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Cache Magazine

Balloon artist

Inflatable creations more than a hobby for Keenan Price The Herald Journal

MARCH 22-28, 2013


contents

March 22-28, 2013

COVER 8 Meet Keenan Price, balloon artist

MUSIC 3 The Utah Symphony makes a stop in Logan

4 Bobby McFerrin per-

forming March 26 and 27

4 Organ concert tonight at Utah State University

6 Guitarist Keith Taylor in concert Saturday

MOVIES 7 Aaron Peck gives ‘The Croods’ two stars

THEATER 3 ‘El Bandito’ takes the stage at Ellen Eccles

5 Last performances of ‘Singin’ in the Rain’ this weekend

COLUMN 12 Spring in Cache Valley is still a pleasant surprise for Dennis Hinkamp

CALENDAR 13 See what’s happening this week

This image shows, from left, Belt the sloth, voiced by Chris Sanders, Guy, voiced by Ryan Reynolds, Eep, voiced by Emma Stone, Ugga, voiced by Catherine Keener, holding Sandy, voiced by Randy Thom, Thunk, voiced by Clark Duke, and Gran, voiced by Cloris Leachman, in a scene from “The Croods,” which is in theaters this weekend. (AP photo/DreamWorks Animation) Cover photo: Keenan Price with a balloon animal he made (Eli Lucero/Herald Journal).

FROM THE EDITOR In my circle of family and friends, there are a lot of March birthdays. Celebrations begin early and last through the month. Balloons have a permanent place at our parties, so this month entails a few stops at the store to pick up balloons. As I was maneuvering a bouquet of birthday balloons into my car a couple weeks ago, I was reminded of another time I had stuffed my vehicle with balloons.

Last spring, my friend Manette (former editor of Cache Magazine) and I had a mustache party. We played mustache games and had a photo booth with props. There was a black and white theme — all the food was black and white, everyone had to wear black and white. Black and white crepe paper was strung across the room and two dozen black and white balloons dotted the ceiling. Manette and I looked online and found must-have mustache party items — mustache cookie cutters, mustache paper clips, mustache pushpins and, most importantly, self-adhesive mustaches that everyone had to wear

unless, of course, they had real facial hair. Once we got over the stress of getting our supplies in order, all we had to do was bake, make the games and decorate. And I had to get those 24 pesky balloons into my car. I weighed them down with towels, books and my purse, and all 25 of us made it to the party. This week, Cache Magazine is featuring Keenan Price, who can shape balloons into flowers, rabbits, a rainbow with a pot of gold, a basketball hoop and more. Check it out on page 8. And, next week, Jeff will be back. — Arie Kirk


‘El Bandito’ shows begin tonight After a summer of sold-out WHAT: Pickleville performances and a sucPlayhouse production of cessful February run at the ‘The Hanging of El Bandito’ Rose Wagner Performing WHEN: 7:30 tonight and Arts Center in Salt Lake City, Saturday, March 23. Pickleville Playhouse will WHERE: Ellen Eccles perform its hilarious, original Theatre in Logan production, “The Hanging of El Bandito,” at 7:30 p.m. tens of thousands that count today and Saturday, March Bandito as their most antici23, at the Ellen Eccles Thepated yearly tradition. atre in downtown Logan. Cast members include T.J. Tickets can be purchased Davis as Juanito Bandito, as online at www.pickleville well as Eric Sackett, Megan playhouse.com or by calling Sackett, Derek Davis, Jacob the Ellen Eccles Theatre box Swain, Jessica Jenkins, Whitoffice at 752-0026. ney Davis and Luke Shepherd Juanito Bandito and his at the piano.   hysterical band of outlaws “Bandito” is directed by are at it again in this highAndrea Davis with choreogenergy, shoot-’em-up musiraphy by Sharli King. cal adventure written by T.J. “We feel like the Bandito Davis. See what happens shows are a truly unique when Bandito, the self-progenre of live performance. claimed “most guapo villain It’s musical comedy with in the world,” seeks revenge a modern-melodrama after nearly meeting his end flair. It’s unlike anything at the hand of a brave westthat people have seen ern lawman. before,” T.J. Davis says. With a talented cast full “The ‘Bandito’ shows are of outrageous, side-splitting the only ones I’ve ever been characters, brand-new music, involved in where the audiand Pickleville’s hilarious ence is literally laughing brand of musical comedy, Photo by Erin Cartwright Davis the entire time from start to “The Hanging of El Bandito” plays tonight and Saturday, “The Hanging of El Bandito” finish.” is a proven winner. Join the March 23, at the Ellen Eccles Theatre.

USU welcomes the Utah Symphony The Utah Symphony travels to Utah State University for one performance in its “Classically Charged” season Saturday, March 23. Performance time Kulenovic is 8 p.m. “We are honored to host the Utah Symphony in

the Manon Caine Russell Kathryn Caine Wanlass Performance Hall,” said Craig Jessop, dean of the Caine College of the Arts at USU. “This is a wonderful opportunity for students and community members alike to enjoy the classic sound of some of Utah’s greatest musicians.” The Utah Symphony will perform the works of Handel, Gabriel Fauré,

Claude Debussy and Felix Mendelssohn, among others. The performance features Vladimir Kulenovic, the associate conductor for the Utah Symphony. In 2011, Kulenovic served as the principal conductor of the Kyoto Music Festival. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at the Boston Conservatory, and his graduate degrees at the Peabody Institute of the John

Hopkins University and The Juilliard School. Tickets for the Utah Symphony’s Classically Charged performance are $15 general admission, $13 seniors, $10 USU faculty and staff and $5 for USU students with ID. For more information and tickets, visit the CCA Box Office in room 139-B in the Chase Fine Arts Center, call 435-797-8022 or go to arts. usu.edu.

“I counted 35 days straight where my belief in the existence of the Wellsville Mountains was faith based.” – Dennis Hinkamp on Cache Valley weather (Page 12)

PET OF THE WEEK Available for adoption

Pet: Leila From: Cache Humane Society Why she’s so lovable: My name is Leila, and I am absolutely ready for a new home! I love the shelter, but I know this is only a temporary solution. My previous owners promised I would find a great family that would love me forever! I hope to meet them soon. At the shelter I enjoy running around outside, and if you have a ball I am ready to play as well. I want more training so I can be the best girl ever! Please come meet me! For more information, call 435-792-3920.

Page 3 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 22, 2013

ALL MIXED UP

Quotable


Page 4 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 22, 2013

all mixed up Grammy Award winner to perform in Logan The Cache Valley Center for the Arts will present 10-time Grammy Award winner Bobby McFerrin at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 26, and Wednesday, March 27, at the Ellen Eccles Theatre in Logan. A matchless vocal improviser with a breathtaking vocal range, Bobby McFerrin comes to Cache Valley with his latest project, spirityouall, influenced by the spirituals his father — the great baritone opera singer Robert McFerrin Sr., the first African-American to sign a contract with the Metropolitan Opera Company — sang. Expect soulfulness, poignancy, beauty and joy. Tickets range from $30 to $44 and are available at the CVCA ticket office located at 43 S. Main St., online at www.CacheArts.org or by calling 435-752-0026. CVCA offers discounts for USU students, 50 percent off kids ages 5-18, and 15 percent of groups of 15 or more. No discounts will be available on day-of-show. “McFerrin’s four-octave vocal range is indescribable because it feels so spontaneous and vast,” said Wally

WHAT: Bobby McFerrin WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 26, and Wednesday, March 27 WHERE: Ellen Eccles Theatre in Logan Cost: Tickets range from $30 to $44 and are available at the CVCA ticket office located at 43 S. Main St., online at www.CacheArts.org or by calling 435-752-0026. CVCA offers discounts for USU students, 50 percent off kids ages 5-18, and 15 percent of groups of 15 or more. No discounts will be available on day-of-show.

Bloss, executive director for the Cache Valley Center for the Arts. “A Bobby McFerrin performance is like watching a painter fill a blank canvas, it starts with a single note and transforms into an orchestra.

His real-time improvisational style is thoroughly aweinspiring and resistant to genre placement. It blends folk, jazz, pop, R&B, classical, and world music into a cross-cultural cross-breed concert.”

The project, spirityouall, features beloved familiar tunes like “He’s Got the Whole World In His Hands” and “Every Time I Feel The Spirit” alongside original songs which explore Bobby’s everyday search for grace, wisdom and freedom. The new material ranges from a celebratory hoedown to a polemic anthem, to a down and dirty blues setting. This project embraces Bobby’s folk, rock and blues influences

without abandoning his fearless improvisational approach or his never-ending exploration of the human voice. He moves seamlessly between lyrics and wordless lines, trading phrases with his band, inviting the audience to sing along. Bobby loves to sing this music, and it shows: spirityouall raises the roof with joyful grooves. Three of the traditional numbers featured on spirityouall — the opening track “Every Time I Feel the Spirit,” “Swing Low Sweet Chariot” and “Fix Me Jesus” — also appeared on the senior McFerrin’s 1957 album Deep River, but similarities end there. The spirituals are about liberation and courage, the human condition, the pioneering spirit, the search for strength in the face of adversity, and the journey toward a better place, and Bobby’s versions reach for new territory. More than 20 years after his hit song “Don’t Worry, Be Happy,” Bobby still regularly sells out nearly all of his performances. For more info about the Cache Valley Center for the Arts visit www.Cache Arts.org.

Tonight’s organ concert features USU music alumnus Utah State University’s Department of Music is celebrating the second anniversary of the Campbell Holtkamp Organ rededication with a performance at 7:30 tonight in the Kent Concert Hall of the Chase Fine Arts Center on the Logan campus. “This performance is to honor the support of the Campbell family and its dedication to the program,” said Lynn Thomas, director of organ studies in the Caine College of the Arts. Each year around this time, the organ program will host a

commemorative performance to honor the family and award the Campbell Organ Prize to someone who has performed a significant service to those in the state of Utah who play the organ. This year’s award goes to Parley Belnap, emeritus professor of organ at Utah State University and Brigham Young University. “Most organists of significance from Utah likely studied under Parley Belnap,” said Thomas. “He was instrumental in getting the Campbell Holtkamp organ to Utah State when he taught here and was

also one of the first professors in the organ program with significant credentials and background.” This year’s performance will also feature guest artist Eric Gundersen, a music alumnus who is the music director at the St. James Episcopal Church in Conroe, Texas. Gundersen served as guest organist at the Mormon Tabernacle in Salt Lake City while attending Utah State University, focusing on music training and organ studies. After graduating from USU, he went on to earn a master’s

degree from Yale University and a doctorate degree from Rice University. Gundersen has performed at St. Paul’s Cathedral and Westminster Abbey in London, St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna, AusGundersen tria, and more throughout Europe and the United States. “I invited Eric to be the guest artist for this performance because he has gone

on to remarkable heights as an organist,” said Thomas. “Yale University is a top level school for church musicians, and earning a degree in music from Rice University is as prestigious as earning a degree in engineering from MIT.” The Campbell Organ performance is free and open to the public. For more information visit the Caine College of the Arts Box Office in room 139-B in the Chase Fine Arts Center on USU’s campus, call 435-797-8022 or go to arts. usu.edu.


“Singin’ in the Rain,” the beloved American musical comedy about Hollywood, music, dance and romance, comes to The Old Barn Community Theatre in Collinston March 1 to 23. Handsome, dashing Don Lockwood was the brightest star in Hollywood. But would his career survive the new sound technology

that was changing the way movies were made? With amazing songs, razor-sharp comedy and sweet romance, The Old Barn Community Theatre’s production of “Singin’ in the Rain” transports audiences back to one of America’s great gilded ages — Hollywood at the end of the silent film era.

Based on the beloved 1952 MGM musical, “Singin’ in the Rain” is set in the roaring ’20s when movie stars like Don Lockwood and his glamorous co-star Lina Lamont were America’s royalty. On screen and off, they enjoyed lives of unimaginable fame and splendor. The film “Singin’ in the Rain” endures as America’s best movie musical (according to the American Film Institute) because, among other things, it tells a story of hope, resilience and the power of friendship and love to see us through tough times. It’s the ultimate feelgood show, accompanied by a hit “Teton Autumn Mood” by Gallery 12 artist Ruth parade of songs, including “Singin’ Stringam Nordstrom. in the Rain,” “Good Morning” and “Make ‘Em Laugh.” The last performances of “Singin’ in the Rain” will be at 7:30 p.m. March 22 and 23 at the Old Barn Community Theatre. Visit www. oldbarn.org or call 435-458-BARN The Logan Fine Art Gallery is pleased to presfor ticket information. ent the paintings of Gallery 12. The display began March 15 and will continue to April 1. Gallery 12 is simply a group of 12 professional Left: Matt Jeppesen and Devery artists residing in Idaho Falls, Idaho, who have Greene in “Singin’ in the Rain.” banded together to present themselves for exhibits to promote each other and themselves at the same time.

Gallery 12 paintings on display in Logan

Exhibit highlights printmaking The Department of Art and Design at Utah State University presents “EastWest: A Survey of Contemporary Printmaking” March 25 through April 12 in the Tippetts Exhibit Hall in the Chase Fine Arts Center on the Logan campus. “This exhibit reflects and celebrates the many methods of printmaking practice and education in the United States,” said Kathy Puzey, assistant professor of printmaking in the Caine College of the Arts. “Each state is represented, and artists were asked to embrace their current techniques and conceptual concerns while creating their piece.” One hundred artists will be highlighted, each one chosen based on their careers as practicing printmaking artists and teachers. The show includes printmaking techniques used in lithography, intaglio, woodcut, silkscreen, archival pigment, hybrid, intaglio types and photo-

WHAT: EastWest: A Survey of Contemporary Printmaking WHEN: March 25 through April 12. The exhibit is open to the public Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. WHERE: Tippetts Exhibit Hall in the Chase Fine Arts Center at USU Cost: Free

relief prints. “The exhibition celebrates these artists as innovators for their continued development of the printmaking medium and their own unique artistic visions,” said Puzey. “These printmakers have had and continue to have dramatic impacts on printmaking education, their institutions and printmaking workshops.” “EastWest: A Survey of Contemporary Printmaking” is in the Tippetts Exhibit Hall, located in the Chase Fine Arts Center on USU’s campus. The exhibit is

Graphic illustration for the USU printmaking exhibition “EastWest: A Survey of Contemporary Printmaking” presented by the Department of Art and Design from March 25 through April 12.

free and open to the public Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, visit arts. usu.edu.

Logan Film Festival ends this weekend The Logan Film Festival, hosted by the Logan Downtown Alliance and Logan City, will run through Saturday, March 23. The three-day event began Thursday, March 21. The Logan Film Festival is a celebration of independent cinema from around the world and promotes a greater appreciation of the art and commerce of filmmaking. This year, the festival will screen 32 dramatic, animated, and documentary films covering a wide variety of subjects and genres including drama, comedy, social justice, health awareness, youth, family, arts and culture. The Logan Film Festival HUB will be located at the historic Caine-Lyric Theatre at 28 W. Center St. The Cache Valley Fam Tour will be from 1 to 3 p.m. today. A lecture by editor Jeff Consiglio and sound designer March Aramian will begin at 5 p.m. at the Caine-Lyric Theatre, followed by a filmmakers’ reception at 6 p.m. and an awards ceremony at 7 p.m. For more information, call Gary Saxton at 7522161 ext. 4, or visit loganfilmfestival.com or arts. usu.edu/fringe.

Page 5 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 22, 2013

Local production of ‘Rain’ continues Ongoing


Page 6 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday,

Show at Crumb Brothers Quilting events ongoing Guitarist Keith Taylor performing Saturday The Bridger Folk Music Society presents a concert with guitarist Keith Taylor at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 23, at Crumb Brothers Bakery, 291 S. 300 West in Logan. Tickets are $13 and are available via PayPal at www.bridgerfolk. org, by calling 435757-3468, or take your chances at the door. Seating is very limited, so advance purchase is recommended. The concert is co-sponsored by Utah Public Radio

and Import Auto. For more information, to listen to song samples or view per-

formance videos, go to www.guitarkeithtaylor. com or www.bridger folk.org.

Quilting traditions of the Bear River Heritage Area (BRHA) are highlighted in a series of events that feature historical and contemporary quilters and their work in northern Utah and southeastern Idaho. Historic quilts of local significance are on display at My Girlfriend’s Quilt Shoppe, 1115 N. 200 East in Logan, through March 28. The display, which began March 21, is in conjunction with a workshop given by Kay Capps Cross, national long-arm quilting expert. The workshop will be today

and Saturday, March 22-23. The display can be seen during regular store hours, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For more information about the workshop, go to www. mygirlfriendsquiltshop pe.com, or call the store at 435-213-3229. At the end of the exhibit, Thursday, March 28, the Utah Humanities Council, BRHA, and My Girlfriend’s Quilt Shop-

pe will co-sponsor a talk by folklorist Sara Jordan and invited quilters from 6:30 to 8 p.m. The presentation will highlight the research of quilting traditions and practices, and oral history interviews with quilters of the region. For more information about the talk or the quilt project, call the Bear River Heritage Area at 435-713-1426, or Sara Jordan at 801-869-0285.

NATIONAL HIT RETURNS TO SALT LAKE CITY!

C.S. Lewis

“RIVETING, EXPERTLY CRAFTED AND CAPTIVATING!” Deseret News

Experience Spring at the Cache Valley Radio Home & Garden Show! • Get new ideas • Talk to experts • Creative solutions for your home & yard • More information at CacheValleyHomeAndGardenShow.com

Friday, March 29th 10 am - 8 pm

Saturday, March 30th 9am - 5pm

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Eccles Ice Center 2825 N 200 E North Logan Free bounce house and craft activities for kids!

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March 23 - Sat 4pm & 8pm Family 4 Pack Available!

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The Reel Place Aaron Peck

DreamWork Animation is always hit and miss, though their most recent movie, “Rise of the Guardians,” was probably their best yet in both style and substance. Yet, more often than not, they tend to stick to the silly side of things, content with animated features that focus more on obvious humor than telling a genuine story. This works to the degree that children are entertained, but movies like “Puss in Boots” and “Madagascar 3” might cause some boredom in parents. “The Croods” is that kind of movie; fun for the kids, slightly less so for the older people in the audience. The Croods are a family of cavemen, and cavewomen, that inhabit a prehistoric land that most certainly isn’t earth. It’s almost as if these are the prehistoric people that colonized Pandora, which would later be teeming with large blue creatures called Navi. I say this because there isn’t one animal present here that would fit into any evolutionary chain. There are turtles that fly

otherwise maimed in the harsh habitat they live Eep, voiced by Emma Stone, in a scene from “The Croods.” in. Most of their time is spent hunkered in a cave, blocked by a boulder, hoping that nothing with sharp teeth finds them. Eep (voiced by Emma Stone) is sick of being Directors // Kirk De Micco and Chris Sanders cooped up in a cave Starring // Nicolas Cage, Ryan Reynolds and Emma Stone all day. She wants to Rated // PG for some scary action explore and learn about the world around her. Like all teenage girls, her the attention of younger- feeling is that her overwith long purple feathbearing father is holding ers acting as huge wings. aged viewers. Throw her back from greatness, dozens of bright colors There are land whales so she rebels. The rest at them and hopefully that walk around with of the family consists of they’ll be mesmerized. stubby legs and blow Grug (voiced by Nico- comedic relief compowater out of blowholes nents like a doltish son las Cage) is the father even though there’s no named Thunk (voiced by water around. Every ani- figure for the Crood Clark Duke), a malicious family. His main goal is mal has neon sheens in animalistic baby, and to keep his family from their fur or skin, more a sassy grandma aptly than likely there to keep being eaten, killed, or AP photo/DreamWorks Animation

★★

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named Gran (voiced by Cloris Leachman). Similar to the last “Ice Age” movie, “The Croods” features a world tearing itself apart. The continents are splitting up and the family must move fast or face losing everything when the chasms appear. Along the way they meet an enigmatic human named Guy (voiced by Ryan Reynolds). Guy inexplicably knows how to create fire and understands that the land masses are going to be breaking up. Inevitably he and Eep are drawn to each other since “The Croods” follows every bit of standard formula it possibly can. Throw in a few plucky animal sidekicks for even more comic relief and

you have a movie that is geared specifically for children. This isn’t one of those animated films, like “Rise of the Guardians,” where adults will be able to find the same enjoyment as their kids. This is strictly elementarylevel humor, story structure and animation. Not that that’s necessarily a bad thing. It knows its audience and centers the entire movie on that demographic. Sadly, it’s a fairly one-dimensional story that follows all the same clichés that you’ve seen in many other forgettable CG animated features. It’ll make the kids happy, but that’s about it.

Page 7 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 22, 2013

‘The Croods’ follows all the same clichés


balloon art Inflatable creations have become a business for Keenan Price By Wade Denniston

A

ll Keenan Price wanted to do was get a girl’s attention. So, he decided to give balloon animals a try. “Before I went on my (LDS Church) mission I was trying to do something to impress a girl,” Price said. “Balloon animals were part of this week-long elaborate scheme to do it, so I just learned to make a poodle and I thought, ‘Hey, that was fun.’ “I still had a ginormous bag of balloons and learned to make some other stuff. I was good at it and really enjoyed it, so I bought more balloons and started doing it more.” Price hasn’t stopped since. In fact, he recently established a business, Utah Balloon Guru, LLC. “I’m trying to get into the Gateway down in Salt Lake City and different conventions,” Price

said. “I’ve been doing parties for a little while and I like doing it on the street. I walk around with a bag of balloons making balloons for people on the street and that’s been pretty fun for me.” The senior at Utah State University — he is majoring in communication studies — also shares his talent with patrons at local parks. In fact, that is how he met his current girlfriend, Janette Velez, last September. “She was just in the park with her family and they were having a big barbecue,” Price said. “I was walking around doing balloon animals for everyone and I ran into her and her family. “It was pretty cool.” What did Price make for Velez? “A flower,” he said. Although he watched a few tutorials on YouTube, Price pret-

ty much taught himself how to make balloon animals. “I only watched about three or four videos on YouTube before I could pick it up,” Price said. “I learned to do the dog, which is about the easiest thing.” Then he learned how to do a rabbit, which wasn’t so easy. “The particular one I learned was really difficult and used a lot of twists,” he said. “From there, I just figured, ‘OK, if you do this with a balloon, it looks like a nose or an ear, or whatever.’” Price makes more than just animals these days. He’s made a basketball player with a hoop, Batman and a rainbow with a pot of gold at the end of it. Even on his mission — he served in New Mexico from 2009-2011 — Price made a name for himself making balloon animals.

“I actually did balloon animals throughout my mission as a way to proselyte,” Price said. “I served in a town of 1,200 people and was there for seven months. About 75 percent of the town, I knew them by their first name. They had a post office there and nobody had mail boxes, so everyone had to go to the post office. “I started asking the postmaster if I could put balloon sculptures in the post office and she let me. People would go in and see it and would be like, ‘Oh, that’s really cool. Who made it?’ She’d say, ‘It’s the Mormon boys that walk around town all the time. We’d be knocking on doors or walking down the street and people would pull over and be like, ‘Hey, I really respect what you do. That’s really neat.’” What’s the best part about Price’s unique trade? “Interacting with people and

the second probably being able to use my creativity,” he said. “I’ve always enjoyed having an idea and being able to put it together and see it come to life. That’s been one fun thing. “When I sat down to do my Batman, I just had an idea that I was going to make a Batman. I looked at a picture of a Batman comic online and was like, ‘All right, I think I’ve got this.’” Seven hours later, he did. “I made the Batman with the intention of spreading the word about me and it worked,” said Price, who noted each creation only lasts about three days until it starts to shrink. “I got about four or five parties as a direct result of that Batman.” For more information on Price and his balloon creations, check out his company’s website, balloonsutah.com, or his Facebook page, Utah Balloon Guru.

From the left: Keenan Price makes balloon art (photos by Eli Lucero/Herald Journal); a basketball player with a hoop; Batman; and a rainbow with a pot of gold (photos courtesy Keenan Price).


balloon art Inflatable creations have become a business for Keenan Price By Wade Denniston

A

ll Keenan Price wanted to do was get a girl’s attention. So, he decided to give balloon animals a try. “Before I went on my (LDS Church) mission I was trying to do something to impress a girl,” Price said. “Balloon animals were part of this week-long elaborate scheme to do it, so I just learned to make a poodle and I thought, ‘Hey, that was fun.’ “I still had a ginormous bag of balloons and learned to make some other stuff. I was good at it and really enjoyed it, so I bought more balloons and started doing it more.” Price hasn’t stopped since. In fact, he recently established a business, Utah Balloon Guru, LLC. “I’m trying to get into the Gateway down in Salt Lake City and different conventions,” Price

said. “I’ve been doing parties for a little while and I like doing it on the street. I walk around with a bag of balloons making balloons for people on the street and that’s been pretty fun for me.” The senior at Utah State University — he is majoring in communication studies — also shares his talent with patrons at local parks. In fact, that is how he met his current girlfriend, Janette Velez, last September. “She was just in the park with her family and they were having a big barbecue,” Price said. “I was walking around doing balloon animals for everyone and I ran into her and her family. “It was pretty cool.” What did Price make for Velez? “A flower,” he said. Although he watched a few tutorials on YouTube, Price pret-

ty much taught himself how to make balloon animals. “I only watched about three or four videos on YouTube before I could pick it up,” Price said. “I learned to do the dog, which is about the easiest thing.” Then he learned how to do a rabbit, which wasn’t so easy. “The particular one I learned was really difficult and used a lot of twists,” he said. “From there, I just figured, ‘OK, if you do this with a balloon, it looks like a nose or an ear, or whatever.’” Price makes more than just animals these days. He’s made a basketball player with a hoop, Batman and a rainbow with a pot of gold at the end of it. Even on his mission — he served in New Mexico from 2009-2011 — Price made a name for himself making balloon animals.

“I actually did balloon animals throughout my mission as a way to proselyte,” Price said. “I served in a town of 1,200 people and was there for seven months. About 75 percent of the town, I knew them by their first name. They had a post office there and nobody had mail boxes, so everyone had to go to the post office. “I started asking the postmaster if I could put balloon sculptures in the post office and she let me. People would go in and see it and would be like, ‘Oh, that’s really cool. Who made it?’ She’d say, ‘It’s the Mormon boys that walk around town all the time. We’d be knocking on doors or walking down the street and people would pull over and be like, ‘Hey, I really respect what you do. That’s really neat.’” What’s the best part about Price’s unique trade? “Interacting with people and

the second probably being able to use my creativity,” he said. “I’ve always enjoyed having an idea and being able to put it together and see it come to life. That’s been one fun thing. “When I sat down to do my Batman, I just had an idea that I was going to make a Batman. I looked at a picture of a Batman comic online and was like, ‘All right, I think I’ve got this.’” Seven hours later, he did. “I made the Batman with the intention of spreading the word about me and it worked,” said Price, who noted each creation only lasts about three days until it starts to shrink. “I got about four or five parties as a direct result of that Batman.” For more information on Price and his balloon creations, check out his company’s website, balloonsutah.com, or his Facebook page, Utah Balloon Guru.

From the left: Keenan Price makes balloon art (photos by Eli Lucero/Herald Journal); a basketball player with a hoop; Batman; and a rainbow with a pot of gold (photos courtesy Keenan Price).


Page 10 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 22, 2013

Upcoming Sky View High School’s Encore performance choir proudly presents “Life’s a Happy Song” at 7 p.m. March 21-23 and 25 at the Sky View High School Auditorium. Don’t miss this evening of fun-filled song and dance for the whole family with classic hits from your favorite decades from the 1920s up to present day. Musical numbers include “Don’t Sit Under the Apple Tree,” “Great Balls of Fire” and “Dynamite.” Tickets are available for $7 at www.skyviewtix.org or at the door for $8.

is $5. A benefit concert for David Grange, a USU student who was injured in a motorcycle accident in November, will be at 8:30 p.m. Friday, March 22, in the ESLC building, room 130, on the USU campus. Tickets are $5 in advance (email James Drake at james.drake@aggiemail. usu.edu) or $7 at the door. There will also be a raffle. Performers include Alex Scoffield, Sarah Olsen, Michael Jenkins and Emily Golightly and Sarah Hakes. Exciting acoustic rock performing artists RacecaR RacecaR will perform live from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, March 22, at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza.

Mt. Logan Middle School will present “Honk Jr.,” a musical tale of the ugly duckling, at 7 p.m. March 21-23 and 25. Ugly learns to find himself despite being different and ridiculed by those around him. Two casts perform two nights each. Cost is $3 for adults, $2 for students and $15 per family.

Season’s Extreme will perform along with Bluhme and Unseen Summits at 8 p.m. Saturday, March 23, at Why Sound, 30 Federal Ave. Admission is $6.

Holy Water Buffalo will perform at 8 p.m. Friday, March 22, at Why Sound, 30 Federal Ave. Admission

Amazing one-man band

Scott Olsen will perform from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday, March 23, at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza. There is no cover charge Jane Austen’s “Emma” will be performed at 7:30 p.m. from Tuesday, March 26, to Saturday, March 30, in the Morgan Theatre at the Chase Fine Arts Center on the USU campus. A matinee will also be performed at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 30. Call 797-8022 or visit arts.usu.edu. Some of the many talented performers of Providence will be featured at the Providence Showcase at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 27, and Thursday, March 28, at the Old Rock Church in Providence. Come see Keiyana Osmond, Missy Checketts, Kristie and Katie Gilbert, Sherid Peterson, Randall Bagley and others perform. Famous Aggie Ice Cream will be served and a portion of the profits will be donated to Primary Children’s Hospital. Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 the day of the show. Purchase tickets at the Old Rock Church, 10 S. Main St. in

Providence.

for information.

The Symphony Orchestra presents the winners of a concerto competition in December, accompanied by the orchestra at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 28, at the Kent Concert Hall on the USU campus. Winners are Marianna Cardon, French horn; Sara Mason, piano; Nathan Southwick, violin; and Clifford Tam, clarinet. The music of Richard Strauss, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Claude Debussy and Edward MacDowell will be performed. Tickets are free to $10. Call 797-8022 or visit arts.usu. edu.

Scott Bradley will discuss the principle of State Nullification to resolve the challenges

Dr. Tom Stohlgren will conduct a seminar at 6 p.m. Wednesday, March 27, and at 4 p.m. Thursday, March 28, at ENGR 103 on the USU campus. Stohlgren is recognized as one of the top 10 most productive scientists in the world in the field of biological invasions. Stohlgren is USGS Liaison to the National Ecological Observatory Network and also directs the National Institute of Invasive Species Science. The event is free. Visit www.usu.edu/ecology

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Art museum event tonight The Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art (NEHMA) at Utah State University is hosting “Warm Music for a Cold Night,” a special event to thank VIP members and to welcome new members to the museum, at 5 p.m. today. “Membership is a great way to support new and interesting exhibits in northern Utah and this event is our way at the museum to say ‘thank you’ to our generous supporters,” said Deb Banerjee, interim deputy director of NEHMA. The event features the Fry Street Quartet, USU’s resident string group and faculty in the Caine College of the Arts, performing selections of Joseph Haydn, Benjamin Britten and Maurice Ravel. The musical program complements the current show Lux, an exhibit exploring how artists use light as a medium or subject matter in their work. “The museum has a long history of the Fry Street Quartet playing works related to the collection on display,” said Nadra Haffar, education curator of

the museum. “We are excited for them to join us for this special occasion.” This special event is also an opportunity for the museum to welcome new members and provide a break to all from the long, cold winter, event organizers said. Membership to the museum provides patrons free admission to members’ events, previews of exhibit openings, after hours’ access to the museum during VIP hours and access to visiting lecturers and artists. Those interested in becoming members of the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art can call Haffar at 435797-0165 or email her, nadra.haffar@ usu.edu. “Warm Music for a Cold Night” is at the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, located in the Chase Fine Arts Center on USU’s campus. Refreshments will be served during the viewing hour from 5 to 6 p.m. and the Fry Street Quartet will perform from 6 p.m.

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An earned spring is so much sweeter than a spring entitlement. I know I am sounding uncharacteristically Republican, but with some of their Jedi philosophies agree I do. Few can refute that we really earned it this year as our weather fell off the meteorological cliff. I counted 35 days straight where my belief in the existence of the Wellsville Mountains was faith based. Frosty the snow man may be a puddle, but I don’t kid myself that just because the calendar flipped to March 21 that spring is really here. Springtime is more a

Slightly Off Center DENNIS HINKAMP

Page 12 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 22, 2013

In Cache Valley, spring is more of a state of mind

state of mind in northern Utah. What we really get is about 30 days of reliable spring commingled with 60 days of fickle Swinter. Swinter is the time when just the lower end of 50-something degrees gets people out half-naked, run-

ning, rowing and riding around the valley. These temperatures at the end of summer (Sumautom?), would have the same people reaching for a sweater. During Swinter water and snow skiing cohabitate in our H2O imaginations. In Swinter you can’t put away the snow shovel, yet you had better waken the grumpy lawn mower from its hibernation. You can’t plant tomatoes with confidence, yet the weeds are growing like weeds. You can’t park your car on the street overnight even though the city has decommissioned its snowplows for the season. You wear

a sweater on the way to work but just sweat on the way home. The swimming pools are preparing to open, but elsewhere, people still might be ice fishing in alpine lakes. Swinter brings things that lurked below winter’s white blanket slowly to life. Not all are pretty. Five months of frozen dog logs are emerging like stinky little zombies from their snow-covered graves. Your friends are also emerging, magnetically drawn to the farmers’ market that opens three months before anything actually grown on a farm is ready for harvest.

Tangled hoses replace tangled Christmas lights and extension cords. Road-repair crews also pop up through the Swinter snow like orange-vested volunteer tulips. Just when you were looking forward to black ice-free cruisecontrolled driving, four lanes narrow to one construction-free lane until late October when the cycle repeats itself. Spring has snuck up on me again. The emerging days of warmth and gusty winds make me want to run and bike and soak up sun, but I have to rake and prune and stack dead branches on the curb to hit that one-

week window where the town picks up the stuff. All the Oscar-winning movies are coming out on DVD, but I feel the need to spend more time outside and less time on the couch hibernating with technology. So I join my fellow winter-weary citizens debating which winter is worse and discussing where we might retire. We compare home repair stories and whine about the weather that will repeat itself next year, but we’ll forget the pattern again. Dennis Hinkamp says spring is still a pleasant surprise even after 32 years here.

2012 Arrington writing awards presented at USU The Leonard J. Arrington Writing Awards are given each year in conjunction with a student writing competition that is part of the annual Leonard J. Arrington Mormon History Lecture. The contest is coordinated by Utah State University’s Special Collections and Archives, and is open to all college students in Utah and surrounding areas. Entrants are required to attend the lecture then write a 2,500-word essay related to the lecture, including a one-page synopsis of the lecture and a bibliography. A minimum of two outside research sources must also be used. The essay topic relates to the lecture topic, which changes every year, but may be expository, persuasive or reflective, but not fiction. The essays are judged by a panel of five judges, including both campus

and off campus experts. The 2012 essays were based on the lecture given in fall 2012 by Terryl L. Givens. Students who submitted essays in the competition based their work on Given’s lecture “The Prophecy of Enoch as Restoration Blueprint.” Benjamin Harmon, an undergraduate at Utah State University, took the $1,000 first place award. The title of his winning essay is “What Has Athens to do with Mormonism?” Harmon is an Honors student at USU pursuing a double major in philosophy and religious studies with a minor in political science. His main research interests are in philosophy of religion, philosophy of mind and the history of Christianity. He also serves as an associate editor for the Intermountain West Journal of Religious Studies. The second place $500

award was presented to Chad L. Nielsen who piano, singing and ringof Latter-day Saints in to Peter Wosnik for his grew up in the Ogden ing English hand bells Illinois and Iowa and essay “The Enoch Text.” area. The title of his with the Westminster the nearby locations for Wosnik is a recent award capturing entry is Bell Choir in downtown many important events of USU graduate who “Capturing the Holy City: Logan. His interests also that church’s past. Curearned bachelor’s The Latter-day Saint include reading and writ- rently, he is working on degrees in history and Quest for Zion.” ing about LDS history a biography about Zerah religious studies. During Nielsen studies biolog- and theology. He said Pulsipher — an early his time as an undergrad- ical engineering at USU his passion for Mormon leader in the LDS Church uate he served as presiand works as an intern. history came into bloom — and he said he hopes dent of the Religious His main hobbies include while serving as a fullto continue to write about Studies Club and as comusic, he said, including time missionary for The history for the rest of his president of the Mormon playing the organ and Church of Jesus Christ life. Studies Club. He was also a copy editor for the Intermountain West Journal of Religious Studies and an undergraduate ARTISAN BREAD teaching fellow for Philip crumbbrothers.com • find us on facebook Barlow, USU’s Arrington Chair of Mormon History and Culture. WosWEST SOUTH nik’s academic interests include Mormon studies, Christian history and philosophy of religion. His Fri. & Sat. only senior capstone project explored the influence of Lemon Strawberry Roulade religious charisma and Pre-Order Early! the Book of Mormon on early Mormon converEaster Sugar Cookies sion in Kirtland, Ohio. Available March 28th through March 30th The third place award Hours: Mon - Fri 7 am - 2 pm, Sat 8 am - 2 pm • 435-792-6063 and $250 was presented

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Friday The annual spring BFA exhibition is here for those students who are earning their Bachelor of Fine Arts degree to exhibit their work. This first exhibit will feature the work of Lauren Williams, Brandon Christensen, Tiffany Torrey and Myles Howell in Gallery 102 in the USU Chase Fine Arts Center, open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. A reception will be at 5 p.m. Friday, March 22. The exhibit and reception are both free and open to the public. Mountainside Elementary will present its first ever musical production “Pirates, Zombies, and Natives” at 7 p.m. Friday, March 22, and at 2 and 7 p.m. Saturday, March 23. Tickets are $3 for 12 and older; $1 for 4 to 11 years old; and $12 for a family pass. Tickets are available at the door or by calling 792-7688.  Dinner and a fashion show from Somebody’s Attic will be at 6:30 p.m. Friday, March 22, at the Bullen Center, 43 S. Main St. Proceeds from the evening will directly benefit CAPSA programs for local victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. Dinner is $35 per plate or $65 per couple. Call 753-2500 to RSVP. The Utah Mobile Vet Center will be in Logan from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday, March 22, at the northwest corner of Main and 200 North. To schedule an appointment, call Linda Yeates at 1-800-613-4012 ext. 2910 or 801266-1499.

SATURDAY USU Forestry Extension agent Mike Kuhns will conduct a two-hour outdoor workshop demonstration of proper pruning methods and tree care from 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday, March 23, at the Smith residence, 497 W. 200 South, Smithfield. The event is free and the public is invited. Please dress warmly. Visit www. smithfieldcity.org or call 232-8010 for more information. A 5K Run for Ghana will be

Saturday, March 23, at Willow Park, 450 W. 700 South. Registration will start at 6 a.m.; the adult run ($15 per person) will begin at 7 a.m., and the children’s run for participants 12 years old and younger ($10 per person) will begin at 8:30 a.m. In between the adult and children runs, USU’s African dance class will be performing with live drummers. Organizer Rache Ross will be leaving for Ghana on May 1, and her volunteer work will be helping to improve the harsh food conditions for the orphanages as well as teaching English. Email Ross at raeross2393@gmail. com for information. The Stokes Nature Center in Logan Canyon will host Snowshoe Saturday: Full Moon from 6:30 to 10 p.m. Saturday, March 23. Join astronomer Jim Akers for a winter’s night walk with only the light of the moon to guide you. Meet at the USFS District Office. Cocoa and snowshoes provided; not recommended for young children. Space is limited; registration is required. Call 755-3239 or visit www.logannature.org. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures, a nonprofit that services individuals with disabilities, is hosting The Beaver Bash at 8 a.m. Saturday, March 23. This is a free event with food and fun. To attend this activity or request additional information, call 7130288. The Tarinelli babies fundraiser will be Saturday, March 23, at Woodruff Elementary School, 950 W. 600 South. Dinner will begin at 5:30 p.m. (cost is $5), followed by a live auction at 6:30 p.m. This event is an effort to help raise money to aid the Don and Ashley Tarinelli family, who are dealing with the extensive financial cost of having premature twins in mid-December, one of whom passed away on Christmas day. Send an email to mirandagodfrey123@gmail.com for more information. Join the Child & Family Support Center for the second annual Strengthening Families Sym-

posium from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, March 23, at Bridgerland Applied Technology College, 1301 N. 600 West. Presenters will address topics such as: positive discipline, strengthening family relationships, self esteem and current issues facing families. Free of charge; lunch is provided. Registration is limited. Register online at: www.childandfamily supportcenter.org. Barbara Allred, author of the children’s book “Too Many Pickles,” will be signing books from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, March 23, at Hastings, 50 E. 400 North. Are you looking for ways to take control of your own health? Come learn about safe, effective and inexpensive alternatives to help you live healthier. You can do more than treat the symptoms. Come learn the power behind essential oils at 6 p.m. Saturday, March 23, at the Logan Chamber of Commerce building conference room at 160 N. Main St. Cache Singles is having an activity for singles ages 31 and older at 6 p.m. Saturday, March 23, at the Willow Park Church, 340 W. 700 South in Logan. There will be line dancing and pulled pork sandwiches. $2 donation.

SUNDAY The Latter-Day Voices Fireside is at 7 p.m. Sunday, March 24, at the Willow Park Church, 340 W. 700 South in Logan. This is a Cache Singles activity for singles ages 31 and older.

MONDAY Common Ground Outdoor Adventures, a nonprofit that services individuals with disabilities, is hosting a rock-climbing activity at 2 p.m. Monday, March 25. Cost is $5. To attend this activity or request additional information, call 713-0288. Are you looking for ways to take control of your own health? Come learn about safe, effective and inexpensive alternatives to

help you live healthier. You can do more than treat the symptoms. Come learn the power behind essential oils at 10:30 a.m. Monday, March 25, at the Logan Chamber of Commerce building conference room at 160 N. Main St.

TUESDAY Spice on Ice 2013 will be from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 26. Tickets are on sale now at the Eccles Ice Center or by calling 787-2288. Come experience Cache Valley’s premiere culinary event. It’s the place to be seen. Macey’s in Providence will host a free class entitled Rolling Dessert at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 26, at the Little Theatre. Do you love cake rolls and ice cream cakes but have always struggled to make them yourself? Elaine Reese, our in-store caterer, will be teaching her easy way of making divine cake rolls, and one of her favorite pie recipes. Reserve a seat at the service desk or visit Providence Macey’s Little Theatre Classes on Facebook. For ages 10 and up. Story Time at the North Logan Library will be at 10:10 and 11 a.m. Tuesday, March 26. Sleepy Time will be at 6:30 p.m. Visit www.northloganlibrary.org for more information. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures, a nonprofit that services individuals with disabilities, is hosting a snowshoeing clinic from 3 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 26. Cost is $15 for the clinic. To attend this activity or request additional information, call 7130288. Becky Yeager is offering soapmaking classes from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 26, and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, March 30, at The Spirt Goat, 28 Federal Ave. The classes will cover the basics of making lye soap using modern-day techniques. Each participant will create their very own log of soap ($36 value). The cost of the class is $120 with $100 going to the

American Cancer Society. Only 14 spots available. Call 757-6283 to sign up or email blyeager@ comcast.net. Health for Life will meet at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 26, in the Bonneville Room at the Logan Library. The speaker will be Jeanne Harold, a master zoneologist and zoneolgy instructor. She will discuss how to analyze the body by using locations on the foot that correspond to body systems. The public is invited.

WEDNESDAY Hoppy Easter Story Time with a craft will be at the North Logan Library at 10:10 a.m. Wednesday, March 27. Visit www.northloganlibrary.org for more information.

THURSDAY Fictionist will perform along with Mideau at 8 p.m. Thursday, March 28, at Why Sound, 30 Federal Ave. Admission is $8. Local choreographers will be showcasing their work at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 28, at the Ellen Eccles Theatre. Attendance is free — but donations are encouraged and appreciated. Auditions for Top of Utah Theatre’s upcoming production of “Anne of Green Gables” will be at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, March 28, at Wilson Elementary School, and at 10 a.m. Saturday, March 30, at the Book Table. All auditioners should prepare to sing 16 bars of a Broadway-type song. On March 28, the theatre will be auditioning ages 13 and up, and on March 30, a special children’s audition will be held. There are roles for all ages 10 and up, including mature actors and teens. The production will take place June 21, 22, 24, 28 and 29 in Logan. For more information, send an email to topofutahentertainment@gmail. com.

Page 13 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 22, 2013

calendar


Page 14 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 22, 2013

CrossworD By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Bamboozled 7. Black shade 11. Break 17. Instigation 19. Smooth talking 20. Congestion reliever 21. University degree field of study 25. Yellowstone sight 26. Moolah 27. Superbright 28. Pre-grocery store notes 31. Evidence 33. Printer’s widths 34. Poetic stress 39. Mountain 41. Bahamas’ capital 44. Sweater material 45. Assumption about the universe 51. Executive landing point perhaps 52. Drier debris 53. Battlestar Galactica character 54. Univalent organic radical 55. Notice 57. Egyptian snakes 59. Stationery brand 64. Tasting as if it was fired up? 66. Martini ingredient 67. Fruity Republic? 68. Self-ignition 75. Containing gold 76. Dos Passos trilogy 77. Trash hauler 78. American astronaut 79. Tableland 81. Pen point 82. ___ du jour 86. 1969 Oates novel 88. Sanctuary 92. Surround 94. It happens in the sun 100. Not free 101. Enumerate 102. Rodent 103. Pacific Rim countries

org. 104. Turmoil 106. “The Green ___” Tom Hanks movie 108. Monopoly participant 112. Billboard category 114. Quote as authority 116. Keats creation 117. Branch of logic 127. Finished with work forever 128. Figwort family, tree 129. French mathematician and astrologer 130. Outer, for short 131. Amount of work 132. Cherry pit Down 1. “Midnight at the oasis, put your ____ to bed” 2. Ancient editorial marks 3. Chicken parts 4. A degree 5. Touch down time perhaps 6. Drat! 7. Hang on someone’s ___ 8. Paint 9. Pub staple 10. City between Boston and Salem 11. Charlotte-to-Raleigh dir. 12. Andress film 13. Bug 14. A.K.A. Clay 15. Fountain for example 16. A little work 18. Emulated Pinocchio 20. Pubs 22. Cymbal sound 23. Faster horsey! 24. Marvel Comics super villain 29. Language of India 30. Unappetizing food 32. Fungal spore sacs 34. Step-up 35. Special effects: (abbr.) 36. Beat

37. Modern address 38. Ed.’s request 40. Internal fluids 42. Japanese honorific 43. Language group 44. Alicia of “Falcon Crest” 45. Half a Latin dance 46. Over, old way 47. Insidious 48. Music hall 49. Style of music 50. Dog tags 56. Squeeze 58. High-hat 60. Picnic crasher 61. Skater, Babilonia 62. Married John 63. “The Invisible Man Returns” actress, Grey 64. Doubles 65. Addressing two or more people, in dialect 66. Girls youth org. (abbr.) 67. Hobgoblin 68. Sinkhole 69. Coin of Afghanistan 70. Cinnabar and hematite 71. NCO part 72. Of service 73. “Whew!” 74. Illegal offer 79. Demographic segment 80. Kiwi comparable 82. Brightly colored bird 83. Floral necklace 84. “Give it ___!” 85. Bo Derek film 87. Coal carrier 89. Former EU group 90. Injure 91. Bound by contract 93. Destroy data 94. Kind of party 95. Possesses 96. Before, prefix 97. Biology class abbr. 98. Spring flowers 99. Vestige 104. Sahara’s climate 105. Put in a period

107. Bibliography abbr. 109. Pertaining to a solution solvent 110. Draw out 111. Change, as a clock 113. Former German chancellor 115. Sparkle 117. Before medical or historic 118. T-__ 119. “Master Melvin” 120. Type of chart 121. Bobby ___ (hockey player) 122. One of 100 in D.C. 123. “The Matrix” hero 124. Legal org. 125. PC “brain” 126. Preceding, for short

answers from last week

Herald Journal one to two days prior to the event. Calendar items can be submitted by Deadlines The email at hjhappen@hjnews.com. Any press releases or photos for events listed in the first Cache Magazine calendar items are due Tuesday by 5 p.m. They will also run for free in

half of Cache Magazine can be sent to jhunter@hjnews.com. Poems and photos can also be sent to jhunter@hjnews.com and run on a space-available basis if selected.

www.ThemeCrosswords.com


Page 15 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 22, 2013


Page 16 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 22, 2013

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