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Four films • Four directors • $2,000

2011 Fringe Film Festival The Herald Journal

April 15-21, 2011


Page 2 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 15, 2011

Cache The Herald Journal’s

Magazine

Arts & Entertainment Calendar On the cover: Utah State University’s Fringe Film Festival will be held

tonight at Logan Arthouse. Background image provided by USU public relations.

From the editor n the last eight years I’ve Imake moved 11 times, and tomorrow will the twelfth. Most of the moves were minor, from apartment to apartment in Logan, when leases ended and/or I needed new roommates for one reason or another. I have lived with 42 different girls over the years, and am finally getting my own place. There will be good things about this: my mess will be all my own, I’ll be able to watch endless amounts of “Friends” without complaint, and the apartment temperature will always be at least 75 degrees. And maybe, because I won’t be working around roommates’ life plans, I’ll be able to stay in one place a little longer. Because let’s face it, moving sucks. A couple weeks ago I went to a show

mnewbold@hjnews.com

at Logan Arthouse where a duo from California called The Milk Carton Kids performed. They play acoustic music and their harmonies are out-of-control good. That night they sang a song called “Permanent,” where they mentioned how something new always seems enticing because “you can open it and plug it in.” However, when it comes down to it, many of us want something that will last a little longer than that first moment of excitement. Something a little more permanent. Apartment living is interesting, because it never really seems permanent, at least not to me. And there’s something nice about that too. But I’m hoping that in this new place I can stay longer than I have in other places in the past. If you haven’t heard The Milk Carton Kids before, I suggest going to their site, themilkcartonkids.com, right now. You can download their album for free, and who doesn’t like free? — Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

What’s inside this week Logan hasn’t defined itself yet, columnist says

(Page 10)

(Page 4) Sky View Players hosting mystery dinners

‘Rio’ a colorful, entertaining film

(Page 7) Books .......................p.13 Crossword.................p.14

Cute

pet photo of the week

This cat is available for adoption! Pet: Jade From: Four Paws Rescue Why he’s so lovable: Jade is a

beautiful Siamese mix. She is very sweet and loving. She is about 1-2 years old, but is very quiet and friendly. Jade would love to have an indoor-only, loving, forever home. If you would like to meet Jade or learn more about her, please call Sheri at 435-787-1751. The adoption fee for most Four Paws cats is $75, which includes spay/neuter and shots. Adopt Jade with a friend for $125.

Slow Wave Slow Wave is created from real people’s dreams as drawn by Jesse Reklaw. Ask Jesse to draw your dream! Visit www.slowwave.com to find out how.


Interfaith choir to perform cantata By Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

ccording to First PresA byterian Choir Director, Elisabeth Evans, power is the

way she would describe the upcoming Easter cantata at the Logan Tabernacle. The performance of “Passion and Glory of the Risen Christ” by Jack Schrader, will be held Sunday evening and include about 50 singers from various faiths in the community, as well as an 11-piece orchestra. “There are really awesome singers,” Evans said. “I’m just getting a dynamic range this year ... I’m just listening to the basses and sopranos and, geez, they sound good.” Evans was recruited to be the conductor of the Easter community choir by Lucille Hansen, who is in charge of the summer and Christmas performances at the Tabernacle. Hansen saw the cantata at First Presbyterian Church last year and asked if Evans would do it again, only on a larger scale. Last year’s performance had about 25 singers and a six- or seven-piece orchestra, Evans said, and to get more people involved this year, a call for performers was put out around Christmas. “And they came!” Evans, said, adding they have been practicing together since March. “I’m most excited about the power behind

the choird this year. These people are invested and they really feel what they are singing, and they show it. You hear it.” Evans said the cantata was published for the first time in 2010 and has “wonderful bluesy rhythms and piano parts” while telling the story of Jesus’ final hours. More than 10 pieces Sunday will be performed, along with some solos and orchestra music. “You’re hearing the story through the music as well as the words with the choir. The part that’s the most emotional is when Jesus is in the Garden, leading up to the crucifixion. You hear the nails pounded into the cross with the music. We haven’t gotten through that part without someone in the choir crying yet.” Evans added that the program ends with a very uplifting and hopeful feeling, and that throughout the performance, it’s easy to get carried away in the music and message. The cantata is being performed by the second interdenominational choir formed this year, the first being for the Martin Luther King program held at the Tabernacle a few months ago. Evans said there are members from the Presbyterian, Catholic, Mormon, Episcopal and Lutheran churches, as well as some members that don’t regularly attend any organized religion. The performance at 6 p.m. April 17 in the Logan Tabernacle.

Swashbuckling USU actors take stage as ‘The Three Musketeers’ he legendary three musketeers T and young Frenchman d’Artagnan engage the Cache Valley community with

a tale of treachery, heroism, close escapes and honor in “The Three Musketeers,” a stage production continuing to show at Utah State University April 15-16 and 20-23. The work is presented by USU’s Theatre Arts Department in the Caine College of the Arts. “The play guarantees a swashbuckling, melodramatic, comedic experience for the audience and provides our 19-person cast the opportunity to learn demanding new skills like 17th century court dances and formal sword fighting,” said Colin Johnson, interim department head for theatre arts and the show’s director. The theatre department employed Roger Dunbar, a fight choreographer from Salt Lake City and USU alum, to train the cast in aspects of hand-to-hand combat and sword fighting, Johnson said. A guest-artist grant from the Marie Eccles Caine Foundation – Russell Family made the professional training possible. In total, there are about 45 minutes of choreographed fight scenes throughout this action-packed production, said Richie Call,

visiting assistant professor of theatre arts and fight coach. “I have the battle wounds from fight call rehearsals to prove it,” said Call. Adventure, drama, humor and romance combine to make this play family-friendly and entertaining, said Call. “I have enjoyed learning the difference between swashbuckling, the type of sword play we use in the play, and fencing, the kind of competitive, sporting sword play I’m more familiar with,” said Jason Craig West who portrays d’Artagnan. “The choreographer has been fun to work with because he is so creative and yet still open to suggestions,” West said. “That’s important to me because I like to give my two cents.” “The Three Musketeers” begins at 7:30 p.m. nightly in the Morgan Theatre of the USU Chase Fine Arts Center. Tickets are $13 reserved seating, $11 for USU faculty and staff, $9 for non-USU students and free for USU students with ID. Tickets are available online (arts.usu. edu), by phone, 435-797-8022 and in person at the Caine College of the Arts Box Office in room 139-B of the Chase Fine Arts Center.

Beatles tribute band to play at fundraiser

magine, RememberIBeatles ing the Fab Four," a tribute band, will

be performing at Ellen Eccles Theater in Logan on Monday, April, 25. The band is donating their time and profit from sales to Primary Children's Medical Center. The band formed in 1993 and have performed more than 900 shows across the United States and abroad. Over the years, the group has had the privilege of sharing the stage with such notable acts as the Beach Boys, Jay Leno, Chicago, They Might Be Giants and the Temptations.

Smith's Marketplace is sponsoring the Logan event.

Tickets are $15 and can be purchased at www.centerforthearts.us.

Page 3 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 15, 2011

All mixed up


Page 4 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 15, 2011

All mixed up

Sky View High hosting mystery dinners S ky High Players’ final productions for the school year will be April 20 through April 29. For the first time this year the group will be hosting four different audience-interactive murder mystery dinner theaters written by Professor Jim Christian, from Weber State University. They will all be catered by Iron Gate Grill and the menu for each production is designed especially for that show. The shows only run two nights each, so don’t miss out. Tickets can be purchased at

ezticketlive.com or skyviewtix.org today. Prices are lowest if tickets are purchased at least 72 hours in advance. Nan Wharton, the director, says, “this is an opportunity for the audience to do their own sleuthing, to be ‘Sherlock Holmes’, and to win prizes if they are good at it!” A little about each show and menu is listed below: “Death on Deck” Wednesday, April 20 and Thursday, April 21 Set sail with the S.S.

Enchantment on an exciting “Halloween” cruise to the Caribbean. Don’t forget that the ‘voodoo’ amulet will be given out at the masquerade ball during this delightful voyage with Captain Dupont and the lovely Cruise Director, Janice Johnson. Who knows what other adventures await. Menu: Tossed green salad with assorted dressings, rice pilaf, coconut chicken with fruit salsa, rolls and butter, peach punch and water, cream cheese brownies.

Want to celebrate Earth Day? he Cache Valley Center for T the Arts presents the first Earth Day Downtown on Friday, April 22, from 2:30

to 7 p.m. on 100 South (Between Main Street and the Thatcher-Young Mansion). The Earth Day Downtown Street Festival will include CVCA’s first public sculpture unveiling, entertainment, arts activities, food vendors, and booths for local envi-

ronment and sustainability groups, Logan City, USU clubs, businesses, and more. The emphasis of this event is to inspire people to participate, no matter how big or small. In partnership with this event the Logan Downtown Alliance is celebrating Earth Day by staying open late. Enjoy Downtown “Alive after Five” (5-9 p.m.).

2:30 to 5 p.m. – Sidewalk chalk/art activities. Play with recycled clay from CVCA ceramics, and/or participate in an art activity with Stokes Nature Center. 2:30 to 7 p.m. – Information booths and recycled material vendors. 3 to 7 p.m. – Buy local. Food vending and more. 3 p.m. Magic act with Richard Hatch. 3:30 p.m. – Public art dedication and unveiling of sculpture by Doug Adams. 4 p.m. – USU humanities recycled dress fashion show. 4:15 p.m. – Performance by Dry Lake Band 4:30 p.m. – Demonstrations 4:30 p.m. – Blip Pot workshop with Jeff Keller (Sunrise Cyclery). Take your garden on the road! Supplies: Four or more bike tires and a hog ring stapler. 5 p.m. – Logan High School Percussion Ensemble Trash Performance 5:30 p.m. – The Gypsies Junk Band (Fast Forward Charter High School and friends) 6 p.m. – Valley Dance Ensemble, “Dancing the Green Map.” Selections learned during Repertory Dance Theatre’s residency in March. 6:30 p.m. – Community Junk Jam. Bring your own junk instruments to play in the street.

“Showdown at Gambler’s Gulch” Friday, April 22 and Saturday, April 23 Mayor Biddle is about to start the 187th weekly town meeting and community supper and you certainly don’t want to miss it. Zedekiah Cosgrave, the undertaker, has slipped away from his duties for few minutes to attend, as has Miss Mercy Trust, the school teacher, Old Scrappy, Tombstone “Jacqueline,” Wilimina Shakespeare, and the local saloon owner Miss Lulabelle Free. When a stranger arrives, Swampwater Samantha LaRue, and someone meets their untimely death, it will be your job to figure out who came for more than a bite to eat. Menu: Dutch oven beans, Dutch oven potatoes, Dutch oven BBQ chicken, rolls and butter, peach punch and water, hot peach cobbler. “Til Death Do Us Part” Monday, April 25, and Tuesday, April 26 Come join the wedding party of the Bordoni’s and the Cabrini’s, as Nina and Dominick have decided to tie the knot. Yes, the two Italian mob families that have been feuding for – who knows

how long – have children marrying each other, and you are invited to the wedding. This is one celebration you should not miss. Menu: mixed garden salad topped with red onion, tomato, olives, croutons and Parmesan cheese, lasagna, Italian herb baby carrots, breadsticks, peach punch and water, lemon bars. “An Heir of Mystery” Thursday, April 28 and Friday, April 29 The late Hamilton Winslow has finally died and the entire clan is about to gather for the reading of his will. Nobody liked him; he didn’t like any of them, but when money is involved, everyone shows up. So should you. You never know if your name will be read ... or who will end up dead. Menu: Spinach poppy seed salad, tenderloin beef medallions, chef’s rice, rolls and butter, peach punch and water, lemon raspberry torte. All shows will be held in the little theater at Sky View High School, so seating is limited. Get your reservations today. If you do not have Internet access call 435-757-9591.


Coach of USU Ballroom Team

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ince 2008 Adam Shelton has not only been coaching the USU Ballroom team, but also teaches classes at Enlight Ballroom, a business he co-owns with his wife, Jeanne-Louis. Since coming to USU, the college ballroom team has been able to place higher at competition than long-time rival University of California, San Diego, and within five years, Shelton would like to see the team compete in Germany at the World Formation Championships. A Brigham Young University graduate with 16 years of dancing under his belt (10 as a competitor and six as a coach), Shelton has big plans for the future. • “I was always interested in dance. I started with a tap dance group at age 5. My true introduction to ballroom dance was through a little red head girl that lived in my neighborhood. She was attending a ballroom dance camp that required partnership registration. I accepted her invitation and loved every second of ballroom dancing since.” • “Perhaps I am slightly biased because I am only 5’7’’, but I enjoy Latin dancing much more than Ballroom dance. Typically Ballroom dance is composed of making long graceful lines and Latin is about making quick moving curves. I suppose my small frame was built more for creating curves than lines.” • Most of Shelton’s competitive ballroom experience comes through the BYU Ballroom Dance program through their youth and college teams. • At BYU Shelton received training from some of the top professionals they bring in each year. He also had the opportunity to win several national formation dance championships through their program. • “During the last year of finishing up a corporate finance degree at BYU I was none to excited about the career options open to a finance graduate. So, I used the last year of college to come up with the details for Enlight Ballroom. Jeanne-Louise, my wife, grew up in Logan so coming here to start a studio seemed like the natural conclusion. So in the fall of 2008 we trekked up to Logan to start our studio.” • Enlight Ballroom offers classes for all ages and abilities. While the primary focus is on competitive youth ballroom from ages 5-18, the Sheltons also teach a weekly adult class on Wednesday nights.

Photo by Jennifer Meyers

• Shelton plans to have his youth team they compete at the U.S. Formation Championships for the first time this year, and has goals of winning the championship within five years. — Manette Newbold

Ballroom team to take stage at Ellen Eccles

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ome join the USU Ballroom Dance Team as they perform Ballroom Dance: Then and Now; The Classic and Contemporary, at the Ellen Eccles Theater, April 22-23. The team will take audiences through a historical journey of ballroom dance – to the ancient royal courts of Austria where ballroom dance first began, to the classic dances of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rodgers as they graced the silver screen, all the way to the vivacious contemporary Latin dances of today. Ballroom Dance: Then and Now, features beautiful costumes and a variety of ballroom dances such as the Latin Samba of Brazil, the majestic slow Waltz of Vienna, the electric American Swing and many more. 2011 marks the 15-year anniversary of the USU Ballroom Dance Team. Over that span the team has performed for thousands of people. The current ballroom team has been busy performing across the United States. The hard work and attention to detail has garnered the team many awards at competitive events. Tickets for the April 22-23 show start at $12 with discounts for students. We ask patrons to be in their seats at 7:30 p.m.

Page 5 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 15, 2011

Meet Adam


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Film New this week “Scream 4” Rated R ★★1⁄2 Ghostface’s 11-year layoff hasn’t made the “Scream” franchise feel any fresher. But with a decent beginning, a mushy midsection and a killer ending, the latest installment at least doesn’t feel any staler. Honestly, it’s not an unwelcome thing to watch the return of Neve Campbell as the slasher victim who wouldn’t die, Courtney Cox as the tabloid hack in bloodlust for a story and David Arquette as the bumbling Barney Fife of fright-flick cops. Director Wes Craven has added an attractive young harvest of fresh meat on the victim and psycho front, led by Emma Roberts, Hayden Panettiere and Rory Culkin, along with amusing cameos from Anna Paquin, Kristen Bell and others. “Scream 4” opens with the franchise’s usual prologue, this one modestly clever, heavier on laughs than suspense. But it gets the action rolling and the blood flowing for the main event: Campbell’s celebrity victim Sidney Prescott returns to her hometown on a book tour for her memoir about surviving her encounters with the various Ghostface slashers. Her arrival coincides with the anniversary of the original slayings, when the town’s teenage Sidney idolaters already are in a frenzy for the annual “Stabathon” party built around the Hollywood franchise inspired by her experiences. Of course, bodies pile up as a new Ghostface goes on a rampage. 111 minutes.

Still playing “Arthur” Rated PG-13 ★★Another inferior, unnecessary remake,

with too many cute, cloyCo-writer McBride and his Russell Brand’s comedy bithia” and “Race to Witch home. An up-and-comer ing moments as Brand’s collaborators apparently at least is benign fluff that in the sport, she wanted to Mountain” does much Arthur grows up while find- get back on her board as set out on a quest to ram should please younger of her own surfing). But ing true love with a penas much coarse language audiences unfamiliar with soon as possible. A month “Soul Surfer” consistently niless tour guide (Greta and as many adolescent the 1981 comedy, even if tries to make her transforlater, she was in the water sexual gags into a movie purists who adore the orig- Gerwig) and avoiding an mation as easily digestible again. Now, at 21, she arranged marriage with a as possible, maybe to inal may hate this version. as possible. 106 minutes. continues to compete procorporate-climbing execucover the fact that the The movie is respectful fessionally. tive (Jennifer Garner). movie doesn’t contain of and faithful to Dudley “Your Highness” “Soul Surfer” takes that Considering the crudeMoore’s original — maybe story of complex emotions, Rated R much else. He and Franco ness of many remakes, too much so. The film★★The knights-errant determination and faith play sibling princes who this could have turned out makers tweak things to — strong emphasize on and turns it into overly team with a mysterious much worse. 110 minutes. modernize the story and the errant — behind this simplistic mush. Director warrior (Natalie Portfit the persona of drunken, adventure comedy spend and co-writer Sean McNaman) to rescue a damsel “Soul Surfer” debauched, billionaire more time wallowing in mara’s film is an uncom(Zooey Deschanel) from Rated PG man-child onto Brand (not fortable combination of pat, medieval filth than weavan evil wizard. Crassness ★1⁄2 Watching “Soul Surfer,” feel-good platitudes, twosurprisingly, it’s no stretch ing clever laughs and overwhelms the movie, for the British comic with engaging action. Reunitdimensional characters, the vulgar language losthe story of Bethany Hamthe party-boy past). Yet ing key players from “Pine- ing all force by incessant cheesy special effects and ilton’s comeback after a the alterations are mostly apple Express” — James generically idyllic scenery. repetition, deadening the shark attack, makes you cosmetic, including the big Franco, Danny McBride, AnnaSophia Robb, who lingo so that even the long for a vivid documenone, changing the sex of director David Gordon occasional witty wisetary on the subject instead stars as Hamilton, cuts Arthur’s stern but loving Green — the movie plays through some of the cracks aren’t funny. 102 — preferably one of those guardian Hobson from like a Middle Ages rolegooey tedium with a natuminutes. excellent “30 for 30” offera man (John Gielgud as playing fantasy dreamed rally athletic presence and ings from ESPN. HamMoore’s butler in the origiup by the giggly stoners no-nonsense attitude (and — All reviews by The ilton’s tale is, of course, nal) to a woman (Helen of that earlier comedy. the star of “Bridge to TeraAssociated Press inspiring. In 2003, when Mirren as Brand’s nanny). she was just 13 years old, First-time director Jason she lost her left arm to a Winer (TV’s “Modern 14-foot tiger shark while Family”) stuffs this version surfing near her Hawaiian


By The Associated Press

lot of passion A and personal feeling clearly went into “Rio,”

the 3-D animated adventure from director Carlos Saldanha, who devised this story as a love letter to his Brazilian hometown. It’s strikingly gorgeous, bursting with big images and vibrant colors. And the use of 3-D, which so often feels so needless and like such an afterthought, is surprisingly effective in the hands of Saldanha (director or co-director of the “Ice Age” movies) and his team. Stuff doesn’t come flinging at you in cheeky, knowing fashion — although that can be fun in its own gimmicky way sometimes — but in the flying sequences especially the chase scenes, the 3-D provides an extra thrill, an added layer of immersive oomph. Blu, a cerulean macaw who’s the film’s reluctant hero, hang-glides around the mountaintop Christ the Redeemer statue, and the depth of field that results is sort of awesome. The whole film has a tremendous energy about it, not just in the way it moves but in the snappy banter and screwball antics between Jesse Eisenberg, who voices the character of Blu, and Anne Hathaway, who voices the free-spirited bird Jewel. Eisenberg works his patented halting, neurotic delivery to ideal comic effect, while Hathaway is confident, bold and impatient as the female of the species who is his destiny. They clash so convincingly, you’d think they’d recorded

their scenes together. (They didn’t, which is unfortunately the norm in animation performances.) So much is so appealing for so long that you can almost forgive the fact that there’s not much story here in the script from Don Rhymer, Joshua Sternin & Jeffrey Ventimilia and Sam Harper. (Three others, including Saldanha himself, get story-by credit.) It’s essentially one long chase, with the usual romantic-comedy friction that will, of course, turn into love. Blu, as a baby, was abducted by smugglers who raided his jungle home to sell him and other beautiful birds illegally in the United States. He ended up getting lost en route and, luckily for him, falling into the loving hands of a nerdy, small-town Minnesota girl named Linda. Over the years, the two forged an amusingly inappropriate bond, and now are enjoying a comfy, co-dependent existence. Linda (voiced as an adult by Leslie Mann) has domesticated this bird she named Blu

★★★ “Rio” Rated G

to such an extent that he makes his own breakfast and enjoys hot cocoa with marshmallows — but he never learned to do what most birds can do, which is fly. One day, a scientist named Tulio (Rodrigo Santoro) arrives to inform Linda that Blu is the only male left of his species. They must

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travel at once to Rio de Janeiro to allow Blu to mate with the last female of the species, Jewel. Anxious about leaving their familiar surroundings, they nonetheless make the trip. But this first date, um, doesn’t go quite as everyone hoped. Not only do Blu and Jewel not get it on, but they

hate each other — and Jewel is too busy anyway planning her escape. Then they’re captured by another set of smugglers, with help from a hideous and diabolical cockatoo named Nigel. Jemaine Clement of “Flight of

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the Conchords” voices the character with preening menace — complete with an elaborate production number — and he’s a hoot. From here, they must figure out how to break free so Blu can get back to Linda and Jewel can enjoy independence. (George Lopez, Jamie Foxx, will.i.am and Tracy Morgan lend their voices to the supporting players who help along the way.) The fact that they’re chained to each other — and Blu can’t fly, if you’ll recall — sets up plenty of slapstick and elaborate mad dashes across slums, beaches, forests and finally the spectacle of Carnival. Nothing deep or heavy here — just a good time and a pleasurable escape.

Page 7 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 15,

‘Rio’ bright and fun, especially in 3-D


Making movies Utah State University’s Fringe Film Festival inspired directors to create films about love and compete for cash

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ontestants in this year’s Fringe Film Festival had four minutes to capture the eyes of judges with a movie themed “Twitterpated: a Spring Love Comedy.” There were about 20 entries, one coming from as far as New York, that have been narrowed to four final films and, tonight, the winner will be announced. The short-film festival is organized by Utah State University’s Caine College of the Arts and the Logan Arthouse Cinema. Courtney Lewis, who is with USU’s Caine College of the Arts Production Services, said the contest has a “more edgy feel” than the usual Caine event. The intent of the Fringe Film Festival is to spark the interest and creativity of people, she said. “Our main goal is just to generate creativity,” Lewis said, and she wasn’t disappointed with this year’s entries.

“We’re really excited with the turnout,” she said. “There were so many spectacular films.” Films were judged based on 10 categories including cinematography and composition, writing, sound, score and delivery, Lewis said. There are four finalists — two determined by a three-judge panel and the other two by online voting. Lewis said the overall winner will receive $2,000. Other prizes include a giftcard to the USU Bookstore. The Fringe Film Festival will be hosted by the Logan Arthouse and Cinema. Tickets are $10, or two tickets for $15. Lewis said that from about 7 to 8 p.m., all the short films will be shown. The four films in the finals will be shown at 8 p.m. Here is a quick look into the life and creativity of the four finalists — Kevin Lacy, Quince Van Orden, Matthew Pool and Stephen Simmons.

Stephen Simmons

Age: 27 Film title: “I Love Me” Film synopsis: Before you can start loving anyone, you have to start loving yourself.

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immons, a Utah native, said that in his films, he likes to have original ideas that challenge himself and clichés, so “I Love Me” isn’t the romantic storyline one might expect. “I like to challenge myself and think of ways I can switch things around and still fit in that type of genre ... I thought about a character falling in love with himself. From there on I took all these elements of a boy meets girl and just took out the girl. Boy meets himself,” Simmons said. Simmons, of Salt Lake City, would like to have a career in film. “I have no notions that I will be a huge Hollywood star or a big shot director,” he said. “I would love one day to live comfortably with my work as an artist,” he said.

Matthew Pool

Age: 25 Film title: “Monday” Film synopsis: A boy and girl working in the same office start a friendly game of surprising the other with Post-it notes.

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ool has been interested in film since he was a kid. At 13, he got his first camera and he has been filming ever since. Pool, who is from Salt Lake City, graduated from The University of Utah with a degree in film studies and hopes to have a career in film. “Monday” was inspired by events in Pool’s life. He said every time one of his coworkers is upset, he writes notes on Postits and sticks them around their office. “I thought it would be kind of a cute story if love were involved,” he said.

Kevin Lacy

Quince Van Orden

Age: 26 Film title: “Love Sick” Film synopsis: Will he ever catch the girl of his dreams?

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acy grew up dreaming of directing movies, but he wasn’t sure a career in film was a practical ambition. “For a long time I was too worried about the practicality of that goal, but finally decided that life was too short to not pursue my childhood dreams,” he said. He graduated from the University of Utah in film and media arts and has been accepted into the American Film Institute’s Directing Conservatory in Los Angeles. Lacy, who grew up in Cache Valley and graduated from Sky View High School, said he learned from Nora Ephron’s commentary for “Sleepless in Seattle” that romantic movies need a “chase scene” and that is something he has captured in “Love Sick.”

Age: 23 Film title: “Silly Love Games” Film synopsis: John is an ESL tutor who has a romantic study session with the hot Ivanna, but as he tells his friends this tale, some other students tell how they remember things differently.

V

an Orden, a USU student from Illinois, said he “combined forces” with his brother to come up with the plot of “Silly Love Games.” He enjoys filming, but does he want a career in it? “Yes and no,” he said, adding that it is hard to get into the business. “Not everybody is a Brad Pitt or a Steven Spielberg.” Still, “Silly Love Games” won’t be the last film we see from Van Orden. “Look forward to more movies from me for sure,” he said.

Story by Arie Kirk


Making movies Utah State University’s Fringe Film Festival inspired directors to create films about love and compete for cash

C

ontestants in this year’s Fringe Film Festival had four minutes to capture the eyes of judges with a movie themed “Twitterpated: a Spring Love Comedy.” There were about 20 entries, one coming from as far as New York, that have been narrowed to four final films and, tonight, the winner will be announced. The short-film festival is organized by Utah State University’s Caine College of the Arts and the Logan Arthouse Cinema. Courtney Lewis, who is with USU’s Caine College of the Arts Production Services, said the contest has a “more edgy feel” than the usual Caine event. The intent of the Fringe Film Festival is to spark the interest and creativity of people, she said. “Our main goal is just to generate creativity,” Lewis said, and she wasn’t disappointed with this year’s entries.

“We’re really excited with the turnout,” she said. “There were so many spectacular films.” Films were judged based on 10 categories including cinematography and composition, writing, sound, score and delivery, Lewis said. There are four finalists — two determined by a three-judge panel and the other two by online voting. Lewis said the overall winner will receive $2,000. Other prizes include a giftcard to the USU Bookstore. The Fringe Film Festival will be hosted by the Logan Arthouse and Cinema. Tickets are $10, or two tickets for $15. Lewis said that from about 7 to 8 p.m., all the short films will be shown. The four films in the finals will be shown at 8 p.m. Here is a quick look into the life and creativity of the four finalists — Kevin Lacy, Quince Van Orden, Matthew Pool and Stephen Simmons.

Stephen Simmons

Age: 27 Film title: “I Love Me” Film synopsis: Before you can start loving anyone, you have to start loving yourself.

S

immons, a Utah native, said that in his films, he likes to have original ideas that challenge himself and clichés, so “I Love Me” isn’t the romantic storyline one might expect. “I like to challenge myself and think of ways I can switch things around and still fit in that type of genre ... I thought about a character falling in love with himself. From there on I took all these elements of a boy meets girl and just took out the girl. Boy meets himself,” Simmons said. Simmons, of Salt Lake City, would like to have a career in film. “I have no notions that I will be a huge Hollywood star or a big shot director,” he said. “I would love one day to live comfortably with my work as an artist,” he said.

Matthew Pool

Age: 25 Film title: “Monday” Film synopsis: A boy and girl working in the same office start a friendly game of surprising the other with Post-it notes.

P

ool has been interested in film since he was a kid. At 13, he got his first camera and he has been filming ever since. Pool, who is from Salt Lake City, graduated from The University of Utah with a degree in film studies and hopes to have a career in film. “Monday” was inspired by events in Pool’s life. He said every time one of his coworkers is upset, he writes notes on Postits and sticks them around their office. “I thought it would be kind of a cute story if love were involved,” he said.

Kevin Lacy

Quince Van Orden

Age: 26 Film title: “Love Sick” Film synopsis: Will he ever catch the girl of his dreams?

L

acy grew up dreaming of directing movies, but he wasn’t sure a career in film was a practical ambition. “For a long time I was too worried about the practicality of that goal, but finally decided that life was too short to not pursue my childhood dreams,” he said. He graduated from the University of Utah in film and media arts and has been accepted into the American Film Institute’s Directing Conservatory in Los Angeles. Lacy, who grew up in Cache Valley and graduated from Sky View High School, said he learned from Nora Ephron’s commentary for “Sleepless in Seattle” that romantic movies need a “chase scene” and that is something he has captured in “Love Sick.”

Age: 23 Film title: “Silly Love Games” Film synopsis: John is an ESL tutor who has a romantic study session with the hot Ivanna, but as he tells his friends this tale, some other students tell how they remember things differently.

V

an Orden, a USU student from Illinois, said he “combined forces” with his brother to come up with the plot of “Silly Love Games.” He enjoys filming, but does he want a career in it? “Yes and no,” he said, adding that it is hard to get into the business. “Not everybody is a Brad Pitt or a Steven Spielberg.” Still, “Silly Love Games” won’t be the last film we see from Van Orden. “Look forward to more movies from me for sure,” he said.

Story by Arie Kirk


Page 10 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 15, 2011

Logan still a young and adolescent metropolis ogan isn’t too anyL thing. It’s not too big or too small, but it’s also not just

right. It’s not too young or too old. Like many towns and small cities in the west, it’s just a petulant, unpredictable, hormonally-challenged adolescent. To put it in perspective, the house I just moved out of was built about 100 years ago which makes it old only by Western U.S. standards. On the east coast and in the Midwest some houses have washing machines that old. Take a trip across the Atlantic Ocean and you’ll find homes with plumbing installed by Druids and Roman arches actually built by Romans. While there are many desirable things about being young, being fickle is not one of them. Adolescents want to be popular and do embarrassing things to achieve this. I know I was thrilled to get a Lowes, Home Depot and Starbucks for my

own selfish consumptive reasons. Many other locals applauded Old Navy, Pet Smart and Chili’s as signs that we were becoming a maturing metropolis. With every binge comes the ensuing hangover and morning of regret. We don’t know who or what we are; at least yet. To continue my youth analogy; do we want to be the popular kid with an iPhone and all the right brand name clothes or the interesting bohemian kid who wears artfully mixed thrift shop ensembles and writes poetry at the coffee shop? Because we are filled with those throbbing hormones of youth, most days the answer is yes, no and somewhere in between. I liked Logan just the way it was, while I still curse that I have to drive to Salt Lake City to catch a plane to anywhere. I want Logan to be different from, and conform with, the rest of the world simultaneously.

Slightly Off Center By Dennis Hinkamp

East coast cities have had several hundred years to decide what they want to be. Many of them have recreated themselves from fishing and farming economies to business centers, art communities or tourist destinations. They

built trains, subways and other means of mass transit not to save energy, but to simplify commuting. There are cities on the east coast where it costs more to park a car than to buy a car. The west is the land of eight-lane highways, drivethrough everything and free parking. Unless you pick your address carefully, there isn’t much of anything within walking distance here. If you do want to walk somewhere, there might not be a sidewalk to get there. Since everyone has a car, we have decided to draw strict lines between residential and commercial. I grew up in long-ago St. Louis with a corner store, laundromat, hardware store and, of course, a corner bar. Most western neighborhoods don’t even have definable corners because the original grids were based on agriculture and irrigation more than commerce. That’s fine, but since

we’ve eliminated most livestock from the city limits, we need to rethink bringing back more places like the Island Market. We are torn between the consistent taste of franchise coffee and burgers while simultaneously longing for a unique local flavor. The eat, drink and buy localvore movement is only partially driven by environmental concerns. Farmers markets are thriving because people want someplace to go that has a local feel and taste even if that taste is sometimes tasteless. Dennis Hinkamp admits that it is a contradiction that he still would like to have at least one Dunkin Donuts in town. He is among a number of freelance writers whose columns appear in The Herald Journal as part of an effort to expose readers to a variety of community voices. He is not an employee of the newspaper. Feedback at dhinkamp@ msn.com.


Male vocal

String

T

he twelfth annual Young Artist Cup was held at Mountain Crest High School on March 31 and April 1. Eighteen performers were selected from 45 entrants to receive awards in five music categories. Cash and prizes totaling $1,200 were given to winners and entrants. New this year was the Audience Choice Award given each evening to one performer chosen by the audience. Also honored were three winners in the Young Artist Cup Logo competition.

Piano

First place

Second place

Third place

First place

Second place

Third place

Jerkia Knight junior

Dorothy Petersen senior

Adreann Peel senior

Matthew Stott senior

Cole Fronk senior

Aiden Curtis senior

Logo design

Instrumental

First place

Second place

Third place

First place

Second place

First place

Second place

Third place

Rebekah Wakefield junior

Matthew Stott senior

Jake Whitney junior

Shem Hale senior

Steve Albrechtsen junior

Sarah Patch sophomore

Andrew Keith senior

Michael Grodhowski senior

Honorable mention

Honorable mention

First place

Troy Irish sophomore

Lacey Hopkins senior

Audience Choice

Female vocal

Jesseca Scholle senior

Second place

LaeKin Burgess senior

Third place

Breanne Sanders senior

Britain Durham sophomore

Jerika Knight junior

Page 11 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 15, 201

2011 Young Artist Cup


Page 12 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 15, 2011

The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board “No Place to Call Home” by Nephi Montana Just traveling around, with no place to call home, can give you a feeling I have often known. I’d settle down if I knew which town to pick. This drifting around can get you feeling sick. I’ve seen some pretty places, the people there are great With all this moving around, how long will I have to wait?

nds” e i r F s u o “Anonym unsaker H a m l i by W use

A little home in the country that I could call my own. Would be the answer to a dream, I’d no longer have to roam

our ho r night at The othe quite a scare bell We got our door one rang ne there. e m o s r o F und no o But we fo t the stree nd down a t e e tr s d up the o trace We looke ut we could find n t run real fast s B u m nners ny race ed the ru a id t c s e o d m e W ld win They cou cookies aw some ing there s s e y e r Then ou the plate just lay em on ist th They were d very hard to res re. a b is te We trie the pla But now card greeting noticed a y one e w n e th And ch a prett It was su h very nice things u s . id c And it sa s such a lot of fun a w it Oh d cially goo ere espe w s ie y k a o aw The co em em right We ate th that came with th rd y a ta c s l ia to c s e p rt And the s planted in our hea Will be is problem ment our e a fuss e it c x e e rais all th Now with ally don’t want to these friends re t u e o w b a d t n u A . do onymous eed to fin But we n e name is just An s u. Who e love yo ymous, w n o n A re a ever you P.S. Who

uet” “Surgeon’s Solo/Daunting D by Cindy Chase s your pain. Tell me the number that measure Is it three, is it seven or twelve? th of a void? How can we measure the dep Should we delve? try? we uld Sho ? ask we Should eone remains Who should remember that som ? hed finis is After the surgeon and afraid, Is it relevant someone’s alone inished? dim e’s eon Why bother that som ss Are we not caving to weakne pain? of ce sien tran the on ll To dwe year a or th mon Given a week or a ains. rem e anc nuis h suc kely It’s unli

GET YOUR STUFF PUBLISHED! The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board is a place for our local community to share, well ... anything! From short stories to poems to recipes to photos to unique tips when it comes to rearranging your closet, Cache Magazine wants your stuff! Send it all to mnewbold@hjnews.com, or mail it to Cache Magazine, 75 W. 300 North, Logan, UT 84321. We’ll be waiting!

sider the cost Should the makers of magic con ent? pati the to Isn’t price to be left than new We fixed her up good, better tion? ova ding So where is our stan that you chose You gave it away, sir, the day eye d blin and ear f dea a all To inst someone’s skin eath ben ied bur The sculpture you . Lies trembling, wondering why pain Even the art of prescribing for nse) lice a uire req t (Which I think mus eone you paid som of duty the is lare dec You r patients To stand between you and you all Write up a formula, one size fits g onward chin mar time ps kee tem sys r You e war una h eac up, New surgeries line standard. p w-u follo r you is lect neg t Tha ile domain As long as you stay in your ster in rubber ned don n, clea Your hands always firewall’s shame ind beh , pair des in , lost se Tho a number. Can keep track of their pain with


Roosevelt takes football’s side in ‘The Big Scrum’ By The Associated Press

hat's getting the W Panama Canal built or making peace between Russia

and Japan compared with rescuing football from damnation and dissolution? In the Age of Theodore Roosevelt, anything was possible. Sports history meets social history in "The Big Scrum" as John J. Miller examines the early years of an all-toodeadly pastime and why only presidential intervention may have saved football from the fate of cockfighting. Miller's easygoing narrative and keen eye for colorful detail should cheer sports fans and history

buffs alike. Football addicts are fortunate that T.R. was the man in the White House when, in 1905, no fewer than 18 players died from injuries suffered on the field. Roosevelt was sensitive to his fellow Progressives who felt scorn for the brutal game and demanded it be abolished. But he, too, was a product of the times, a period in which physical fitness began to be promoted on the same level as mental agility. Miller juxtaposes the decades-long evolution of football from a rugbymeets-soccer knockoff to an all-American sport with Roosevelt's own transforma-

tion from sickly rich kid to hardy, adventurous youth. He was still rich, of course, and all the better able to enjoy the things — boxing lessons and big-game hunts were but two — that came with wealth. In presenting a joint history of football and the 26th president, Miller focuses far more on why Roosevelt got involved than what he actually did as president to make a difference. Fewer side trips into the minutiae of both subjects might have put more energy into this dual narrative. But then readers could have missed out on the fact that painter Frederic Remington once soiled his college football

businesslike." And that college student Woodrow Wilson, later a Roosevelt nemesis, extolled the virtues of football for the Princeton newspaper and even served as an officer for the college team. And that a dead player's mother almost singlehandedly stopped an effort to ban football in Georgia. Roosevelt enjoyed solving problems, even those that didn't concern his office. He used his bully pulpit to cajole modern football's founders into revising the rules — the forward pass was one innovation — to make the game less lethal. In doing so, T.R. scored a touchdown for American sports.

uniform with slaughterhouse blood to make it appear "more

‘Periodic Tales’ a charming look at the elements By The Associated Press

S

ome people collect coins or baseball cards. Others collect stamps or Pez dispensers. Hugh AlderseyWilliams collects the building blocks of the universe. Aldersey-Williams has been trying to collect pure samples of every element known to humankind — from the common to the rare, the inert to the lethal. His quest sprang from a simple desire: to see and feel the elements that otherwise seem to exist only as abbreviations on the periodic table. The author’s scientific sentimentality may be unusual. But he makes it easy to share his passion with his latest book, the charming “Periodic Tales: A Cultural History of the Elements, From Arsenic to Zinc.” Few people give elements a second thought outside of chemistry class, but each one has an interesting story. The

quest for gold drove some cultures to explore the world, while other cultures dismissed it as useless. Platinum is as plentiful as gold but it’s more valuable because of artificially created demand. And chlorine changed the way nations waged war. In this context, the elements are surprisingly fascinating. AlderseyWilliams writes about how each element was discovered, explains its place in human history and describes the cultural changes it wrought. The vignettes are interesting and eloquently written. The only drawback is quantity — with more than 100 elements, it’s hard to keep some of the stories straight. Aldersey-Williams eases the journey by avoiding complex language. Readers won’t need a strong science background to appreciate the stories. The best part of the book is the author’s evident passion. For example, after reading about an alchemist who extracted faintly glowing phosphorus from human urine, Aldersey-

* This week’s New York Times Best-seller List * HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “The Land of the Painted Caves” by Jean M. Auel 2. “Lover Unleashed” by J. R. Ward 3. “Mystery” by Jonathan Kellerman 4. “Live Wire” by Harlan Coben 5. “Toys” by James Patterson and Neil McMahon HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “Onward” by Howard Schultz with Joanne Gordon 2. “Unbroken” by Laura Hillenbrand 3. “The Social Animal” by David Brooks 4. “Moonwalking With Einstein” by Joshua Foer 5. “Red” by Sammy Hagar with Joel Selvin

Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/

PAPERBACK TRADE FICTION 1. “Water For Elephants” by Sara Gruen 2. “Cutting For Stone” by Abraham Verghese 3. “Private” by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro 4. ‘The Art of Racing In the Rain” by Garth Stein 5. “The Postmistress” by Sarah Blake Paperback Advice & Misc. 1. “Hungry Girl 300 Under 300” by Lisa Lillien 2. “Now Eat This! Diet” by Rocco DiSpirito 3. “The Five Love Languages” by Gary Chapman 4. “What to Expect When You’re Expecting” by Heidi Murkoff and Sharon Mazel 5. “The Happiness Project” by Gretchen Rubin Williams tries to duplicate the feat. It’s not often that a story about urine is so gripping. “Periodic Tales” is a rela-

tively quick read, and AlderseyWilliams writes with simplicity and elegance. The stories may not help you on your next

chemistry test, but they’ll help you appreciate the building blocks that are all around us yet all too easy to overlook.

Page 13 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 15, 2011

Books


Page 14 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 15, 2011

Answers from last week

Calendar Friday A book signing event with Shaunda Kennedy Wenger at Hastings in Logan will be held Friday, April 15, from 5:30 to 8 p.m. She is the author of two new children’s books, “The Ghost in Me,” and “Into the Forest Again,” which is a sequel to the classic story of “Little Red Riding Hood.” Utah State University’s Relay for Life, sponsored by the American Cancer Society and put on by the USU chapter of Colleges against Cancer, begins April

15 at 6 p.m. and lasts until April 16 at 8 a.m. Join us for food, games, entertainment, all while fighting back against cancer. Meet at the USU Fieldhouse, 700 N. 800 East, Logan. For more information visit relayforlife.org/utahstateuniversityut. An LDS mid-singles dance (ages 31 to 45) will be held at the Cobblestone church (420 W. 100 North, Providence), on Friday, April 15. Speed dating starts at 8 p.m., dance instruction at 8:30 p.m., with the dance following from 9 p.m. to midnight. Refreshments served. Cost is a $3 donation. Age-appropriate photo ID required for admission to the mid-

Crossword

singles dances, no exceptions. The Child & Family Support Center’s 6th Annual Blue Ribbon Benefit Dinner & Auction will be held Friday, April 15. The event will be held at The Copper Mill Restaurant. This year’s theme is the Wild, Wild, West. Please join us for dinner, live entertainment, silent auction and live auction. All proceeds will benefit the Child & Family Support Center. Call 752-8880 for additional information. The Logan City School lunch workers pan sale will be held Friday, April 15, from 3 to 6 p.m. at Mount Logan Middle

www.ThemeCrosswords.com

By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Pool exercise 5. Pitcher, of a sort 10. Garbage 15. Jamie Foxx’s vehicle in “Collateral” 18. Tropical fever 19. Jungle climber 20. Get up 21. Dr. J’s first pro league 22. Powerful urges 26. Baby shower gift 27. Shows amorous intentions 28. Archipelago part 29. Cage for hawks 30. Utah lilies 32. Colorful carp 33. Kind of bean 37. Sodium carbonate 39. Conduct business 44. Magazine employee 46. Green one 47. Cameron 48. Car accessory 49. Fail to think something through 54. Ship to Colchis 55. Decorative inlay 56. Kind of apartment 57. ___ publica 58. ___ buggy 61. Radiation-emitting amplifier 62. Big sellers 63. One billion years 64. Top Tatar 66. Kind of job 69. Sorority rite 73. Cote quote 76. Operating room drug

79. Actor O’Shea 80. Chevron ___ 81. Almost automatically 85. Scand. land 86. French Sudan, today 87. “Tosca” tune 88. Existent 89. In a stylish manner 92. Anatomical ring 94. Cantankerous 95. Succor 96. Gauge boson 97. Genetics lab study 99. Colleen 101. Tapestry 103. Cross 108. While angry or excited 112. “Them” 113. Vino from Verona 114. Up the ante 115. Look ___ 116. Bankrupt 117. Wrote, old-style 118. Bumps 119. Senate attire Down 1. Of the flock 2. Indian tourist stop 3. Feline vibrato? 4. Nostradamus, for one 5. Gertrude’s partner 6. Repudiate 7. Drudge of the Internet 8. Blade beaked bird 9. Pinch 10. Where to find Eugene 11. Some gift wrappings

12. Stew 13. Ophidians 14. Moldovan moolah 15. French liqueur 16. Street Fighter IV character 17. Despicable 23. Numeral, for one 24. Exit 25. Animal with a mane 30. Sane 31. New York canal 32. Wind instrument 33. Fragrant wood 34. Be nuts about 35. Saturn has these 36. Dog in “Beetle Bailey” 38. Crosses with loops 39. Link 40. Tanners catch them 41. Supports, in a way 42. Box 43. Reduce gradually 45. “I, ___” (Asimov short story collection) 47. Chess term 50. Willa Cather’s “One of ___” 51. Mideasterner 52. Frighten 53. Tilt 58. Aware of 59. Prepare for winter takeoff 60. Baloney 62. Quiet 64. Pleated garment 65. Flutter 66. King protectors 67. ___ Pacific 68. Prefix with -hedron 69. Europe’s “boot”

70. Not yet final, at law 71. Embryonic sac 72. Kind of wave 73. Fake 74. Buddhist who has attained Nirvana 75. Well 77. Moist 78. Series finale 80. Like a button? 82. Opera’s Enrico ___

83. Lunchbox treat 84. Book size 90. Affixed, in a way 91. Word of contempt 92. Winged 93. Stop 96. Like some accents 98. Directory contents 99. ___ lessons 100. Erelong 101. Yawl call

102. Get 103. “___ Is It,” Jackson film 104. Put out 105. City near Sparks 106. Cuddle, slangily 107. It towers over Taormina 109. D.C. setting 110. One way to swing 111. Letter after sigma


The 2011 Cache County Dairy Princess Scholarship application deadline is Friday, April 15. Applications are available at the Gossner’s store. For more information contact Cache Dairy Women’s Board Secretary at 787-8892 or cachedairyprincess@gmail.com. Stokes Nature Center invites curious toddlers, ages 2-3, to join them for Parent Tot from 10 to 11 a.m. on Friday, April 15. The program fee is $3 ($2.50 for SNC members). For more info, call 435-755-3239 or visit www.logannature.org. The Hyrum Senior Center will be hosting a spring boutique this Friday, April 15, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. There is no admission fee but we will have a jar for donations for Japan Relief. All of our vendors have handcrafted items available for all ages. The senior center is located at 675 E. Main in Hyrum. We have items for Easter, Mother’s Day, spring, gifts and home decor. Please come and support these valley vendors. Free door prizes and treats. Call 245-3570 with any questions. A “Spring Fling” dance will be hosted by the Pioneer Valley Lodge on Friday, April 15, from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Rick Rose will be the DJ, playing a variety of dance music. Light refreshments will be served. Pioneer Valley Lodge is located at 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. This event is free and open to the public. For more information call 792-0353. Singer/songwriters Bryce Wood and Eli Wilson will perform on Friday, April 15, at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza from 6 to 8 p.m.

Saturday The Western singing duo Tumbleweeds will perform at LD’s Cafe in Richmond this Saturday,

April 16, from 6 p.m. to closing. On April 16, 23, and 30, the Kiwanis Club of Logan with the Key Clubs and Circle K club, will be at various stores in the area to receive donations of baby items for the Cache Community Food Pantry. We ask people to purchase a baby item and then donate it to the Food Pantry baby cupboard. Food stamps do not cover diapers, wipes, formula, or other needed baby supplies. This is an opportunity to selectively aid the smallest ones with the greatest needs. Eleven stores are cooperating. Stokes Nature Center will host Backyard Harvest: Spring Starts with Seeds, the second workshop in their backyard gardening series, on Saturday, April 16, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. The cost is $10. Registration is required. For more information, call 435-755-3239 or visit www. logannature.org. The USU Museum of Anthropology is hosting “Topaz: Japanese Internment in America,” on Saturday, April 16. The event features three lectures by Jane Beckwith, Director of the Topaz Museum, at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., each discussing the history of Topaz, the people that were imprisoned there, and the artwork created by the internees of Topaz. There will be displays of artifacts and art from prisoners of the internment camp. Patrons can also participate in creating Japanese Lanterns and a “What to Pack?” activity. The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information regarding this event, feel free to call 797-7545, or visit anthromuseum.usu.edu. Ryan Wight will entertain on the piano Saturday, April 16 at 3 p.m. at the Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East in North Logan. Please come and join us for this free event that is open to the public. For more information please call 792-0353. The Bear River Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will meet Saturday, April 16, at 10:30 a.m. at the Logan Library in the east conference room. Our special guest is

George Welch. He will speak on his induction into the National High School Hall of Fame for his musical talents. All visitors and friends are welcome. For more information, please contact Marilynne Wright at 435-881-0458 or marilynnewright4@msn.com. Sei Scrapbook Outlet is having a spring open house. There will be incredible discounts, prizes, giveaways,demos, make-andtakes, a class featuring Mother’s Day cards, refreshments and more. Sei Scrapbook Outlet is located at 1717 S. 450 West in Logan. For more information call 753-4142. JulieAnn Hewkin will perform celtic music Saturday, April 16 at 8 p.m. at Why Sound. Cost is $5. Cache Humane Society is hosting a spring fling for the animals on Saturday, April 16, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 2370 W. 200 West in Logan. There will be crafts, pictures with the Easter Bunny, face painting, snow cones, tours of the center, and reduced adoption fees. Bring rawhide bones in and trade for a hot dog combo. A princess party will be held Saturday, April 16, at the Riverwoods Conference Center from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Cost is $15 in advance or $20 the day of. Wear your princess dress and come join in princess activities such as a tea party with the Mad Hatter, storytime, makeup, nails, wand and tiara making, dancing, and a runway show. Other activities (at an additional charge), include pictures with princesses, making picture frames, up-do’s, hair tinsels, etc. Register online at www. cachecfsc.org. Brandon Kendrick will share recipes and teach about improving health and well-being through adjustments in your diet on Saturday, April 16, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Smithfield Recreation Center. To reserve a seat, contact Anjanelle Kendrick at anjanelleh@gmail.com, Jamie Garner at renrag44@yahoo.com, or call 563-9483. Solo artist Todd Milovich will perform at Pier 49 San Fran-

cisco Style Sourdough Pizza on Saturday at 7 p.m. Isael Torres will open for him at 6 p.m. Pier 49 is located across the street north of Maceys on 1200 South. A fruit tree pruning workshop will be held Saturday, April 16, at Zollinger Fruit and Tree Farm. Workshop begins at 10 a.m. Cost is $25. Please call 7527810 for more information.

Monday The USU Guitar Ensembles concert will be held Monday, April 18, at 7:30 p.m. at the USU Performance Hall. Multiple guitar ensembles will be featured. All styles including jazz, classical, blues, bluegrass, rock and world music will be played. Tickets are $5 and can be purchased at the CCA Box Office, at ccatickets@ usu.edu, or by phone at 435-7978022. Free for USU students with ID.

Wednesday “Celebrating the Sunshine Way,” the annual Sunshine Terrace membership meeting, will be held Wednesday, April 20, at 6:30 p.m. at the rehabilitation center in the Great Room, 248 W. 300 North, Logan. We will have a short business meeting and celebration of staff, board and community recognitions. Appetizer buffet will be served. Pernicious Wishes will perform hip-hop/experimental music Wednesday, April 20, at 8 p.m. at Why Sound. Cost is $5. Local easy listening group “ City Heat,” featuring Bill Gabriel on guitar, performs each Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza, located on 1200 South across the street north of Maceys. Everyone is welcome.

Tuesday

Thursday

A USU Percussion Ensembles concert will be held Tuesday, April 19, at 7:30 p.m. at the Kent Concert Hall on USU campus. Tickets are free for USU students with ID, or $8 for general admission. They can be purchased at the CCA Box Office, ccatickets@usu.edu, or by calling 435-797-8022.

The Bridgerland SHRM luncheon for April will be held Thursday, April 21, from noon to 1 p.m. at Hamilton’s Accolade. Rob Rice, attorney at the Salt Lake City law firm of Ray Quinney and Nebeker will be speaking. Cost is $10 for SHRM members and $12 for non-members. Please RSVP to Danene at danene.dustin@ usu.edu or register online at: http://www.bridgerlandshrm.org by Tuesday, April 19.

The AARP senior defensive drivers class will be held from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 19, at Cache County Senior Center. Cost is $12 for AARP members, or $14 for non-members. The certificate of completion will reduce auto insurance rates. Call Susie at 435-753-2866 for reservations. The Cache Valley Gluten Free Group will be meeting Tuesday, April 19, at 7 p.m. at Logan Regional Hospital Rooms 2 and 3. Check your pantry for gluten free items and bring them with you to swap with others. Join us for a night with free samples and coupons for gluten free items. For more information contact cachevalleygfg@gmail.com.

Shauna Flammer will share some of her favorite Easter treats at a free cooking and community class at Macey’s on Thursday, April 21 from 7 to 8 p.m. The USU Symphonic Band spring concert will be held Thursday, April 21, at 7:30 p.m. at the Kent Concert Hall. Tickets are $8 for the public and free for USU students w/ID. Mountain Crest drama department presents “A Night in the Theatre,” a one-act and variety show on April 21 and 22, at 7 p.m. in the Mountain Crest High School auditorium. Free admission, but donations encouraged.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 15, 2011

School, 875 N. 200 East. The sale includes all new commercial cookware. Great for weddings, graduation and Mother’s Day. Cash or check only, please. No credit cards.


Page 16 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 15, 2011

CACHE MAGAZINE DINING GUIDE “Look here every week for great deals from your favorite restaurants.” L

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Cache Magazine