Issuu on Google+

A one-woman band

The Herald Journal

Feb. 25-March 3, 2011


Page 2 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 25, 2011

Cache The Herald Journal’s

Arts & Entertainment Calendar

On the cover:

From the editor

kburgess@hjnews.com

able slightly Asian look (courtesy of my mother’s Chinese genes.) On Monday, Lisa and the baby left the hospital and they are now resting came on the morning of Thursday, comfortably at home in Tucson, AriFeb. 17, when my sister, Lisa, called zona. My parents arrived Wednesday to tell me that her and have settled in for a three-week water had broken stay to help out while she heals. and she was on her Like many modern couples, Lisa way to the hospital. and her husband, Jason, are keeping At the time, I was friends and family informed about coasting through Max’s progress through Facebook, New Mexico on posting frequent photos and updates. a train with my My favorite is this comment from fiancé, Bruce — a Lisa, her first after the birth: “I’m die-hard Amtrak sure all parents think this about their fan. As I gazed out the window at the dry brown hills and child (and probably should), but my baby is the most amazing thing ever.” clear blue sky, I had that feeling of a distinct and unforgettable instant — a I can’t help but smile every time I pivot point where everything changes. read that. It’s an old cliche that the arrival of a child is a “miracle,” but Roughly 24 hour after that call, I became an aunt for the first time. Lit- there really doesn’t seem to be any tle Max Paul Stephens arrived at 5:17 better word for it. a.m. on Feb. 18, after Lisa endured 15 Here’s to my sister’s little miracle. hours of labor and a caesarean section — Kim Burgess (yes, she’s a trooper). Cache Magazine editor The healthy baby boy weighed in at and proud aunt 5 pounds 14 ounces and has an ador-

Slow Wave

Utah State presents 38th annual Pow-wow

Magazine

HiIlary Murray performs with multiple instruments during her looping show at Caffe Ibis on Friday. Braden Wolfe/Herald Journal

VERY NOW AND THEN, I’M E reminded that life is precious and extraordinary. One of those moments

What’s inside this week

(Page 4)

(Page 10)

(Page 10)

BYU Men’s Chorus comes to Logan Tabernacle

Books .......................p.13 Crossword.................p.14

‘Hall Pass’ offers few surprises

(Page 7)

(Page 5) Cowboy up at Rendezvous

Cute

pet photo of the week

This dog is available for adoption! Pet: Max From: Cache Humane Why he’s so lovable: Looking for a constant companion who will love being with you and be a perfect gentleman? I’m the BEST. I’m good with everybody — cats, gentle dogs and older kids — and I’m housetrained. I know lots of tricks and am very smart! I hardly ever bark. I’m not much of a snuggler nor do I sit in your lap, but I LOVE being with you. I like human company VERY much. I’m very low maintenance and I have a fantastic personality. Mellow and sweet! To learn more, call my foster mom at 890-3022.

Slow Wave is created from real people’s dreams as drawn by Jesse Reklaw. Ask Jesse to draw your dream! Visit www.slowwave.com to find out how.


‘The Secret Garden’ comes to Perry stage ERITAGE THEATRE H presents “The Secret Garden” at 7:30 p.m. March 4 to 26

on Mondays, Fridays and Saturdays. Saturday matinees at 2 p.m. on March 12 and 19. The play will be performed at Heritage Theatre, 2505 So. Hwy 89, Perry. Tickets for adults are $9; seniors and children $8. Call 723-8392 for reservations from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Monday or Wednesday thru Saturday. A young girl, Mary Lennox, is the sole survivor of a Cholera epidemic in India in 1904. Her parents and the other British officers dead, Mary is sent to the home of her uncle, Archibald Craven. He is her only surviving relative, his wife, Lily, having died in child-birth 10 years earlier. Archibald is a hunchback, grown bitter after the tragic death of his wife.

He has closed off her beloved garden and his heart, not even seeing his own son. When Mary comes to his home, the ghosts of her father and Lily seem to haunt her and her uncle. She turns to her maid, the gardener and a strange young man in the woods for companionship and guidance.

Page 3 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 25, 2011

All mixed up

Volunteer opportunities abound at Heritage Center

H

AVE YOU ALWAYS wanted to learn how to quilt, make butter or milk a cow? Are you looking for a family-friendly volunteer opportunity? The American West Heritage Center is preparing for another fun-filled year, and seeks volunteers to be part of it. New and returning volunteers are invited to the annual Volunteer Orientation and Pancake Breakfast at the AWHC from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 26.

Volunteers are an essential part of the AWHC’s mission to celebrate and teach about the history of the West from 1820 to 1920. Some volunteers dress in historical clothing, interact with visitors and animals and share their knowledge and skills with people of all ages. Other volunteers help behind the scenes with construction and restoration projects. There is even a need for volunteers to drive a train! The AWHC event calendar (found at www.awhc. org) is filled with festivals of

all kinds (such as Baby Animal Days, Daily Adventures during the summertime, and Fall Harvest Days), which means there are many diverse opportunities. For college students, internship credit may be available. Those who attend the Volunteer Orientation and Pancake Breakfast can expect a delicious meal, information about policies and procedures and an overview of the events at the AWHC. For more information, contact Lorraine Bowen at 2456050 x 24. 

A royal farce at Old Barn

T

HE OLD BARN COMMUNITY Theatre presents “Once Upon a Mattress,” the zany musical adaptation of the beloved fairy tale “The Princess and the Pea.” The show tells the story of Princess Winnifred (Amber Kacherian) who must pass a secret test devised by her future mother-in-law, the queen, (Cece Craner) before she can marry her prince (Brett Kirby). Other cast members include the King (Jay Greene), The Minstrel

(David Hull), Lady Larken (AnnMarie Murdock) and Sir Harry (Matt Jeppesen). The production is directed by Laura Lee and Marvin Hull. The show will be presented at 7:30 p.m. every Monday, Friday and Saturday from March 4 to 26. Matinees will be performed on March 12 and 19 at 2:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online at www.oldbarn. org or reserved by calling 435-458BARN.


Page 4 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 25, 2011

All mixed up

BYU Men’s Chorus makes first trip to Logan

B

RIGHAM YOUNG University’s Men’s Chorus will perform at 7 p.m. on Friday, March 4, at the Logan Tabernacle. Free admission. At 190 voices strong with regular extended tours, the BYU Men’s Chorus is the largest and one of the most popular men’s choirs in the United States. Conducting this critically-acclaimed choir is Rosalind Hall, a graduate of the Royal Academy of Music who has earned a host of accolades. As a native of Wales in Great Britain, Hall comes from a land with one of the strongest choral traditions in the world. She came to the

U.S. to continue her studies at BYU, earning a master’s degree. Prior to directing the Men’s Chorus, she was director of choral activities and music department chair at the Waterford School in Sandy, Utah. Men’s Chorus is known for concerts full of every kind of music, including Gregorian Chants, classical pieces, hymns, spirituals and traditional arrangements. The group has traveled to California, Arizona, Nevada, Idaho and throughout Utah performing as the feature choir and in popular venues like the American Choral Directors Association and the Celebrity Concert Series.

In 2009, Deseret Book rereleased the popular Men’s Chorus albums “Awake My Soul” and “Shout with Glory,” two of the group’s eight album releases. In the fall of 2005, Men’s Chorus released its latest commerical album, a longawaited disc titled “Praise Him.” Produced by Tantara Records, BYU’s own recording label, the CD features 19 songs that demonstrate the power and versatility of the group through a combination of anthems, folk songs and hymns. The CD includes familiar favorites like “Danny Boy,” “Shanandoah” and “A Mighty Fortress Is Our God.”

Film buffs invited to enter USU contest WO THOUSAND DOLLARS T is up for grabs at the 2011 Fringe Film Festival, presented by Utah State University’s Caine College of the Arts and the Logan Arthouse and Cinema. Entries must fit the 2011 Fringe theme “Twitterpated: a Spring Love Comedy” and be turned into the Chase Fine Arts Center Manager’s office (inside the Tippetts Exhibit Hall) with the official entry fee and form by April 1. “The short-film festival, which is scheduled to take place April 15 at the Logan Arthouse, will have a different vibe than in past years,” said Denise Albiston, marketing director for the Caine College of the Arts. “This is a chance to offer greater

exposure to Cache Valley film makers and display their talent in this community.” Rules, regulations, information and the entry form are available at the Fringe Film Festival website (arts.usu.edu/fringe). “Our goal is to make this film festival a little more like Sundance, except with a four-minute limit,” said Jonathan Ribera, co-owner of the Logan Arthouse. “We’re working with the Caine College of the Arts to up the prize money from last year’s $1,000 and add a few new community-engaging twists.” New aspects to this year’s film festival include requiring all films to follow the same theme, removing the use of required elements in films,

increased prize money and greater interaction with the winning entrants as directors explain the creativity behind their films at the festival, said Albiston. The $2,000 cash prize will be awarded to the entry that receives the Critics’ Choice Award, selected by a panel of professional judges. Other awards, based on the results of online voting at arts.usu.edu/fringe, may also be announced at the film festival. There is a $50 fee per entry and entrants must be 16 years of age or older to be eligible. For more information, call 7979203 or visit arts.usu.edu/fringe.

Museum explores beauty standards EAUTY” AND HOW “B it is perceived is the next topic at Utah State University’s Museum of Anthropology and its “Saturdays at the Museum” series. The museum presents educational displays Saturday, Feb. 26, that look at how perceptions and standards of beauty have changed through time among gender and cultures throughout the world. The event addresses ways

cultures have altered their looks through tattoos, piercings and other body modifications, including plastic surgery, foot binding and neck stretching. The museum offers informational tours at 11 a.m., 1 and 3 p.m. The museum will also provide free face painting, henna tattoo painting and hair tying for interested participants. The USU Museum of Anthropology is on the USU campus in

the south turret of the historic Old Main building, Room 252. In addition to its Saturday program hours, the Museum of Anthropology is open to USU students and members of the public six days a week, with regular hours Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free. For Saturday activities, free parking is available in the adjacent lot,


Page 5 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 25, 2011

USU geologist to discuss history of climate change

C

LIMATE CHANGE IS A hot topic of current interest but what do we know about climate changes that occurred in the distant past? Inquiring minds of all ages are invited to the Science Unwrapped presentation “Records of Past Climate Change” Friday, Feb. 25, at Utah State University. Featured speaker is Tammy Rittenour, assistant professor in USU’s Department of Geology and director of the USU Luminescence Lab. Her talk takes participants on a journey in paleoclimatology, the study of climatic conditions in the geologic past. The presentation, hosted by USU’s College of Science, begins at 7 p.m. in the Emert Auditorium, Room 130, of the Eccles Science Learning Center. Admission is free and open to all. Following Rittenour’s talk, attendees are invited to bring their “mystery rocks” for identification by USU

geologists. Participants will enjoy free refreshments along with a variety of hands-on activities in the ESLC atrium ranging from Pangaea puzzles and climatic maps to examination of tree rings and learning how geologic samples are collected.

Teen piano prodigy joins Cache Symphony Orchestra

T

HE CACHE SYMPHONY Orchestra will perform at 7:30 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 27, in the Kent Concert Hall at Utah State University. Admission is free. The program will begin with Franz Schubert’s Overture to the Magic Harp, originally a piano duet written for a short play that evolved into the famous Rosamunde. Following this the orchestra will amuse you with the Schvanda Polka, a humorous piece written by a Czech-American composer who was otherwise famous for writing serious, humorless music. The third piece of the night will feature one of the winners of a local Piano Festival, Jessica Christensen (age 15), who has studied the piano since age 6 and received several awards throughout her career. This year she will be performing the tranquil

2nd movement of Chopin’s Piano Concerto in F minor. Next on the program will be the performance of Alexander Borodin’s Symphony No. 2 in B minor. Borodin was better known as a chemist and a physician. The tone then lightens up with a performance of Debussy’s Ballet from Petit Sweet, which was originally written for four hands on a piano and was later arranged for a full orchestra by Henri Büsser. The concert will conclude with a piece from the ballet Gayane. The famous Sabre Dance by Aram Khachaturian is an intense piece written for sword-wielding ballet dancers. The Cache Symphony Orchestra is in its 37th season and has grown from a small chamber orchestra performing in the lobby of the Kent Concert Hall to an 85 member symphony orchestra performing on the stage. For more information, visit http://cachechamberorchestra.

Giddy up at first Cowboy Rendezvous J

ACKSON HOLE’S famous Bar J. Wranglers will be traveling to Hyrum for the first annual Cache Valley Cowboy Rendezvous, which also features dozens of other performers. This event, scheduled on March 4 to 6 at Mountain Crest High School, is a reunion of western musicians, cowboy poets, and artisans to promote the culture of western life. The three-day event will feature headline performers The Bar J. Wranglers for a Friday evening concert and Saturday matinee performance along with other guests Eli Barsi, Andy Nelson and Larry Wilder.

On Friday evening and all day Saturday there will be a continuous round of Cowboy Poetry and Western Music on three stages – two of which will be for published’ and/or professional performers, one being an open mic stage for local, and/or unpublished performers. Each poet will be given a 10 minute time slot, with musicians receiving 20 minutes. Other attractions will be dutch oven dinners, vendor and artisan trading post, educational activities and a poetry contest for kids, culminating with a family dance on Saturday evening. Event organizer Dale Major said that he hopes

to highlight local talent through the event. He also stressed that you don’t have to be a cowboy to enjoy the program. “That’s why we have the slogan ‘Spurs and Chaps are Optional,’” Major explained. Tickets for the general rendezvous are $5 for USU students and seniors, $8 for adults, $20 for families of up to eight. Tickets for the Bar J. Wranglers are $20 and $25. Cost for dinner is $12.50; lunch is $7.50. For more information and a complete schedule of events, go to http://cache valleycowboyrendezvous. com.


Page 6 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 25, 2011

Film New this week “I Am Number Four” Rated PG-13 ★★ Great, another Chosen One. Director D.J. Caruso’s action tale “I Am Number Four” is mostly familiar stuff, presenting the latest teen outsider coming into possession of his latent superpowers just in time to battle evil forces intent on world chaos. While the filmmakers manage some entertaining fight sequences, they offer a standard-issue gang of heroes backed by a vague, unoriginal mythology about human-looking aliens finding refuge on Earth after their planet is destroyed. Alex Pettyfer has the title role, one of nine youths being hunted down by the destroyers of their own world before the kids develop genetically inherited abilities that could help them defeat the bad guys, who now aim to invade Earth. One character notes that his upbringing was like an endless episode of “The X-Files,” but even weak installments of that show had more creepy chills and clever twists than this. 109 minutes. “Unknown” Rated PG-13 ★★1⁄2 A couple of years ago, Liam Neeson starred as a former CIA agent in “Taken,” searching for his kidnapped daughter and kicking as much butt as necessary to find her. Now, he’s continuing this fascinating late-career path, remaining in actionstar mode as he creeps ever closer to 60. It’s a chilly little thriller about amnesia, mistrust and lost identity, with the kinds of chases and explosions you’ve seen countless times before. Interchangeable Euro baddies lurk in the shadows, seemingly omniscient and omnipresent, waiting to

strike. Nothing and no one is what it seems, which makes the unpredictability somewhat more predictable. Still, Neeson’s always-intelligent screen presence, his nuance and gravitas, help elevate “Unknown” beyond its preposterous elements. He gets help from a classy supporting cast, including Frank Langella and Sebastian Koch. And, to be fair, the film from Spanish director Jaume ColletSerra has its suspenseful moments, including the startling, precisely staged taxicab accident that sends Neeson’s character, Dr. Martin Harris, on his dangerous journey. Martin had traveled to Berlin for a scientific conference, but the crash places him in a four-day coma. When he awakens, his wife (January Jones) insists she doesn’t know him and another man (Aidan

Quinn) has assumed his identity. Martin seeks help from the cab driver (Diane Kruger) to piece together what happened. 106 minutes.

Still playing “The Eagle” Rated PG-13 ★★1⁄2 The gladiatorial thumbs-up or thumbs-down is a key plot point in this ancient Roman adventure. The movie itself merits more of a thumb wriggling horizontally, nudging upward for its precise detail and gorgeous landscapes but downward for its somewhat hollow characters and their admirable but monotonous sense of honor. Channing Tatum and Jamie Bell deliver solid though unremarkable performances as a former Roman soldier and a British slave on a quest beyond the edge of the

known world to retrieve the standard of a lost legion that vanished in the wilds of 2nd-century Scotland. Director Kevin Macdonald (”The Last King of Scotland”) crafts a technically sumptuous epic, glorious to the eye though often dry and uninvolving to the ear. The movie is based on Rosemary Sutcliff’s 1954 novel, “The Eagle of the Ninth,” a tale written for young readers that does not ripen well for a modern grown-up audience. The skirmishes and images are suited for adult crowds, yet the ideals and emotions that bond the main characters are boyish and stunted, leaving the movie caught between mature action and shallow characterizations. 114 minutes.

“Gnomeo & Juliet” Rated G ★★ This animated riff on “Romeo and Juliet,” with yard gnomes standing in for our star-crossed lovers, doesn’t have a single original idea in its pointy, ceramic head. Spirited and brisk as this family film can be, its energy cannot disguise the fact that it’s an awkward mash-up of Shakespeare puns, hackneyed pop culture references and familiar Elton John songs. The concept is clever enough — I mean, come on, who doesn’t like yard gnomes? — but that’s pretty much all this film from director Kelly Asbury (”Shrek 2”) is. Like “Snakes on a Plane,” the title is the gag, and it tells you all you need

to know. And of course, “Gnomeo & Juliet” is in 3-D. While adding a third dimension can provide an inspired sense of perspective and makes some of the details pop in a tactile way — the chips in the gnomes’ paint, the smudges of dirt on their faces — it is, as always, unnecessary. “Gnomeo & Juliet” does feature a strong voice cast, though, led by James McAvoy, Emily Blunt, Michael Caine and Maggie Smith. Some of the one-liners and visual bits hit their targets, but for the most part, reheated gags and sequences that recall earlier, better animated films are the norm. 84 minutes. — All reviews by The Associated Press

THE LATEST ECO-GUIDE IS ONLINE NOW

Going green can help you do more than save the planet. It can help you save money too! Our Think Green e-section is online now and offers living tips, eco-friendly activities and more to help you get started.

follow us on

THINK GREEN

A SPECIAL SECTION TO

Don’t miss the printed section coming out on Sunday, February 27th. Take the first step and check out Think Green at www.hjnews.com today!

facebook and win! Help us reach 1500 fans and you’ll be entered to win one of four $25 gift certificates to Lee’s Marketplace!

facebook.com/theheraldjournal


T

HE FARRELLY brothers are obsessed with making movies about shallow males who act more like giant manbabies than actual human beings. “Dumb and Dumber,� “There’s Something About Mary,� “Shallow Hal,� all full of men who act like 14-year-olds. “Hall Pass� is no different. Again we’re faced with two leads that have not grasped the concept of reality. Here Rick (Owen Wilson) and Fred (Jason Sudeikis) are convinced that if it wasn’t for their marriages they’d be picking up chicks left and right. Their wives played by Christina Applegate and Jenna Fischer are sick of their childish behavior, so at the behest of their friend who’s a shrink they decide to give their husbands a “hall pass.� This means that for an entire week Rick and Fred, two suburbanites who’ve been completely cut off from the dating world for years, have now been thrust back into that world unencumbered by their burdensome marriages. Pretty much everything about “Hall Pass� requires supreme suspension of disbelief. First of all we’re supposed to believe that Rick and Fred were somehow able to land Jenna Fischer and Christina Applegate as spouses. Second, we’re supposed to swallow the fact that they’d rather be messing around with other women. Third we’re made to believe that this is actually a good and healthy idea to strengthen one’s marriage. So, the hall pass week begins. Rick and Fred head on over to the nearest Applebee’s to meet

The Reel Place By Aaron Peck

â˜…â˜…Â˝ “Hall Passâ€? Rated r

some hotties. It’s then they realize that this isn’t going to be as easy as they thought it was going to be. It is funny watching Rick and Fred flounder around parties and nightclubs trying to pick up on young twenty-somethings that won’t even give them the time of day. Maybe they aren’t the ladies men Action!

2297 N. Main MOVIE HOTLINE 753-6444 WWW.WALKERCINEMAS.NET ALL SEATS ALL TIMES $3.00 OpEN SuNdAy-FRIdAy AT 3:45pM OpEN SATuRdAy AT 11:30AM FOR OuR MATINEES

yOGI BEAR 2d (pG) 4:00

Saturday Matinee

12:00 & 2:00

TRON LEGACy (pG) 4:45

THE dILEMMA (pG-13) 7:15 & 9:45

THE TOuRIST (pG-13) 9:30

Saturday Matinee 12:40

CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE THE GREEN VOyAGE OF THE HORNET (pG-13) dAWN TREAdER 6:45 & 9:15

(pG) 4:30 & 7:00

Saturday Matinee HARRy pOTTER 11:45 & 2:10 & THE dEATHLy HOLLOWS pT. 1 THE ROOMMATE

(pG-13) 4:15 Saturday Matinee 12:20

(pG-13) 7:30 & 9:20

they’ve made themselves out to be. But, then the Farrelly brothers regress to their old tricks and stick in scenes like guys eating pot brownies and getting into shenanigans on the golf course. This is a hard R-rated raunchy comedy, which the Farrelly brothers have been making for quite a long time. With “There’s Something About Mary,� the brothers created a surreal comedy about a bunch of numbskulls who were infatuated with one girl. It

was funny. It’s still funny. The idea, however, has worn thin. “Hall Pass� isn’t that different. It’s got the Farrellys written all over it from the gross-out conversations to the seemingly indispensible side character that suddenly jumps into the picture as a homicidal maniac. I did laugh, quite often, during “Hall Pass.� It’s got some witty, bizarre scenes including a scene where Rick and Fred are overheard, via video cameras, making fun of their

rich friend and his wife. There’s some genuinely comedic material in here, but in the end the movie becomes way too preachy

for its own good. We know that Rick and Fred are going to have a revelation about their marriages. It’s a given. The movie also cuts back and forth between what the guys are doing and what their wives are up to. The scenes with Fischer and Applegate are dreadfully dull, and only serve to stop the movie dead in its tracks. The Farrellys know how to craft a decent comedy, but this isn’t something you haven’t seen from them before. Slightly different gimmick, same juvenile characters, but if that’s what you’re looking for then “Hall Pass� has got you covered. Aaron also writes for TheReelPlace.com. Feedback at aaronpeck46@gmail.com.

A Reunion of Cowboy Poets, Musicians & Artisans with Featured Artists

1-":*/('&#."3 .07*&)05-*/&

6/*7&34*5:

45"%*6.

8/1307*%&/$&

GNOMEO and JULIET in 2D (G) 12:35 2:25 4:15 6:05 7:55 9:45

1:01 4:10 6:40 9:05

(PG-13)

GNOMEO and JULIET in Digital 3D (G) 12:30 2:20 4:10 6:00 7:50 9:40

12:55 3:05 5:15 7:25 9:35

UNKOWN

(PG-13)

12:45 3:00 5:15 7:30 9:45

DRIVE ANGRY in 3D

9:30

(R)

12:40 2:50 5:00 7:10 9:20

HALL PASS

(R)

12:40 2:55 5:10 7:25 9:40

12:45 3:00 5:15 7:30 9:45

.07*&445"%*6.

12:35 2:40 4:45 6:50 9:05

TANGLED in 2D (PG) 4:15 NO STRINGS ATTACHED (R)

DRIVE ANGRY in 3D (R) UNKNOWN (PG-13)

12:40 2:55 5:10 7:25 9:40

HALL PASS (R)

12:30 2:50 5:10 7:30 9:50

JUSTIN BIEBER: NEVER SAY NEVER in 2D (PG) 12:30 2:40 4:50 7:00 9:10

BAR J. WRAnGleRs

12:30 2:45 5:00 7:15 9:30

JUST GO WITH IT

BIG MOMMAS: LIKE FATHER LIKE SON (PG-13) TANGLED (PG) 12:35 2:40 4:45 JUST GO WITH IT (PG-13) 6:50 I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13)

/& #&)*/%)0.&%&105 .*%/*()54)08'3*4"5 I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13)

/035)."*/

6:45 FRI/SAT 9:00

TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 4:00 FRI/SAT 9:05 COUNTRY STRONG (PG-13) 6:30 KINGS SPEECH (R) 4:20 6:50 FRI/SAT 9:15

BIG MOMMAS: LIKE FATHER LIKE SON (PG-13) 4:05 6:45 FRI/SAT 9:10 127 HOURS (R) 4:10 THE EAGLE (R) 6:55 FRI/SAT 9:10

GIFT BOOKS AND CARDS AVAILABLE BUY TICKETS ONLINE AT WWW.MOVIESWEST.COM

Andy nelson Cowboy Poet & Humorist

elI BARsI Canada’s Cowgirl

lARRy WIldeR National Yodeling Champion

MARCH 4-6

MOUNTAIN CREST HIGH SCHOOL HYRUM, UT

For Information & Tickets, Go To: www.cachevalleycowboyrendezvous.com Call Toll Free 1-866-967-8167

Get Your Tickets at Maceys in Providence, IFA in Hyde Park, Ridleys in Hyrum or Tremonton.

sponsors:

Host Hotel

Spurs and Chaps are Optional

Page 7 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, February

‘Hall Pass’ is classic Farrelly fare


A one-woman band

HIlary Murray performs with multiple instruments during her looping show at Caffe Ibis Friday.

B

y the time she was eight years old, Hilary Murray had a pretty good idea of what she wanted to do, and she knew it would involve music. She and her two siblings were taking piano lessons in their Smithfield home, but for Hilary that wasn’t enough. She wanted a violin. As her dad, Mark Murray, tells the story, Hilary had her heart set on a beautiful — and expensive — instrument, one that Mark and her mom, Naomi Stamm, couldn’t afford at the time. So Mark, a competitive trap shooter, went to a pawn shop and traded “an old 10-gauge shotgun” for a serviceable violin. “We all took piano, but I was the only one who would stick with it and practice,” Hilary recalls. “My parents were very supportive. A little girl learning violin has to be about the most nerve-wracking thing you can listen to.” It wasn’t long before the investments of time and money paid off, as Hilary spent most of her 20s touring the country with different bands. After briefly attending Dixie State College on a music scholarship (and dropping out because “I got sick of people telling me how to

play”) she started performing in informal venues, such as campfires, and something about that unleashed her creativity. “I had never thought outside the box before that,” Hilary says. She joined a heavy metal band, then started doing openmic performances, then joined a bluegrass band. At some point she caught a performance by Theresa Andersson, a folk/indie pop artist who uses a loop — a device that repeats a sample, either of voice or instrument — that allows a musician to layer their performance. Hilary saw a chance to become her own frontwoman and bought a loop, which she says is “like learning a separate instrument.” After practicing for over a year, she decided she was ready to debut, but it wasn’t easy: “That first show I don’t think I took a breath,” she recalls. Eventually she got the hang of it, and for performances now she hauls her guitar, violin, cello, mandolin, two separate loop stations, delay pedal, phaser, volume pedal, box switch, tuner and octaver. She may be a solo performer, but she can’t pack light. Her musical tastes are as varied as her equipment

— “I play a little of everything but polka” — and on a recent evening at Caffe Ibis she covered songs by Bob Marley, Death Cab for Cutie and Passion Pit. Hilary, who resists being pigeon-holed into a single genre, also writes a lot of her own songs, and says she is “constantly finding inspiration.” With her new, one-womanband style, a given song might start with Hilary beat-boxing into the mic until she finds a rhythm she likes, and catching that on a loop. Then she might catch a riff from the guitar on the other loop, and once those two loops are coordinated, she’ll pick up the violin and start singing. Many times she’ll even harmonize with herself, adjusting volume dials with her toes (she performs barefoot) while clutching a guitar in her right hand and her violin and bow in her left. Any one of those talents would be impressive, but add them together and it’s nothing short of amazing. “Hilary is just so unique in her style,” says Holly Conger, who coordinates performances for Caffe Ibis. “The way she uses layers of music to create this big sound, you can’t just walk away,

See a video of Hilary online at www.hjnews..com. and catch her on March 11 and 12 at Fredrico’s Pizza or on March 25 at Caffe Ibis.. For more information, call Hilary at 720-329-7067 or go to http://www. reverbnation.com/hilarilly. To learn more about events at Caffe Ibis, which pays performers to put on free weekly shows, call Holly Conger at 753-4777.

you have to stop and listen.” Looping is gradually catching on around the country, Hilary says, and she has developed a following in the Logan area even though “this is pretty new to Cache Valley for sure. A lot of people don’t understand what I’m doing, but Cache Valley has really embraced me.” Although music is no longer her primary source of income, her CD keeps selling out locally, and Hilary still tours — this week and next she’ll be playing in Colorado — in addition to working as a barrista at the Ibis. She also teaches snowboarding at Beaver Mountain and recently got engaged to Nick Kiely, so she’d like to settle down and stay close to home. She practices her music 10 hours a week, “always trying to grow and learn more and improve,” she says, and she’s come to enjoy life without a band. See HILARY on p. 12

* Story by Lance Frazier * Photos by Braden Wolfe

HIlary Murray performs with multiple instruments during her looping show at Caffe Ibis Friday.


A one-woman band

HIlary Murray performs with multiple instruments during her looping show at Caffe Ibis Friday.

B

y the time she was eight years old, Hilary Murray had a pretty good idea of what she wanted to do, and she knew it would involve music. She and her two siblings were taking piano lessons in their Smithfield home, but for Hilary that wasn’t enough. She wanted a violin. As her dad, Mark Murray, tells the story, Hilary had her heart set on a beautiful — and expensive — instrument, one that Mark and her mom, Naomi Stamm, couldn’t afford at the time. So Mark, a competitive trap shooter, went to a pawn shop and traded “an old 10-gauge shotgun” for a serviceable violin. “We all took piano, but I was the only one who would stick with it and practice,” Hilary recalls. “My parents were very supportive. A little girl learning violin has to be about the most nerve-wracking thing you can listen to.” It wasn’t long before the investments of time and money paid off, as Hilary spent most of her 20s touring the country with different bands. After briefly attending Dixie State College on a music scholarship (and dropping out because “I got sick of people telling me how to

play”) she started performing in informal venues, such as campfires, and something about that unleashed her creativity. “I had never thought outside the box before that,” Hilary says. She joined a heavy metal band, then started doing openmic performances, then joined a bluegrass band. At some point she caught a performance by Theresa Andersson, a folk/indie pop artist who uses a loop — a device that repeats a sample, either of voice or instrument — that allows a musician to layer their performance. Hilary saw a chance to become her own frontwoman and bought a loop, which she says is “like learning a separate instrument.” After practicing for over a year, she decided she was ready to debut, but it wasn’t easy: “That first show I don’t think I took a breath,” she recalls. Eventually she got the hang of it, and for performances now she hauls her guitar, violin, cello, mandolin, two separate loop stations, delay pedal, phaser, volume pedal, box switch, tuner and octaver. She may be a solo performer, but she can’t pack light. Her musical tastes are as varied as her equipment

— “I play a little of everything but polka” — and on a recent evening at Caffe Ibis she covered songs by Bob Marley, Death Cab for Cutie and Passion Pit. Hilary, who resists being pigeon-holed into a single genre, also writes a lot of her own songs, and says she is “constantly finding inspiration.” With her new, one-womanband style, a given song might start with Hilary beat-boxing into the mic until she finds a rhythm she likes, and catching that on a loop. Then she might catch a riff from the guitar on the other loop, and once those two loops are coordinated, she’ll pick up the violin and start singing. Many times she’ll even harmonize with herself, adjusting volume dials with her toes (she performs barefoot) while clutching a guitar in her right hand and her violin and bow in her left. Any one of those talents would be impressive, but add them together and it’s nothing short of amazing. “Hilary is just so unique in her style,” says Holly Conger, who coordinates performances for Caffe Ibis. “The way she uses layers of music to create this big sound, you can’t just walk away,

See a video of Hilary online at www.hjnews..com. and catch her on March 11 and 12 at Fredrico’s Pizza or on March 25 at Caffe Ibis.. For more information, call Hilary at 720-329-7067 or go to http://www. reverbnation.com/hilarilly. To learn more about events at Caffe Ibis, which pays performers to put on free weekly shows, call Holly Conger at 753-4777.

you have to stop and listen.” Looping is gradually catching on around the country, Hilary says, and she has developed a following in the Logan area even though “this is pretty new to Cache Valley for sure. A lot of people don’t understand what I’m doing, but Cache Valley has really embraced me.” Although music is no longer her primary source of income, her CD keeps selling out locally, and Hilary still tours — this week and next she’ll be playing in Colorado — in addition to working as a barrista at the Ibis. She also teaches snowboarding at Beaver Mountain and recently got engaged to Nick Kiely, so she’d like to settle down and stay close to home. She practices her music 10 hours a week, “always trying to grow and learn more and improve,” she says, and she’s come to enjoy life without a band. See HILARY on p. 12

* Story by Lance Frazier * Photos by Braden Wolfe

HIlary Murray performs with multiple instruments during her looping show at Caffe Ibis Friday.


Page 10 - The Herald Journal - Cache Magazine - Friday, February 25, 2011

All mixed up

USU hosts annual Pow-wow

T

HE 38TH ANNUAL POWWOW hosted by the Utah

State University Native American Student Council (NASC), “Echoing Traditional Ways,” will be Feb. 25 and 26 in the Nelson Field House on the Logan campus. Prizes include a $1,000 winnertakes-all drum contest. Dance categories include: golden age, traditional, grass, fancy, jingle, tiny-tots and a NASC committee sponsored switch dance. There is also a give-away for senior citizens. The $2,000 Iron Man Grass Dance Special, sponsored by the Denny Family, is cancelled. Special guests include the Crazy Horse Singers of South Dakota, Jermaine Bell of Riverton, Wyo., Meredith Kanip of Fort Duchesne, Utah, Jeremy Garcia-Standing Soldier, of Cedar City, and Miss Indian Utah State University, Gabrielle George, who is passing on her crown earlier in the week. Dancer registration fee is $5 and drum registration is $25. Registration fees are due at the door. Registration table opens Friday, Feb. 25, at 3 p.m. in the Nelson Field House.

A

Participants of the 2010 USU Pow-wow during the Grand Entry.

Grand Entry begins Friday at 7 p.m. with ongoing processions occurring at 12 and 6 p.m. the following Saturday. Parking is available in the Taggart Student Center Parking Terrace and the open air lot, east of the Field House. Admission is $3 for the general public and $2 for senior citizens and USU students with ID. Children 7 and under enter free. A concession and fry bread

stand will be available. For more information on overnight stay and group rates, contact the University Inn at 797-0017. For vending opportunities, contact the USU Native American Student Council at 797-1728 or nasc@aggiemail.usu.edu. If you’d like more information, or to schedule interviews with the Native American Student Council, call Sandra McCabe: 623-363-1115.

Local Folk band to play at Crumb Brothers

T

HE NEXT CRUMB Brothers Bakery concert features an up-and-coming trio, The New Folk Revival, on Saturday Feb. 26, at 7:30 p.m. at Crumb Brothers Bakery, 291 S. 300 West in Logan. New Folk Revival features Pat Lambert on guitar and lead vocals, Eric Wagner on various instruments and lead vocals, and Joe Farmer on bass and harmony vocals. The band began with Lambert and Wagner in early 2010, with Farmer adding the bass note in the fall of 2010. While the band is new, the members have more than 50 years of combined musical experi-

Historian’s lecture opens Utah State Founder’s Day

ence behind them. As the band name implies, the band plays mostly folk music, including some originals and other tunes from the Celtic and American folk music repertoire. Influences include Nancy Griffith, Emmy Lou Harris, Kate Wolf, Gillian Welch, Bill Staines, and Adrianne Young. With a variety of songs both new and old, the band presents these with rich vocal harmony, a dash of humor, and tasteful instrumentation. Lambert began playing guitar as a child. Over the years she has played solo for a wide variety of events and church gatherings.

Farmer has been performing for more than 35 years, playing guitar, mandolin, and bass. He played with Wagner and others in the Down Home Band for 13 years, a band which played regularly for Logan’s Summerfest Art Fair and Festival of the American West. Wagner is a singer and multiinstrumentalist, playing guitar, harmonica, violin, and cittern. He began performing in 1985 with the band County Line in Moscow, Idaho. Tickets are $13 and are available by calling 757-3468. Seating is very limited, so advance purchase is recommended.

WARD-WINNING historian Jared Farmer will kick off Founder’s Day events at Utah State University with his talk “Possessed by the Past,” at the David B. Haight Alumni House March 4. Farmer is the featured guest for the College of Humanities and Social Sciences’ Distinguished Alumni Speaker Series. “My education at Utah State University changed my life and shaped my career as a history professor,” Farmer said. “I will share my thoughts on the value of a history education for everyone, not just historians.” Farmer, a native of Provo, graduated from USU in 1996 and earned his doctorate at Stanford University. He now serves on the faculty of the State University of New York at Stony Brook, specializing in environmental history and the history of the American West. He has published two books, including “On Zion’s Mount: Mormons, Indians, and the American Landscape,” which received the 2009 Francis Parkman Prize from the the Society of American Historians — an honor awarded to the best book in American history each year. His third book, “Trees in Paradise: A California History” is forthcoming from W.W. Norton & Company, Inc. “Jared’s intellectual work

revolves around places and the different meanings people give those places over time,” said USU history professor David Rich Lewis. “As a native Utahan, he embraces this place and people, telling our collective history in the most complex yet personal way. He’s one of the most analytical people I’ve ever known, but also one of the most engaging storytellers. I expect his presentation to contain good doses of both.” Farmer made a good impression early on with the faculty of the USU history department. As an undergraduate he interned with the “Western Historical Quarterly” and began writing his first book. “I think he knew, and I found out before he graduated, that he was going to be a historian of the West and environment and Utah,” Rich Lewis said. “I think we all sensed greatness in this most unusual individual.” The College of Humanities and Social Sciences welcomes prominent alumni back to campus throughout the year to discuss their career trajectories and emerging issues in their fields. Talks are open to all. Students in the college are encouraged to meet these distinguished alumni and learn how their education at USU prepared them for the future.


oys” “My B -Balls t n a S ie by Kar e joy

oh th a boy”! ay, but can’t s s, “You have cry s d r o y W ctor sa s’s I laugh, I the Do When ries, then pee my little guy. s, He c my arm l He’s in ve I fee e, the lo ond so real! s lo c im b I hold h s strong, the bby feet u n h o c ti o d n m a My e ands sweet! h o y s b b h Chu are o s y o b y Baby and pla ey run h ! y T a t! d s ll fa ey go a row so They g ever stop! Th ey do not n t y u th ht? The tired, b e caug I get so p! Can one b a an more I need n go no e door a c I k g out th en I thin art Just wh own, and goin y take my he r e t. g r th e ta , ’r s s r y l e e il Th ey w y pray th m s e ie k il They ta their own fam s Soon, ttle boy e my li toys b s y a of alw They’ll d faces, lots bing, fun Excite nning, clim un. es g, ru Jumpin ing faces in th w Glo ve up abo ! Father so much love y m k n e m I tha g brin ys, who For bo

Both by Vicki Nielson

GET YOUR STUFF PUBLISHED! The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board is a place for our local community to share, well ... anything! From short stories to poems to recipes to photos to unique tips when it comes to rearranging your closet, Cache Magazine wants your stuff! Send it all to kburgess@hjnews.com or mail it to Cache Magazine, 75 W. 300 North, Logan, UT 84321. We’ll be waiting!

“Have a Heart” by Anonymous Heartless people are at bottom stupid; I have never met anyone of intelligence Who did not resonate to the Sufferings of others. (Clever, yes; Intelligent, no; There is a very real difference.)

“Trapped” by Trevor O. Larsen Blind by the lies When daylight is outside Truth can be cruel At least we all know that it’s true Lies can be comforting At least we all know that it can be frightening Years go by fast Yell at all, that’s the past A stain that stings the mind Calls us to be so divine Mysteries seal the truth To concern, is to be at youth To most of some youth Not to see everything through and through Find it knows well After all, we all do know well Mind is burning towards the cell Can’t I just ring the bell? Truth is nothing but lies Go on and yell your cries Nobody will respect your mind Until you follow their lies You will soon forever die Trapped

Page 11 - The Herald Journal - Cache Magazine - Friday, February 25, 2011

The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board


Page 12 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 25, 2011

Theater

‘127 Hours’ director turns to the stage By The Associated Press

D

ANNY BOYLE MADE the world root for a Mumbai street urchin in “Slumdog Millionaire,” made James Franco sweat as a climber trapped in a Utah canyon for “127 Hours.” Then for his next trick, he made a monster. The Academy Award-winning director returns to the British stage after 15 years with “Frankenstein,” a new adaptation of Mary Shelley’s Gothic chiller about a scientist who builds himself a man, with tragic consequences for himself and his creation. The show opens Tuesday at London’s National Theatre and its run is already sold out. In part, that’s due to anticipation about what the visually inventive Boyle — working with longtime design collaborator Mark Tildesley — will pull off. It’s also a product of the high-profile casting of Benedict Cumberbatch — a rising star recently seen as the dashing Baker Street detective in the BBC’s TV series “Sherlock” — and Jonny Lee Miller, star of Boyle’s “Trainspotting,” and a regular on TV series “Eli Stone” and “Dexter.” The two actors alternate the roles of Victor Frankenstein and his creation — a decision that plays up the idea that the scientist and the monster are mirror

Hilary Continued from p. 8 “I can play the songs I want and not play the songs I don’t like,” Hilary says, adding that she doesn’t miss the complications and drama of organizing rehearsals and performances for a group with different personalities and agendas. “I have a lot more freedom in what I do,

AP photo

In this photo taken Jan. 25, playwriter Nick Dear poses for a portrait outside Britain’s National Theatre on River Thames’ South Bank ahead of the theatre’s new production of Frankenstein, in London. “We’re not just looking at scaring people with a monster,” said Dear, who has tried to remain more faithful to Shelley’s 1818 novel than most previous adaptations. The play avoids the Mword. The character is called The Creature, the term most often used in the book.

images, two halves of a flawed human whole. Playwright Nick Dear said the casting of two notably handsome actors also helps ensure that “no one is expecting the eight-foot freak” with bolts in its head. “We’re not just looking at scaring people with a monster,” said Dear, who has tried to remain more faithful to Shelley’s 1818 novel than most previous adaptations. The play avoids the M-word — the character is

called The Creature, Shelley’s preferred term. “What we’re really looking at is the relationship between the scientist and his experiment,” Dear said. “Dr. Frankenstein tries to create this thing in his own image, and he gets it wrong.” Audiences elsewhere in Britain, Europe and the United States can see the play when it is broadcast in movie theaters as part of the National Theatre Live

which is awesome.” The violin is still her favorite instrument — her original violin long since having been replaced by a custom-made instrument — although she has come to “really love the cello,” and she’s resigned to buying other instruments in the future. “I think I’m always going to stay in the poor house because I’m always finding new stuff I like,” she says with a chuckle.

She particularly enjoys entertaining children, who are fascinated by her equipment and the lively nature of her shows. Although she doesn’t rely on her music to make a living anymore, it’s definitely a lifestyle, one she doesn’t plan to give up soon. “I keep on getting positive reinforcement,” she says. “So I’ll keep going until that stops, and then I’ll reconsider.”

series. The theater plans to broadcast performances on March 17 and 24 — one with Cumberbatch as the Creature, the second with Miller in that role. “Frankenstein” has been adapted countless times — from the black-and-white 1930s classic starring Boris Karloff to the schlocky Hammer Horror flicks of the 1950s and Kenneth Branagh’s lavish 1994 movie version, which starred Robert De Niro as the Creature. Some of the images are so familiar they border on cliche: The mad scientist amid steaming potions and sparking machines in his lab; the brute, horrible creature rejected by his creator, wreaking havoc as he searches for love. Dear — who first discussed adapting “Frankenstein” with

Boyle when they worked together at the Royal Shakespeare Company 20 years ago — says he has tried to steer clear of cliche. And Boyle and his team have looked for a new visual language for the story. This is no dark, Gothic world of shadows and mist. Tildesley, who worked on Boyle’s films “Millions,” ‘’Sunshine” and “28 Days Later,” has lit the stage with 3,500 light bulbs and swathed the 1,100-seat auditorium in bandages. Tildesley said he wants the audience to feel the heat and the light that bring the Creature to life. “We really didn’t want to do that whole horror thing of black,” Tildesley said. “We have this big white stage, this intense light.


‘Blind Side’ star pens autobiography By The Associated Press

O

F THE MANY WELLchronicled challenges Michael Oher has overcome in his young life, the task of writing an autobiography has to be the most strange: How do you tell your own story after it’s been seen on the big screen in an Oscar-winning-film? In “I Beat the Odds,” Oher, with a capable assist from author and former Sports Illustrated associate editor Don Yaeger, mostly succeeds in his stated goal of going beyond “The Blind Side,” a best-selling book by Michael Lewis and then a box-office smash starring Sandra Bullock. While there’s some inevitable retread here — Lewis is, after all, one of the finest journalists of his generation — there’s much to be gained from hearing the story straight

from the man dubbed “Big Mike.” His own voice is matter-of-fact, both hopeful and a touch melancholy. His experience growing up poor in Memphis, Tenn., was, if anything, more harrowing than it was portrayed in the film. He saw a baby shot by a stray bullet, struggled to find meals, and his mother’s onagain, off-again relationship with drugs nearly prevented

him from reaching his potential. “My mother did her best,” Oher writes. “I have to give her that much. When she was sober, she worked hard to give us a good home and look after us. The problem was that she was not sober very much.” There are other interesting rejoinders to Hollywood’s version of Oher’s life. He was not, as portrayed, an untrained rube on the football field; he was already quite good. Photos in the book show that while Bullock might have been a deadringer for Oher’s adoptive mother, Leigh Anne Tuohy, Tim McGraw was a flattering choice to play Sean Tuohy, Oher’s adoptive father. And so on. In telling his side of “The Blind Side,” Oher’s prose is not always as purple as his No. 74 Baltimore Ravens jersey. One chapter begins with

* This week’s New York Times Best-seller List * HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “Tick Tock” by James Patterson and M. Ledwidge 2. “A Discovery Of Witches” by Deborah Harkness 3. “The Girl...The Hornet’s Nest” by Stieg Larsson 4. “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett 5. “Dead Or Alive” by Tom Clancy with G. Blackwood PAPERBACK (TRADE) FICTION 1. “Water For Elephants” by Sara Gruen 2. “Cutting For Stone” by Abraham Verghese 3. “The Girl...The Dragon Tattoo” by Stieg Larsson 4. “Little Bee” by Chris Cleave 5. “The Postmistress” by Sarah Blake HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “Known and Unknown” by Donald Rumsfeld 2. “Unbroken” by Laura Hillenbrand 3. “Cleopatra” by Stacy Schiff 4. “Battle Hymn Of The Tiger Mother” by Amy Chua 5. “Decision Points” by George W. Bush PAPERBACK NONFICTION 1. “Heaven Is For Real” by Todd Burpo with L. Vincent 2. “Inside Of A Dog” by Alexandra Horowitz 3. “The Big Short” by Michael Lewis 4. “Committed” by Elizabeth Gilbert 5. “The Glass Castle” by Jeannette Walls

Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/

a stretched reference to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. That said, the sports biography genre is not one particularly well-known for its literary pizazz. This book also moves along at a brisker pace than your average NFL game. Where “Odds” succeeds most is in going beyond what we have seen — overglossed as it may have been — and into an assessment of life

after your life story is put on the big screen. What Oher describes is a strange, disorienting experience for a man already living the typically surreal existence of a professional football player. Oher is genuinely awed by the impact of his story. He is baffled at how it makes some people teary. But he also obviously takes pride in the effect telling his story has had on others.

‘Georgia Bottoms’ filled with colorful characters By The Associated Press

A

BAWDY COMIC NOVEL steeped in Deep South stereotypes, “Georgia Bottoms” covers a lot of familiar territory: philandering preachers, mixed-race romance, a befuddled old racist white woman (she’s called “Little Mama”) and a ne’er-do-well brother (he’s called “Brother”). There are also the pillars of the community — the bank president, the publisher, the doctor and the sheriff — whose lives are built on sand. Each gets a night of the week for creative sport in bed with Georgia. Georgia Bottoms is our heroine, and the novel lives mostly in her marvelously goodhearted but teeming and scheming mind. She lives in a rural Alabama town called Six Points, where the once prosperous family name was Butts but got changed to Bottoms as finances went South, so to speak. This is a well-traveled Southern literary landscape drawn for comic effect. Childress, whose previous novels include “One Mississippi” and “Crazy in Alabama,” knows his way around. Scenes and whole sections are skillfully crafted, memorable and amusing, but some can be tedious, or just not all

that funny. The preparations for Georgia’s famous annual luncheon for the ladies of the community, for example, spares no detail on decor and menu, then it turns out to be spectacularly ill-timed — it’s Sept. 11, 2001 — and few show up. But Georgia, goodlooking and devious, is a compelling character who keeps the narrative alive with her survival skills. And her moral compass, which swings wildly. She cannot help herself when she first takes stock of the new Baptist preacher in town, Brent Colgate: “Shiny blond movie-star hair combed up off his forehead in an old-fashioned Cary Grant wave. ... An honest to God dimple in his chin, a face chiseled like the men in those old-fashioned ads for Arrow shirts.” He has just gotten out of his beat-up blue Chrysler, and you know this will not end well. Or maybe Georgia can figure a way out.

Page 13 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 25, 2011

Books


Page 14 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 25, 2011

Answers from last week

Calendar Friday Judith Torres will be signing her recently released picture book “Duck Duck Moose” from 4 to 7 p.m. on Friday and 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday at Hastings, 50 E. 400 North. Jagannatha w/Tina Ferguson and Julie Perry will perform acoustic music at 8 p.m. on Friday at Why Sound, 30 Federal Ave. Cost is $5. Robert Linton will perform from 5 to 7 p.m. on Friday at Caffe Ibis, 52 Federal Ave. Linton has a new CD available. Science Unwrapped presents “Records of Past Climate Change” at 7 p.m. on Friday in the Eccles Science Learning Center Auditorium on the USU campus. Featured speaker for the free presentation is USU geologist Tammy

The 38th Annual Pow-wow hosted by the Utah State University Native American Student Council (NASC), “Echoing Traditional Ways,” will be held Friday and Saturday in the Nelson Field House on the USU campus. Grand Entry begins Friday at 7 p.m. with ongoing processions occurring at noon and 6 p.m. the following The USU Wind Orchestra and Saturday. Admission is $3 for the general Symphonic Band present their public and $2 for senior citizens and USU annual winter concert at 7:30 p.m. on students with ID. Children 7 and under Friday at USU’s Kent Concert Hall. free. Tickets are $8 for general admission and free for USU students. For more information or to purchase tickets, go to http://arts.usu.edu. Stokes Nature Center will host the Stokes Snow Art Competition, a free MCBAND Night will be held from 4 event for anyone who likes to play in to 7 p.m. on Friday at the McDonald’s the snow, from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday. Participants can form a team or make in Hyrum. A percentage of sales will a creation of their own. Prizes will be be donated to the marching band awarded. No registration is required. for their trip to Washington DC. All sales of cookies in the lobby will go to For more information, call 755-3239 or visit www.logannature.org. the trip. Rittenour. All ages are invited. Refreshments and hands-on activities follow the lecture. Attendees are invited to bring their “mystery” rock or fossil for identification by USU geologists. For more information, call 797-3517 or visit www.usu.edu/science/unwrapped.

Crossword

Saturday

www.ThemeCrosswords.com

By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Most heart-to-heart 8. Antiaircraft fire 14. Makes do 19. Caribe 20. Yogi’s pal 21. Sacramento’s Arco ___ 22. Its mortgage value is $100 25. Math rings 26. Gossipmonger 27. London’s ___ of Court 28. One who leads a Spartan lifestyle 32. Plant part 36. Porter 41. Mayberry role 42. Rush job notation 44. Eyeball benders 45. Sir Thomas More novel 46. It might read “Pay school tax of $150” 49. With the bow, in music 52. Anatomical sac 53. One of the five W’s 54. Most stingy 58. Call at first 61. One born on a kibbutz 66. “Chicago” lyricist 67. Abraham’s nephew 68. Scottish landowner 70. Wanton look 71. Dark blue properties 78. Nonpareil 79. Lookout point 80. Royal insomnia cause 81. Critter you can smell? 82. Ladder rung 84. Whap 85. Inlaid with metals

88. Sharp point 90. Part of a flight 93. Crumbs 94. He wears a top hat 103. Unearthly abductors? 104. Scorched 105. Like the White Rabbit 106. Chinese tea 109. Coup d’oeil 110. Classified 112. Bad-mouthed 114. Furies 116. Math figure 118. Neptune’s realm 119. Game tokens 129. Get-go 130. Prepare 131. Hard rubber 132. Wavelike design 133. What you will 134. More arboraceous Down 1. Fly in the face of 2. Brosnan 3. Bud Grace comic strip 4. Bread served with korma 5. U.S.N. officer 6. Short 7. It’s softer than gypsum 8. Butchery 9. Diddle 10. Colorful carp 11. Dr. J’s first pro league 12. Greek port 13. Riddle with no solution 14. High-pitched voices 15. Muff 16. Opposite of paleo17. Essence of life? 18. ___ sack

23. Anatomical duct 24. Sudden flow 25. Can opener 29. Concept embodying yin and yang 30. Social or Hindu ending 31. Video maker, for short 33. Picks 34. Save for the future 35. Tolkien cannibal 37. Disney dwarf 38. Balancing pro 39. Cause of inflation? 40. Crash site? 43. Public houses 46. Wheel part 47. Colocynth or Mongongo 48. Dolly, for one 49. One-celled critters 50. Start again, in a way 51. Beach shelter 55. Antiquity, in antiquity 56. Layer of masonry 57. Capt.’s guess 59. Sculptor Jean 60. Kind of approval 62. Monopolist’s portion 63. Check payee, maybe 64. Take back 65. Mountain spurs 68. Delphinium 69. Blackbird 72. King’s title: Abbr. 73. Neighbor of a Vietnamese 74. ___ Masters, video game character 75. Unit of frequency: Abbr. 76. Mauna ___ Observatory 77. ___ de deux 83. State clearly

84. World Service provider 85. Clangor 86. Organic radical 87. Comedian Bill, informally 89. Supplement 91. Dry run 92. Bovid 94. Sleazy paper 95. Taken ___ 96. The Company 97. It might have a clutch 98. Snags

99. Nigerian language 100. ___-Rhin (Stras- bourg’s department) 101. Bank letters 102. It precedes aitch 106. Come up with 107. Auditor 108. Much spam 111. Period, in Web addresses 113. Computer acronym 115. Periphery

117. Waxed 119. Hanks or Petty 120. Kim followers? 121. Letter that appears twice in the Schrödinger equation 122. The other woman 123. Roscoe 124. Support system? 125. Pass ___ 126. ___ of Tiflis, Christian saint 127. Murmur 128. It may be bitter


Ralph Degn will play Rag-time piano favorites at 3 p.m. on Saturday at the Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East, North Logan. For more information, call 792-0353. A “Regional LDS Singles Special Activity” for ages 31 and up will be held at 3 p.m. on Saturday at Hardware Ranch. Includes a sleigh ride and campfire. Admission is $5. To carpool, meet at the Willow Park Stake Center at 2:20 p.m.; we’ll leave at 2:30 pm. To RSVP, call/text or e-mail Joel Stewart at 801953-7999 or Joel@ztron.com.   The American West Heritage Center is hosting its annual volunteer orientation and pancake breakfast on Saturday at 9 a.m. New and returning volunteers are invited to enjoy a delicious meal, learn about living history training opportunities, and sign up to help at more than 16 exciting programs during 2011. Great for families, retirees and students (internship credit may be available). Free, no reservations required. See www.awhc.org for more information, or call Volunteer Coordinator Lorraine at 435.245.6050 ext. 24. A fundraiser to benefit a single mom with four children will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. on Saturday at Quality Inn. Includes dinner, raffle and gift baskets. Cost for dinner is $15 for adults, $10 for seniors and $8 for children. All proceeds help the family, which is facing eviction. For more information, call Leslie at 8814967 or Jen at 213-3352. The Cache Practical Shooters (CAPS) will hold its monthly pistol match at 9 a.m. on Saturday at the Cache Valley Public Shooting Range three miles west of Logan on Valley View Highway. The match will consist of six stages, including a USPSA Classifier. Approximately 150 round of ammunition are required. Minimum caliber is 9 mm. Luger. A required New Shooter Orientation Class will begin at 7:45 a.m. The match is at 9 a.m. Free to first time shooters or shooters who have not shot with us previously. Match fees are $12 for members and $17 for non-members. For information contact Rich Meacham at 7709399 or e-mail drmeacham@comcast.net. “Beauty” and how it is perceived is the next topic at Utah State University’s Museum of Anthropology and its “Saturdays at the Museum” series. The museum presents displays Saturday that look at how standards of beauty have changed through time among gender and cultures throughout the world. The museum will also provide free face painting, henna tattoo painting and hair tying. The museum is located in Old Main room 252. Free parking on Saturdays in the lot south of the building. For more information, call 7977545. Unicorn Theatre’s Pillow Show “The Hysterical History of Troy” plays at 2 p.m. on Saturday in the Unicorn Room at the Bullen Center, 43 S. Main St. Tickets sold at the door: $3 for anyone 3 and older; under 3 free.

Sunday Jan and Brittany will perform a Sunday Brunch show on Sunday at Caffe Ibis, 52 Federal Ave. The Cache Symphony Orchestra will perform at 7:30 p.m. on Sunday in the Kent Concert Hall. Admission is free. All ages are invited. Brother Bryan Winward will speak to the LDS Adult Singles group at 7 p.m. on Sunday at Willow Park Stake Center 350 W. 700 South. Winward has a Ph.D from Utah State in Marriage and Family Relations. He is currently a teacher at the Logan LDS Institute of Religion.

Monday Utah State University’s Theatre Student Association presents “Mrs. Hill” at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday in the USU Black Box Theatre in the Chase Fine Arts Center. Tickets are $5 or $3 for TSA members. This play is rated M for Mature. For more information or to purchase tickets, go to http://arts.usu.edu.

Tuesday Logan City School District kindergarten registration will be held from March 1-4 at the Logan City School District Building, 101 W. Center St.. The child must be 5 on or before Sept. 1, 2011 in order to register for kindergarten. Please bring your child, official birth certificate, proof of immunizations and proof of address. For more information call Maria Ibarra at 755-2300.

Wednesday The Cache Valley Historical Society will meet at 7 p.m. on Wednesday at the Historic Cache County Courthouse. The speaker will be Leslie Albrecht Huber, an award-winning freelance writer and speaker who lives in western Massachusetts. She will talk about her book “The Journey Takers,” which talks about European immigrants to Utah. “To Preserve the Nation,” a Constitution class led by Scott Bradley will be held at 7 p.m. on Wednesday at the Booktable (upstairs). No charge. For more information call 753-2930 or 753-8844. USU will hold it 22nd annual Career Fair from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Wednesday at the Taggart Student Center. Includes 150 employers from across the country. Music for the Small and Tall Spring Session - Jumping into Spring! starts March 2 at the Thatcher-Young Mansion, 35 W. 100 South. Eight classes will be offered. Tuition is $48. All classes are held on Wednesdays and include a Babies and Tots Class at 10:15 a.m., a Family Class at 11 a.m. and a Preschool Class at 11:45 a.m. Contact information Ewa Wilczynski at 755-0853, email music4st@ comcast.net or go to http://sites.google.com/ site/music4st.

Stokes Nature Center will host Wild Wednesday from 4 to 7 p.m. on March 2. The theme is Backyard Birds. Participants will learn how to identify common area birds, discover ways to feed them and make a recycled bird feeder. Wild Wednesday is a free program for all ages held the first Wednesday of every month. For more information, call 7553239 or visit www.logannature.org.

Thursday David Sidwell presents a class titled Heritage Cooking from 7 to 8 p.m. on Thursday at the Macey’s in Providence. Sidwell will demonstrate how to make some of his family favorites.

Ongoing “Earn it. Keep it. $ave it.” is Utah’s statewide coalition for improving family financial stability through the utilization of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), free tax preparation (VITA), and asset building programs. The VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) program was initiated by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to offer free tax preparation for low-tomoderate income households who cannot prepare their own taxes or afford to pay a preparer. For eligibility information or to schedule an appointment, dial 2-1-1. Pintech Computers offers free computer classes at 6 p.m. each Tuesday night at 270 N. 400 West Suite C, Hyrum. On March 1, the subject is Computer Security. Call 245-8324 for more information.   Neighborhood Nonprofit is offering a free forclosure prevention/assistance workshops. They will be taught by HUD-approved and certified housing specialists and cover the following topics: understanding modifications, short-sales and re-payments; determining your best option; negotiating with lenders and servicers; avoiding scams; and knowing the forclosure process and timeline. The workshops will be held March 3, March 31 and May 5 from 6-7:30 p.m. and March 19, April 16 and May 21 from 9-10:30 a.m. Register by calling 753-1112. Neighborhood Nonprofit is located at 195 W. Golf Course Road, Suite 1 in Logan. Providence City baseball and softball registration are now being held from Feb. 14 to March 24. Please register during business hours at the city office, 15 S. Main, Providence. Boys and girls ages 5-14 are invited to participate. No late registrations will be taken after March 24. For more information, go to www.providencecity.com or call 435-752-9441 ext. 22.   Nordic United and its partners have begun grooming Green Canyon for cross country skiing. Please check the website www.nordicunited.org for a grooming schedule. “Breakfast With Your Legislators” Town Hall Meetings with all Cache Valley state legislators will be held at 7:30 a.m. on Saturdays through March 5, at the Cache County Offices, 179 N. Main St. All are welcome.

Tickets are now on sale for the Eccles Ice Center’s “Spice on Ice” chef cook-off and auction annual fundraiser, which will take place on March 31 at  the Eccles Ice Center, 2825 N. 200 East, North Logan. For more information, call 787-2288. The Towne Singers have begun their spring rehearsals and are excited to invite new members to join. They are especially looking for tenors, baritones and basses. This valley choir has been in existance for over 40 years and performs a Christmas and spring concert each year, as well as singing at Valley rest homes. Practices are held each Wednesday from 7:30 to 9 p.m. at the Dansante building, 75 S. 100 West. For more information, contact Karen Hoffman at 563-5177. Join us at Chick-fil-A for a fun time! We provide a craft, story time, singing and playdough time. Free. From 10 a.m. to noon every Monday at 1323 N. Main St. The Bel Canto Women’s Chorus is beginning its Spring Rehearsals on Tuesday evenings at the Logan Fourth/Yorkshire Ward Building, 294 N. 100 East. Women interested in joining the chorus should contact Laurel Maughan, 245-3204, for audition information. Singers are needed for all sections (S,SS,A). The Logan Family History Center offers free classes on topics like ancestry. com, Legacy, Danish research, Hispanic research, and others. Class sizes are limited. To assure a seat, register in advance by calling 755-5594. To see a list of classes and obtain a class handout go to www.rootsweb.com/~utcfhc. Take a historical journey through an exhibition of Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art’s permanent collection highlighting different themes of art from Post Surrealism to Postmodernism, at the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, 650 N. 1100 East. For information, go to www.artmuseum.usu.edu. Dog training classes will be held every Wednesday at 5 p.m. at the Cache Humane Society shelter, located at 2370 W. 200 North. This class is mandatory for dog volunteers that joined Cache Humane before December. We will discuss how to train shelter dogs basic obedience skills like sit, down, stay — all without punishment or pushing. We will also learn the “wrap” technique for dogs that drag you, loose leash walking, how to read dog body language, etc. There will be many new techniques at the shelter to learn for the dog volunteers. Registration required, space is limited. Contact Marcia Robinson at marciacachehumane@gmail.com and confirm the month and day you are interested in. The Eccles Ice Center offers Family Night from 5:30 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. on Mondays at the center, 2825 N. 200 East, North Logan. Up to eight people can skate for $30, including skates. Call 752-1170 for an updated, daily schedule as times are subject to change.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 25, 2011

Desert Noises w/Norther, Buffalo will perform indie/experimental music at 8 p.m. on Saturday at Why Sound, 30 Federal Ave. Cost is $5.


Page 16 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 25, 2011

CACHE MAGAZINE DINING GUIDE L

B S

Logan Burgers & Sandwiches

Delicious Food at Reasonable Prices

Charbroiled Gourmet Burgers • Gyros • Souvlaki BBQ Pork • Kababs •Calamari Salads Seafood Dinners • Falafel coupon

Breaded Chicken Bacon Swiss Combo (with fries & soda) Only $4.99 coupon

Pastrami Cheeseburger (with fries & soda) Only $5.99

Cache Valley’s favorite for over 20 years!

coupon

Gyro Dinner (with feta cheese salad & soda) Only $5.99

NOW Serving Frozen Yogurt With Probiotics

coupon

Fish & Chips Dinner

Mon-Thurs: 11AM - 10:30PM

(with salad, fries & garlic toast) Only $6.99

Fri-Sat: 11AM - 12 MIDNIGHT 1219 North Main • Logan 753-4355

Offer Expires 3/4/11 • Must Present Coupon • Limit 4

1085 North Main, Suite 130, Logan

435-752-1215 • Mon-Sat 10:30-8:00pm

²5IF4PVMPG*OEJBJO$BDIF7BMMFZ³

Tandoori Oven 'JOFTU*OEJBO$VJTJOF

Now Serving Wine & Indian Beer (Taj Mahal & Kingfisher)

Buy one entree and get

$1.00 OFF on the second entree Expires 3/2/11. Not valid with any other offer.

Dine In • Take Out • Catering

720 East 1000 North 750-OVEN (6836) Gift Certificates Available

For information about advertising on this page please call 792-7263 • Monday – Friday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm


Cache Magazine