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Cache

Magazine

i k s s t s o h U US d r a o b w o n and s n o i t i t e p m o c The Herald Journal

April 8-14, 2011


Page 2 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 8, 2011

Cache The Herald Journal’s

Magazine

Arts & Entertainment Calendar On the cover: Jacob Brown, of Vernal, competes in the Rail Jam at USU

What’s inside this week William Moore discusss wines

(Page 12)

in the Romney Stadium parking lot Tuesday. Photo by Jennifer Meyers/Herald Journal

From the editor his has been one of those T weeks I was reminded to appreciate the little things. Last Wednesday evening I was driving around Logan, the cool breeze coming in my windows and the stars right above my head. I know this is cheesy, but in that moment I felt really lucky to be free to do the things I wanted, and to live in a beautiful valley. I tend to think about the purpose of life a lot, and often times my answer changes. But sometimes I think one of the main reasons why we are here is just to enjoy ourselves and the things we are surrounded with. Those things may be as simple as a night sky or the open air on an early spring night. Or they may be the moments we notice the mountains have

mnewbold@hjnews.com

turned green again and are ready for hiking. I never get sick of living in this place thanks to the sunsets, the summers, the stars. In a couple of weeks the Cache Valley Center of the Arts will be celebrating Earth Day by combining local art and musicians into a downtown Logan event. Officially Earth Day is on April 22 and while this day often goes by without me thinking a lot about it, I think this year I will plan on doing something to celebrate it. Several of the people participating are using recycled items to create music, art and even fashion projects. It’s amazing what people can create from simple objects in front of them, some imagination, or perhaps a little rhythm. Whenever I feel like this, I always hope that it lasts — that I can remember to think of the little things. — Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

(Page 5) USU Ballroom Team to perform

‘Hanna’ provides something original

(Page 7) Books .......................p.13 Crossword.................p.14

Cute

pet photo of the week

This dog is available for adoption! Pet: Billy From: Cache Humane Society Why he’s so lovable: Billy, a

Labrador Retriever/Border Collie mix, has been with us at the shelter for three months. He is a big teddy bear that loves people. Billy is a 1-year-old, and great with children and other animals. Billy has become a true favorite of the shelter staff and volunteers that come to spend time with him. He is a fairly quiet dog. He is already neutered, which means his adoption fees are much less.

Slow Wave Slow Wave is created from real people’s dreams as drawn by Jesse Reklaw. Ask Jesse to draw your dream! Visit www.slowwave.com to find out how.


aby Animal Days continB ue at The American West Heritage Center in Wellsville, April 8-9,

from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Once again, visitors of all ages are invited to pet and hold their favorite baby farm animals, learn about the American West, and celebrate the changing seasons. Admission is $8 for adults, $7 for students/military/seniors, and $6 for kids ages 3-11. Bring a food or hygiene item donation for the Cache Community Food Pantry and receive $1 off admission. This spring, the AWHC and USU Charter Credit Union are excited to welcome back the baby bears of Bear World, who made their Baby

Animal Days debut in 2010. In addition to seeing the bears, petting the baby lambs, kids, chicks, ducklings, piglets, calves, and bunnies, festival visitors can participate in a multitude of other activities. There will be living history demonstrations, sheep-shearing by hand, horse-farming demonstrations, the lil buckaroo rodeo, food and craft vendors, a history treasure hunt, candy cannon, stage performances, and much more. Pony, train, wagon, and Model T rides are scheduled throughout the threeday festival. Tickets can be purchased at the door, online at www.awhc.org, or

at Macey’s in Providence. For more information, call the AWHC at (435) 245-6050 or (800) 2253378, or visit www.awhc.org. The American West Heritage Center is a non-profit living history museum dedicated to teaching about and celebrating the culture of the American West during the years 1820-1920. The center is committed to providing community access to memorable experiences and quality education through family-oriented festivals and special events, field trips for students of all ages, historic re-enactments, volunteer opportunities, and outreach programs.

Family presents afternoon of magic and music

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he Hatch Academy of Magic and Music presents “Matinée Enchantée,” an enchanted afternoon of magic and music in the historic Thatcher-Young Mansion on April 9 at 2 p.m. Deceptionist Richard Hatch and violinist Rosemary Hatch, co-owners of the Hatch Academy, will be joined by their son, pianist Jonathan Hatch in a 75-minute program featuring the music of Béla Bartók, Camille SaintSaëns, Johann Sebastian Bach and Fritz Kreisler and magic created by Johann Nepomuk Hofzinser, Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin, Dai Vernon and Punx, among others. A unique feature of the program is the ensemble aspect with magic and music performed simultaneously. While the performance includes numerous magical and musical solos, it is the ensemble pieces, with the magic choreographed to the music, that give this program

its special character. Richard Hatch holds two graduate degrees in physics from Yale University, but finds it easier apparently to violate the laws of nature than to discover them. A childhood interest in magic became a lifelong obsession after he met and was encouraged by the German magician Fredo Raxon in 1970. Richard has been a full-time professional “deceptionist” since 1983. Rosemary Kimura Hatch received her master’s degree from Yale School of Music and her bachelor’s degree with performer’s certificate from Eastman School of Music. She has performed with the New Haven, Hartford, San Antonio and Houston symphonies and with the Houston Grand Opera. Jonathan Hatch studied piano at St. Thomas University in Houston, Texas, and at the University of Texas in Austin. He is currently

studying piano privately while simultaneously pursuing studies to become a veterinary technician. In his spare time, he volunteers at the Cache Valley Humane Society. Richard said he and his wife first performed such a program at the Puppet House Theater in Stony Creek, Conn., in 1983. The matinées are currently scheduled for the second Saturday of each month at the Thatcher-Young Mansion, 35 W. 100 South in Logan. For these performances, the downstairs gallery space will be transformed into a 56-seat theater. Tickets are $10 for adults, and $7 for children under 12. Because there are only 56 seats are available, advance purchase is strongly advised to avoid disappointment. Tickets may be purchased online at the Hatch Academy website www. HatchAcademy.com or by calling 435-9320017.

Page 3 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 8, 2011

It’s that cute and cuddly time of year at AWHC


Page 4 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 8, 2011

All mixed up

Downtown Logan to celebrate Earth Day

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he Cache Valley Center for the Arts presents the first Earth Day Downtown on Friday, April 22, from 2:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. on 100 South (between Main Street and the ThatcherYoung Mansion). The Earth Day Downtown Street Festival will include CVCA’s first public sculpture unveiling, entertainment, arts activities, food vendors, and booths for local environment and sustainability groups, Logan City, USU clubs, businesses, and more. The emphasis of this event is to inspire people to participate, no matter how big or small. In partnership with this event the Logan Downtown Alliance is celebrating Earth Day by staying open late. Enjoy Downtown “Alive after Five!” Earth Day provides an opportunity for us to embrace the world we live in and find out how we can serve as better stewards of the planet and its resources. As part of the festivities Jeff Keller with Sunrise Cyclery will provide a “Blip Pot” workshop that will inspire you to take your garden whereever you go. The USU Dress & Humanities Class, taught by Family and Consumer Sciences Education Assistant Professor Lindsey Shirley, will be showcasing recycled fashions. Logan High School Percussion Ensemble, under the direction of Chris Rasmussen, will be performing a “Trash Band” concert. Additional performances will be offered by various groups including: “The Gypsies Junk Jam,” a group of students and friends of Fast Forward High School. Under the direction of Todd Milovich, The Gypsies will be playing on a variety of found

objects. The evening will conclude with a community “junk” jam so be sure to bring something to play on or create your own “junk” inspired instrument. The arts are one way we can give back and provide a platform to inspire action, said Amanda Castillo, program CVCA program director. “This event is just one small opportunity to create dialog in the community and help us celebrate our journey in a fun interactive way,” she added. “If we all made a commitment to change or improving one green behavior, we would live in a very different world. That pile of junk may start to look like a mound of treasure if you are an artist or musician.” Many artists and musicians in Cache Valley are already creating music and art out of trash. The lifecycle of everyday products and the potential uses are endless. CVCA is “taking out the trash” by collecting a few items for future community art projects and art camp. If you have lids, caps, toilet paper rolls, 24-ounce soda bottles, CD-R’s, magazines, salt and cleanser containers, please stop by the Center. They would love to recycle your trash! This event is sponsored in part by the Utah Division of Arts & Museums in partnership with Logan City and the Logan Downtown Alliance. For details about Earth Day Downtown, call 435-752-0026 or come by the Cache Valley Center for the Arts located at 43 S. Main in Logan. You can also visit www. CacheArts.org. The Center is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

USU dance team to perform history of ballroom style

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ome join the USU Ballroom Dance Team as they perform Ballroom Dance: Then and Now; The Classic and Contemporary, at the Ellen Eccles Theater, April 22-23. The team will take audiences through a historical journey of ballroom dance – to the ancient royal courts of Austria where ballroom dance first began, to the classic dances of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rodgers as they graced the silver screen, all the way to the vivacious contemporary Latin dances of today. Ballroom Dance: Then and Now, features beautiful costumes and a variety of ballroom dances such as the Latin Samba of Brazil, the majestic slow Waltz of Vienna, the electric American Swing and many more.

2011 marks the 15-year anniversary of the USU Ballroom Dance Team. Over that span the team has performed for thousands of people. The current ballroom team has been busy performing across the United States. The hard work and attention to detail has garnered the team many awards at competitive events. For three years the team has been under the direction of Jeanne-Louise and Adam Shelton. Under the couples’ direction the team has achieved their highest competitive marks ever, placing second at nationals. Tickets for the April 22-23 show start at $12 with discounts for students. We ask patrons to be in their seats at 7:30 p.m.

Opera Guild organizes fundraiser

The UFO Opera Guild invites the public to attend their fundraiser evening April 16 at the Dansante, 59 S. 100 West, starting at 7 p.m. Tickets are $65 per person and can be purchased now at the Dansante or can be reserved by calling 1-800-263-0074. The theme is South Pacific. Dress for the evening is also South Pacific and menu includes pork, fish, rice and island desserts. There will also be dancing and musical entertainment.


rittany Beecher, LindB sey Mickelsen and Erik “Riko” Wynn are USU students

and members of two dance companies on campus. Dance is their passion, all three say they have danced most of their lives, but they aren’t dance majors because no such major exists at Utah State University. Still, they and 29 others who share a love of dance, will be on stage this month for their yearending concert. The companies, Full Circle and Vilociti, perform Thursday, April 14, at 7:30 p.m. at the Chase Fine Arts Center’s Kent Concert Hall. Krissy Smith-Fry started the program at USU four years ago and now directs the two companies. “I was a dance major at another university and transferred to Utah State after my freshman year,” she said. “There was nothing here for students who wanted to continue to dance. I just decided to start a program. I do it to give students the opportunity to continue in their passion and to continue to grow not only as dancers but as students.” Smith-Fry said after she formed the dance company she started a push to encourage the school’s administration to reinstate dance as an academic program. “We use our dance companies to show not only the community but the university that dance is still very much a part of univer-

usicians at Mountain Crest High M School had the opportunity to show off their talents and compete in the 12th

sity life at Utah State.” She knows that should the USU administration decide to reinstate dance, it could be at least three years away. “I am really hopeful. Dr. (Craig) Jessop (Dean of the Caine School of the Arts) is really pushing for this program as is President Albrecht’s wife, Joyce. We are hoping within the next few years we can get the program reinstated.” Smith-Fry said the number of interested students grows each year with now 32 members in the two companies. Four performers dance in both companies. She said Full Circle is a modern or contemporary, jazz-based company including dancers who have a lot of technical training. “Vilociti is hip hop and break dance based, they are the more street style dancers.

“Both companies are extremely athletic. We had 75 students audition for Full Circle and there were 68 at the Vilociti audition,” she said. “There is high interest and that is very exciting for us.” Smith-Fry said this year’s concert theme is “Chromatics – Life in Color.” She said the idea is to depict the wide variety of ways we use color in everyday life. “We identify with colors as humans. For example some people identify with red as evil or as the color of love. We attempt in this show to have a wide variety of pieces that are really light and fun and happy and others that get the audience to feel something that they’re not really comfortable with.” Tickets are less expensive if purchased online (arts.usu.edu) or in advance at the Chase Fine Arts Center ticket office.

Bullen Center presents Coppélia

oppélia, a fairytale, C intertwines a love story with unexpected events as the village

doll maker, Doctor Coppélius, endeavors to create a life-size doll with a soul. This much-loved ballet with a hint of European folklore is one of the most delightful, well-known ballets and continues to please audiences worldwide. Coppélia will be presented by the Cache Valley Civic Ballet, April 15 and 16, at the Ellen Eccles Theater. Tickets are $10 and available at the theater box office. The continuous training

Young Artist Cup winners chosen

and dedication to the art of ballet by our company members is exciting and praiseworthy as we enter into our 29th year of presenting full length ballet productions. We are thrilled to have all principle roles danced by CVCB company members; Becky Erickson as Swanilda with Luke Anderson as Franz and Kevin Nakatani as Doctor Coppélius. Returning audiences will see some new faces as well as recurring favorites completing the lovely ensemble cast of Cache Valley

Civic Ballet Company members and community players. Coppélia’s Doll Party will be held prior to the Saturday Matinee performance, April 16 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Bullen Center Ballroom. Please bring your favorite doll to attend with you while you have a treat, meet characters from the ballet and have a staged photograph taken with Coppélia, Swanhilda, Frantz or Doctor Coppélius ($5 per picture/$2.50 for duplicates). Tickets to Coppélia’s Doll Party are sold at the door for $3 a person.

annual Young Artist Cup last week. On March 31 and April 1 performers vied for cash prizes in six areas: graphic arts design, female vocalists, male vocalists, strings, brass/winds/percussion and piano. Awards were given to first-, second-, and third-place winners in each category. As in years past, the logo for this year’s Young Artist Cup was selected from submissions by Mountain Crest students in a competition that was held earlier this year. Past Young Artist Cup participants have gone on to excel professionally in music and the performing arts. The 2011 winners were: Piano 1st — Rebekah Wakefield 2nd — Matthew Stott 3rd — Jake Whitney Honorable Mention — Troy Irish and Lacey Hopkins Male Vocal 1st — Matthew Stott 2nd — Cole Fronk 3rd — Aiden Curtis Female Vocal 1st — Jesseca Scholle 2nd — LaeKin Burgess 3rd — Breanne Sanders String 1st — Jerika Knight 2nd — Dorothy Petersen 3rd — Adreann Peel Brass/Wind/Percussion 1st — Shem Hale 2nd — Steve Albrechtsen Logo 1st — Sarah Patch 2nd — Andrew Keith 3rd — Michael Grodhowski Audience Choice Award Britain Durham Jerika Knight

Page 5 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 8, 2011

Local dance companies to perform


Page 6 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 8, 2011

Film New this week “Arthur” Rated PG-13 ★★Another inferior, unnecessary remake, Russell Brand’s comedy at least is benign fluff that should please younger audiences unfamiliar with the 1981 comedy, even if purists who adore the original may hate this version. The movie is respectful of and faithful to Dudley Moore’s original — maybe too much so. The filmmakers tweak things to modernize the story and fit the persona of drunken, debauched, billionaire man-child onto Brand (not surprisingly, it’s no stretch for the British comic with the party-boy past). Yet the alterations are mostly cosmetic, including the big one, changing the sex of Arthur’s stern but loving guardian Hobson from a man (John Gielgud as Moore’s butler in the original) to a woman (Helen Mirren as Brand’s nanny). First-time director Jason Winer (TV’s “Modern Family”) stuffs this version with too many cute, cloying moments as Brand’s Arthur grows up while finding true love with a penniless tour guide (Greta Gerwig) and avoiding an arranged marriage with a corporate-climbing executive (Jennifer Garner). Considering the crudeness of many remakes, this could have turned out much worse. 110 minutes. “Soul Surfer” Rated PG ★1⁄2 Watching “Soul Surfer,” the story of Bethany Hamilton’s comeback after a shark attack, makes you long for a vivid documentary on the subject instead — preferably one of those excellent “30 for 30” offerings from ESPN. Hamilton’s tale

through some of the is, of course, inspiring. In gooey tedium with a natu2003, when she was just rally athletic presence and 13 years old, she lost her no-nonsense attitude (and left arm to a 14-foot tiger the star of “Bridge to Terashark while surfing near bithia” and “Race to Witch her Hawaiian home. An up-and-comer in the sport, Mountain” does much of her own surfing). But she wanted to get back on her board as soon as pos- “Soul Surfer” consistently tries to make her transforsible. A month later, she mation as easily digestible was in the water again. as possible. 106 minutes. Now, at 21, she continues to compete professionally. “Your Highness” “Soul Surfer” takes that story of complex emotions, Rated R ★★The knights-errant determination and faith — strong emphasize on and turns it into overly the errant — behind this simplistic mush. Director adventure comedy spend and co-writer Sean McNamore time wallowing in mara’s film is an uncomfortable combination of pat, medieval filth than weaving clever laughs and feel-good platitudes, twoengaging action. Reunitdimensional characters, ing key players from “Pinecheesy special effects and apple Express” — James generically idyllic scenery. Franco, Danny McBride, AnnaSophia Robb, who director David Gordon stars as Hamilton, cuts

Green — the movie plays like a Middle Ages roleplaying fantasy dreamed up by the giggly stoners of that earlier comedy. Co-writer McBride and his collaborators apparently set out on a quest to ram as much coarse language and as many adolescent sexual gags into a movie as possible, maybe to cover the fact that the movie doesn’t contain much else. He and Franco play sibling princes who team with a mysterious warrior (Natalie Portman) to rescue a damsel (Zooey Deschanel) from an evil wizard. Crassness overwhelms the movie, the vulgar language losing all force by incessant repetition, deadening the lingo so that even the occasional witty wise-

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he previews T for Joe Wright’s (“Atonement”) “Hanna”

promise a pretty standard action experience, but with one twist. The heroine is a young 16 year-old girl. The trailers are full of quicklycut high-flying action scenes. It’s sure to draw in a few action movie enthusiasts this Friday when it opens. I want to be there when those same people walk out of “Hanna” wondering to themselves what in the world they just sat through. “Hanna” is indeed full of some insanely choreographed action sequences, but the entire film is paced with a European feel to it. Much like “The American” was last year. Think of “Hanna” as “Salt” meets “The American” and you pretty much know what you’re in store for. Hanna (Saoirse Ronan) lives deep in the snowcapped Russian mountains where her father Erik (Eric Bana) has been training her for these past 16 years. He’s been grooming her to be a deadly assassin; to be a complete, ferocious fighting machine. Why’s he doing this? Well, it’s not really clear from the beginning. We’re simply observers, watching as Hanna undergoes rigorous training and studying, like it’s just part of her everyday routine. We soon learn that Erik has been in hiding for a while. He’s hiding from the CIA, specifically an operative in the CIA named Marissa (Cate Blanchett). Marissa is one of those CIA agents who doesn’t play by the rules. She enlists the help of nefarious

The Reel Place By Aaron Peck

characters to try and find Erik and Hanna, before they can reach her. Hanna’s backstory is soon revealed, but I won’t discuss it much here. There are a few surprises later on that you’ll be glad I didn’t spoil. What I did want to talk about is why this movie is so different from any other movie you’ll see in wide release this year. This is an art house film all the way. It’s as stylized Action! 2297 N. Main MOVIE HOTLINE 753-6444 WWW.WALKERCINEMAS.NET ALL SEATS ALL TIMES $3.00 OpEN SuNdAy-FRIdAy AT 3:45pM OpEN FRI & SAT 11:30AM FOR OuR MATINEES

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been cooped up, and now she’s been set loose on the world. Her buttkicking instincts aren’t nearly as interesting as

it pushes headfirst to a frenzied finish. Instead it lingers between large action scenes with a story that’s much more poignant than you might have expected. Here’s a girl that’s grown up in a log cabin in the mountains. For 16 years she’s

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watching her interact with a completely foreign world. She meets a British family along the way, and learns about interaction. It’s really rare that you see a coming-of-age story mixed into an action film. It’s even more rare that it actually works. “Hanna” is a peculiar movie. One that has to be experienced. One that a simple review just can’t convey. It’s definitely a different kind of movie. Don’t you think that with summer of 2012 looming on the horizon with all those brain-dead superhero movies coming our way, that you owe it to yourself to check out something at the theater that’s completely original?

Page 7 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 8,

‘Hanna’ original with European feel


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Utah State University Big Blue performs a jump during the Rail Jam event of Entrepreneur Week at USU Tuesday. Spectators watch a performer at the Rail Jam. Kade Hansen competes in the Rail Jam. Greg Steindorf performs a move on skis. For video of the Rail Jam, visit www.hjnews.com.

By Joey Hislop Photos by JENNIFER MEYERS

othing embodies the entrepreneurial spirit like a sick frontside 50-50, and there was plenty of both at the USU Innovation and Entrepreneurship Council’s Rail Jam 2011 — a snowboard and ski trick competition held Tuesday in the Romney Stadium parking lot on a touring two-story-high snowboard rail apparatus. The attraction was the centerpiece of “E-Week” (Entrepreneur Week), which is put on by the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business, but it’s difficult to say whether Rail Jam patrons came for the accompanying business expo and stayed for the Rail Jam, or vice versa. Regardless, a good time was had by all. “Their set is pretty sick, and everything’s pretty mellow,” said Spencer Olson of Salt Lake, one of the top boarders in the competition. “(I did) some front 50-50s, switch-up on the down, front lipslide, two sev-out and 360 and 180 off the little rocket slider. ... I wish I could do a couple more things. ... It’s good fun. I like it, good set-up. Fun to ride it.” Sporting a couple battle scars from a spill on one of his drops, Olson was awaiting the final round of competition, having moved on with a number of well-executed tricks. The IEC’s Rail Jam event was not only the second year in a row the tour had made its way to Logan, but it was also the ninth of 11 stops on

the Ford Campus Rail Jam Tour. The traveling crew, made up of snowboarders, has been out on the road in the late winter and early spring months for four years now. “It’s great. Besides setting up these events, we do a lot of snowboarding in different areas,” said Drew Diehl, of Pennsylvania, one of the founding members of the tour. “We do a lot of hiking, and a lot of going to different places — Trampoline Worlds, batting cages, roller rinks. We just try to have fun as much as possible. It’s great. I love it. It’s four years now, and I’ve been doing it every year and I can’t get away from it. “This is our last stop before we go back to Oregon for a month and a half. We have our finals in Portland, Ore. — downtown Pioneer Square. All the winners from the event top five from each category ... will go to Portland finals. The winners from this event will be invited to come to Portland finals. It’s on them to come, but there’s a $5,000 cash purse given away.” While it may seem like quite a task for the small crew to throw up the scaffolding that supports the rails, after enough times doing it and undoing it, Diehl has it down to a science. “This is my fourth year on tour. I’m the only remaining guy from the original year, so we have pretty much a whole new crew this year,” Diehl said. “... It’s not really that hard, as long as you know what you’re doing. It’s just basic scaffold-

ing.” Having drawn roughly 2,000 people to last year’s Rail Jam, the IEC decided to try it again for 2011. According to Brianne Petersen, a public relations student and vice president of events for the IEC, the hope is to make Rail Jam an annual event. “They had already done it last year, so we decided to make it an annual thing,” Petersen said. “... It has two purposes: one to have fun ... and two to give student businesses an opportunity to advertise for free. Any student business can have a booth here for free, with the hopes that a lot of people from the community and students will come and kinda see what’s going on and everything. ... We’re just letting student businesses ... get the word out to the community that we’re here to go big. Go big or go home.” As Petersen pointed out, Utah State has one of the best entrepreneurial programs in the country. So good, it’s starting to draw national attention. “We’re trying to promote entrepreneurship, obviously, and kind of showcase how good of an entrepreneurial program this school has, because it really is excellent,” Petersen said. “... I don’t know all the stats exactly, but I do know we’re one of the top in the nation. ... It was voted the most bang for your buck.” One student-run business that was at the expo was Rayne Clothing, out of Ogden. Having start-

ed just this past September, the maker of hats, beanies, shirts and hoodies for use in extreme sports was hoping to spread the word and get some exposure in Cache Valley. “We’re just trying to get our name out. We’ve been using Facebook a lot to who people who we are, but it’s great to get out to events like this,” said Jason Gardiner, a Weber State public relations major from Ogden, and one of the owners of Rayne. “... We have a great niche — we have a really cool logo and name. ... That right there gives someone an instant (recognition). They instantly like it. With that, all it is is getting the name out. ... We’d love for all of Northern Utah to know Rayne like any other brand they know; that they feel a part of Rayne because they’re from Utah. And then hopefully we’ll just continue to grow.” While profit is the sole objective for most businesses, Gardiner says Rayne is also about making a difference in the community and the world. “What we’d love to do is make enough profit to start making big organizations to start helping charities and different things so we can make a difference, especially in Northern Utah,” Gardiner said. “... Business is good. We’re really happy with it. Right now it’s self-sustaining, so we don’t have to put any more money into it. Our profit is helping us continue to buy clothing.”


N

Utah State University Big Blue performs a jump during the Rail Jam event of Entrepreneur Week at USU Tuesday. Spectators watch a performer at the Rail Jam. Kade Hansen competes in the Rail Jam. Greg Steindorf performs a move on skis. For video of the Rail Jam, visit www.hjnews.com.

By Joey Hislop Photos by JENNIFER MEYERS

othing embodies the entrepreneurial spirit like a sick frontside 50-50, and there was plenty of both at the USU Innovation and Entrepreneurship Council’s Rail Jam 2011 — a snowboard and ski trick competition held Tuesday in the Romney Stadium parking lot on a touring two-story-high snowboard rail apparatus. The attraction was the centerpiece of “E-Week” (Entrepreneur Week), which is put on by the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business, but it’s difficult to say whether Rail Jam patrons came for the accompanying business expo and stayed for the Rail Jam, or vice versa. Regardless, a good time was had by all. “Their set is pretty sick, and everything’s pretty mellow,” said Spencer Olson of Salt Lake, one of the top boarders in the competition. “(I did) some front 50-50s, switch-up on the down, front lipslide, two sev-out and 360 and 180 off the little rocket slider. ... I wish I could do a couple more things. ... It’s good fun. I like it, good set-up. Fun to ride it.” Sporting a couple battle scars from a spill on one of his drops, Olson was awaiting the final round of competition, having moved on with a number of well-executed tricks. The IEC’s Rail Jam event was not only the second year in a row the tour had made its way to Logan, but it was also the ninth of 11 stops on

the Ford Campus Rail Jam Tour. The traveling crew, made up of snowboarders, has been out on the road in the late winter and early spring months for four years now. “It’s great. Besides setting up these events, we do a lot of snowboarding in different areas,” said Drew Diehl, of Pennsylvania, one of the founding members of the tour. “We do a lot of hiking, and a lot of going to different places — Trampoline Worlds, batting cages, roller rinks. We just try to have fun as much as possible. It’s great. I love it. It’s four years now, and I’ve been doing it every year and I can’t get away from it. “This is our last stop before we go back to Oregon for a month and a half. We have our finals in Portland, Ore. — downtown Pioneer Square. All the winners from the event top five from each category ... will go to Portland finals. The winners from this event will be invited to come to Portland finals. It’s on them to come, but there’s a $5,000 cash purse given away.” While it may seem like quite a task for the small crew to throw up the scaffolding that supports the rails, after enough times doing it and undoing it, Diehl has it down to a science. “This is my fourth year on tour. I’m the only remaining guy from the original year, so we have pretty much a whole new crew this year,” Diehl said. “... It’s not really that hard, as long as you know what you’re doing. It’s just basic scaffold-

ing.” Having drawn roughly 2,000 people to last year’s Rail Jam, the IEC decided to try it again for 2011. According to Brianne Petersen, a public relations student and vice president of events for the IEC, the hope is to make Rail Jam an annual event. “They had already done it last year, so we decided to make it an annual thing,” Petersen said. “... It has two purposes: one to have fun ... and two to give student businesses an opportunity to advertise for free. Any student business can have a booth here for free, with the hopes that a lot of people from the community and students will come and kinda see what’s going on and everything. ... We’re just letting student businesses ... get the word out to the community that we’re here to go big. Go big or go home.” As Petersen pointed out, Utah State has one of the best entrepreneurial programs in the country. So good, it’s starting to draw national attention. “We’re trying to promote entrepreneurship, obviously, and kind of showcase how good of an entrepreneurial program this school has, because it really is excellent,” Petersen said. “... I don’t know all the stats exactly, but I do know we’re one of the top in the nation. ... It was voted the most bang for your buck.” One student-run business that was at the expo was Rayne Clothing, out of Ogden. Having start-

ed just this past September, the maker of hats, beanies, shirts and hoodies for use in extreme sports was hoping to spread the word and get some exposure in Cache Valley. “We’re just trying to get our name out. We’ve been using Facebook a lot to who people who we are, but it’s great to get out to events like this,” said Jason Gardiner, a Weber State public relations major from Ogden, and one of the owners of Rayne. “... We have a great niche — we have a really cool logo and name. ... That right there gives someone an instant (recognition). They instantly like it. With that, all it is is getting the name out. ... We’d love for all of Northern Utah to know Rayne like any other brand they know; that they feel a part of Rayne because they’re from Utah. And then hopefully we’ll just continue to grow.” While profit is the sole objective for most businesses, Gardiner says Rayne is also about making a difference in the community and the world. “What we’d love to do is make enough profit to start making big organizations to start helping charities and different things so we can make a difference, especially in Northern Utah,” Gardiner said. “... Business is good. We’re really happy with it. Right now it’s self-sustaining, so we don’t have to put any more money into it. Our profit is helping us continue to buy clothing.”


Page 10 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 8, 2011

Downtown Gallery Walk April 8

By Jeremy Winborg

Locations The Art Center Cache Valley Center for the Arts Caffe Ibis Gallery Deli The Crepery & Citrus and Sage Fuhrimans Framing & Fine Art Gallery Gia’s Italian Restaurant Global Village Gifts Iron Gate Grill Logan Downtown Alliance at the Chamber Logan Arthouse & Cinema Mountain Place Gallery S.E. Needham Jewelers The Sportsman St. John’s Episcopal Church, SDesigns at the Thatcher-Young Mansion Utah Public Radio Winborg Masterpieces Art Gallery

J

oin the Cache Valley Center for the Arts Downtown on Friday, April 8 from 6-9 p.m. for the CVCA Gallery Walk. More than 17 locations will be participating in this spring walk. Enjoy everything from fiber expressions to fine masterpieces by some of Cache Valley’s favorites. Just look for the yellow banner at various participating locations or stop in and pick up a map. In an effort to be a little more green, download the gallery walk map to your phone at cachearts.org. This walk features some of Cache Valley’s masters and some up and coming artists including: Janimarie Lester DeRose, Andrea Smith, Royden Card, Aiko Anderson, Robert Guy, Lynda Burruss, Lucy Watkins, The Cache Valley Watercolor Society (mixed media show), Cache Valley Photographers, Don O’Leary Photography, Linda Sargent, Dick Broün, Russ Fjeldsted, Mary Johnson, Brett Hoffmann and many more.

This walk also features many USU ArtsBridge projects and scholars from around the valley including: Fast Forward Charter High School Arts Ambassadors, Bear River Charter School, Mountainside Elementary School, Millville Elementary School and Hillcrest Elementary School. This is the perfect opportunity to go outside for a stroll and visit with friends and family. Enjoy a little music and a lot of art during the walk. Galleries and businesses will stay open late to showcase their artists. While you are here, check out all the wonderful local restaurants Downtown Logan has to offer. The Gallery Walk is the perfect time to see what local artists are creating, enjoy works of art by featured artists, and just hang out. Don’t forget that many artists will be selling their original works of art and prints. Extend the gallery walk experience by taking a piece of art home with you.

any locations including Caffe Ibis Gallery Deli, Fuhrimans Framing & Fine Art M Gallery, The Logan Arthouse & Cinema, The SDesigns at Thatcher-Young Mansion, will usually display their shows for three to four weeks after the Gallery Walk.

Check out www.cachearts.org for maps, details, and special hours of operation, or you can call the Cache Valley Center for the Arts at 435-752-0026. If you are an artist and would like to be considered for a future walk, email events@ centerforthearts.us or call 435-753-6518 ext. 11. Mark your calendars for the remaining 2011 CVCA Walks: July 8, Sept. 9, and Dec. 2. Below is a list of participating businesses.


The gallery “A Brighter World” by Linda Burruss will be featured at Fuhriman’s Framing and Fine Arts for a month.

Linda Sargent enjoys exploring the natural world through photography and watercolors. While hiking throughout the valley she is constantly analyzing shadows, values, colors and patterns looking for that perfect shot and imagining the possibilities for rendering that shot with paper, pigment and water. She is fascinated by the process of transforming flat white paper into a colorful image containing depth, character, and imagination. Sargent will be featured at Caffe Ibis.

Featured artists

Photo by Mel Torrie

Photos from SDesigns will be displayed at the Thatcher-Young Mansion. Photo by Levi Sim

Page 11 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 8, 2011

Lucy Peterson Watkins is a graphic artist and photographer who morphed her art into fabric and fiber art. Lucy has completed well over 300 fabric pieces using free-motion embroidery and quilting techniques. She dyes a lot of her fabric and uses paint, ink, or colored pencils to get the effect she wants. She loves mathematics and uses concepts of fractional, spirals, line designs and Fibonacci numbers in many of her designs. Watkins will be featured at Gia’s Restaurant.


Page 12 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 8, 2011

Let’s talk full bodied wines and gewürztraminer

I

According to the Companion, do not think that April “(wine) is well balanced if its is the cruelest month, but alcoholic strength, acidity, it certainly is a difficult residual sugar, and tannins month alternating between complement each other.” Furwinter and spring. Actually spring is the shortest season in ther on it states that balance Cache Valley in my mind. Last is not related to aroma. Next week, I skied powder one day, time look at the alcoholic content of the wine you buy. and two days later had a bike Unfortunately, residual sugar ride up Smithfield Canyon. If and acidity are seldom shown I were a golfer that would be on the bottle, but sometimes on the menu too. Then, days will go by where none of these found on the winery website. I think some of big red wines outdoor pursuits are possible. have gone overboard on high Still, we can drink wine all alcohol content. Sherries and year long. Ports have alcoholic content As wine drinkers we often approaching 20 percent, but toss around terms like full one does not drink a third of bodied to mean a big wine. a bottle of these wines in an I find that body has been evening. These are sipping defined in two ways. Body in one sense refers to the alcohol wines for before or after the meal. content, and in another way I am amazed at the number body refers to color. These two concepts often go together of wineries in the Mountain West, and I do not know how in that dry white wines are they can survive. There are usually of lower alcoholic more than 4,700 wineries in content than deep red wines. the U.S. with 60 percent on Looking through my current the west coast. Colorado, New collection of white wines, the Mexico and Idaho have more alcohol content is between 11 than 30 wineries each, but to 13.5 percent, whereas most Nevada, Utah and Wyoming of the red wines are between have less than 10 each. Again, 14 to 15 percent with a hefty I do not how there can be so full bodied Zinfandel coming in at 16.3 percent. The Oxford many when more than 90 percent of all the wine produced Companion to Wine states in the United States comes that full bodied wines tend from California. We see very to make a greater impression few wines at Utah Liquor on tasters, but balance is a more important aspect of wine. stores that do not come from

Cache Wines By William Moore

the west coast. I was given a 2009 Debeque Gewürztraminer from Colorado near Grand Junction. This was an elegant, delicious wine with just the right amount of spicy flavor that denotes a gewürztraminer. To refresh my memory, I purchased the 2009 Willm Gewürztraminer at $14.99 from Alsace. On first tasting I found the Alsatian wine sweeter and heavier on the spiciness. After two days of drinking the Alsatian gewürz-

Recommended F 2009 Willm Gewürztraminer at $14.99

F 2009 Chateau Ste. Michelle Gewürztraminer at $7.99 F 2008 Chateau Ste. Michelle Pinot Gris at $11.99 F 2009 King Estates Pinot Gris at $15.95 F 2008 Snapdragon Red at $6.99 F 2008 Red Truck Red at $8.95 F 2008 Seven Deadly Zins Zinfandel at $14.95 F 2009 Di Majo Norante Sangiovese at $13.99

traminer I would say that I like both styles equally well. It would depend on the meal which one would be best. I found that there is a group of Gewürztraminers on one of the front panels of the store. The only one rated at 88 is the 2009 Chateau Ste. Michelle Gewürztraminer at $7.99. Their website gives all of details about balance including acidity, residual sugar and pH. Last month I recommended the 2008 Chateau Ste. Michelle Pinot Gris at $11.99.

This Washington winery is producing some nice white wines at reasonable prices. Try a Gewurztraminer and you may be in for a pleasant surprise. The 2009 King Estates Pinot Gris at $15.95 (reduced price) is another beautiful example from Oregon. This is very dry and delicate wine with good balance as shown on their website. It has been some time since I visited blended red wines. At reduced prices are the 2008 Snapdragon Red at $6.99 and the 2008 Red Truck Red at $8.95. The Snapdragon is mainly Zinfandel and the Red Truck is a blend of five different grapes. Either should be good with a simple red meat meal. Two other red wines that have been recommended to me are the 2008 Seven Deadly Zins Zinfandel at $14.95 (reduced price), and the 2009 Di Majo Norante Sangiovese at $13.99. These are big wines with balance and flavor. The Di Majo Norante website gives details about making the wine. Last month I paid $11 for this wine, but I still think it has good value. I do not think the changes in the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control will have much effect on our local store since the hours have already been reduced.

“The Three Musketeers” to play at USU he legendary T three musketeers and young Frenchman

d’Artagnan engage the Cache Valley community with a tale of treachery, heroism, close escapes and honor in “The Three Musketeers,” a stage production showing at Utah State University April 14-16 and 20-23. The work is presented by USU’s Theatre Arts Department in the Caine College of the Arts.

“The play guarantees a swashbuckling, melodramatic, comedic experience for the audience and provides our 19-person cast the opportunity to learn demanding new skills like 17th century court dances and formal sword fighting,” said Colin Johnson, interim department head for theatre arts and the show’s director. The theatre department employed Roger Dunbar,

a fight choreographer from Salt Lake City and USU alum, to train the cast in aspects of hand-tohand combat and sword fighting, Johnson said. A guest-artist grant from the Marie Eccles Caine Foundation – Russell Family made the professional training possible. In total, there are about 45 minutes of choreographed fight scenes throughout this actionpacked production, said

Richie Call, visiting assis- in the play, and fencing, tant professor of theatre the kind of competitive, arts and fight coach. sporting sword play I’m “I have the battle more familiar with,” said wounds from fight call Jason Craig West who rehearsals to prove it,” portrays d’Artagnan. said Call. “The choreographer has Adventure, drama, been fun to work with humor and romance com- because he is so creative bine to make this play and yet still open to family-friendly and enter- suggestions,” West said. taining, said Call. “That’s important to me “I have enjoyed learning because I like to give my the difference between two cents.” swashbuckling, the type “The Three Musketeers” of sword play we use begins at 7:30 p.m. night-

ly in the Morgan Theatre of the USU Chase Fine Arts Center. Tickets are $13 reserved seating, $11 for USU faculty and staff, $9 for non-USU students and free for USU students with ID. Tickets are available online (arts.usu.edu), by phone, 435-797-8022 and in person at the Caine College of the Arts Box Office in room 139-B of the Chase Fine Arts Center.


Ex-mayor offers insider’s account of city politics By The Associated Press

n the fall of 1974, a Imayor few days after he was elected of Providence, R.I.,

Buddy Cianci sipped beer with a few reporters and joked about the “Philistines” he had ousted from city hall. The denizens of the Democratic machine that had run the city for 30 years had trashed the place, he said, nailing wallboard over the historic building’s mahogany paneling and poking pencils through the eyes of the portraits of former mayors. His predecessors had left Providence in terrible shape. The city’s old industrial base had crumbled, its infrastructure was falling apart, its rivers were paved over with concrete, downtown storefronts were boarded up, its wealth of historical buildings were deteriorating, its tax base was imploding and the prevailing mood was despair. It was hard to find anyone but Buddy who thought the city had a future. But this young Republicanin-name-only (he later ran as an independent) had dreams of turning the city into a showplace. Today, Providence makes national magazines’ lists of the best places to live. It boasts of the biggest retail mall in New England, a revitalized downtown, winding rivers with gondolas and water taxis, restored historic buildings, a vibrant arts community and a remarkable assortment of great restaurants. While not all of this was realized during Cianci’s 21 years as mayor, even his detractors — and they are legion — acknowledge that he envisioned it and made much of it happen. But progress came at a cost. Former Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln C. Almond once claimed that the rebirth came

with a 30 percent corruption tax. And Cianci himself ended up spending nearly five years in a federal prison for running the city government as a criminal conspiracy. Cianci has already been the subject of one political biography: Mike Stanton’s bestselling “The Prince of Providence” focused on the dark side, recounting the charges against him. Now, in “Politics and Pasta,” Cianci has his say. His memoir is by turns insightful and evasive, serious and funny, selfdeprecatory and self-serving. He cops to none of the corruption accusations, writing that he was found not guilty of each specific criminal act, including soliciting bribes, that was brought against him. He never took a bribe — “not one cent,” he says — and maintains that he was unaware of the activities of other members of his administration who were convicted of doing so. His conspiracy conviction, he asserts, amounts to being found guilty of having served as mayor. Cianci pleads guilty only to playing ward-heeler politics: rewarding his allies with city jobs, using his power to settle political scores, and trading favors, such as planting trees,

fixing potholes and putting up photographer. He says he tried, traffic lights, to boost his popu- and failed, to get an Indian larity. casino in nearby Connecticut to After he won his first maypay the city $1 million a year oral election, Cianci writes, he in return for scuttling a Proviheld a fundraiser that brought dence casino he didn’t want in over $200,000 from donors built anyway. who “believed this was a vic“Sometimes,” he says, “every tory for good government or politician has to do the wrong people who wanted to do busithing to get the right thing ness with the city. Obviously, done.” I’m kidding about the good He laces his story with bits government people...” of political wisdom including: “That’s the way the system “Parades are to politicians as works,” he declares, “and I blood is to Dracula,” “Never don’t know how to reform it.” march behind a horse” and He acknowledges all manner “Never get between a voter and of political chicanery. Twice, his bingo card.” he says, he forced banks to And he describes many of his change their policies by threatantics, including marketing his ening to remove city pension “Mayor’s Own” marinara sauce money from them. He boasts of and playing a game of pinball getting the federal General Ser- with the head of the police vices Administration to build a union to settle a dispute over $32 million federal building in whether the cops should get Providence by hiring the GSA lifetime Blue Cross coverage. director’s nephew as his official (Cianci lost.)

Today, Cianci is a radio talkshow host in Rhode Island, and he remains one of the state’s most popular, albeit controversial, figures. He slyly implies that his political enemies shake at the notion that he might, once again, run for mayor. “Politics and Pasta” is a compulsively readable — if not entirely candid — insider’s account of city politics by one of the most colorful and longest-serving mayors in memory. And it’s written by, as Cianci puts it, perhaps the only person who has ever been inside the White House, Windsor Castle and the federal penitentiary at Fort Dix in New Jersey. ___ Bruce DeSilva is the author of the crime novel “Rogue Island,” which has been nominated for the Edgar and Barry Awards.

* This week’s New York Times Best-seller List * HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “Live Wire” by Harlan Coben 2. “Toys” by James Patterson and Neil McMahon 3. “The ... Wedding Party” by Alexander McCall Smith 4. “Sing You Home” by Jodi Picoult 5. “Night Road” by Kristin Hannah HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “Unbroken” by Laura Hillenbrand 2. “The Social Animal” by David Brooks 3. “Red” by Sammy Hagar with Joel Selvin 4. “Moonwalking with Einstein” by Joshua Foer 5. “Unfamiliar Fishes” by Sarah Vowell PAPERBACK TRADE FICTION 1. “Water For Elephants” by Sara Gruen 2. “Leaving” by Karen Kingsbury 3. “Cutting For Stone” by Abraham Verghese 4. “Private” by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro 5. “Heart of the Matter” by Emily Giffin Paperback Nonfiction 1. “Heaven is For Real” by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent 2. “The Immortal ... Lacks” by Rebecca Skloot 3. “Inside of a Dog” by Alexandra Horowitz 4. “The Glass Castle” by Jeannette Walls 5. “The Big Short” by Michael Lewis

Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/

Page 13 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 8, 2011

Books


Page 14 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 8, 2011

Answers from last week

Calendar Friday A bake sale to raise money for victims of the Japanese earthquake will be held on Friday, April 8, from 3-7 p.m. at the Whittier Community Center. We need volunteers to help set up, collect donations and bake goods to sell. Contact Amanda Severance at 435-770-9291 or bakeforjapan@ hotmail.com to get involved. A World Record Knock Out basketball game will be held April 8, from 7 to 10 p.m. at the USU Spectrum. Cost is $3 per ticket, sold at Lee’s

Marketplace the week of the event; $5 at the door; $1 to watch. The event will raise money for the SEED foundation. See http://huntsman.usu.edu/ seed/ for more details. Stokes Nature Center will host Scout Friday during spring break from 1-4 p.m. on Friday, April 8. Boy Scouts will have the opportunity to complete all of the requirements for the Weather merit badge. The cost is $10 per scout. Registration is required. For more information or to register, call 435-755-3239 or visit www.logannature.org.

Crossword

Join the Cache Valley Center for the Arts Downtown on Friday, April 8, from 6-9 p.m. for the CVCA Gallery Walk. Enjoy everything from fiber expressions to fine masterpieces by some of Cache Valley’s favorites. Just look for the yellow banner at various participating locations or stop in and pick up a map. In an effort to be a little more “green,” download the gallery walk map to your phone at www. cachearts.org. Join the Cache Valley Stargazers to learn and enjoy the night sky, hear about the latest astronomy news, and

www.ThemeCrosswords.com

By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Staying on a temporary basis 8. Experiences 11. Foreign dignitary 14. Pussyfooted 19. Animate 20. Vending machine 22. Pith helmet 23. Chart-topper in 1964 26. They may be seeded 27. Finish, with “up” 28. Affaire d’honneur 29. Hydrocarbons 30. Pop singer Grace 32. Power or ego ender 34. USMC rank 35. Pierces, in a way 39. Insect stage 41. Aristocracies 45. Royal band 46. Welsh rabbit ingredient 47. Mighty long time 49. Like some losers 50. Chart-topper in 1965 57. Worked the soil 58. Diddle 59. Manhattan ___ 60. Street drug 61. Kind of candle 62. Engine sound 64. It’s higher on the hwy. 65. Slips 67. Weight added to a moving engine part 73. Allow to be known 76. “I thought so!” 77. Chemical compound 78. Seizure 82. See 24-Down 83. Colorless alkene 88. Couple

89. Norfolk river 90. Chart-topper in 1966 (with “These”) 94. Effluvium 95. Chant by some Olympic spectators 96. Amscrayed 97. Fools 98. Feast 100. Cabbages 104. Creamy desserts 106. Franco-Spanish botanist 107. Taxing trip 108. Crossbeam 110. Cereal ingredients 114. Dash 116. One of the Clantons 117. Give the slip to 121. Chart-topper in 1967 125. Ore remover 126. Slippery 127. Thinks 128. ___-off coupon 129. Scale notes 130. ___ turtle 131. Nautical cord Down 1. Sidelong glance 2. Invidia 3. Aweather’s opposite 4. Paul and Mick 5. Brown, e.g. 6. Small cloud 7. Intuitive knowledge 8. Stable diet? 9. Getting on, in Glasgow 10. Kinds of 46-Across 11. ___ Island, Fla. 12. Sequoia fluid

13. Surmounting 14. Unsaturated alcohol 15. President Obama, for one 16. Familiar with 17. Grant 18. Diatonic scales 21. Undisguised 24. Datebook abbr. 25. Ancient Greek city 30. Waste 31. Narc’s unit 33. Urge 35. Restless 36. Cat cry 37. Control ___ 38. Like Radio City Music Hall 40. Leaves home? 42. Drudges 43. Like a maple leaf 44. Propels 46. Old time Scottish stipend 48. Not running 51. Like raw silk 52. Warner Bros. creation 53. Brassard 54. Spanish snack 55. Fireplace 56. Ontario natives 63. Bailiwick 66. Drawer pair 68. Vending machine inserts 69. Mother of Hades 70. Playwright Chekhov 71. Roulette bet 72. Ball of yarn 73. ___ union 74. Lyric poem 75. Band

79. Libertines 80. Get out of bed 81. Elaine’s last name on “Seinfeld” 84. Firms 85. Store posting: abbr. 86. Bakery supply 87. Mysterious: var. 91. Church structure 92. Firmly secured 93. Malaria symptom 99. Fishing nets

101. Circus sites 102. Grasslands 103. Giraffe-like animals 104. Arrive 105. Wear oneself out 109. Swindle, slangily 110. Microprocessor type 111. Penny ___ 112. Screen symbol 113. Sibyl 115. “Scream” star Campbell

117. Cry in a mudslinging contest 118. Not taken in by 119. Flight segment 120. “___ quam videri” (North Carolina’s motto) 122. Old-time welcome 123. Kind of patch 124. EU official


Keiyana Osmond, winner of the first annual “Cache County Idol” contest last summer, will perform at 6 p.m. Friday, April 8 at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza. She will be followed at 7 p.m. by Jessie Jo Kerr.

Saturday The first annual Logan MI Garand Match will be held at the Logan Cache Valley Public Shooting Range on April 9, at 9 a.m. This is a Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) sanctioned match which will qualify participants to purchase a MI Rifle from the CMP (http://www. odcmp.com/. The Match Fee will be $20 and $10 for juniors. Any iron sighted as issued manually operated, military rifle as well as the MI Garand is eligible to participate. As we have limited spaces please pre-register either at the Cache Valley Public Shooting Range or contact Terry Johnston at 435-750-6102 or email atTerence.Johnston@ comcast.net. The Campus Run for Cancer 5k will be held April 9. Participants should gather at the USU HPER building at 9:30 a.m.; the race starts at 10 a.m. Cost is $10 with a discount given to those who preregister at Runner’s North or online. All

proceeds go to funding cancer research through Huntsman Cancer Foundation. For more information visit the Campus Run for Cancer Facebook page, or visit www.huntsmancancerfoundation.org. One-woman-band Hilary Murray will perform a twohour set at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza from 6 to 8 p.m. on Saturday, April 9. Hilary was recently featured on the cover of the Cache section of The Herald Journal. Pier 49 is located across the street north of Maceys on 1200 South. No cover charge, but generous tips are encouraged! The Utah Fibromyalgia Association will hold it’s monthly education/support group meeting at 11 a.m. on Saturday, April 9, in Room 5/6 at the Logan Regional Hospital. Free to anyone who is interested. This month’s topic is foot zone therapy/accupressure. Come listen to a presentation on footzoning and how it might be helpful for fibromyalgia. There will be several certified therapists in foot zoning who will give a brief foot zone treatment to anyone interested. The Western Singing Duo Tumbleweeds will perform this Saturday, April 9, at the Cracker Barrel Cafe in Paradise from 6 p.m. to closing. The Cache Public Shooting Range and the Cache Valley Vaqueros is hosting a Cowboy Action Shooting (CAS) match on April 9 starting at 9 a.m. Rules of the Single Action Shooting Society (SASS) will apply. The cost will be $7 per shooter. The Cache Public Shooting Range (753-4600) is located at 2851 W. 200 North, three miles West on Logan on Highway 30 to Tremonton. If you would like to get involved in a CAS Club in the Logan area, this is the place. Eye and ear protection required. Spectators welcome. If it is actively raining or snowing Saturday morning, the match will be cancelled. For more information contact Rich Meacham 435-770-9399.

Monday An Easter Wildlife Fair will be held Monday, April 11 from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. on the Utah State University Quad. Bring the kids for live animals, Easter egg hunt and games.

Tuesday A Big Band Jazz Concert featuring Marco Renzi, Bepi D’Amato and Dave Pietro will be held Tuesday, April 12, at 7:30 p.m. at the USU Performance Hall, 4030 Old Main Hill, Logan. Tickets are $8 for general admission and free for USU students and can be purchased at ccatickets@usu.edu or 435-797-8022. Food $ense girls will share recipes at a free cooking and community class at Macey’s. The class will be held Thursday, April 12, from 7 to 8 p.m. Pintech Computers will be offering free computer classes each Tuesday night at 6 p.m. On April 12 the subject is “More About Computer Security” classes are held at 270 N. 400 West, Suite C, Hyrum. Call Don Pinkerton at 435-245-8324 for more information. The Cache Valley Watercolor Society will be holding its April general membership meeting April 12 at 6:30 p.m. Meet at the Logan City Library, 255 N. Main, in the Jim Bridger Room (NE corner). Entrance and parking for this event are both on the NE side of building. Guest artist will be Lucy Beale. Lucy and her friend, Heather Quinton (both from UWS in SLC), have taken their art to the next step by working with an art coach, who inspired Lucy’s weaving. Heather will be joining Lucy to share with us their coaching experience. Check her website at www.lucybeale.com. Also visit us at UWS-CVC blog: http://uws-cvc.blogspot.com/ and UWS-CVC website: http:// cachevalleywatercolorsociety. com/. Local easy listening group

“City Heat,” featuring Bill Gabriel on guitar, performs each Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza, located on 1200 South across the street north of Maceys. Everyone is welcome.

Wednesday

Scott Bradley will teach a free Constitution class, “To Preserve The Nation” on Wednesday, April 13, at 7 p.m. at the Book Table (upstairs). The Cache Valley Historical Society will have two speakers at the April 13 meeting. Jon Allred, a graduate student at Utah State University, will discuss the architectural, landscape and oral history of the USU barn – also known as the horse barn or art barn. He will also discuss the rehabilitation and expansion of th ebarn to house an expanded Museum of Anthropology and a welcom center. The second speaker, Benjamin Fowler, also a graduate student at Utah State University, will discuss what the archeological record reveals about the Native Americans who occupied Cache Valley and the surrounding areas of southern Idaho and northern Utah between 11,000 and 7,000 years ago. The meeting will be held in the historic Cache County Courthouse at 7 p.m.

Thursday USU Extension in Cache County will present their monthly eat and educate class on Thursday, April 14, in the Multipurpose Room of the Cache County Administration Building, 179 N. Main, at 11 a.m. April’s topic will be “Easter and Springtime Traditions and Treats.” After a long, cold winter, aren’t we ready for some springtime activities and food? A light lunch will be demonstrated and served. Cost is $3 per person at the door or $2 if you pay 24 hours prior to the class. For reservations, phone 752-6263.

On Thursday, April 14, Stephanie Skewes will teach kids ages 4 to 14 kitchen etiquette and yummy brunch ideas at a free cooking and community class at Macey’s. The class will be held from 4 to 5 p.m.

Ongoing Music Theatre West will be holding auditions April 27 and 28 at the Ellen Eccles Theatre for our September production of Annie. In addition to orphans, bald guys, and bad people with great singing voices, we are looking for a trained (trainable) dog to play Annie’s dog, Sandy. Any leads would be helpful! Please prepare a one-minute song that shows your abilities. If you are auditioning for Annie/Orphan, you will need to sing “Tomorrow” from the bridge to the end (“when I’m stuck with a day ...”) for callbacks. You should also be prepared to learn a dance combination. An accompanist will be provided. Please download and complete an audition form to bring with you. For additional information visit http://musictheatrewest.org/auditions.html. Tickets are available for Stokes Nature Center’s Wine Party Fundraiser, held on April 29 at 6:30 p.m. at The Italian Place. The party is in honor of Chris Sands and Barbara Farris for their many years on the SNC Board and their continuing volunteer efforts. There will be wine, appetizers, music, a raffle, and other opportunities to contribute to SNC’s school and community nature education programs. Tickets are $40 and can be purchased by calling 435-755-3239 or online at www.logannature.org Stokes Nature Center invites ages 8 and up to sign up for Wild Art summer camp, held June 13-17. Campers will get inspired through nature exploration and create natural artwork. Art projects include plein air drawing and painting, handmade paper, and outdoor natural object art. The cost is $150 for SNC members, or $180 for non-members. Registration is required. For more information call 435-755-3239 or visit www.logannature.org.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 8, 2011

look through telescopes. The Cache Valley Stargazers are holding their monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, April 8, in Room 244 of the ScienceEngineering-Research (SER) Building on the USU campus (free parking in the lot adjacent to SER, behind the Performance Hall). The meeting will feature a talk by Dr. Stacy Palen from the Ott Planetarium and Department of Physics at Weber State University. Stacy will talk to us about “The Death of Sun-like Stars.” Get that dusty telescope out of the closet or the binoculars out from under the car seat and join the fun! Everyone is welcome to join us, experts and beginners alike! For information visit www. cachestargazers.org or email cache.stargazers@gmail.com.


Page 16 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, April 8, 2011

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Cache Magazine  

Cache Valley's arts and entertainment magazine

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Cache Valley's arts and entertainment magazine

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