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TAKING

FLIGHT

Students at Willow Valley Middle School perform in ‘Peter Pan Jr.’

The Herald Journal

MARCH 14-20, 2014


contents

March 14-20, 2014

COVER 8 ‘Peter Pan Jr.’ features Willow Valley students

MUSIC 5 Bridgerland Honor Gala Concert this weekend

5 Jazz Combos perform in spring concert

5 Local performing group presents ‘Celebrate!’

6 Two solo recitals part of Wassermann Festival

13 From the Heart Choir

to perform in Cache Valley

MOVIES 7 ‘Need for Speed’ earns two stars

THEATER 5 Unicorn Pillow Theatre

presents ‘Heads and Tales’

5 Performances of

‘Cinderella’ upcoming

13 ‘Into the Woods’

performances in Perry

CALENDAR 15 See what’s happening this week

The cast of the Willow Valley Middle School production of “Peter Pan Jr.” bows at the end of a rehearsal. On the cover: Emily Nielsen plays the role of Tinker Bell in the Willow Valley production of “Peter Pan Jr.” (Eli Lucero/Herald Journal)

FROM THE EDITOR Sometimes figuring out what to eat can be such a hassle. Have you noticed? Don’t get me wrong, I love to eat. It is planning a meal, going to the grocery store and preparing the food that gets to me. As I’ve written here before, I’m not much of a cook. When I’m tired at the end of the day, cooking sounds like a lot of work. In addition to being short

on energy, I’m missing some pretty crucial things — like food. Last week a friend went through my kitchen. He counted about 20 food items. That isn’t a lot, he said, pointing out that his tally included ketchup, mustard, pickles, ice cream and six boxes of cereal. I may not always have the energy or ingredients to make a meal, but I somehow manage to make dessert occasionally. That said, I am excited to announce the newest addition to my kitchen: doughnut pans. I bought doughnut pans earlier this week and can’t wait to use them. I also have a

doughnut cookbook filled with recipes for glazes and cake flavors that sound amazing. So this weekend (hopefully), I’ll be baking doughnuts. What are you doing this weekend? There are plenty of events going on around the area. Celtic Night begins tonight at Ellen Eccles Theatre in Logan and “Into the Woods” is at the Heritage Theatre in Perry. To learn about these events and more, check out the following pages of this issue of Cache Magazine. — Arie Kirk


Local pens young adult novel By Jeff Hunter Cache Magazine editor

In need of another chapter to help complete her first novel, local author Marcy Hope Williams utilized a “Back to the Future”-like moment. Although she didn’t realize it at the time, she had actually written something a decade earlier that fit perfectly into “Wise Eyes: The Adventure Begins.” “When I sit down at the computer, I just write whatever I’m guided to write, and I was inspired to write that chapter even though I didn’t know what to do with it,” Williams explains. “But I filed it away, and about 10 years later I started writing this story, and I thought, Oh my gosh, there’s the missing chapter right there.” The first book of a planned trilogy, Williams took about a year to write “Wise Eyes” — not counting that inaugural chapter. She describes the book as “a contemporary coming-of-age story dedicated to the great Beehive State of Utah.” Set in Cache Valley, “Wise Eyes” tells the story of a 14-year-old boy named Daniel, his friend Jenny, and their friends and family. Williams says the book would primarily be of interest to young people between fifth and eighth grade. “I’m marketing it as the first green, young adult novel, and I truly think it is,” Williams adds. “I’ve been a vegetarian for 40 years and a vegan for almost 20, and Jenny turns vegetarian in the book. It’s very contemporary.” A native of Southern

“‘Need for Speed’ doesn’t merely ask you to suspend disbelief. No, it straps your disbelief to a helicopter and dangles it over the Grand Canyon.” – Aaron Peck (Page 7)

PET OF THE WEEK Available for adoption

Photo courtesy Marcy Hope Williams

Local author Marcy Hope Williams wrote “Wise Eyes.”

California, Williams lived in Hawaii for 14 years before relocating to Cache Valley with her now ex-husband and their family. Raising three children as a single mother kept her extremely busy, but she managed to go back to school at Utah State and completed her bachelor’s degree in philosophy and a master’s in folklore. “I’ve been involved in literacy and language for a long time; I believe in it,” says Williams, a driving force behind the Festival of Words that has been held in Cache Valley in the past. “I believe that’s the way to help children keep on the right track, and to have answers, opportunities and alternatives. “The more children read about different characters and what roads they choose, if they get in that situation,

maybe it will help them make a better choice.” Williams has already published several short stories, including “Twiga,” a folktale about a young giraffe. She published “Wise Eyes” through CreateSpace, Amazon.com’s self-publishing subsidiary, and put a photograph of her daughter’s dog, Blink, wading in Tony Grove Lake on the cover. “This story was a way to couple my love of nature and animals and children altogether, and hopefully bring young adults to a sanctuary, a peaceful place,” Williams says. “My books are G-rated; they’re motivational; they’re uplifting. And yet, they’re different. They’re very different.” ——— “Wise Eyes” is currently available for $8.95 online at

Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble, and locally at the Book Table, Stork Landing and Hastings Entertainment. Williams will also be featured at a book signing from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, April 12, at Hastings, 50 E. 400 North. For more information, visit Williams’ website at www.story-express. com.

Pet: Lexie From: Cache Humane Society Why she’s so lovable: Don’t let Lexie’s age fool you! This girl has a lot of life left in her. By getting an older dog like Lexie, you’re getting a mellow, easygoing, lowenergy dog. That’s not to say that she won’t go on a long walk with you if you want to, but if you don’t, you’ve got a dog happy to chill at home! Sound like a match? Come meet Lexie!

Page 3 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 14, 2014

ALL MIXED UP

Quotable


Page 4 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 14, 2014

all mixed up

Photo courtesy of American Festival Chorus and Orchestra

The American Festival Chorus and Orchestra will perform Johannes Brahms’ Ein deutsches Requiem on Friday, March 28, at the Ellen Eccles Theatre.

Musicians to perform Brahms’ Requiem By Eric Warren USU Media Relations

Cache Valley will play host to one of the most celebrated and recognizable pieces of music to come from Germany when the 300 members that make up the American Festival Chorus and Orchestra perform Johannes Brahms’ Ein deutsches Requiem at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 28, at the Ellen Eccles Theatre. “We are delighted to be able to perform this beautiful and very moving piece in Cache Valley,” said Craig Jessop, director and conductor of the American Festival Chorus and Orchestra. “Brahms’ Requiem presents us with a unique opportunity to bring together musical talents from all over the valley, and beyond, to one stage and perform a magnificent piece of musical history.”

Jessop said that Brahms’ Requiem reflects a time of tragedy in Brahms’ life and shows how he chose to commemorate loss. Rather than use remorseful Latin prose, he created a celebration of life; a musical tapestry filled with elegant melodies, infused with the rich vocal textures of Germanic prose, and coupled with the beautiful sonance of a full orchestra. According to Utah State University assistant professor of musicology Christopher M. Scheer, Brahms’ Requiem is arguably one of the most important pieces of choral music written in the 19th century. “The inspiration for its composition may have been the passing of Brahms’ beloved mother, though many scholars have noted that some musical material

used in the Requiem dates from 1856, around the time of the death of his close friend, the composer Robert Schumann,” Scheer said. Though modeled on the Roman Catholic mass for the dead, Brahms drew his texts from Martin Luther’s German Bible, which is why the work is in German and not in the customary Latin. Scheer commented that Brahms takes many liberties with the traditional requiem texts, playing down and expunging references to Christian dogmas, while emphasizing the human experiences of suffering and bereavement. The work reflects Brahms’ personal view of the spiritual, and he is even said to have remarked that the work should be called a human requiem. “Everything about Brahms’ masterpiece is elegant and

WHAT: American Festival Chorus and Orchestra performance WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 28 WHERE: Ellen Eccles Theatre COST: Ticket prices are $12, $16 and $20.

exquisite,” said Jessop. “My hope is that our audience will fully experience the music as it fills the hall and reverberates with the grace it was composed for.” To help accomplish that, Jessop has enlisted renowned vocalists Cindy Dewey and Steve Meredith. Dewey, an associate professor at Utah State’s Caine College of the Arts, has appeared as soprano soloist with orchestras across the United States and Canada.

She has performed numerous works with American Festival Chorus and Orchestra, including Haydn’s Creation, Mendelssohn’s Elijah, Orff’s Carmina Burana, as well as in works by Mozart and Bach. Dewey’s students have gone on to perform at opera houses in the United States and Europe, including the Metropolitan Opera in New York. Meredith is an oft soughtafter baritone and was a favorite of Grammy Awardwinning conductor Robert Shaw. Meredith sang Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis and 9th Symphony under his direction with orchestras throughout the United States. Meredith also has appeared regularly with other notable conductors, including Margaret Hillis, Hermann Michael, See BRAHMS on Page 10


Bridgerland Gala Concert

St. Patrick’s Day is just around the corner, and whether you are Irish or not, everyone can enjoy the spectacular “Riverdance”-themed show, Celtic Night, coming to Ellen Eccles Theatre at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 14, and Saturday, March 15. Celtic Night 2014, traditionally presented by Inishfre Irish Dance Company and Leaping Lulu, is the 10th annual Celtic Night, making it a special production for the whole cast. To commemorate the show’s 10th anniversary, Inishfre and An Tús Nua Irish Dance Academy will be performing together to make a few of the dance numbers extra entertaining. Inishfre Irish Dance has performed in Utah, Idaho and Wyoming since 2005. Inishfre Irish Dance has 15 dancers ranging in age from 16 to 50 with diverse dancing experience, but all share a passion for Irish dance and the music that inspires it. Founding director Julie Zufelt comes from a background in ballet and piano and became fascinated with Irish step dancing after experiencing “Riverdance.”

Zufelt’s original choreography is set to music that combines traditional folk tunes with driving rhythms and traditional and new-age instrumentation that culminate in extraordinary high-energy entertainment. Many of the Inishfre Dancers are Logan locals, including high school students, college students and moms. The very first Celtic Night was held in the Whittier Center Auditorium. It was supposed to be a fun, low-key performance, but it ended up selling out. Ever since then, it has just continued to grow and has become a tradition for many people in Cache Valley. This year An Tús Nua Irish Dance Academy will be joining Inishfre on the stage. Terena Lund, the director of An Tús Nua, also participated in the first Celtic Night. Since then, she has become a certified Irish dance instructor and founded her own school, which contains national championshiplevel dancers. Leaping Lulu accompanies all of the dancing at Celtic Night. Leaping Lulu is a neo-traditional Celtic folk band based

in Logan, that features Sara Gunnell on violin, Liz Fallis on flute and piccolo, Don Anderson on guitar and cittern and Kent Braddy on vocals, bodhran and cajon. Tickets for Celtic Night 2014 are available at the Ellen Eccles

Theatre box office at 43 S. Main St., by calling 752-0026 or online at www.cachearts.org. Reserved seating prices are $13 to $20. Visit www.bridgerfolk.org and www.leapinglulu. com for more information.

Utah State University’s Department of Music presents the Jazz Combos annual spring concert at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 19, in the USU Performance Hall. “This concert presents a great opportunity for students and audience members to interact,” said Jon Gudmunson, director of jazz studies in the Caine College of

the Arts (CCA). “The students are able to learn firsthand what music the audience enjoys.” Denson Angulo, USU CCA student, is coaching a combo called Mad Brittney and the Guy Tones. Angulo said the audience will hear guitar, keyboards, saxophones, bass and drums in a unique setting that is not common to popular

mainstream music today. “Much of the music that will be heard is improvised on the spot so no two performances will ever be the same,” said Angulo. “The spontaneous construction of the music unfolds live and fresh before the audience’s eyes and ears.” Other combos playing in the performance are Mickey D and the Fat

Fats, Muck Duck and the Caine Jazz Combo. Tickets are $10 adults, $8 youth and seniors, $5 USU faculty and staff and free for USU students with ID. For more information, visit the CCA Box Office in room 139-B of the Chase Fine Arts Center, call 435-7978022 or see the college’s Production Services website (arts.usu.edu).

The Bridgerland Honor Gala Concert featuring the region’s top seventh through ninth grade band, orchestra and choir students is scheduled for 1 p.m. Saturday, March 15, in the Kent Concert Hall at Utah State University. The best music students from Box Elder, Cache and Franklin counties auditioned for the show and 350 were selected. Admission is free to the public. For information, contact Logan High School band director Chris Rasmussen at 232-3823.

‘Celebrate!’ at Sky View

Sky View High School’s Encore performing group proudly presents its spring show, “Celebrate!” Come and enjoy song and dance numbers from all of your favorite eras, including classic favorites like “Joint is Jumpin’,” “Love is Here to Stay,” “Route 66” and “Rock and Roll is Here to Stay,” as well as contemporary hits including “SkyFall,” “Forget You” and “You’ll Be In My Heart.” Performances for “Celebrate!” begin at 7 p.m. March 13-15 and 17. There will also be a 1 p.m. matinee March 15. Tickets are $7 online at skyviewtix.org or $8 at the door. Family tickets (up to six people) are available for $30.

‘Cinderella’ in Brigham City Inishfre Irish Dance Company and An Tús Nua Irish Dance Academy will perform together at Celtic Night 2014; Leaping Lulu, a neo-traditional Celtic folk band, will also perform.

Jazz Combos take the stage

Dream Pointe Ballet Company of Brigham City proudly presents “Cinderella” at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, March 29, at Box Elder High School. This ballet will include a full cast, including a graceful Cinderella danced by Jasmine Barlow and Prince Charming performed by Jonathan Clark. Tickets are $9 per person; $8 for five or more. Tickets may be purchased online at www.starstruckarts.com, in person at 2895 S. U.S. 89 in Perry, from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, or by calling (435) 239-8338. 

High school art contest

The Brigham City Museum of Art and History is sponsoring a statewide, all-media art competition titled “Young Masters, 2014.” The competition is open to regular and home-schooled students in grades nine through 12. Artwork should be delivered to the museum March 22 through April 4. Only school teachers can submit works. For more information, visitbrighamcitymuseum.org, email klandon@ brighamcitymuseum.org or call (435) 226-1439.

‘Heads and Tales’

Unicorn Pillow Theatre presents ���Heads and Tales” by Carol Lauk at 2 and 4 p.m. Saturday, March 15, and Saturday, March 22, at the CVCA Bullen Center, 43 S. Main St. In “Heads and Tales,” a whimsical and energetic “professor” and her comical assistants guide 10-year-old T.J. through a series of adventures to free her imagination. Tickets are $3 and will be sold at the door. Seating is limited, so come early. For information, visit www.centerforthearts.us/unicorntheatre.htm.

Page 5 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 14, 2014

Celtic Night at Ellen Eccles Coming up


Page 6 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 14, 2014

Wassermann Festival continues at USU The next two solo Members of USU’s recitals at Utah State piano faculty were in University’s WasserTexas for the competimann Festival and Contion and heard both piacert Series provide a rare nists compete. Dennis opportunity. Audiences Hirst, director of USU’s will have the chance to Wassermann Festival, hear not one but two said the response to the of the prize-winning top winners was strong pianists from the most from the start. recent Van Cliburn “Both Sean Chen and International Piano Vadym Kholodenko Competition, recognized stood out from the other by many as one of the Cliburn competitors world’s most important from the preliminary competitions. round,” Hirst said. Performing in Logan “Throughout the compein back-to-back solo tition, their performancrecitals are two of the es continued to display top three finishers from extraordinary musicianthe 2013 Cliburn: crystal ship and technical ability. award winner Sean Chen I’m extremely pleased to and the gold-medal win- be able to feature both ner Vadym Kholodenko. of them at Utah State Both recitals begin University as part of the at 7:30 p.m. at USU’s Wassermann Festival Manon Caine Russell this season.” Kathryn Caine Wanlass Performing first is Performance Hall. Chen, who is featured

Thursday, March 20. He was born in Flori“I was able to hear da and grew up in CaliSean twice in the prelim- fornia and has earned a inary rounds and I was bachelor’s degree at the impressed by his fresh Julliard School. He now approach to works that resides in New Haven, many of us know,” Hirst Conn., where he is pursaid. “Sean’s program is suing an artist diploma perfectly suited to what at the Yale School of he does best. It will be a Music. diverse aural experience Chen’s program is for the audience.” about color, timbre and The program includes sonic effect. works by Alexander Kholodenko, the Scriabin, Frederic Chonext performer, has a pin, Maurice Ravel and program that is built on Sergei Prokofiev. harmonic and melodic Chen’s reviews from integration and the aural the Cliburn competitapestries that result, tion, and beyond, are Hirst said. impressive. Phrases like The second half of his “exceptional ability to program features works connect with an audiwith rhythmic drive and ence” and “easy virtuos- “virtuosic elements.” ity” are used. According Kholodenko’s solo to the competition’s recital is Friday, March website, Chen is the first 21, and includes works American since 1997 to by Henry Purcell, achieve a Cliburn prize. Handel, Brahms, Nikolai

Medtner and concludes with Igor Stravinsky’s “Trios Mouvements de Petrouchka.” This concluding work, which is often performed in its symphonic version, makes great technical demands of the pianist. “Stravinsky created the piano version in a very orchestral manner,” Hirst said, “and much of it requires the solo pianist to elicit the same sounds

that are more reasonably distributed out among multiple musicians and instruments in the symphonic version. It is a popular competition piece, and Kholodenko brought the house down in Fort Worth last May when he performed it during the Cliburn competition.” Critical response to

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“Need for Speed” doesn’t merely ask you to suspend disbelief. No, it straps your disbelief to a helicopter and dangles it over the Grand Canyon. There’s a complete demolition of disbelief. One that requires so much brain shutting off that it’s almost impossible to enjoy all the macho engine revving. The “Fast & Furious 6” infinite runway is far more believable than just about anything that happens in “Need for Speed.” I guess that’s what we should expect from an adaption of a racing video game. Tobey (Aaron Paul) is a street racing legend, only he’s never had the proper wheels to really make his dreams come true. He and his friends go to impossible lengths to pull off insane street races. We open with a street race which is run by what appear to be militarygrade computer systems, and someone in a Cessna up above spotting for traffic and cops. Bear in mind this race is taking place in a little town in New York. It’s one of those movies where the characters have unlimited resources and yet, are still somehow

he broadcasts his face and voice all over the Internet during his race-centric podcast. We know that the endgame is the De Leon race, but it’s getting there AP photo/DreamWorks II that’s the problem. With all the gurgling Aaron Paul plays Tobey in “Need for Speed.” engines, all the spitting tail cackles about his evil plans. pipes and the screeching tires, there’s very little else He’s stolen Tobey’s girlgoing on. They’ve set up friend, has found fortune in fixing up expensive cars, Director // Scott Waugh and races in a super-secret Starring // Aaron Paul, Dominic Cooper, Scott street race called the De Mescudi and Michael Keaton Leon. Rated // PG-13 for sequences of reckless street Speaking of that race, racing, disturbing crash scenes, nudity and crude it’s run by the only characlanguage ter that seems to be having any fun in this ridiculous Dino (Dominic Cooper) strapped for cash. Go figmovie. The resurgent leaves everyone to burn. ure. Michael Keaton plays The consummate bad guy. While Tobey’s the kind the Monarch. A man that of guy that would pull both He might as well come equipped with a pencil-thin no one has met, the pinfriend and foe from burning wreckage, his nemesis mustache to twirl while he nacle of anonymity, but

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‘Need for Speed’

the expected showdown between two rivals. One that is, at the very least, mildly intriguing to see where it leads even though they all eventually lead down the same road. Yet, most of the movie is spent driving cross country as Tobey’s flying friend follows improbably overhead giving him the directions on how to get to the race avoiding minimal traffic. Sure there are some chases along the way, but we know he’s going to make it to the race so what’s the point? The movie tries to build a few characters along the way, and might fool us a time or two into making us think they have. Then Keaton appears

Page 7 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 14, 2014

‘Need for Speed’ standard car chase fare

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TAKING

FLIGHT

Willow Valley Middle School students perform in ‘Peter Pan Jr.’

H

YRUM — If you are going to do the play “Peter Pan,” the main character needs to be able to fly around. While that may sound like a tall order for a middle school theater group, it recently became a reality. EmmaKaite Coleman did take to the air last weekend when Willow Valley Middle School put on the production for three nights at South Cache. They needed to perform there, because the stage allowed more room for flying. “When people think of Peter Pan, they think flying,” co-director John Caldwell said. “In my opinion, Peter Pan has got to be able to fly.” And so it happened. Of course there was a concern for safety. Caldwell said being safe was a top priority. With Daniel Coleman — the father of 12-year-old EmmaKaite — running the flying harness and cable off stage, Peter Pan took to the air. Being a firefighter in Salt Lake County, Daniel Coleman made sure his daughter was in good hands the whole time. “They wanted someone she (EmmaKaite) could trust on the other end of that line, because it is a pretty

skinny cable,” Coleman said. “... The hardest part are the landings, trying to get her to come down soft. Up and down is easy, but when you swing on a pendulum, moving at an angle, you need to let out more line.” And how did EmmaKaite like being Peter Pan and getting to fly? “They told us we would fly, but we didn’t know it would be like this,” EmmaKaite said. “... It’s been difficult learning to fly, because you have to keep yourself straight in the air and you want to turn and spin all over. But it’s been fun though.” It was also interesting for the preteen to play Peter Pan. She has been in other productions and had “big parts,” but never the main one. “I guess they ran out of boys,” EmmaKaite said when asked about playing Peter Pan. “... I wanted to be Tinker Bell or Wendy, but I got Peter Pan. It’s pretty cool. ... It’s been a tough play, but it’s really fun and exciting, awesome and funny too.” And working with her father? “I guess,” she said with a smile. “For some jumps he has to jump off a ladder and pull the cable and land on his back and then lift me back up.”

Above: EmmaKaite Coleman flies through the air as Peter Pan in the Willow Valley Middle School production of “Peter Pan Jr.” Left: Pirates are tied up after Peter Pan returns; Brigette Noble plays Wendy in the production of “Peter Pan Jr.”

Article by Shawn Harrison Photos by Eli Lucero

Students from Willow Valley began rehearsing for the production back in October. This is the fourth year a show has been put on by the theater group from the school. While many raved about how fun doing “Oklahoma!” was a year ago, they have also enjoyed doing Peter Pan. “I love acting,” said 12-year-old Kaden Denison, who played John Darling. “Last year we did ‘Oklahoma!’ and it was so much fun. ... I still like this play, but ‘Oklahoma!’ was so much fun.” “I’ve been in a lot of plays,” said 13-year-old Kehler Ames, who played Smee. “... I do want to continue in theater arts. All the hard work is worth it when you see that one person who enjoyed it thoroughly. I try to look at the audience, but it’s hard with the bright lights, but I like to see when I make a difference in a kid’s life.” More than 50 students are involved this year in “Peter Pan.” There are 48 performers, who all had to try out. Any student at the school can try out. Then there is a handful of students involved behind the scenes, plus parents that help as well. It is a community effort. “The thing about ‘Peter Pan Jr.’ is there are lots of parts; you can get a ton of involvement from tech people and scene people,” said co-director Kylie Funk, who is a teacher at Willow Valley. “... This is open to everyone. Your tryout determines the part that will work for you and is in your comfort level. There is something for everyone. We will never not give you a part. If you are committed and want to be here, we want you.” Many of the students went into tryouts thinking about a specific part, but ended up with another. After practicing for a while, they realized how much they liked the part. “I auditioned for John (Darling), Captain Hook, Peter Pan,” Kaden said. “... I was a little disappointed at first, but I’m pretty proud about my part now. I really didn’t know who John was until I looked into it.” “I wanted to be Wendy, but I got Tinker Bell and I’m actually really glad I did, because it is so fun,” 13-year-old Emily Nielsen said. “I love it. ... I would encourage others to try out. It is so fun, no matter what

part you have.” Brigette Noble agreed. The 11-yearold played Wendy. “I think her personality is curiosity and I’m pretty curious about a lot of things,” Brigette said. “I like imagining things like she does with Peter, so I guess we could relate a little. ... I love meeting new people, makes me braver and I can share my talent more. When I was younger, I was nuts about singing and ‘American Idol.’” Carson Adams played two parts in the show. The 12-year-old was Captain Hook and Mr. Darling. “It takes a lot of work,” Carson said. “And you’ve got to keep your grades up and memorize your lines.” “The kids give a lot of time and effort,” Caldwell said. “... They learn to use their time effectively.” This adaptation of “Peter Pan” was based on the play by J.M. Barrie and the 1953 Disney film. It is called “Peter Pan Jr.,” and has been out less than a year. Willow Valley is the first school in Utah to perform it. “We try and pick a show the kids can be successful at,” Caldwell said. “Some shows are too hard for this age group. This one was new, and we thought it would be good for the kids.” It takes dedication to be part of the group, but those who participate have a passion for getting up in front of people and entertaining. “It’s always fun, no matter what,” Emily said. “... It’s been a lot of work. It’s either going to be awesome or it’s going to be a train wreck.” Caldwell said the production went well, with a few technical glitches. Funk marveled at how well the students have done in learning their parts. “They are really talented and if you push them, they really do rise to the occasion,” Funk said. “It’s been so fun to see them be part of something that we try to make quality, but also challenging and to love that.” Both Caldwell and Funk applauded the school district for “fighting” for a grant that allows an after-school program like this. While this production is over, this weekend 85 students from Wellsville Elementary will be putting on “Aladdin Jr.” at the school in Wellsville.


TAKING

FLIGHT

Willow Valley Middle School students perform in ‘Peter Pan Jr.’

H

YRUM — If you are going to do the play “Peter Pan,” the main character needs to be able to fly around. While that may sound like a tall order for a middle school theater group, it recently became a reality. EmmaKaite Coleman did take to the air last weekend when Willow Valley Middle School put on the production for three nights at South Cache. They needed to perform there, because the stage allowed more room for flying. “When people think of Peter Pan, they think flying,” co-director John Caldwell said. “In my opinion, Peter Pan has got to be able to fly.” And so it happened. Of course there was a concern for safety. Caldwell said being safe was a top priority. With Daniel Coleman — the father of 12-year-old EmmaKaite — running the flying harness and cable off stage, Peter Pan took to the air. Being a firefighter in Salt Lake County, Daniel Coleman made sure his daughter was in good hands the whole time. “They wanted someone she (EmmaKaite) could trust on the other end of that line, because it is a pretty

skinny cable,” Coleman said. “... The hardest part are the landings, trying to get her to come down soft. Up and down is easy, but when you swing on a pendulum, moving at an angle, you need to let out more line.” And how did EmmaKaite like being Peter Pan and getting to fly? “They told us we would fly, but we didn’t know it would be like this,” EmmaKaite said. “... It’s been difficult learning to fly, because you have to keep yourself straight in the air and you want to turn and spin all over. But it’s been fun though.” It was also interesting for the preteen to play Peter Pan. She has been in other productions and had “big parts,” but never the main one. “I guess they ran out of boys,” EmmaKaite said when asked about playing Peter Pan. “... I wanted to be Tinker Bell or Wendy, but I got Peter Pan. It’s pretty cool. ... It’s been a tough play, but it’s really fun and exciting, awesome and funny too.” And working with her father? “I guess,” she said with a smile. “For some jumps he has to jump off a ladder and pull the cable and land on his back and then lift me back up.”

Above: EmmaKaite Coleman flies through the air as Peter Pan in the Willow Valley Middle School production of “Peter Pan Jr.” Left: Pirates are tied up after Peter Pan returns; Brigette Noble plays Wendy in the production of “Peter Pan Jr.”

Article by Shawn Harrison Photos by Eli Lucero

Students from Willow Valley began rehearsing for the production back in October. This is the fourth year a show has been put on by the theater group from the school. While many raved about how fun doing “Oklahoma!” was a year ago, they have also enjoyed doing Peter Pan. “I love acting,” said 12-year-old Kaden Denison, who played John Darling. “Last year we did ‘Oklahoma!’ and it was so much fun. ... I still like this play, but ‘Oklahoma!’ was so much fun.” “I’ve been in a lot of plays,” said 13-year-old Kehler Ames, who played Smee. “... I do want to continue in theater arts. All the hard work is worth it when you see that one person who enjoyed it thoroughly. I try to look at the audience, but it’s hard with the bright lights, but I like to see when I make a difference in a kid’s life.” More than 50 students are involved this year in “Peter Pan.” There are 48 performers, who all had to try out. Any student at the school can try out. Then there is a handful of students involved behind the scenes, plus parents that help as well. It is a community effort. “The thing about ‘Peter Pan Jr.’ is there are lots of parts; you can get a ton of involvement from tech people and scene people,” said co-director Kylie Funk, who is a teacher at Willow Valley. “... This is open to everyone. Your tryout determines the part that will work for you and is in your comfort level. There is something for everyone. We will never not give you a part. If you are committed and want to be here, we want you.” Many of the students went into tryouts thinking about a specific part, but ended up with another. After practicing for a while, they realized how much they liked the part. “I auditioned for John (Darling), Captain Hook, Peter Pan,” Kaden said. “... I was a little disappointed at first, but I’m pretty proud about my part now. I really didn’t know who John was until I looked into it.” “I wanted to be Wendy, but I got Tinker Bell and I’m actually really glad I did, because it is so fun,” 13-year-old Emily Nielsen said. “I love it. ... I would encourage others to try out. It is so fun, no matter what

part you have.” Brigette Noble agreed. The 11-yearold played Wendy. “I think her personality is curiosity and I’m pretty curious about a lot of things,” Brigette said. “I like imagining things like she does with Peter, so I guess we could relate a little. ... I love meeting new people, makes me braver and I can share my talent more. When I was younger, I was nuts about singing and ‘American Idol.’” Carson Adams played two parts in the show. The 12-year-old was Captain Hook and Mr. Darling. “It takes a lot of work,” Carson said. “And you’ve got to keep your grades up and memorize your lines.” “The kids give a lot of time and effort,” Caldwell said. “... They learn to use their time effectively.” This adaptation of “Peter Pan” was based on the play by J.M. Barrie and the 1953 Disney film. It is called “Peter Pan Jr.,” and has been out less than a year. Willow Valley is the first school in Utah to perform it. “We try and pick a show the kids can be successful at,” Caldwell said. “Some shows are too hard for this age group. This one was new, and we thought it would be good for the kids.” It takes dedication to be part of the group, but those who participate have a passion for getting up in front of people and entertaining. “It’s always fun, no matter what,” Emily said. “... It’s been a lot of work. It’s either going to be awesome or it’s going to be a train wreck.” Caldwell said the production went well, with a few technical glitches. Funk marveled at how well the students have done in learning their parts. “They are really talented and if you push them, they really do rise to the occasion,” Funk said. “It’s been so fun to see them be part of something that we try to make quality, but also challenging and to love that.” Both Caldwell and Funk applauded the school district for “fighting” for a grant that allows an after-school program like this. While this production is over, this weekend 85 students from Wellsville Elementary will be putting on “Aladdin Jr.” at the school in Wellsville.


Page 10 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 14, 2014

Brahms Continued from Page 4 Stewart Robertson and Robert Page. He is the music department chair and director of choral activities at Snow College in Ephraim, Utah. Dewey concurred that it is generally believed Brahms wrote his German Requiem in honor of his mother, and said that it takes on special significance for her when she can perform it in honor of her own mother. “Because of my close relationship with my mother, it is special to perform a piece that is about the mother-child relationship,” Dewey said. “In the fifth

movement where I sing the soprano solo, the choir’s text translates as ‘I shall comfort you, as one whom his mother comforts,’ and in that moment, I am truly comforted.” Opening the program is Utah composer Jeff Detton’s Tritone: A Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, which was inspired by the 10th anniversary of 9/11, and is based around a tritone, the most dissonant musical interval. This performance marks the debut of Detton’s first major work for piano and orchestra. Born in 1986, Jeff Detton showed exceptional musical talent from an early age.  Self-taught in his earliest years, Detton began

composing at age 8, and has been writing symphonic music since age 10. Brahms’ Ein deutsches Requiem will conclude the sixth concert season for the American Festival Chorus and Orchestra. “I can think of no greater season finale than this performance to enable us to continue our goal of providing a culture of musical excellence that edifies, entertains and educates performers and audiences,” Jessop said. Ticket prices are $12, $16 and $20. For more information visit americanfestivalchorus. org, or call (435) 7520026.

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Quartet to perform in Logan The Jasper String Quartet performs the closing concert of the Chamber Music Society of Logan’s 2013-14 season at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 27, at the Performance Hall on the USU campus. The Jasper String Quartet will play a wide-ranging concert, including music from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. The quartet is made up of J. Freivogel, violin, Sae Chonabayashi, violin, Sam Quintal, viola, and Rachel Henderson Freivogel, cello, who have played together as the Jaspers since 2006, when they formed the quartet at Oberlin Conservatory. Jaspers perform pieces emotionally significant to its members ranging from Haydn and Beethoven through Berg, Ligeti and living composers. They have commissioned string quartets from some of today’s up-and-coming composers, including Andrew Nor-

WHAT: The Jasper String Quartet WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 27 WHERE: USU Performance Hall COST: Tickets $24, students $10.

man, Nicholas Omiccioli, Conrad Tao and Annie Gosfield. They are delighted to be in the midst of a commissioning project with Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Aaron Jay Kernis. Critics and audiences commend the Jasper String Quartet’s “programming savvy” (clevelandclassical.com) and they have performed throughout the United States and in Canada, England, Italy, Japan, Korea, Norway and Panama. Educational outreach is a highlight of the Jasper quartet’s

professional life. The members have brought many more than 100 outreach programs into schools and enjoy educational work of all types. During the week before their performance in Logan, they plan three days of outreach with Cache Valley high-school and elementary-school students, as well as a master class at Utah State University. Based in Philadelphia, Penn., the Jasper String Quartet is the ensemble-in-residence at Classic Chamber Concerts in Naples, Fla. The quartet recently released two highly acclaimed albums for the Sono Luminus label featuring the works of Beethoven, Schubert and Aaron Jay Kernis. In 2014, they will digitally release Beethoven Op. 131 on Sono Luminus as well. For more information, please visit cmslogan.org, www.jasper quartet.com or www.facebook.com/ jasperstringquartet.

Campbell Organ Festival at the Kent Concert Hall Utah State University’s Department of Music will present the third annual Campbell Organ Festival on Tuesday, March 18, and Wednesday, March 19, at the Kent Concert Hall. This year’s festival features Richard Elliott, the principal organist for the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. On March 18, Elliott will conduct a workshop at 2:30 p.m. and a master class entitled “Making Music at the Organ” at 6:30 p.m. Several local organists will play literature appropriate for church settings, and Elliott will offer suggestions during the class to enhance both music and performance. A free concert will then be held at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 19. As principal organist, Elliott performs, tours and records with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. He also plays for the weekly “Music and the Spoken Word” broadcasts and joins with his fellow organists in presenting daily 30-minute organ recitals in the tabernacle. In addition, Elliott performs widely as an organ recitalist and has recorded on the tabernacle organ for several record labels.

it’s time for...

Crumb Brothers Luck o’ the Irish

Winners of the

14th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition

Sean Chen

Vadym Kholodenko

Crystal Award Winner

Gold Medalist

Thursday March 20

Friday March 21

Concerts are at 7:30 p.m. in the USU Performance Hall. Reserved Seating: Adult $24, USU Faculty/Staff $20, Student $12 Tickets: (435) 797-8022 or arts.usu.edu More information at www.usu.edu/wassermann

Visit us online at crumbbrothers.com & like us on Facebook!

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Need

in the game. Coming out of “Need for Speed” with any enjoyment whatsoever requires completely powering down any and all thinking. Don’t question a thing. Don’t question the ludicrously low amount of prison time that is handed down to a person involved in a street race which likely killed half a dozen police officers. Discount the idiocy on display as the movie has you believe that someone can take off and land a plane at will without any communication with any sort of air traffic controllers. Try not to understand the reasoning for such a risky race, where the winner retains all the competitors’ cars,

C

A

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THE STAGE MUSICAL

MARCH 25 – 29, 2014, 7:30PM MORGAN THEATRE CHASE FINE ARTS CENTER, USU CAMPUS MATINEE : MARCH 29, 2PM

arts.usu.edu • 435.797.8022 Book available at

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199 N Main St. Logan

435-755-1890

CCA Box Office | Chase Fine Arts Center 139-B USU Campus Adults $18, Seniors & Youth $15, Faculty & Staff $10, USU Students w/ID $5 Box Office Hours : Mon–Fri 9–5PM

TARZAN OWNED BY EDGAR RICE BURROUGHS, INC.

Continued from Page 7 on screen, and we realize he’s the only fully realized character and it’s mostly because Keaton is just going completely bonkers. If you’ve ever played the “Need for Speed” games you’ll know that you can run into other cars, buses and even mountains. Your car will flip over, and then it’ll blink and appear right back in the middle of the road so you can keep going. At least the movie retains some sort of realism in that aspect. Although the cops in the movie are just as worthlessly dumb as the ones

BASED ON THE DISNEY FILM. MUSIC & LYRICS BY PHIL COLLINS. ADAPTED FROM THE STORY “TARZAN OF THE APES” BY EDGAR RICE BURROUGHS. BOOK BY DAVID HENRY HWANG. ORIGINALLY PRODUCED ON BROADWAY BY DISNEY THEATRICAL PRODUCTIONS.

Page 12 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 14, 2014

Series

welcome at the master classes and tickets are available at the door. Tickets for the solo Continued from Page 6 recitals are available at the Caine College of the Kholodenko’s Cliburn performances is equally Arts Box Office located in the Chase Fine Arts impressive, where Center, Room 139-B. it was noted that he Reserved seat tickets are captured the attention $24 for adults, $20 for of jury, audience and USU faculty and staff and critics alike for “mesmerizing and exhilarat- $12 for students ages 8 ing” performances that and older. Call the box brought the crowd to its office with questions, feet, “cheering him like (435) 797-8022, or purchase tickets online via a rock star.” the college’s Production Born in Kiev, Services website (http:// Kholodenko has perarts.usu.edu). formed across the Detailed information globe. He made his first appearances in the about the Wassermann Festival and Concert United States, China, Hungary and Croatia at Series can be found on the festival’s website, the age of 13. He now http://www.usu.edu/ lives in Moscow with his wife and 3-year old wassermann/. daughter. He holds a teaching position at the Moscow P.I. Tchaikovsky Conservatory. While at USU both pianists will offer master classes at the Wassermann Festival. The first is provided by Kholodenko on Thursday, March 20, from 3-5 p.m. at the USU Performance Hall. Chen’s class is the following day, Friday, March 21, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the same location. The public is

yet it appears very few cars make it through in working condition. Just stop. Don’t think. It’ll hurt. Trust me. You’re likely going to hear all kinds of autorelated hyperbole about this movie. Something like it’s a “high-octane thrill ride.” Don’t

believe it. “Need for Speed” is yet another movie in the long line of uninteresting video game adaptions. Not that the movie had much, if anything, to live up to. But it’s pretty standard car chase fare all the same.


The Heritage Theatre in Perry will present “Into the Woods” from March 7 to 29. Based on the musical by Stephen Sondheim, “Into the Woods” will take the stage at 7:30 p.m. on Mondays, Fridays and Saturdays. Matinees will also be performed at 2 p.m. on March 15 and 22. Tickets are $10 for adults; $9 for seniors and children. For reservations, call the Heritage Theatre box office at (435) 7238392 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily except for Tuesdays and Sundays. Tickets can also be purchased online at www.heritagetheatreutah.com, or at the Heritage Theatre box office, 2505 S. U.S. Photo courtesy of Heritage Theatre Hwy. 89 in Perry. Kelli Morris, left, and Nathan Bigler star in “Into the Woods.” The Heritage Theatre in Perry will present “Into the Woods” from March 7 to 29. In “Into the Woods,” The Brothers Grimm hit the stage Handy, Cheighny Merkley, Jenon a journey to break the curse. with an epic fairy tale where nifer Christensen, Ally Braegger, Everyone’s wish is granted, but worlds collide. The story folJason Whitaker, Cherie’ Hansen, the consequences return to haunt lows a baker and his wife who Jennifer Hunsaker, Chelsea Cumthem all. wish to have a child, Cinderella mins, Jenica Christensen, Joseph Directed by Brad Whitaker who wishes to attend the King’s Burgan, Jay Christensen, Briwith musical direction by ClauFestival and Jack who wishes anna Taylor, Alec Bradford, Rob his cow would give milk. When dia Bigler, the cast of “Into Christensen, Madison Merkley, the baker and his wife learn that the Woods” includes: Kelli Elysia Christensen and Duane they cannot have a child because Morris, Nathan Bigler, Kenzie of a Witch’s curse, they set off Pace, Grant Christensen, Diana Rice.

Cache Valley Civic Ballet presents ‘Sleeping Beauty’ The Cache Valley Civic Ballet is proud to present its production of “Sleeping Beauty” at 7:30 p.m. March 21-22 and 24, at the Ellen Eccles Theatre. An additional matinee performance will begin at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, March 22. “Sleeping Beauty” is a ballet in a prologue and three acts first performed in 1890. Thirty minutes prior to the matinee, Sandy Emile, the CVCB artistic director, will present a short lecture to better help the audience understand the story told within ballet. The wonderful music by Tchaikovsky, colorful scenery, beautiful costumes and technical choreography will enchant audiences. The story centers on the beautiful princess Aurora, upon whom the evil witch Carabosse will cast a spell. On

her 16th birthday, princess Aurora pricks her finger on a spindle and falls into a 100year sleep. At the end of those 100 years, she will be woken by the kiss of a handsome prince. Supporting these characters is an ensemble of nearly 50 company members as well as more than 50 public cast members. Public auditions were held in February and had more than 150 participants. More than 200 hours of rehearsal and volunteer time go into creating this production of “Sleeping Beauty.” For more information or to purchase tickets, please visit cachearts.org, visit the Ellen Eccles box office at 43 S. Main St. or call 752-0026. More information about the Cache Valley Civic Ballet is also available at cvcballet.org.

CCC hosts ‘Who Do You Think You Are?’ Similar to the popular British and American television series, “Who Do You Think You Are?”, three local “celebrities” will trace their ancestral roots in an event at the Logan Tabernacle at 7 p.m. Friday, March 14. With the help of expert genealogists, Sister Marilyn of St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church, the Rev. Dr. Stephen Sturgeon, Vicar of St. John’s Episcopal Church, and Rev. Derek Forbes, Associate Pastor of the Logan First Presbyterian Church, will become better acquainted with their ancestors, and they have invited us to the event. In the course of our discovery, we will learn about the methods of research and free resources that are available to all to pursue a similar quest. Beyond being entertained, we hope that the evening will help to remind us that we are all members of the same big family. The event is sponsored by Cache Community Connections, our local interfaith and civic organization, and is partially supported by RAPZ funds.

Choir to perform in Logan

From the Heart Choir will perform a free concert at 6 p.m. Sunday, March 16, at the Logan Tabernacle. Anyone and everyone is welcome. From the Heart Choir is based out of Rexburg, Idaho, but is not directly affiliated with BYU-Idaho, although many members are current students or graduates of the university. The group used to be called Show Time back in the days of Ricks College, but the choir was discontinued following the transition. However, the students banded together and began the From the Heart Choir through their own extracurricular and financial efforts. Visitors to the performance should expect to hear solos, a duet and choir arrangements of songs such as, “Come Thou Fount” and “I Stand All Amazed.” The hour program focuses on the blessings of the atonement of Jesus Christ. Visit fromtheheartchoir.wordpress.com for information.

‘Tarzan’ at Old Barn

Tarzan swings into The Old Barn Community Theatre tonight. Tickets for “Tarzan: The Musical” are available by calling (435) 458-BARN, or by visiting www.oldbarn.org. Performances are scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 28 through Saturday, March 22, with matinees at 2:30 p.m. on March 8 and 15. “Tarzan: The Musical” showcases music and lyrics by pop icon Phil Collins, including the Grammy- and Oscar-winning song, “You’ll Be in My Heart,” and book by Tony Award-winning playwright, David Henry Hwang.

Benefit concert at USU

A concert to benefit Dallin Wengert and his family will be Friday, March 21, at the Kent Concert Hall on the USU campus. On May 30, 2013, Wengert was on his way to work at the USU farm when he was struck by an oncoming SUV traveling 60 mph. Wengert was in a coma for almost two weeks, and then he faced months of intensive speech, occupational and neuropsych rehabilitation in Arizona. Fortunately, he is now well on his way to a full recovery. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. and the concert will start at 7:30 p.m. The Ellis Boys will open the show, followed by County Red. Advance tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for youths and USU students; tickets at the door are $18 and $12.

‘Addams Family’ coming

The 2013/2014 National Tour of the new musical “The Addams Family,” based on the bizarre and beloved family of characters created by legendary cartoonist Charles Addams, will make its Logan premiere March 29 at The Ellen Eccles Theatre. “The Addams Family” will be performed March 29 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. at the Ellen Eccles Theatre. Tickets are available now at CacheArts.org, or the Ellen Eccles Theatre Box Office, 43 S. Main St., Logan, or call (435) 752-0026.

Page 13 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 14, 2014

‘Woods’ continues on stage Coming up


Page 14 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 14, 2014

CrossworD By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Cool car wheels 5. Head butt 8. Rush about 15. Punch, slangily 19. Go up against 20. Start for step or stop 21. Covered cart 22. Part of the eye 23. Tank feature 26. Occupy 27. Off course 28. Mysteriously 29. Low seats 31. Attack forcefully 32. Colorless solvent 33. Lacking high station 34. A mare, familiarly 36. Art degrees 37. Utopian 38. Paranormal ability 41. Jordanians, for example 44. Egg holder 46. ____ moves 50. Guru 52. Thing, legally 54. Lady’s wear 55. Moneylender 56. Tide flowback 58. Arranged in a sequence of grades 62. Talking starling 63. What’s left 65. Pinpoint 66. Show off what you’re selling 69. Indian monkey used in experimental medicine 71. Picked some fruit 72. In the slightest degree 76. Topper that’s down inside 78. Watch pocket 79. Greek assemblies 80. “Gimme __ thing!” 81. Type of American 82. Subtle influence 84. Whizzes

88. “___ about time!” 90. Join the gridlock! 91. Canadian creature 92. Cut of beef 94. Australian runner 96. Before, once 98. San Francisco Bay attraction 101. Quote givers 104. Suez ___ 109. Fortuneteller’s cup contents 110. Go by plane 111. Alloy 112. Queen in India 113. Follow someone else’s example 116. You can pump it 117. Newspaper item 118. By means of 119. Tepee 120. ___ Frank 121. Nephrologist’s concern 122. Do wrong 123. Irascible Down 1. Long-tailed parrot 2. Make uneasy 3. A drop (architecture) 4. Rudder’s spot 5. Resembling thick cords 6. “Gimme ___!” (start of a cheer at Iowa) 7. Brawl 8. Some iconic gems 9. Constellation near Vela 10. Uncontrived 11. Like a bog 12. “Lenore” author 13. Tickled pink 14. Lowers 15. “Oh Home on the Range” animal 16. Prestigious institutions 17. Hat materials 18. Two-timing 24. Scraps

25. Big Apple subway, familiarly, with “the” 30. Deception 32. Towel ID 33. Kitchen gadget 35. Head locks? 38. Effortless 39. Eschew 40. Fort wall 42. Onward 43. Fundamentalist region 45. Small blood vessel 47. Pass away notice (abbr.) 48. Nest setting 49. “We’ve been ___!” 50. It may be “the word” 51. Work up old material in a new form 53. Dieters choice 57. Howled 58. Dandruff 59. Jutting rock 60. Glacial period 61. Hard to deal with pitch 63. Big city in Iraq 64. Here/there separator 67. Get bitter about 68. Artist Max 69. Made out 70. “Unimaginable as ___ in Heav’n”: Milton 73. Fleshy seed covering 74. Thin 75. Flight segment 76. They may say no to drugs (abbr.) 77. Barrage 79. Say so 83. Quite a while 85. Carmel-covered almond 86. Bag 87. Part of Borneo 89. Key quality in customer relations 90. Changes

93. “Surfin’ ___” 95. Above all 97. She loved Narcissus 98. Roman rooms 99. Live’s partner 100. Rebel maker 102. Biblical suffix 103. Pass rope through a hole 105. Ridge 106. Butted in 107. Surrounded by 108. 2013 British Open winner’s nickname 110. Blood-related 111. Burn slightly 114. Inc., abroad 115. Elton John, for example

answers from last week

Herald Journal one to two days prior to the event. Calendar items can be submitted by Deadlines The email at hjhappen@hjnews.com. Any press releases or photos for events listed in the first Cache Magazine calendar items are due Tuesday by 5 p.m. They will also run for free in

half of Cache Magazine can be sent to jhunter@hjnews.com. Poems and photos can also be sent to jhunter@hjnews.com and run on a space-available basis if selected.

www.ThemeCrosswords.com


Friday The Cache Community Connections is hosting a night of “Who Do You Think You Are?” at 7 p.m. Friday, March 14, at the Logan Tabernacle. This fun event is free and open to the public. Everyone seems to be interested in learning about their ancestors. One of the most popular uses of the Internet is genealogy, searching family roots and connections. We seem to be interested in learning about our connections to other people, both near and far. Visit www. logantabernacle.blogspot.com for more information. Celebrate good times, come on! Sky View High School’s Encore performing group proudly presents its spring show, “Celebrate!” Come and enjoy song and dance numbers from all of your favorite eras, including classic favorites like “Joint is Jumpin’,” “Love is Here to Stay,” “Route 66” and “Rock and Roll is Here to Stay,” as well as contemporary hits including “SkyFall,” “Forget You” and “You’ll Be In My Heart.” Performances for “Celebrate!” will begin at 7 p.m. March 13-15 and 17. There will also be a 1 p.m. matinee on March 15. Tickets are $7 online at skyviewtix. org or $8 at the door. Family tickets (up to six people) are available for $30. Wellsville Elementary School is proud to present the musical “Aladdin Jr.” at 7 p.m. Friday, March 14, and Saturday, March 15, in the auditorium. Tickets are $3 per person or $15 for a family. Curves is holding its 16th annual food drive March 10-24. Curves is a weight-loss facility especially designed for women and as such wants to contribute to and appreciate the women of Cache Valley. This year, donations will benefit CAPSA and Child and Family Support Center. Come and contribute to the cause with a bag of nonperishable food or monetary contribution of at least $30. All new members who make a food or monetary donation will receive

a $0 service fee when joining Curves as either a Fitness or Curves Complete member. Please help them beat their goal from last year by dropping off a bag of groceries at Curves, 55 W. 1000 North. An amazing one-man-band, Scott Olsen will perform from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, March 14, at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza. Olsen has an amazing repertoire with a wide variety of styles. There is no cover charge. Celtic Night is coming to the Ellen Eccles Theatre at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 14, and Saturday, March 15. Traditionally presented by Inishfre Irish Dance Company and Leaping Lulu, this is the 10th annual Celtic Night, making it a special production for the whole cast. To commemorate the show’s 10th anniversary, Inishfre and An Tús Nua Irish Dance Academy will be performing together to make a few of the dance numbers extra entertaining. Tickets for Celtic Night 2014 are available at the Ellen Eccles Theatre box office at 43 S. Main St., by calling 7520026 or online at www.cachearts. org. Reserved seating prices are $13 to $20. Visit www.bridgerfolk. org and www.leapinglulu.com for more information. The Hyrum Royalty Pageant will be at 7 p.m. Friday, March 14, at the Hyrum Civic Center. Admission is free. The Shadow Dogs, a classic rock and blues band, will be playing at 8 p.m. Friday, March 14, at the Logan Eagles, 170 W. 900 North. Cover charge is $5 with valid ID. Eagles is a private club for members and guests.

SATURDAY The Mikesell Brothers will perform from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday, March 15, at Caffe Ibis, 52 Federal Ave. Don’t be fooled by their young age, these boys can play a mean guitar. Come have your minds blown by some amazing talent.

The Bridgerland Honor Gala Concert featuring the region’s top 7-9th grade band, orchestra and choir students is scheduled for 1 p.m. Saturday, March 15, in the Kent Concert Hall at Utah State University. The best music students from Box Elder, Cache and Franklin counties auditioned for the show and 350 were selected. Admission is free to the public. For information, contact Logan High School band director Chris Rasmussen at 232-3823. False Witness will perform with Tr3ason, Burn the Gallows and Skald at 7 p.m. Saturday, March 15, at Why Sound, 30 Federal Ave. Admission is $5. The Native Plant Propagation Workshop will be from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, March 15, at the USU Teaching Greenhouse, 1390 N. 800 East. Start native plants for your garden from seeds and cuttings at this hands-on workshop. All materials will be supplied, and you will leave with a planted seedling tray holding about 60 seeds. Learn water conservation strategies, germination times and get plans for an indoor lighting fixture to give your seedlings an early start. Cost is $20 for Master Gardeners and UNPS members; $25 for all others. Registration required. Please call 752-6263. Unicorn Pillow Theatre presents “Heads and Tales” by Carol Lauk at 2 and 4 p.m. Saturday, March 15, and Saturday, March 22, at the CVCA Bullen Center, 43 S. Main St. In “Heads and Tales,” a whimsical and energetic “professor” and her comical assistants guide 10-year-old T.J. through a series of adventures to free her imagination. Tickets are $3 and will be sold at the door. Seating is limited, so come early. For more information, visit www.centerfor thearts.us/unicorntheatre.htm. The LDS Singles 31+ March Square Dance will be from 7 to 9 p.m. Saturday, March 15, at the Willow Park building, 340 W. 700 South. We have a wellknown square dance caller com-

ing to help us do-si-do the night away. Come join us for a great time; please invite all your single friends. Visit www.cachesingles. org for more information. Cheyanne Thatcher & Phillip Hellewell will perform from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday, March 15, at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza, located across the street north of Maceys in Providence. Don’t miss Chey & Phil’s vocal/piano music; you’ll love their contemporary easylistening combination. Everyone is welcome. David Barker will be signing copies of his book “Science and Religion: Reconciling the Conflicts” from 3 to 6 p.m. Saturday, March 15, at Hastings, 50 E. 400 North. A charity dinner with bingo will be at 7 p.m. Saturday, March 15, at the Logan Eagles, 170 W. 900 North. Dinner is $10. Come on out and enjoy St. Patty’s bingo. Eagles is a private club for members and guests.

SUNDAY Tim Pearce will perform from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, March 16, at Caffe Ibis, 52 Federal Ave. From the Heart Choir from Rexburg, Idaho, will perform a free concert at 6 p.m. Sunday, March 16, at the Logan Tabernacle. Anyone and everyone is welcome. The Post-Mormon Community is a non-sectarian organization of individuals and families who have left Mormonism. The Cache Valley chapter meets for dinner and socializing at a local restaurant at 6:30 p.m. every Sunday. Newcomers welcome. For more information call 7704263 or visit www.postmormon. org/logan.

MONDAY The Ralph Smith Camp of DUP will meet at 1:30 p.m. Monday, March 17, at the LDS church at 1550 E. 1900 North in

North Logan. The William Hyde DUP Camp will meet at 1:30 p.m. Monday, March 17, downstairs in the Hyde Park Civic Center. There will be a history and lesson. Visitors are welcome. The William B. Preston DUP Camp will meet at 2 p.m. Monday, March 17, at the home of Patch Barfuss. The history will be given by LouJean Whittaker and the lesson by Zoe Nielsen.

TUESDAY The workshop “Financially Fit #7: Retirement & College Planning” will be at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 18, at the Little Theatre at Macey’s in Providence. For those out there who are amateurs in the investment game, this class will lay out a plan on how to smartly invest in your future. You must reserve a seat at the service desk.

WEDNESDAY Utah State University’s Department of Music presents the Jazz Combos annual spring concert at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 19, in the USU Performance Hall. Tickets are $10 adults, $8 youth and seniors, $5 USU faculty and staff and free for USU students with ID. For more information, visit the CCA Box Office in room 139-B of the Chase Fine Arts Center, call 7978022 or visit arts.usu.edu. Merit will perform with My New Mistress and September Say Goodbye at 8 p.m. Wednesday, March 19, at Why Sound, 30 Federal Ave. $5.

THURSDAY “Panini Pizzazz” is the title of the cooking class at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 20, at Macey’s Little Theatre in Providence. You must reserve a seat at the service desk. Classes are for ages 10 and up. Check us out on Facebook or visit littletheatre recipes.blogspot.com for more information.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 14, 2014

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Page 16 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, March 14, 2014

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