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Cache Magazine t i t e L

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S R E T A K S Y E L L A V IES E B H R C E A D C IN S T I M I PUSH L

The Herald Journal

APRIL 27-MAY 3, 2012


contents

April 27-May 3, 2012

MUSIC 4 Jazz Kicks Band to put on show Tuesday

5 Local musicians team up to raise funds for cancer research

6 USU Chamber Singers to perform Saturday

theater 3 ‘Anne of Green Gables’ plays this weekend

3 Logan High presents ‘Pride and Prejudice’

5 Youth take on ‘Narnia’ this weekend

MOVIES 7 Aaron Peck gives

‘The Raven’ two stars

MISC. 4 Science Unwrapped looks at end of the world ideas

5 Splash of Color 5K takes place Saturday

COLUMN 12 Hinkamp believes in like more than love

CALENDAR 15 See what’s happening this week

Photos by Eli Lucero/Herald Journal

Julie “Tic Tac Flo” Young, left, talks to her Railway Banditas teammate “Shorty Shock-N-Awe” as they take on the Hilltop Aces in a roller derby bout Saturday at the Davis Conference Center in Layton. On the cover: Young skates during the bout.

FROM THE EDITOR

I

t’s race season around here. Every year in April or May 5Ks seem to pop up every weekend. So far, Cache Valley has already hosted the Shamrock Shuffle, the BraveHeart Run, the Second Chance 5K and the CAPSA Run From Violence fun run. Forgive me if I missed one, or three. This weekend will continue with more races, including the Child and Family Support Center’s Run from Abuse 10K, 5K and 1-mile run, and two fundraiser 5K races planned in Smithfield and at the American West Heritage

Center for two adults fighting cancer. And perhaps there are a few I haven’t heard of? The 5Ks around here are great because they all seem to support good causes, and since the races aren’t very long, a lot of people feel they can participate. Plus, competing in 5Ks is hip these days. What’s difficult is choosing which one to run. A co-worker of mine really wanted to run the Second Chance 5K last Saturday, which raised awareness about organ donation, but he ended up at the CAPSA 5K instead, a race I competed in as well. We’ve talked about how it’s difficult to support every race when there are so many for honorable organizations and a

bunch that overlap. I’ve never felt like a good runner. Instead, I’ve always felt like an off-andon poky racer. The slow and steady turtle, if you will. I tend to get out of shape every winter, then train for a couple races each summer. I like that race organizers have been getting more creative in the last five or 10 years by adding elements like mud, color and team options to the mix. My goal for this year is to try a couple of those types of 5Ks, the first being the Color Me Rad race in Provo on Saturday. For all the runners out there, I hope you find the right race for you this weekend. Have fun! — Manette Newbold


Carrots takes stage tonight “Anne of Green Gables,” one of the world’s most beloved novels, will be seen on stage as a musical adapted by Donald Harron at 7 p.m. April 27 and 28 by the River Heights Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The event is free to the public, but seating is limited, so audience members are advised to come early. The show features the popular story in musical theater format, with charming songs augmenting the characters and action. Starring as Anne is Miranda O’Very of Mountain Crest High School. Her adoptive family, siblings Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert, are played by Marianne Sidwell, director of Summerfest Arts Faire, and Chris Rasmussen, orchestra director at Mount Logan Middle School and Logan High School. Members of the River Heights Stake play the other roles, including a large cast of children. The production is directed by David Sidwell, an adjunct professor at Utah State University. O’Very has been seen

“We’re probably better off staying away from love and hate and sticking with like and dislike. I don’t think anyone went to war over dislike or married the wrong person in the throes of like.” – Dennis Hinkamp, page 12

PET OF THE WEEK Photo courtesy David Sidwell

on Cache Valley stages in Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre’s productions of “Secret Garden,” “The Sound of Music” and “Annie Get Your Gun.” Marianne Sidwell, who plays the terse but loving Marilla Cuthbert, recently played the queen in “The Slipper and the Rose” produced by

Music Theatre West. David Sidwell has directed numerous productions for Utah State University, the American West Heritage Center and other organizations. “If you love the story, you’ll probably fall in love with the musical as well,” O’Very said. The musical is currently

touted as Canada’s National Musical and is the longest running show in Canada’s history, taking place in Charlottetown, Nova Scotia, on Prince Edward Island for more than 40 years. The River Heights Stake Center, where the production will be held, is at 800 S. 600 East in River Heights.

Logan High School students perform ‘Pride and Prejudice’

AUDITIONS

Logan High School will continue performing Jane Austin’s beloved “Pride and Prejudice” at 7:30 p.m. April 27, 28 and 30 in the Logan High School auditorium. All of the wit and romance of Jane Austin’s classic 1813 novel comes to life in the fast-paced new adaptation by local playwrights Wendy

Auditions for Music Theatre West’s “Jane Eyre” will be held May 9 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. and May 10 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Ellen Eccles Theatre stage (Door #3 in the southwest corner). Please prepare a oneminute song. An accompanist will be provided,

Hassan and Nancy Hills. “Pride and Prejudice” focuses on the duel between Elizabeth Bennet (Amy Jackson-Smith) and her pride and Mr. Darcy (Jonny Spach) and his prejudice. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for students and children and can be purchased at the door.

Available for adoption

but actors are allowed to bring their own accompanist or a CD. Those who would like to audition should download a form at http://www. musictheatrewest.com/ auditions.html, and bring it with them completed. Show dates are Oct. 11 to 16.

Pet: Sid From: Cache Humane Society Why he’s so lovable: Though

shy with strangers at first, Sid comes out of his shell quickly with sweet talk and petting. Because of his sweet, quiet nature, households with busy toddlers may not be the best fit for him. Sid has not yet been neutered and his long fur will need frequent brushing and occasional bathing to keep him looking his best.

Page 3 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 27, 2012

Stage

Quotable


Page 4 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 27, 2012

all mixed up Jazz Kicks Band to perform Akiyoshi music

The Jazz Kicks Band will present a concert featuring the music of Toshiko Akiyoshi on Tuesday, May 1. The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. in the USU Performance Hall. Admission is $8 for general admission and free for all students. The Jazz Kicks Band is led by Larry Smith and is sponsored by the USU music department. Akiyoshi was born in Manchuria. She began her piano studies at an early age. In Tokyo, at the end of World War II, she was introduced to jazz music by American GIs. She was entranced by the music and decided she wanted to devote her life to playing jazz. She was playing with local groups when she was heard by American jazz musicians and encouraged to come to the U.S. to study jazz at the Berklee School of Music in Boston. After her studies in Boston, she moved to New York City to begin her professional career. She played with top musicians (Charles Mingus, Charlie Mariano), but felt she wasn’t gaining enough recognition, so she decided to give a concert at Carnegie Hall. In this concert, she featured herself playing with a trio, and with a big band that played several of her compositions.  While getting a big band together for her concert, she

met tenor saxophonist and flutist Lew Tabackin. They soon married. Tabackin was playing in Doc Severinson’s Tonight Show Band when Johnny Carson and CBS decided to move “The Tonight Show” to California. Akiyoshi and Tabackin moved with it. After a while, Akiyoshi felt Tabackin was getting restless, missing the vibrant New York jazz scene, so she decided to start rehearsing a big band to

add more interest to his musical life. She wrote new pieces and started forming a band to play her music. Eventually, due to the interest created by her challenging and exciting music and her use of flutes and clarinets, she had the top L.A. studio musicians playing for her. Tabackin was the featured soloist. Akiyoshi was the first woman to lead an all-male professional jazz big band.

Now, 10 years later, the Jazz Kicks Band is playing a concert of Akiyoshi’s music. Pianist Liz Woolley will be the soloist in “Harlequin Tears.” Tenor saxophonist Mike Reeder will solo on “Song for the Harvest.” J. Paul Ward on trumpet and Tyler Whittaker on alto saxophone will be featured on the fiery samba “Success May Be Hazardous to Your Health.” “Transcience” is a solo vehicle for baritone saxophonist Jon Gudmundson. Jim Schaub, bassist, will solo on “I Know Who Loves You.” Trumpeter Alex Meibos will solo on “Long Yellow Road.” “Let the Tape Roll” showcases Roger Karren on trombone. Greg Wheeler’s alto saxophone will be featured on “Road Time Shuffle.” Vocalist Monica Fronk will sing several classics from the Great American Songbook including “Gone with the Wind” and Photo by Brian McMillen “The Song Is You.” The Jazz Kicks Band There was a lot of buzz includes Greg Wheeler, Tyler about the new band and many magazine and newspaper arti- Whittaker, Larry Smith, Mike Reeder and Jon Gudmunson cles were written. The Akiyoshi big band, featuring Taback- on woodwinds; Hal Briggs, J. Paul Ward, Alex Meibos and in, played at USU twice. In Dan Rich on trumpets; Roger the spring of 2002, Akiyoshi Karren, Andrew Watkins, and Tabackin performed with Spencer Jackson and Scott the USU jazz bands, playEvensen on trombones; Liz ing Akiyoshi’s compositions. Woolley on piano; Jim Schaub She led the bands and played piano with them, and Tabackin on bass; Jason Nicholson on drums; and Monica Fronk on played solos on the tenor sax vocals. and flute.

Science Unwrapped to cover end of the world How will the world end? Maybe a giant asteroid will strike the Earth and send us the way of the dinosaurs. Perhaps a sizzling solar flare will knock out the world’s power and plunge millions into freezing, dark chaos. Or maybe the entire plant will simply be sucked into a black hole.

Utah State University’s Science Unwrapped welcomes celebrated astronomer Phil Plait to campus Friday, April 27, to explore this question. Plait is the author of the 2001 book “Death from the Skies: The Science Behind the End of the World” and Discover Magazine’s “Bad Astronomy” blog. He

speaks at 7 p.m. in the Emert Auditorium, Room 130, of the Eccles Science Learning Center. Hosted by USU’s College of Science, the event is free and open to all ages. Plait earned a doctorate from the University of Virginia in 1994 and helped to design NASA’s Hubble Space

Telescope. Learning activities and refreshments follow Plait’s talk. Guests can make comets and craters, learn about space weather and find out what happens if people fall in a black hole. Weather permitting, guests can use telescopes to view craters on the moon.


Vanessa Ballam

Stefan Espinosa

Brandon Lee

Cache Valley Cancer Kids is a group of families in Cache Valley whose children have been diagnosed with cancer. They are teaming up with musicians to help raise funds for childhood cancer research and give every child a cure. A benefit concert for CureSearch for Children’s Cancer, an organization that supports and funds childhood cancer research, will be held May 3 at 7 p.m. at St. John’s Episcopal Church. Childhood cancer research is underfunded which spurred the idea for the concert. In 2010, The American Cancer Society gave one penny of each dollar raised to childhood cancer research. The National Cancer Institute only

Trenton H. Chang

Sophie Spreier

donated 4 percent of their proceeds to research childhood cancers, while breast cancer received 24 percent alone. CureSearch gives 94 cents of every dollar raised to childhood cancer. The organization funds childhood cancer research at Primary Children’s Medical Center where children from Cache Valley are treated every year. Every day 36 children are diagnosed with cancer and every day seven of those children will die from childhood cancer.  At the May 3 concert, Vanessa Ballam, Stefan Espinosa, Brandon Lee, Trenton H. Chang, Sophie Spreier, Azure Kline, Nicole Tolson and Rebekah Blackner will perform.

Azure Kline

Nicole Tolson

Rebekah Blackner

Ballam and Espinosa have performed in theaters in Utah and around the country. Ballam currently serves as education director for the Utah Festival Opera and Music Theatre company and Espinosa serves as Conservatory director. Lee is a nationally acclaimed pianist and has been performing for more than 20 years. Chang, a 14-year-old pianist, was recently featured on NPR’s From the Top. Spreier and Kline will entertain on the cello, and Tolson and Blackner will play violin. Cost for the concert is a $10 suggested donation. Ages 8 and up are welcome. For more information or to make a donation, visit cachevalleycancerkids.blogspot.com.

Color for Tessa Winger

Fundraiser includes a Splash of Color 5K, festival and concert Color for Tessa, a fundraiser for three-time cancer fighter Tessa Basset Winger, will be held April 28 at the American West Heritage Center. A Splash of Color 5K and 1-mile kids run will begin at 9 a.m. Cost is $25 for adults and $10 for kids. Runners will start the race wearing all white. As they make their way through the course, they will be blasted with handfuls of colored cornstarch by the race crew. A color festival with lunch, concessions, live music, a silent auction, raffle prizes, games, pony and train rides and baby animals will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for $3. A Colors concert will be held at 7:30 p.m. at USU Eccles Conference Center. Cost is $10. Register for the race, purchase concert tickets or make donations at www.usu. edu/colorfortessa.

‘Narnia’ plays four more times this weekend “Narnia,” the musical version of C.S. Lewis’s classic “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe,” continues April 27 and 28 in the Dansante building. The production is staged by two separate casts of 30 youth each. Performers range in age from 7 to 19 and are students of the Utah Festival Conservatory of the Performing Arts. Michael Ballam, who is a child at heart, guest stars as Aslan the lion. “What makes this project such a great challenge, as well as such an important show for our students to tackle, is the sheer breadth of imagination it demands,” said Stefan Espinosa, director and Conservatory supervisor. “There are many themes throughout: courage, self-empowerment, faith and personal accountability, but the overarching message is one of limitless imagination.” Children of all ages are welcome to attend. “Narnia” lasts just under two hours, including intermission. The show plays April 27 at 5:30 and 8 p.m., and April 28 at 2 and 7 p.m. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for children ages 12 and younger. The recital hall holds 100 people and all performances are expected to sell out. Visit the Dansante box office at 59 S. 100 West or visit www.utahfestival.org for tickets. Call 750-0300 ext. 106 for more information.

USU Wind Orchestra to perform movie classics

Tessa Basset Winger is pictured with her children McKell and Evan.

The Utah State University Wind Orchestra presents “Movie Night” on Friday, April 27, at 7:30 p.m. in the Kent Concert Hall. The annual spring concert by the USU Wind Orchestra celebrates music used in movies. Many selections on the program will be familiar to film fans.            The Wind Orchestra will perform “Symphony No. 6” by Vincent Persichetti, the “Finale” of Tchaikovsky’s Fourth Symphony and “Tuba Concerto” by Edward Gregson, among other works. One of the main pieces to be performed is “Sinfonia Sacra” by Floyd Werle, a former United States Air Force Band arranger. “Movie Night” is free and open to the public.

Page 5 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 27, 2012

Local musicians team up to raise funds for cancer research


Page 6 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 27, 2012

A tribute to veterans The experiences and emotions of soldiers shown through art is the subject of the next “Saturdays at the Museum” activity at Utah State University. USU’s Museum of Anthropology invites veterans and members of the community to join the museum in its refection on the reality of the American soldier in activities Saturday, April 28. Two temporary exhibits, “Humanity Behind the Uniform” and “Emotion on Canvas,” highlight the experiences and emotions of soldiers. “Humanity Behind the Uniform” is an exhibit assembled in partnership with USU Special Collections and Archives, the Hyrum City Museum and the Hill Aerospace museum.            For the Saturday event, the exhibits will be available from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Additionally, a panel of veterans will share their experiences from 10:30 a.m. to 1:45 p.m., followed by a ceremony, “Let Us Not Forget,” to honor all veterans at 2 p.m. The ceremony is sponsored by the Museum of Anthropology, USU Air Force Detachment 860 and USU Army ROTC Jim Bridger Detachment. Utah veterans and their families are invited to attend. Light refreshments will be served after the ceremony. The USU Museum of Anthropology is on the USU campus in the south turret of the historic Old Main building, Room 252. Admission is free.

USU Chamber Singers to perform in China Sneak-peek performance will be held Saturday at the Performance Hall Thirty-eight Utah State University Caine College of the Arts choral students will travel to China in May to perform at the Beijing International Collegiate Choral Festival.            “The USU Chamber Singers are one of only five choirs receiving this prestigious invitation,” said Cory Evens, director of choral activities in the department of music. “It’s an honor to be invited.”            A preview performance of the Beijing inspired concert will be held in the USU Performance Hall on April 28 at 7:30 p.m. The event, “New Sounds: Contemporary Choral Music,” is a program of newly-composed choral music in a variety of styles that people — foreign or domestic — will enjoy, said Evans.            “An invitation to perform in China is such a satisfying affirmation

choral compositions. The repertoire chosen features a number of percussion instruments.            “The real challenge will be to see how we can bring a few octaves of handbells, drums, cymbals, tambourines, claves, shakers and even a Chinese gong on the plane with us,” said Evans. “Passing through customs ought to be an adventure.” Tickets for the preview concert “New Sounds: Contemporary Choral Music” are $10 for general admission, $8 for seniors and youth, $5 for USU faculty and staff Photo courtesy USU Public Relations and free for USU stuUtah State University’s Chamber Singers have been invited to perform in China. dents with ID. For more A preview performance by the group is Saturday, April 28, 7:30 p.m., at the USU information or to purPerformance Hall. chase tickets, go to the CCA Box Office located only desire is to bring that what we are doing arrangements of Ameriin Room 139-B of the their best singing and a at Utah State University can spirituals, choral Chase Fine Arts Center, little bit of Aggie spirit is as good as any choral settings of samba and to another part of the music anywhere,” said tango music, movements call 435-797-8022 or see the Caine College of the world. I can’t wait for the from contemporary setEvans. “The students Arts website at arts.usu. adventure.”            have worked so hard to tings of the mass and edu. The program contains make it happen, and their other recently-composed

The Towne Singers will perform their spring concert Monday, April 30, at 7:30 p.m. at the Dansante building located at 59 S. 100 West in Logan. A variety of music including patriotic, Broadway, folk and spiritual songs will be performed. Guest artists Jeff and Marni Lyon and Kermit Herd will perform as well. This free event open to the public. The 30+ member Towne Singers is a nonauditioned community chorus based in Logan. Since being founded in 1967, the chorus has grown to become a wellknown source of entertainment for the valley. Membership comes from

all the nearby communities. The Towne Singers take pride in their ability to sing all types of music in a wide variety of styles. The choir performs two or three major concerts each year. In addition, they perform twice a year at the

Towne Singers to present spring concert valley nursing homes. The Towne Singers is a non-profit organization open to singers of all ages and backgrounds. Each concert season provides a place for people to sing and grow artistically, and to bring excellent choral entertainment to the valley.

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The Towne Singers are happy to introduce Gary Poore as their new director this year with the accomplished Terry Duncombe as his accompanist. Poore comes to the Towne Singers with a very extensive music background. He received his BS in

music education, vocal/ instrumental from Wisconsin State College. He was in the graduate program at USU and received his MFA in vocal music. He has taught music and coached numerous vocalists for competitions, solos and ensembles.

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‘Raven’ doesn’t measure up to Cusack

Page 7 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 27, 2012

movies

“The Raven” begins with a message about Edgar Allen Poe’s last few days of life. He was found delirious on the streets of Baltimore. No one knows why he was found that way, or what happened to cause his death. This movie purports to give the audience an account of what could have happened those last days of Poe’s life had he lived in a Hollywoodized, serial killer movie. going on because Poe (John Cusack) when you find out, it’s is madly in love with underwhelming, to say Emily Hamilton (Alice the least. It’s a twist Eve), but Emily’s that you might not see father Captain Hamilcoming, but you’ll find ton (Brendan Gleeson) yourself understanddoesn’t think his daughing why you didn’t see ter should be cavorting it coming because it with a broke poet. In doesn’t make all that Relativity Media the movie, Poe is a Luke Evans portrays Detective Fields, left, and John Cusack portrays Edgar Allan Poe in a scene from “The Raven.” much sense given the drunk and completely motives. There are so obsessed with himself. many other characters This whole genre has Picture the loony way in kind of magic. in the movie that had become old. David which Robert Downey, We’re simply led motive to toy with Poe. Fincher’s “Seven” is the from one murder to Jr. embodied the characThe answer we’re given best movie from this ter of Sherlock Holmes another as we try to at the end, however, Director // James McTeigue tired sub-genre. “The and you can imagine piece together the clues. just doesn’t stack up. Starring // John Cusack, Alice Eve and Luke Raven” comes nowhere There’s no need to try the eccentric way Evans close to recreating that Cusack approaches his and figure out what’s See RAVEN on p. 10 Rated // R for bloody violence and grisly images role. A grisly murder has PLAYING APRIL 27-MAY 3 Action! just taken place in MOVIE HOTLINE 435-753-1900 Baltimore. A mother Soon the bodies start Movie serial killers are UNIVERSITY 6 STADIUM 8 and daughter have 1225 N 200 E., BEHIND HOME DEPOT piling up, each one of obsessed with riddles, 535 W. 100 N. PROVIDENCE MIDNIGHT SHOW FRI/SAT $6.00 2297 N. Main been killed. The killer them bearing a striking puzzles and intricately THE RAVEN in Digital (R) PIRATES: BAND OF MISFITS (PG) MOVIE HOTLINE 753-6444 12:50 2:50 4:50 6:50 8:50 escaped from a locked WWW.WALKERCINEMAS.NET resemblance to Poe’s staging the crime scene. CHIMPANZEE in Digital (G) ALL SEATS ALL TIMES $3.00 MIRROR MIRROR (PG) apartment as the police gruesome fictional OPEN SUN-FRI AT 3:45 PM PIRATES: BAND OF MISFITS 12:40 2:50 5:00 7:10 9:20 in Digital 3D (PG) SATURDAY OPEN AT 11:30 AM were moving in. The murders. “The Raven” SAFE (R) LUCKY ONE in Digital (PG-13) JOHN CARTER windows are nailed shut. sets up a cat-and-mouse ACT OF VALOR 1:15 3:15 5:15 7:15 9:15 (PG) 4:00, 6:45 & 9:30 (R) 7:30 & 9:50 FIVE YEAR ENGAGEMENT in Digital (R) Detective Fields (Luke serial killer movie LOCKOUT (PG-13) Sat Mat 12:45 1:20 3:20 5:20 7:20 9:20 THE HUNGER GAMES in Digital (PG-13) Evans) is brought in to where Poe must race 2D JOURNEY 2: THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) investigate. The crime against the clock to MYSTERIOUS ISLAND 12:30 3:30 6:20 9:10 MOVIES STADIUM 5 (PG) 4:30 2450 NORTH MAIN scene seems familiar, save his beloved Emily LUCKY ONE (PG-13) Sat Mat 12:00 & 2:20 12:45 2:55 5:05 7:15 9:25 like he’s seen it before, from the grasp of a THINK LIKE A MAN (PG-13) SHERLOCK HOLMES: THE VOW even though he’s sure deadly killer. 1:30 4:00 6:30 9:00 (PG-13) 4:45, GAME OF he hasn’t. Then it all Why is it that serial CABIN IN THE WOODS (R) 7:15 & 9:20 SHADOWS 12:30 2:45 5:00 7:15 9:30 becomes clear. The killers in movies (PG-13) 7:00 & 9:40 Sat Mat 11:45 & 2:30 EVERY TUESDAY IS PEPSI DISCOUNT NIGHT murder has been modalways seem to have THE SECRET WORLD OF ARRIETTY ALL SEATS MATINEE PRICE ALL DAY eled exactly after one of time to make a game (G) 5:00 GIFT BOOKS AND CARDS AVAILABLE Poe’s stories. of the whole situation? Sat Mat 12:15 & 2:40

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DERBY

LET IT ROLL

LOCAL SKATERS PUSH, PIVOT, BLOCK AND JAM AS MEMBERS OF THE JUNCTION CITY ROLLER DOLLS

T

Photos by Eli Lucero/Herald Journal

Clockwise from above: Railway Banditas lead jammer Julie “Tic Tac Flo” Young tries to keep “Pickle” from the Hilltop Aces from passing her during a roller derby bout in Layton on Saturday; Young, left, tries to pass Hilltop Aces’ pivot “Cherry Von Sin;” Young leads the Railway Banditas onto the track before the bout.

GIRLS BY JEFF HUNTER

he Doll Brawl was just over 15 minutes old when Tic Tac Flo took over as jammer for the first time of the night. The Railway Banditas were in a huge, 37-10 hole at the time and showing little signs of life during their bout with the Hilltop Aces on the night of April 21. Jamming for the Aces was Pickle, a younger skater, who while not particularly fast on the open track, had already racked up numerous points against the Banditas with a bevy of slick moves. At the sound of the referee’s whistle, Tic Tac Flo and Pickle quickly left the jammer start line behind, with Flo reaching the pack first. Realizing this, the Railway blockers cleared out a hole for her, and the pretty brunette hit the gap while losing little speed. As Flo was breaking loose of the pack, under the guidance of their pivot skater, the rest of the Banditas turned their concentration towards Pickle, who soon found herself all bottled up. Skating smoothly by herself around the oval taped out on the floor of the Eclipse Expo Hall at the Davis Conference Center in Layton, Tic Tac Flo caught up to the back of the pack in no time. Now the lead jammer, she found the going tough, however, and received a big bump from a much larger Hilltop skater known as Cherry Von Sin. Although she managed to stay on her skates after her battle with Sin, Tic Tac Flo promptly absorbed another shot from Aces’ blocker Slayer Cake. Forced off the track on the inside, Flo had to slide to the back of the pack. But that seemed to relax the Aces and within seconds, Tic Tac Flo found a crease on the inside and lapped all five of Hilltop skaters.

With Pickle still caught up in traffic, Flo decided to take the five points and signaled the end of the jam by placing her hands on her hips. As the Railway fans ringing the track cheered, Flo’s teammates immediately swung into action and started getting organized for the next jam, which would start in just 30 seconds. The Banditas were still way back, but at least they finally had some momentum going their way.

W

hile the Railway Banditas were unable to completely rebound from their early deficit and lost to the Aces, 118-99, roller derby as a sport is clearly making a comeback throughout the world. Most popular in the late 1950s and the ’60s when bouts were often broadcast on national television, roller derby all but disappeared in the United States in the following decades. Amateur, all-female leagues started popping up in the early 2000s, however, and the release of the movie “Whip It” in 2009 helped create some additional interest in the sport. There are now about a halfdozen roller derby leagues in Utah, although none in Cache Valley. But because of their passion for the sport, a handful of women from the extreme north end of the state spend hours every week driving down to the Wasatch Front to skate. The closest of the leagues, the Junction City Roller Dolls, is based in Ogden and fields three home teams (the Railway Banditas, Hilltop Aces and the Aftershocks), as well as a traveling squad made of the league’s top skaters known as the Junction City Trainwrecks.

Known as Tic Tac Flo on the flat track, Dr. Julie Young skates for both the Banditas and the Trainwrecks when she’s not serving as an assistant professor at Utah State University. A wildlife biologist with the National Wildlife Research Center, Young first got involved in roller derby about three years ago when some ultimate Frisbee teammates in Arcata, Calif., talked her into giving it a try. “I took about a 20-year hiatus from being on roller skates,” Young said. “But I went throughout their fresh meat practices with Humboldt Roller Derby, and I learned everything I needed to know about skating and derby and joined the league and have been doing it ever since. Once I found out I was getting a job here, one of the first things I did was start looking for a league close by.” The 37-year-old Young ended up playing in one game with the Junction City Roller Dolls in 2010, then competed all of last season. She was joined in the Logan-to-Ogden commute — the Dolls hold their practices and some of their bouts at the Golden Spike Arena — by 32-year-old Natalie Bursztyn, aka Canadian Bacon, a doctoral student in the USU geology department. “I was running a geology club at the community college in Bakersfield, Calif., and they wanted to do a fun activity,” Bursztyn recalled. “They chose roller skating, and despite being Canadian, I had never been on skates. It was really fun to watch. But a couple of the girls who were in a new league starting up came over and said, ‘You should try out for roller derby.’” See DERBY on p. 13


DERBY

LET IT ROLL

LOCAL SKATERS PUSH, PIVOT, BLOCK AND JAM AS MEMBERS OF THE JUNCTION CITY ROLLER DOLLS

T

Photos by Eli Lucero/Herald Journal

Clockwise from above: Railway Banditas lead jammer Julie “Tic Tac Flo” Young tries to keep “Pickle” from the Hilltop Aces from passing her during a roller derby bout in Layton on Saturday; Young, left, tries to pass Hilltop Aces’ pivot “Cherry Von Sin;” Young leads the Railway Banditas onto the track before the bout.

GIRLS BY JEFF HUNTER

he Doll Brawl was just over 15 minutes old when Tic Tac Flo took over as jammer for the first time of the night. The Railway Banditas were in a huge, 37-10 hole at the time and showing little signs of life during their bout with the Hilltop Aces on the night of April 21. Jamming for the Aces was Pickle, a younger skater, who while not particularly fast on the open track, had already racked up numerous points against the Banditas with a bevy of slick moves. At the sound of the referee’s whistle, Tic Tac Flo and Pickle quickly left the jammer start line behind, with Flo reaching the pack first. Realizing this, the Railway blockers cleared out a hole for her, and the pretty brunette hit the gap while losing little speed. As Flo was breaking loose of the pack, under the guidance of their pivot skater, the rest of the Banditas turned their concentration towards Pickle, who soon found herself all bottled up. Skating smoothly by herself around the oval taped out on the floor of the Eclipse Expo Hall at the Davis Conference Center in Layton, Tic Tac Flo caught up to the back of the pack in no time. Now the lead jammer, she found the going tough, however, and received a big bump from a much larger Hilltop skater known as Cherry Von Sin. Although she managed to stay on her skates after her battle with Sin, Tic Tac Flo promptly absorbed another shot from Aces’ blocker Slayer Cake. Forced off the track on the inside, Flo had to slide to the back of the pack. But that seemed to relax the Aces and within seconds, Tic Tac Flo found a crease on the inside and lapped all five of Hilltop skaters.

With Pickle still caught up in traffic, Flo decided to take the five points and signaled the end of the jam by placing her hands on her hips. As the Railway fans ringing the track cheered, Flo’s teammates immediately swung into action and started getting organized for the next jam, which would start in just 30 seconds. The Banditas were still way back, but at least they finally had some momentum going their way.

W

hile the Railway Banditas were unable to completely rebound from their early deficit and lost to the Aces, 118-99, roller derby as a sport is clearly making a comeback throughout the world. Most popular in the late 1950s and the ’60s when bouts were often broadcast on national television, roller derby all but disappeared in the United States in the following decades. Amateur, all-female leagues started popping up in the early 2000s, however, and the release of the movie “Whip It” in 2009 helped create some additional interest in the sport. There are now about a halfdozen roller derby leagues in Utah, although none in Cache Valley. But because of their passion for the sport, a handful of women from the extreme north end of the state spend hours every week driving down to the Wasatch Front to skate. The closest of the leagues, the Junction City Roller Dolls, is based in Ogden and fields three home teams (the Railway Banditas, Hilltop Aces and the Aftershocks), as well as a traveling squad made of the league’s top skaters known as the Junction City Trainwrecks.

Known as Tic Tac Flo on the flat track, Dr. Julie Young skates for both the Banditas and the Trainwrecks when she’s not serving as an assistant professor at Utah State University. A wildlife biologist with the National Wildlife Research Center, Young first got involved in roller derby about three years ago when some ultimate Frisbee teammates in Arcata, Calif., talked her into giving it a try. “I took about a 20-year hiatus from being on roller skates,” Young said. “But I went throughout their fresh meat practices with Humboldt Roller Derby, and I learned everything I needed to know about skating and derby and joined the league and have been doing it ever since. Once I found out I was getting a job here, one of the first things I did was start looking for a league close by.” The 37-year-old Young ended up playing in one game with the Junction City Roller Dolls in 2010, then competed all of last season. She was joined in the Logan-to-Ogden commute — the Dolls hold their practices and some of their bouts at the Golden Spike Arena — by 32-year-old Natalie Bursztyn, aka Canadian Bacon, a doctoral student in the USU geology department. “I was running a geology club at the community college in Bakersfield, Calif., and they wanted to do a fun activity,” Bursztyn recalled. “They chose roller skating, and despite being Canadian, I had never been on skates. It was really fun to watch. But a couple of the girls who were in a new league starting up came over and said, ‘You should try out for roller derby.’” See DERBY on p. 13


Page 10 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 27, 2012

All welcome to percussion classes and concert at USU The Utah State University music education program presents “Day of Percussion” on Saturday, April 28, in USU’s Morgan Theatre. “Anyone interested in the various types of drumming, both from the United States and from around the world, will enjoy themselves as they attend the master classes and performance,” said Jason Nicholson, assistant professor of percussion in the Caine College of the Arts. There will be four master classes offered, followed by a concert in the Morgan Theatre. Three guest percussionists will teach along with Nicholson. The first master class will start at 10 a.m., and features Nicholson on the drum set. The second class starts at 11 a.m., featuring Casey Cangelosi on the marimba. There will then be an hour break from noon to 1 p.m. for lunch, catered by USU Catering. The next master class at 1 p.m. will be taught by guest artist Michael Williams on frame drums. The final master class will be at 2 p.m. and is on marching percussion, taught by Paul Rennick. Cangelosi is a USU alum and music instructor at Concord University in West Virginia. Williams is associate editor of the Percussive Notes maga-

WHAT: “Day of Percussion” master classes and concert When: Saturday, April 28 COST: Admission to the “Day of Percussion” master classes is $20 and includes lunch. For more information and to register, visit the CCA Box Office located in Room 139-B of the Chase Fine Arts Center on USU’s campus or visit arts.usu.edu.

zine and the director of percussion studies at Winthrop University in South Carolina. Rennick is a lecturer for percussion at the University of North Texas and is also the director of percussion for the Phantom Regiment Drum & Bugle Corps. “All three of these guest artists are fantastic musicians known throughout the world,” said Nicholson. “This is a great opportunity for the college and the state to have these three renowned players here.” The concert, which is free and open to the public, begins at 3:15 p.m. and features performances by the USU Percussion Ensembles and the Caine Ensembles.

COMING UP Bluegrass double-bill on May 5 Salt Lake City’s Puddle Mountain Ramblers and Durango’s Waiting on Trial will perform May 5 at 7:30 p.m. at the Logan Arthouse and Cinema, 795 N. Main Street. Tickets are $13 advance or $15 the day of show. They are available at www. bridgerfolk.org or by calling Dave at 435881-9076. The Puddle Mountain Ramblers have been playing together for five years and have

graced some of the things the standard best stages in the interway, the band plays mountain west. Somealmost entirely original times described as a material, occasionally merchandising group throwing in the unexwith a bluegrass probpected cover song. You lem, they have evolved might hear a song from into one of Salt Lake’s Social Distortion or an best bluegrass bands. obscure cover stolen Waiting On Trial has from some random also been together for ’80s movie soundtrack five years and hail from thrown into the mix at the great four corners a Waiting on Trial show. mecca of beer, blueFor more information, grass and outdoor recgo to www.bridgerfolk. reation that is Durango, org, www.puddlemounColo. Never having tain.com and waitinany interest in doing gontrial.com.

Head Start invites public to learn about programs Bear River Head Start is holding its annual Get a Head Start night Thursday, May 3, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Logan Center, 852 S. 100 West in Logan. The community is invited to learn more about Bear River Head Start's services and fill out applications. There will be free books, food, family activities and prizes for all who attend. Family service agencies will also be on site to provide information about programs. Bear River Head Start is committed to serving

families by providing free education and social services to low-income families and children with disabilities. The organization serves families in Cache, Rich and Box Elder Counties in Utah and families in Franklin, Oneida, Caribou, Bear Lake and South Bannock Counties in Idaho. Services include: • Preschool for children ages 3-5 years • Home-based education for children ages 0 to 5 • Center-based care for

children ages 0 to 3 • Connection to quality childcare providers in Cache and Box Elder Counties • Parenting classes • Nutrition, health and dental information • Family counseling services • Services to pregnant women For more information on this event or for services available, contact the Bear River Head Start office at 435755-0081 or toll free at 1-877-755-0081, or visit www.brheadstart.org.

Raven

gives it his all. Whether or not his character reflects the way Poe really acted is irrelevant. It’s fun seeing Cusack lost in the role, spouting off poetry at a steady clip, badgering bartenders who are sick of him drinking and not paying, coming up with insults only a literary genius could think up. That’s where the real fun and

games are. The whole serial killer nonsense feels tacked on and silly. Now that this movie is out of the way, how about someone make a true-to-life biopic of Poe starring Cusack in the role. I have a feeling that would be a much better use of film.

Continued from p. 7 If you end up going to see “The Raven,” the real reason to watch it is Cusack’s performance. It’s obvious that he knows he’s in a less-thanstellar movie, but, like Nicholas Cage, he still

Feedback can be sent to aaronpeck46@gmail.com.


I’m all for more like and much less love Slightly Off Center DENNIS HINKAMP

The thing I like about they love their PC, but the “like” function on lots of people like them Facebook is that like because they are moderis not love. Besides all ately priced and you can its romantic connecactually look under the tions, love just seems to hood and change parts. be a totally unyielding, Apple doesn’t even trust often irrational comyou to change a battery.  mitment to something. At this moment Apple This is possibly good stock is at $560 a share for repopulation and and Microsoft is $32. I novelization, but not for haven’t heard of a singetting along with your gle Apple charity, but fellow earthlings.  the Bill and Melinda Or, you could conGates foundation gives clude that when faced away billions of dollars with complexity, we a year for immunization choose sides. I’m not programs in third world sure how we can expect countries and to support the government to be science and education bipartisan when we here in the U.S.  have such a hard time not falling into dichoto“People are mies ourselves. When I hear people yelling lovingly mated “anybody but Obama,” to their Apple I harken back to the people who claimed products more they would leave the monogamously country if George W. Bush was elected to a than most of second term. The modthe human or erates are the ones I like. Moderates are survivors. animal If President Obama population.” does not win a second term, I don’t cherish the thought of Mitt Romney That said, I don’t hate as president, but I am Apple; I like many of grateful that it is not their shiny objects and Hugo Chavez or Newt even have one Apple Gingritch. I will still computer running Winlike America, though I dows. I know, it’s like won’t always love it.  a mixed marriage, but People are lovingly that is one of the other mated to their Apple black and white, gay products more monoga- and straight dichotomously than most of mies we need to get the human or animal over. And can’t we all population. Whenever agree that life would be I complain about some easier if everyone spoke niggling problem with English? I hope not.  any non-Apple computLately I have been er, I get replies such as, thinking this is all lead“Why don’t you just get ing up to a bad supera Mac?” or “Macs don’t natural horror movie get viruses.” I don’t plot ... Apple, Garden hear many people say of Eden, temptation,

the Devil ... it could be happening again. Or, I could just be paranoid.  I really don’t have to love Walmart to like some of its charitable contributions. I’m a Mormon abstainer but I was recently in so much awe of the money one of the wards raised for a new food bank that I gushed “Go Mormons” on my Facebook account. Ambiguity “R” Us. We’re probably better off staying away from love and hate and sticking with like and dislike. I don’t think anyone went to war over dislike or married the wrong person in the throes of like. Dennis Hinkamp does have a Facebook account, but he will never ask you to “like” him. He is among a number of freelance writers whose columns appear in The Herald Journal as part of an effort to expose readers to a variety of community voices. He is not an employee of the newspaper. Feedback can be sent to dennis. hinkamp@usu.edu.


Page 12 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 27, 2012

Books

Alvarez crosses borders for ‘A Wedding in Haiti’ By Jennifer Kay Associated Press

Wedding invitations are meant to be joyous proclamations, but Julia Alvarez received one in 2009 that she had hoped would never come. A casual promise to attend a young employee’s wedding was suddenly, firmly, expected to be fulfilled, but doing so required a trip to Haiti, a place the Dominican-American writer never intended to explore. “A Wedding in Haiti” is Alvarez’s account of how she reluctantly visited the other side of her parents’ homeland and found family connections in spite of language and circumstance.

Sky View teacher to release summer serialized novel Marty Reeder, creative writing teacher at Sky View High School, will spend his summer writing, editing and releasing one chapter of a new novel to the public each week. His project begins June 5 and has been funded through family, friends, local businesses and strangers. He said he was inspired to write his serialized novel after reading similar works by Charles Dickens, Jules Verne and Fyodor Dostoevsky. Reeder’s novel, “Once Upon a Fjord,” will be a young adult fiction book based on an 11-year-old Norwegian boy who meets a helpful Finnish sailor after tragedy strikes. Those who donate to Reeder’s project through www.kickstarter. com, will receive emails of each chapter and other rewards. Search for “Once Upon a Fjord” on the website. Donations will be accepted through May 1.

The Dominican Republic shares the Caribbean island of Hispanola with Haiti, but Alvarez, known for exploring her heritage in her writing,

including her novel “How the Garcia Girls Lost their Accents,” never crossed the border until Piti’s wedding. Alvarez met the Haitian teen called “Piti” for his small size in 2001. He had come to the Dominican Republic to find work, and over the years he became like a son to Alvarez and her husband, who run a coffee farm in the country’s mountains. In 2009, he invited Alvarez and her husband to his wedding in northwestern Haiti. The next year, Alvarez drove Piti and his wife back to their families to check in after a catastrophic earthquake leveled much of Haiti’s capital, throwing the small, vulnerable country into greater

Brennan writes chilling gem By Jeff Ayers Associated Press

An FBI trainee ends up over her head when she helps investigate a congressional sex scandal in “Silenced,” the latest in the Lucy Kincaid series by Allison Brennan. Lucy is rising up the ranks of the FBI, and she’s ready for her final round of training. A woman found dead in a park appears to be the victim of a sexual attack. When she’s identified as the mistress of a congressman, the case appears to be a slam-dunk. Then another woman is murdered and the evidence reveals she was a high-class prostitute with several well-known clients. Is the congressman covering his tracks? A simple case becomes complicated when Lucy’s P.I. boyfriend helps her with the investigation. They quickly discover a witness who appears to know the killer’s identity and the truth behind the deaths.

uncertainty. “A Wedding in Haiti” is an open-eyed view of Haiti before and after the earthquake. Alvarez has no agenda for her visits, other than attending to people she considers family; she’s not a missionary, she’s not a journalist, she’s not there to save anyone or rail against foreign policy. Her small traveling group packed in her husband’s pickup truck lacks a security detail. “We’re just here to look,” Alvarez tells someone who inquires about what a white couple is doing in a Haitian bakery on their own. Though Alvarez is naive

about what it takes to survive in Haiti and navigate its border with the Dominican Republic, her lack of cynicism leaves her open to the small but not insignificant victories of ordinary life: the sweetness of fruit that seemed too scrawny in the basket, the tidy order of a dirt yard freshly swept in the morning, the box of spaghetti that had to be delivered by car, not on foot, because a homecoming is a kind of ceremony. “A Wedding in Haiti” is Alvarez’s view into the rural Haitian family life that never makes the news.

new york times best-sellers COMBINED PRINT & E-BOOK FICTION 1. “Fifty Shades of Grey,” by E. L. James 2. “Fifty Shades Darker,” by E. L. James 3. “Calico Joe,” by John Grisham 4. “Fifty Shades Freed,” by E. L. James 5. “The Lucky One,” by Nicholas Sparks COMBINED PRINT & E-BOOK NONFICTION 1. “A Night to Remember,” by Walter Lord 2. “Drift,” by Rachel Maddow 3. “Mrs. Kennedy and Me,” by Clint Hill with Lisa McCubbin 4. “Heaven is for Real,” by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent 5. “The Big Miss,” by Hank Haney HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “Calico Joe,” by John Grisham 2. “Guilty Wives,” by James Patterson and David Ellis 3. “The Lost Years,” by Mary Higgins Clark 4. “Come Home,” by Lisa Scottoline 5. “The Shoemaker’s Wife,” by Adriana Trigiani

As Lucy and her boyfriend continue their investigation, the FBI starts pressuring Lucy to back off, putting her reputation, career — and possibly her life — at stake. Previous knowledge of Lucy Kincaid books isn’t necessary to enjoy this chilling and twisty romantic suspense gem.

HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “Drift,” by Rachel Maddow 2. “Mrs. Kennedy and Me,” by Clint Hill with Lisa McCubbin 3. “The Big Miss,” by Hank Haney 4. “Imagine,” by Jonah Lehrer 5. “Trickle Down Tyranny,” by Michael Savage Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/


Continued from p. 9 Soon Bursztyn was hooked and when she was trying to decide where to pursue her Ph.D, having a roller derby league nearby was a factor. She’s playing with the Aftershocks this year, as well as traveling with the Trainwrecks. Amanda Howard, who started a roller derby club at Utah State, recently moved to Ogden, while another skater, Ingrid VanZanten, temporarily left the league when her college schedule became too demanding. Two other Cache Valley skaters, Amber Greening and Nina McDermott, have joined JCRD’s “Fresh Meat” program that requires newcomers to display a certain level of skating competency before competing in an official bout. “It’s a huge commitment,” Young said. “Practice is twice a week for three hours, if you’re on the travel team, and you have to be geared up and ready to go.” “So, that makes it like six hours a practice for those of us who have to drive down there,” Bursztyn noted. Although Bursztyn and the Aftershocks didn’t compete in the Doll Brawl on April 21, she still went down for the day with Young. And that day started in Layton at 8 a.m. with them and some other skaters taping out the track on the floor of the expo hall so the teams could practice

though — and overprotective,” she said. “He can’t sit down when he’s here. He’s always up pacing around and trying to hit for me when I’m hitting and juking for me when I’m juking.” Although she admits to being “a little achy in spots,” Tic Tac Flo, er, roller derby bout Young, said she planned is made up of two, to get up and go hik30-minute halves ing with Heath the next with a running clock. morning. Each jam between the “I didn’t get hit too two, five-player teams hard tonight,” she said. can last up to two min“Although, I did get hit utes, and scoring is in the face once and Photos by Eli Lucero/Herald Journal achieved when a squad’s Julie “Tic Tac Flo” Young and her teammates interact with the crowd following a derby started bleeding in my designated jammer laps against the Hilltop Aces on Saturday. Inset: A sign warning the crowd of the danger of mouth a little, so that members of the opposwas a little sucky. derby is displayed on the floor of the arena. ing team. That means She then added with a the four blockers — one when she’s not jamming. for photos and signlaugh, “If you’re bleedbout because he was of which is known as ing, you can’t skate on “And if they think the ing autographs. Flo’s representing his wife at the pivot and helps the track, so I swalother girl is going to husband, Heath Weaver, a baby shower. direct their actions — lowed it.” be hitting the hole first, was unable to attend the “He’s very supportive, can essentially be either then they should be conan offensive or defencentrating on defense.” sive unit, depending Flo said the Bandion the location of their tas didn’t “play as a jammer in relation to the team” early on in the other team’s jammer. Doll Brawl, which led to them falling behind early as Pickle and Malibu Harpy racked up big By Terri Barnes scores for the Aces. Railway started making a move By Nephi Montana I see the trains, Go down the tracks. late in the first half Going to far away places, behind some strong Sold down the river, Then coming back jamming from Flo Then I lost my home. Sold down the river, and Killa Patra, Taking their cargo, Now I’ll have to roam. however, and pulled Going back and forth to within 65-46 by Some go to the south Sold down the river, halftime. Some go to the north. I’ve lost my trust in man. The Banditas Sold down the river, trimmed their Their whistles are blowing I’ll survive if I can. deficit to just nine So loud and so clear points during the Just letting you know Sold down the river, first couple of That they are near The river of despair. second-half jams, Sold down the river, but then things fell I love to ride on them I’m not getting anywhere. apart and Hilltop To where I am bound led 118-72 before But the best thing of all, Sold down the river, They are on the ground. Railway’s final jam By those I gave my trust. made the score a Sold down the river, For those of us who are not frequent “If they know I’m little more respectable. Life is seldom just. flyers. faster and I’m going to Afterwards, the two be hitting the pack first, Sold down the river, teams who had just been This is the end of the poem. then they should be throwing elbows and Sold down the river, Send your poems and stories to mnewmaking holes for me,” hip checks at each other, I’ll never have a home. bold@hjnews.com. said Tic Tac Flo, who good-naturedly teased also serves as a blocker each other while posing

A

Your Stuff “Sold Down the River”

“Trains”

Page 13 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 27, 2012

Derby

prior to the bout. There was also a team breakfast and meetings before the start of the Doll Brawl, which ended after 9 p.m. just as high school students were arriving for the prom in another part of the conference center.


Page 14 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 27, 2012

CrossworD By Myles Mellor and Sally York Two Peas in a Pod

Across 1. Coat part 4. Close-knit group 9. Little oinker 15. Discharge 19. Like some notebooks 21. Magnet alloy 22. Put in stitches? 23. Eluding law enforcement 26. Paella pot 27. Tippler 28. Special forces unit 29. Extend 34. Bribe 37. Malodorous 41. Bacteria type 45. Made anew 48. Don’t just seem 49. Grain-growing pests 53. Hotel amenity 54. Entries on Nixon’s list 55. Puts out 56. Move again 59. Gas station abbr. 60. One of the Three Fires of Buddhism 63. Baked, in Bologna 66. Noted Virginia family 68. Edible mushrooms 70. Cold and wet 71. Take the first step in seeking employment 79. Electromagnetic unit, for short 80. Van Gogh title word 81. Leprechaun’s land 82. Table part 85. With the bow, in music 86. Lawyers’ org. 89. Pertaining to Ohio, e.g. 93. Inexperienced 95. Odd ducks 98. Root vegetable 99. Hollywood social climbers 105. Eggs

106. Calls to mind 107. Minifies 108. Skin layer 111. Less polite 113. Irritates 114. Texas shrine, with “the” 117. Really bad coffee 119. Door securer 123. Occur just before it’s too late 132. Elliptical 133. Draw near 134. Cuts of meat 135. “While You ___ Sleeping” 136. Most sensible 137. Capital on the Red River 138. Double standard? Down 1. Therewithal 2. “Let’s ___” 3. Drudge 4. Education acronym 5. ___ Baba 6. Place for a DVD player 7. Sleazy paper 8. Tritons 9. Theater area 10. U.N. arm 11. Animal with curved horns 12. Binds with a bandage 13. Genuine 14. Carryall 15. Swelling 16. “I can’t believe it!” 17. E.U. member 18. It’s a blast 20. Merciful one 24. Monopolize 25. Crone 30. Old NOW cause 31. Brief written reminders 32. Like some piano keys 33. Electrician, at times 35. London restaurant

36. Clod 38. Leaders in pits 39. Miss the mark 40. Survey choice 41. Certain chieftain 42. Fine 43. Quite a while 44. Flat-topped flower cluster 46. Trick on a bike 47. ___ de guerre 50. One-horse carriage 51. Snap 52. Turn the page abbreviation 57. “Slippery” tree 58. Muumuu accessory 61. Ernst colleague 62. Address book no. 64. Chinese ideal 65. Bristle 67. “Their ___ Majesties Request” 68. Word of possibility 69. Tailor’s tool 71. One of 104 worldwide 72. Foul caller 73. Cat ___ 74. Mason ___ 75. Tolkien cannibal 76. Deeply suntanned 77. “If the ___ is concealed, it succeeds”: Ovid 78. Twinings product 83. Rush attraction 84. Kan. neighbor 86. Order between “ready” and “fire” 87. Engendered 88. Calculator, at times 90. “Little piggies” 91. Ranch unit 92. Glasgow gal 94. Before of yore 96. Right of passage 97. Ocean danger 99. Package letters 100. First family member 101. Multitudes 102. ___Tube 103. Spirit

104. Iranian language 109. Sugar source 110. Public order 112. Unbroken series 115. De novo 116. Late-60’s fashion item 118. Potluck choice 120. Isn’t wrong? 121. Merganser 122. Baja bread 123. Reporter’s question 124. Forum greeting 125. When it’s broken, that’s good 126. Kind of time 127. ___ Master’s Voice 128. Chinese tea 129. Connections 130. Ending for Kim 131. DOJ agency

answers from last week

Herald Journal one to two days prior to the event. Calendar items can be submitted Deadlines inbyThe email at hjhappen@hjnews.com. Any press releases or photos for events listed in the Cache Magazine calendar items are due Wednesday by 5 p.m. They will also run for free

first half of Cache Magazine can be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com. Poems and photos can also be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com and run on a space-available basis if selected.

www.ThemeCrosswords.com


Friday False Witness will perform metal music with Autostigmatic and Broken Angels on Friday, April 27, at 8 p.m. at Why Sound. Cost is $5. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures is hosting a canoeing activity and barbecue Friday, April 27, at noon. Common Ground takes canoeing trips to Benson Marina or First Dam. Cost is $3. To sign up for this activity as a participant or volunteer, request transportation or to learn about other activities, call 435-713-0288. The Cache Valley Figure Skating Club will present their annual spring show “Skating Around the World” on Friday, April 27, and Saturday, April 28, at 7:30 p.m. at the George S. Eccles Ice Center. Show admission is $8 for reserved seats, $5 for general admission and free for children younger than 3. Tickets are available at the George S. Eccles Ice Center, 2825 N. 200 East, North Logan. For more information, visit www.cvfscutah.org or call the EIC at 435-787-2288. The queen contest for the 97th annual Richmond Black and White Days will be held April 27 at the Richmond Indoor Horse Arena at 6:30 p.m. Local talent and multi-instrumentalist Hilary Murray will perform Friday, April 27, from 4:45 to 6:45 p.m. at Caffe Ibis. Free. Popular acoustic duo Wood, featuring Bryce Wood and Eli Wilson, will perform at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza from 6 to 7 p.m. Friday, April 27. They will be followed by acoustic oldies artist Becky Kimball at 7.

SATURDAY The Child and Family Support Center’s sixth annual

Race Against Abuse will be held Saturday, April 28, at 9:30 a.m. in Wellsville. The race features a 10K, 5K and 1-mile run/walk. Registration is open online at www.cachecfsc.org. Call 752-8880 or email leigh@ cachecfsc.org for additional information. The application deadline for the Anita Ream UMTA Memorial Scholarship is Saturday, April 28. This scholarship is intended for piano study beyond high school and is offered to any student who has studied with a Bridgerland Chapter UMTA piano teacher. Application forms can be downloaded from the Anita Ream UMTA Memorial Scholarship Facebook page or located at any of the local high schools in the Cache County, Brigham City and Tremonton areas. For more information, contact Dianne Hardy at 755-7609. Scott Hunsaker, a former member of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, will perform at the Pioneer Valley Lodge on Saturday, April 28, at 3 p.m. The performance is free and light refreshments will be served. Pioneer Valley Lodge is located at 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. For more information, call 435-792-0353. A fundraiser for the Travis Kidman family will be held April 28 at Mack Park in Smithfield to help Travis in his battle against Metastatic RCC. A 1-mile/5K fun run will take place at 4 p.m., with registration beginning at 3 p.m. Cost is $5 per runner or $25 per family. All runners are eligible to win a treadmill from Icon Health & Fitness. From 5 to 7, pulled pork sandwiches will be sold for $5, hand-dipped corndogs for $4 and a raffle and silent auction will end the evening at 7. A spin bike, Cricut machine, Kindle Fire and much more will be given away. To register, donate, or volunteer, or for more information, see crappy cancerfundraiser.blogspot.com.

Learn how to replace every medicine cabinet item with all natural, superior products Saturday, April 28, from 10 a.m. to noon at Alphagraphics Conference Room, 517 W. 100 North, Suite 110, in Providence. Participants will learn to treat acne, ADD/ADHA, anxiety, warts, wounds and wrinkles with holistic natural remedies rather than synthetic drugs. For questions, contact Caroline at 760-3038. Hilarilly will open for Arson Gang at the Eagles Lodge (a private club for members) on Friday, April 28, at 9 p.m. Cost is $5. Amazing one-man-band Scott Olsen will perform Saturday, April 28, at 6 p.m., followed by acoustic act Juice Box at 7 at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza, 99 E. 1200 South. Come walk through the historic John E. Lee Home in Hyde Park on Saturday, April 28, anytime between 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The house, located at 123 W. Center St., has been recently renovated.

SUNDAY Singer/songwriter Katie Jo will perform Sunday, April 29, from noon to 2 p.m. at Caffe Ibis. Free.

a trip down to the Salt Lake City Aquarium on Monday, April 30, at 3 p.m. This is a fun opportunity to get out of Cache Valley for the afternoon and see something new. Cost is $8. To sign up for this activity as a participant or volunteer, request transportation or to learn about other activities, call 435-713-0288.

estate planning for families with special needs children will be held Wednesday, May 2, from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the Copper Mill Restaurant, Legacy Room, located at 55 N. Main St., in Logan. Seating is limited. To reserve a spot, visit www.hallock-law.com or call 435-753-2335 by April 30 at 5 p.m.

Dine at Chili’s on Monday, April 30, and the restaurant will give a portion of their proceeds to the Cache Humane Society. Be sure to mention this announcement.

USU faculty member Eric Schulz will speak on effectively using social media for small businesses Wednesday, May 2, at 11:30 a.m. at Hamiltons Steak and Seafood, 2427 N. Main St., Logan. Cost is $10 at the door (cash or check only). Please RSVP to Monica Neilson at cachecec@gmail.com or 435-797-9610.

TUESDAY Dr. Robert Allred with Body Balance Chiropractic will teach a free cooking and community class on how to stay healthy and young Tuesday, May 1, from 7 to 8 p.m. at Macey’s Little Theater. Enter to win a free massage. Hogie sandwiches will be served. The Cache Carvers Woodcarving Club will meet Tuesday, May 1, at 7 p.m. in the Senior Citizen Center located at 236 N. 100 East in Logan. Bring a project; there will be open carving. Guests are invited and welcome. Call 435-5636032 for additional information.

WEDNESDAY

Musical Charis will perform indie/pop/funk music with ZuhG, Jumbie and Sarah Olsen on Monday, April 30, at 8 p.m. at Why Sound. Cost is $5.

The USU Parks and Recreation Club is organizing one of the largest 3-on-3 basketball tournaments in Cache Valley: The 2012 Spring Shootout. The event is open to everyone ages 16 and older and will be held Wednesday, May 2, at 6 p.m. at the USU HPER gyms 201 and 209. All teams are guaranteed at least four games. Cost is $35 per team; rosters of four players are recommended. For more information, call Colton Thompson at 435-890-7070 or email team name and managers contact information to logan_hoops@hotmail.com.

Common Ground is taking

A free lunch and seminar on

Antonio Vivaldi’s “Gloria” will be performed by the Chancel Community Choir and chamber orchestra, conducted by Elisabeth Evans, on Sunday, April 29, at 6 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church in Logan. Admission is free.

MONDAY

THURSDAY The North Logan City Library teen advisory board will meet Thursday, May 3, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Come voice ideas about upcoming teen activities. The Fry Street Quartet will present their newest member Robert Waters to USU and Cache Valley on Thursday, May 3, at 7:30 p.m. in the Performance Hall. Come listen to the quartets of Haydn, Shostakovich and Mendelssohn. Tickets range from free to $10 and can be purchased at arts.usu. edu. Utah State University Extension is offering a researchbased course, “How to Avoid Falling for a Jerk.” Whether class members are single, dating, engaged or single again, this class offers information about how to pick a partner and develop a relationship in a healthy way. This three-session program is free. Classes will be held May 3, 10 and 17 from 6 to 8:15 p.m. at the FCHD West Building, 670 E. 500 North in Logan. Dinner will be provided. Call 435-2326022 or email k.anderson@ usu.edu to register.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 27, 2012

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Page 16 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 27, 2012

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