer camps When: Sessions start in June, July and August COST: $90 per child. Register at the CVCA Ticket Office (43 S. Main in Logan), online at www.cachearts.org, or by calling 435-7520026.

cachearts.org or by callare “Mythology” for the ing us at 435-752-0026. June camp, “Mystery” for July, and “Magic” for Many campers were turned away last year, so August, so children can don’t miss the opportuexpect to explore rich nity to enroll your child stories, symbols, rituals and superhuman charac- in one of the three fun camps. ters through the arts. Programs at the CVCA All Art Camp classes are sponsored in part by are held in the Bullen funds from the Marie Center located at 43 S. Eccles Caine Foundation Main in Logan. Classes – Russell Family; Logan fill up quickly, so regCity Cultural Arts Grant; ister early at the CVCA and Utah Division of Ticket Office, 43 S. Main St., online at www. Arts & Museums.

‘Jane Eyre’ Auditions for Music Theatre West’s “Jane Eyre” will be held May 9 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. and May 10 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Ellen Eccles Theatre stage (Door #3 in the southwest corner). Please prepare a one-minute song. An

‘Hello Dolly’ Auditions for The Old Barn Community Theatre’s “Hello, Dolly!” will be held May 14 and 15 from 7 to 9 p.m. with callbacks on May 19 at 1 p.m. All roles are open. Performances are

accompanist will be provided, but actors are allowed to bring their own accompanist or a CD. Those who would like to audition should download a form at www.musictheatrewest.com/auditions.html, and bring it with them completed. Show dates are Oct. 11 to 16. scheduled for July 27 to Aug. 18. Please prepare 16 measures from a Broadway-style show and come prepared to learn a short dance sequence. Auditions will be held at 3605 Bigler Road, Collinston.

‘West Side Story’ Auditions for Four “Romeo and Juliet” will Seasons Theatre take stage this fall Company’s “West in Cache Valley. The Side Story” will be company is looking for held Monday, May 14, singers and dancers. from 4 to 8 p.m. This All parts are open. Visit Academy and Tony fourseasonstheatre.org award-winning musical for audition informabased on Shakespeare’s tion.

Page 5 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 4, 2012

Sign up for summer art camps AUDITIONS


Page 6 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 4, 2012

movies The problem that plagues so many Judd Apatow productions — the one that keeps good comedies from being great ones — unfortunately exists here, too. It’s a matter of knowing when to say when, of knowing which bits should be trimmed and which should have been cut altogether. “The Five-Year Engagement” is so scattered and overlong, it really feels like it lasts five years, and even the inherent likability of stars Jason Segel and Emily Blunt cannot overcome the film’s pervasive sense of strain. It becomes so tortured, it almost gets to the point where you hope these two will break up for good, just because it’s the pragmatic thing to do and because it would finally wrap things up. And that’s a shame, because the movie reunites Segel with Nicholas Stoller; the two also co-wrote 2008’s “Forgetting Sarah Marshall,” one of the more wellbalanced Apatow productions, with Stoller once again directing and Segel starring as the doughy

★★ ‘The Five-Year Engagement’ Director // Nicholas Stoller Starring // Jason Segel, Emily Blunt and Chris Pratt Rated // R for sexual content and language throughout everyman. As in that earlier film, “The Five-Year Engagement” touches on themes of love found and lost in a serious way, and to its credit it does find some moments of emotional truth amid the inconsistent laughs. But man, it can be a messy slog to get to them. Segel and Blunt star as a newly engaged

couple who encounter multiple obstacles on the way to the altar, including cross-country moves, career ambitions and family issues. If it sounds like a drag, that’s probably because it is, and wacky supporting players including Brian Posehn and Chris Parnell don’t exactly liven things up. 124 minutes.

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Page 7 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 4, 2012

‘Avengers’ kicks off summer movie season


The boy in the ballet S

omething happened a little more than 10 years ago that changed the life of a teenager. A friend convinced him to come along and check out the short track speed skaters from China who were using the Ice Center in North Logan to prepare for the 2002 Winter Olympics. He reluctantly went, taking a break from playing video games and eating Doritos. What happened next shaped Luke Anderson’s path in athletics, art and dance. “I don’t know what struck me about it, but it was so cool,” Anderson said. “I don’t think I had seen somebody that was a master at something, not only that, but how hard you have to work.” That experience set in motion a series of events that has molded the 6-foot-1 North Logan resident into the person he is today — the leading male dancer with the Cache Valley Civic Ballet (CVCB). But that is jumping ahead almost a decade. Back in 2002, Anderson returned every day to the Ice Center before the Olympics began to watch the Chinese, several Olympic hockey teams and figure skaters from Russia and France. “I wanted to be a short-track Chinese speed skater,” Anderson quipped. “Unfortunately, they didn’t have that at the rink.” The figure skaters caught his eye as well. The then 14-year-old started taking figure skating lessons. A year passed and a figure skating coach decided

By Shawn Harrison

Anderson needed to become more graceful. He was asked what he thought of taking a ballet class. Wanting to improve on the ice, he agreed. At 15, he signed up for a beginner adult ballet class in the summer of 2003. “I did not like that,” Anderson said with a chuckle. “I was like, ‘this sucks the big one.’ ... There was this really cute girl in the class, so I thought I would stick around and see how that worked out. She ended up quitting a week later, so that flopped pretty bad.” However, he decided to continue on for a while and by the end of the summer ballet had started to grow on him. “I started really liking it,” Anderson said. “Pretty much every year since then it has gotten better.” And so has he. The now 24-year-old son of Andy and Sher Anderson has been the top male dancer with the CVCB for the past two years. This Monday night he will play the lead male role in “Sleeping Beauty Act III” at the Ellen Eccles Theatre. The performance will follow the end-of-the-year dances by different CVCB classes, which begins at 7 p.m. “It’s a beautiful performance, and Luke has done a great job with his part, partnering with Hanna Corcoran,” said Sandy Emile, the artistic director for the CVCB. “They performed ‘Nutcracker’ together this year.” But before Anderson became the principle male with the local ballet company, he put in a lot of work. He

actually continued to figure skate as well until just a few years ago. The competitive side of figure skating eventually wore on him. Not a highly competitive person by nature, Anderson decided to focus on just ballet. Plus, when he gave up figure skating, he was an engineering student at Utah State University with plenty of studies to keep him busy. Time for sleep was limited when he was doing both ballet and figure skating. “Figure skating can be pretty stressful, but with ballet you have a huge support group,” Anderson said. “Everyone wants you to succeed, everyone is happy. With ballet, the atmosphere was so much better.” Though he does miss figure skating. He has since received his bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering and is in the process of finishing his thesis for a master’s in mechanical engineering, which has stressed him some and limited his time for dancing. Next up is a second master’s, which will be in business. “What I really would like to do is technical management,” Anderson explained. “Instead of a personnel manager, you are more of a project manager.” With at least another year of schooling ahead of him, that means he will continue to dance with the CVCB. That is music to Emile’s ears. “No, no, he is not allowed,” said Emile, when asked about Anderson moving away some day. “He may be thinking he wants a job that pays real money, but I’ve

decided, no, he is always going to be with us. He is awesome to work with.” Plus, there just aren’t a lot of male dancers in Cache Valley. “Getting guys to dance is a tough sell,” Anderson said. “The thing is, they are going to get a lot of crap; they are going to get teased. Unless you love it, it’s just not worth it, not worth all the crap you’re going to get.” For Anderson, who said he has been teased, it hasn’t bothered him. He credits the way he was raised by his parents. He doesn’t worry about what other people think of him. Anderson wished there were more guys, especially when he shows up for a partnering class and is the lone male with 10 females. While that would be pretty good odds at a high school dance, Anderson takes the time to work with each of the females which can be exhausting. And, “there are a heck of lot easier ways to get girls. I’ve been in ballet for how many years now and never got a ballerina.” Taking the time to work with all the females that want to learn and improve has impressed Emile. She said Anderson remembers when he was beginning and how others took time to help him. Anderson said he may have quit had others not befriended him and helped in his early years of ballet. When it comes to partnering, respect is the key. See LUKE on p. 10

From left: Luke Anderson dances in “The Nutcracker” at the Ellen Eccles Theatre in November 2010 (Caitland Photography); Merri Lyn Balling Turner and Anderson perform together in “Sleeping Beauty,” a 2006 performance by the Cache Valley Civic Ballet (Quentin Gardener Jr.); Becky Erickson and Anderson perform in “The Nutcracker” at the Ellen Eccles Theatre in 2010 (Caitland Photography); Karyn Hansen and Luke Anderson warm up for “The Nutcracker” on Nov. 22, 2011 (Eli Lucero/Herald Journal).


The boy in the ballet S

omething happened a little more than 10 years ago that changed the life of a teenager. A friend convinced him to come along and check out the short track speed skaters from China who were using the Ice Center in North Logan to prepare for the 2002 Winter Olympics. He reluctantly went, taking a break from playing video games and eating Doritos. What happened next shaped Luke Anderson’s path in athletics, art and dance. “I don’t know what struck me about it, but it was so cool,” Anderson said. “I don’t think I had seen somebody that was a master at something, not only that, but how hard you have to work.” That experience set in motion a series of events that has molded the 6-foot-1 North Logan resident into the person he is today — the leading male dancer with the Cache Valley Civic Ballet (CVCB). But that is jumping ahead almost a decade. Back in 2002, Anderson returned every day to the Ice Center before the Olympics began to watch the Chinese, several Olympic hockey teams and figure skaters from Russia and France. “I wanted to be a short-track Chinese speed skater,” Anderson quipped. “Unfortunately, they didn’t have that at the rink.” The figure skaters caught his eye as well. The then 14-year-old started taking figure skating lessons. A year passed and a figure skating coach decided

By Shawn Harrison

Anderson needed to become more graceful. He was asked what he thought of taking a ballet class. Wanting to improve on the ice, he agreed. At 15, he signed up for a beginner adult ballet class in the summer of 2003. “I did not like that,” Anderson said with a chuckle. “I was like, ‘this sucks the big one.’ ... There was this really cute girl in the class, so I thought I would stick around and see how that worked out. She ended up quitting a week later, so that flopped pretty bad.” However, he decided to continue on for a while and by the end of the summer ballet had started to grow on him. “I started really liking it,” Anderson said. “Pretty much every year since then it has gotten better.” And so has he. The now 24-year-old son of Andy and Sher Anderson has been the top male dancer with the CVCB for the past two years. This Monday night he will play the lead male role in “Sleeping Beauty Act III” at the Ellen Eccles Theatre. The performance will follow the end-of-the-year dances by different CVCB classes, which begins at 7 p.m. “It’s a beautiful performance, and Luke has done a great job with his part, partnering with Hanna Corcoran,” said Sandy Emile, the artistic director for the CVCB. “They performed ‘Nutcracker’ together this year.” But before Anderson became the principle male with the local ballet company, he put in a lot of work. He

actually continued to figure skate as well until just a few years ago. The competitive side of figure skating eventually wore on him. Not a highly competitive person by nature, Anderson decided to focus on just ballet. Plus, when he gave up figure skating, he was an engineering student at Utah State University with plenty of studies to keep him busy. Time for sleep was limited when he was doing both ballet and figure skating. “Figure skating can be pretty stressful, but with ballet you have a huge support group,” Anderson said. “Everyone wants you to succeed, everyone is happy. With ballet, the atmosphere was so much better.” Though he does miss figure skating. He has since received his bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering and is in the process of finishing his thesis for a master’s in mechanical engineering, which has stressed him some and limited his time for dancing. Next up is a second master’s, which will be in business. “What I really would like to do is technical management,” Anderson explained. “Instead of a personnel manager, you are more of a project manager.” With at least another year of schooling ahead of him, that means he will continue to dance with the CVCB. That is music to Emile’s ears. “No, no, he is not allowed,” said Emile, when asked about Anderson moving away some day. “He may be thinking he wants a job that pays real money, but I’ve

decided, no, he is always going to be with us. He is awesome to work with.” Plus, there just aren’t a lot of male dancers in Cache Valley. “Getting guys to dance is a tough sell,” Anderson said. “The thing is, they are going to get a lot of crap; they are going to get teased. Unless you love it, it’s just not worth it, not worth all the crap you’re going to get.” For Anderson, who said he has been teased, it hasn’t bothered him. He credits the way he was raised by his parents. He doesn’t worry about what other people think of him. Anderson wished there were more guys, especially when he shows up for a partnering class and is the lone male with 10 females. While that would be pretty good odds at a high school dance, Anderson takes the time to work with each of the females which can be exhausting. And, “there are a heck of lot easier ways to get girls. I’ve been in ballet for how many years now and never got a ballerina.” Taking the time to work with all the females that want to learn and improve has impressed Emile. She said Anderson remembers when he was beginning and how others took time to help him. Anderson said he may have quit had others not befriended him and helped in his early years of ballet. When it comes to partnering, respect is the key. See LUKE on p. 10

From left: Luke Anderson dances in “The Nutcracker” at the Ellen Eccles Theatre in November 2010 (Caitland Photography); Merri Lyn Balling Turner and Anderson perform together in “Sleeping Beauty,” a 2006 performance by the Cache Valley Civic Ballet (Quentin Gardener Jr.); Becky Erickson and Anderson perform in “The Nutcracker” at the Ellen Eccles Theatre in 2010 (Caitland Photography); Karyn Hansen and Luke Anderson warm up for “The Nutcracker” on Nov. 22, 2011 (Eli Lucero/Herald Journal).


Page 10 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 4, 2012

Luke

“It’s always fun to be the one they are all throwing the flowers too, but actually, what I like most is you get to Continued from p. 9 work with great girls, the prima donna ballerinas,” “When a girl allows Anderson said. “You get you to be her partner, to do the hard stuff. The she is putting a lot of leading roles are always trust in you,” Anderson the cool ones. I have to said. “You need to be admit, if someone said, respectful, you can’t be ‘Luke you are not going aggressive. ... Wouldn’t to be the leading role,’ I it be cool in a few years when one of these girls is would be OK, but a little sad. It’s about the dancdancing in New York, I can say I danced with her. ing. As long as you get to dance, you’re always I taught her.” fine.” That kind of attitude All the hard work has makes Anderson popubeen worth it, he said. lar among the company “For a little while when dancers, as well as many you dance, you get to others around the valley. be the prince and be in The USU student also love with the princess,” does modern, jazz, hipAnderson said. “It’s basihop, Irish and ballroom cally stories boiled down dancing. He described to their most pure state. ... his favorite as a contemWhat is really good about porary ballet/modern. Anderson puts in an aver- it, is dancing is beautiful. It’s wonderful. ... You get age of 17 hours a week doing various dancing. Before he started writing his thesis, he also tried to hit the gym every day. Ballet takes a lot of strength and flexibility. He lifts weights, does cardio and Pilates. While some dancers may get tired of doing the same ballet over and over, Anderson singled out “The Nutcracker” as a favorite. The CVCB traditionally does “The Nutcracker” every year after Thanksgiving and then a different ballet each spring. “‘Dracula’ is a hoot, but I like ‘The Nutcracker,’” Anderson said. “It’s predictable, because you know what you are doing, but you can totally improve it each year.” If and when Anderson moves away, he said he will never quit dancing. • Soaps And if he isn’t the lead, that is all right too, but • Lotions while he is, there is no reason not to enjoy the moment.

to take all the great parts of dancing and yourself and then you get to show it to everyone, which is really cool.” Anderson fondly reflects back on the trigger point that would eventually bring him to ballet. “The thing with dancing, people start for any number of reasons,” Anderson said. “There’s usually a story. I’ve always found the guy stories are a little more exotic than the girls. The girls are always, ‘I wanted to be a ballerina.’ You don’t usually come across guys that grew up wanting to be a ballerina.” Which is certainly the case with Anderson. While he didn’t become a Chinese short track speed skater, he is certainly happy to be dancing with the CVCB.

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Paintings at the Hyrum Library to be displayed through June

“First Snowstorm” by Florence Ware.

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Scott Bushman and the Hyrum Library and Museum Foundation requested to borrow eight oil paintings from the Cache County School District to display through June 15. The current artists being featured include Theodore Milton Wassmer, David Howell Rosenbaum Jr., Florence Ellen Ware, Sydney Paul Smith, William Wendell Perkins and Gordon Cope. The exhibit is part of a series entitled “WPA and the Depression Years.” On May 6, 1935, the Works Progress Administration (WPA) was created to help provide economic relief to the citizens of the United States who were suffering through the Great Depression. For Utah artists, the devastating impact of the Depression was somewhat moderated by three major institu-

Free

tions: The Utah Arts Council and the School Arts Fund, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the WAP Federal Arts Project. The following artists produced work from that time period. Florence Ellen Ware (18911972): Ware was a painter, illustrator, costume designer, interior designer and muralist. She had numerous commissions from all of these sources and was constantly busy, working for her eager clientele. In 1934, she was offered to oversee several WPA projects including a mural at Kingsbury Hall. Theodore M. Wassmer (19102006): When the Depression hit Utah in 1931, the working members of the Wassmer family lost their jobs, leaving him the sole support of a household of 10. In 1934, he sought out Ware and

applied to work under the WPA as an artist. Ware hired Wassmer and they had a close friendship until Ware’s death. Gordon Cope (1906-1999): Cope was from Salt Lake City and became recognized as a major Utah artist of the Great Depression. He started the art department at LDS University and worked there until 1931. David Howell Rosenbaum J. (1908-1983): Rosenbaum, an expressionist painter and JudeoMormon artist, was one of Utah’s great colorists. Many of his finest paintings were done during the Depression years. To view the work of all the artists, visit the Hyrum Library at 50 W. Main St., Mondays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Tuesdays through Fridays from noon to 7 p.m. or Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

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Page 12 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 4, 2012

MUSIC Members of Tr3ason hope to make it big someday By Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

Like most musicians, the members of local metal band Tr3ason want to tell stories with their songs. The lyrics for lead singer Tyler Thurston’s “Death Won’t Take Me” came to the 16-year-old after he got in a life-threatening 4-wheeler accident. He says the song speaks of his experience and every time he sings it, he can connect to the message. Other songs Thurston’s written, including “Cold Lies,” are about life events, while “Hate Called Love” and “Progessing” allowed him to place himself into someone else’s shoes. “(‘Progressing’) is about suicide and stuff, and I’ve never thought about it, but I’ve put myself in the shoes of somebody that has,” he says. Tr3ason is made up of Thurston, who also plays guitar, Colton Bunce on drums and backup vocals and Kaden Roholt on bass. The three musicians often perform at Why Sound in Logan, and they’ve also played at Battle of Bands at USU and Sky View High School. Their next performance will be at In the Venue in Salt Lake City, as part of another Battle of the Bands on May 12. Their style of music is screamo metal, and they are all basically selftaught musicians, with lessons here and there.

Jennifer Meyers/Herald Journal

Left: Tyler Thurston performs with the band Tr3ason at Why Sound on April 14. Above: Colton Bunce plays the drums during Tr3ason’s performance.

Bunce said he took lessons at KSM for a while until he passed up the teacher, Roholt learned guitar from his dad and Thurston has been coached vocally by Rex Davis, the lead vocalist

of local metal band For Tomorrow We Die. Thurston says one of the misconceptions about metal bands is that they’re made up of angry, depressed musicians. And although

Tr3ason has taken on some heavy subjects in their songs, like suicide, the whole generalization that metal music is always dark is an untrue stereotype. “They figure it’s like

the Devil’s work,” he friends with other local says, but then menmetal bands. tions the band As I Lay “I love going to Why Dying, a Christian metal Sound and playing group that may sound shows there because brutal and mean, but at school there’s those really sings about Jesus. people that are like, “We don’t swear in our ‘You’re the weird kid, stuff,” Bunce says. “It’s you like to wear black.’ not like we’re talking You go to Why Sound about the Devil either.” and you’re with your Thurston adds, people. You go there “There’s that one song and everyone is your about suicide and peofriend, even if you ple are like, ooh, that’s haven’t met before. It’s terrible, but it’s like, just cool. It’s nice that people go through that way.” stuff. You know what I Bands that have mean? I wasn’t saying, helped mentor Tr3ason ‘Go kill yourself.’ I was include For Tomorbeing the person that row We Die, Deicidal was going through it.” Carnage, Poor Ophelia, Tr3ason has currently Gravetown, Swamp recorded several songs, Donkey and Demolition both vocal and instruBio. mental, which can be As for the future, the heard at www.reverbna- members of Tr3ason tion.com/tr3ason. This hope to continue playsummer Tr3ason plans ing together and hopeto finish an album they fully land a tour or a will tentatively release contract someday. in September. The band “We want to make records at Why Sound, it big,” Thurston says. where they say they’ve “We do, really.” made a sort of family of


Comic book heroes are in the spotlight at the next “Saturdays at the Museum” activity presented by Utah State University’s Museum of Anthropology. The museum invites patrons to activities that examine the impact that comic books and their protagonists have had on society. Activities are Saturday, May 5, and the museum is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. A special guest speaker, Ryan Paul, is featured at noon and at 2 p.m. Paul is president of the Utah Museum

Association. He will address the history of comic books and why they’re important in today’s world. Visitors are encouraged to come dressed as their favorite comic book hero, and participate in a costume contest at 1 p.m. to win Aggie Ice Cream. Prizes will be available for winners in both the adult and children’s groups. Other activities during the day at the museum include a chance to make your own super hero. “Who doesn’t love to read and look at

pictures about heroes and villains, magic and technology, everyday life and amazing deeds?” said Aurora Durfee, a Saturdays program team member. “Comic books are the perfect escape and have shaped our culture in ways we often don’t notice. As a museum, we are excited to share the fascinating world of comic book heroes.” In addition to the Saturday activity series, community members and USU students alike can visit the museum during its operating

Avengers

see Cap, Hulk, Thor, and Iron Man pulverize, vaporize and ionize their competition. Be honest, that’s really

what you came for, right?

Continued from p. 7

The last 30 minutes or so are filled with wall-to-wall action in which numerous action movie one-liners are spouted. There are many instances where you might find yourself wondering how in the world the heroes will get out of this mess, but then you realize sequels are already in the planning stages, so you can just sit back and watch the movie without much worry. “The Avengers” marks the first big blockbuster of the summer season and it’s a fun one. Yes, there are quite a few too many wink-wink, nod-nods to hardcore fanboys that regular movie-goers just won’t get. Yes, there is some forced, cartoony humor which seemed oddly out of place. But, in the end we get to

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hours, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The USU Museum of Anthropology is on the USU campus in the

south turret of the historic Old Main building, Room 252. Admission is free. For Saturday activities, free parking is available in the adjacent lot, south of the

building. For more information about museum events, call museum staff at 435-797-7545 or visit the museum website, anthromuseum.usu.edu.

Page 13 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 4, 2012

Explore the world of comic book heroes Saturday


Page 14 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 4, 2012

CrossworD By Myles Mellor and Sally York Movie Presidents

Across 1. Not here 7. Noodles 12. Inclined 15. Fine things 19. Skin folds 20. World record? 21. ___ cabinet 22. Secular 23. They played Abraham Lincoln 27. Going to the dogs, e.g. 28. Ropes down a mountain 29. Dirtier, of a chimney 30. Datebook abbr. 31. United Nations agcy. 33. Urgent 35. Military acronym 37. Computer acronym 40. Senatorial affirmative 41. “The Beast of ___ Flats” (1961 sci-fi bomb) 46. Island ring? 48. Refinable rock 49. Pathet ___ 52. Heaven 53. They played Franklin D. Roosevelt 61. Elevator, stock market or mood movement 62. Atomic number 75 63. Nine-sound signal 64. Interstate hauler 65. “___ Bangs” (Hung tune) 66. Tournament passes 67. Old World duck 69. The way things are going 71. Most brazen 74. Lofty 78. Deceive 81. Subatomic particle 82. Bolt 85. Defunct magazine 86. Hydromassage facility 89. French composer

and pianist 91. Arise anew 93. They played Dwight D. Eisenhower 96. Department 97. Blockhead 98. Ceiling 99. Grassy area 100. “Fiddler on the Roof” role 102. Col. entrance exam 105. Succeed 107. Cambridge sch. 110. Knave 114. Transgression 116. Matchsticks game 118. Country house 122. Assigns a new moniker 125. Very, in music 127. They played Ronald Reagan 130. Eastern pooh-bah 131. By the agency of 132. Unspoken 133. Climbing tropical plants 134. A question of timing 135. Ages 136. Blocks 137. Most ironic Down 1. Greenfly, e.g. 2. Knives have them 3. Glass ingredient 4. Reverberate 5. A Judd 6. Rolodex no. 7. Normal prefix 8. Mounted on 9. More careless 10. Selfish sort 11. Furniture giant 12. Bristle 13. Zoroastrian 14. Check for fit 15. Gazillions 16. Punjabi princess 17. Ocean motion 18. Lasting effect

24. Boys in the ‘hood 25. They, in Trieste 26. One who is out of fashion 32. Property owners 34. Beauty ___ 36. Copying 38. Attic sight 39. Side in a 1980’s war 42. Secret Service agent’s weapon 43. Weeds 44. Small salmon 45. Sugar bowl marchers 47. The living ___ 50. Urdu poet 51. Egg 53. Solomonlike 54. Little, e.g. 55. “Second verse, ___ as the first” 56. “Wonderful!” 57. Shipyard sight 58. It may reflect well on you 59. Actress Walton 60. Straw in the wind 66. Lose one’s nerve 68. Tungsten 70. Gull 72. Crude group? 73. Fashions 75. Dinghy or dory 76. Centers of activity 77. Barely gets, with “out” 79. Hang loose 80. Standout 83. Put to ___ 84. Cores 86. Hang out 87. Sweat source 88. “You got that right!” 90. OK, in a way 91. Bit attachment 92. French way 94. Was inactive 95. Refinement 101. Offshore 103. Vikki ___ 104. Uses Twitter

106. Red letters? 108. Loony 109. Bejeweled toppers 111. Work on a turkey or pumpkin 112. Tape or book leader 113. City in Scotland 115. Rock bottom 117. Thick 118. Sticking point 119. Lit 120. Head or heart trailer 121. Larger ___ life 123. Disable 124. New newts 126. Move back and forth 128. Deep-six 129. Antiquity, in antiquity

answers from last week

Herald Journal one to two days prior to the event. Calendar items can be submitted Deadlines inbyThe email at hjhappen@hjnews.com. Any press releases or photos for events listed in the Cache Magazine calendar items are due Wednesday by 5 p.m. They will also run for free

first half of Cache Magazine can be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com. Poems and photos can also be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com and run on a space-available basis if selected.

www.ThemeCrosswords.com


Friday Katie Ainge will perform Friday, May 4, from 4:45 to 6:45 p.m. at Caffe Ibis. Free. Singer/songwriter Cherish Tuttle returns to Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza on Friday, May 4, at 6 p.m. Celebrate Cinco de Mayo with a party at OPTIONS for Independence (1095 N. Main, Logan) on May 4 at 6:30 p.m. Enjoy ethnic food and a piñata. Food donation is $3 and transportation is $2. RSVP to Mandie at 435753-5353 ext. 108.

SATURDAY The Hyrum State Park will host its first-ever Cinco de Mayo celebration May 5. This free event will be held on the beach from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visitors can canoe, kayak or take a motorboat tour. They can also learn to fish and how to set up the perfect campsite. Enjoy children’s nature activities and savor food from vendors on site. For more information, call the Hyrum State Park at 435-245-6866. National Homebrew Day provides opportunities for brewers to check out other equipment set ups and processes as well as meet new brewers or people interested in making their own beer or to see what it’s all about. The Cache Brewing Society will set up at 10 a.m. May 5 at 332 S. 600 West, with an annual toast at 11. For more information, contact Andy at 435-512-5049 or Dirk at 435-890-0951. An Allen Stokes Memorial canoe trip will be held

Saturday, May 5, and Sunday, May 6. Cost is $10 per boat or $15 for canoe rental. Join local expert naturalists Bryan Dixon and Jack Greene from the Bridgerland Audubon Society on either one of these two dates for a canoe trip down the Bear River. They will start in Trenton and end in Amalga, watching birds and other wildlife along the way. Bring a lunch and lots of water. Meet in the parking lot near Caffe Ibis (Church St. and Federal Ave.). Registration required. For more information, contact Bryan Dixon at 435-752-6830, or email bdixon@xmisson. com. The Mountain Crest baseball team will hold a Dutch oven dinner fundraiser Saturday, May 5, at 6 p.m. in the cafeteria. A raffle and auction will follow. Contact a Mountain Crest baseball player to purchase dinner and/or raffle tickets. For questions, contact Coach Steve Hansen at 245-6093 or 760-7030. The Cache Valley Folk Dancers and Bridger Folk Music Society will host their monthly “first Saturday” contra dance Saturday, May, 5. The dance will be held at the Whittier Community Center, 290 N. 400 East in Logan and begins at 7:30 p.m. Kay Forsyth will be the caller. A $6 donation is suggested for adults and $3 for children younger than 12. Beginners and families are welcome and all dances are taught. For more information about contra dancing, call 753-2480 or 753-5987 or visit www. bridgerfolk.org. Keiyana Osmond will perform at 6 p.m. Saturday, May 5, at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough

Pizza. Kyle Wesley will follow at 7 p.m. The Cache County Master Gardeners are sponsoring a “Purge the Spurge” work day Saturday, May 5, at 10 a.m. at the gravel pull-out at 500 E. Canyon Road, Logan. Learn to identify and eradicate this noxious weed, Myrtle Spurge a.k.a. Donkey Tail and Blue Spurge. Wear long sleeves, long pants, gloves and eye protection to protect against the toxic sap. Bring a light-weight mattock, shovel or other tools suitable for grubbing weeds out of rocky soil. Loppers are also useful when unwanted shrubbery mingles with the spurge. Several shovels and plastic bags for disposal will be available. The Pioneer Valley Lodge is hosting a “Let’s Visit Mexico” travel program at 1:45 p.m. Saturday, May 5. There will be a short DVD clip and authentic refreshments will be served. Pioneer Valley Lodge is located at 2351 N. 400 East, North Logan. For more information and to RSVP, call 435-792-0353.

SUNDAY

vocal entertainment. All retired school employees in the valley are invited to attend. Reservations are necessary. Call Diane Esplin at 563-6412 to RSVP. A Peer to Peer support group will meet May 7 at OPTIONS for Independence, 1095 N. Main in Logan, from 6 to 7 p.m. The group is open to people with all kinds of disabilities. Share personal challenges and exchange ideas to assist with living with a disability. RSVP one week in advance for transportation needs. For more information, contact Anna at 435-753-5353 ext. 103. The Booklore Club will meet at 1:30 p.m. Monday, May 7, at the home of Lorraine Larsen.

TUESDAY Quaid Peterson and friends will read poetry at Caffe Ibis on Tuesday, May 8, from 4:45 to 6:45 p.m. during open mic night. The event is open to all poets to come, share and listen. Dress rehearsals for the Hyde Park stake’s production of “The Music Man” are open to the public May 8 and 9. Performances will be May 10, 12 and 14 at 7 p.m.. The show will include a live orchestra.

WEDNESDAY The English-speaking quilters group will meet May 9 at OPTIONS for Independence, 1095 N. Main in Logan, from 10

a.m. to noon. For more information, contact Royella at 435-753-5353, ext. 105. The next Cache Valley Arts Summit meeting will take place at noon Wednesday, May 9, in the Bullen Center Ballroom at 43 S. Main Street. The Cache Valley Center for the Arts encourages our fellow non-profit arts organizations to take part in this important but informal discussion at our quarterly meeting.

THURSDAY Public Aggie Ice Cream tours will be held May 10, 11 and 18 at 2, 3 and 4 p.m. Cost is $3 per person and includes a single scoop.

CALLING ALL MOMS! PL AY OUR 2012

MOTHER’S DAY Photo Contest

Withered Soul will perform Sunday from noon to 2 p.m. at Caffe Ibis. Free. Join us at the Pioneer Valley Lodge for Sunday dinner and a tour May 6. Dinner begins at 12:30 p.m. The address is 2351 N. 400 East, North Logan. To RSVP, call 435-792-0353.

MONDAY The Cache Valley Retired School Employees Association will meet Monday, May 7, at the Copper Mill Restaurant, at 1 p.m. Lilium will perform

Enter & VOTE

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Page 15 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 4, 2012

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Page 16 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, May 4, 2012

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