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Cache Magazine Tale as old as time

Sky High Players present “Beauty and the Beast”

The Herald Journal

FEBRUARY 10-16, 2012


contents

February 10-16, 2012

MUSIC 3 USU choirs present a

night dedicated to the ’80s

4 Bridger Folk Music

Society has two upcoming shows

4 St. Lawrence String

Quartet coming to Logan

12 Meet local band RacecaR RacecaR

theater 7’Safe House isn’t as good as it looks

ART 3 Gallery Walk takes place this evening

MISC. 10 Kiger Hour focuses on music next week

BOOKS 13 See reviews and best-sellers

COLUMN 10 Lael Gilbert shares the deliciousness of Italian hot chocolate

CALENDAR 15 See what’s happening this week

PAGE 8 Members of the Sky High Players rehearse Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” in Smithfield on Monday evening. On the cover: Brock Christian Wilson, left, and Max Benson play Cogsworth and Lumière in Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast.” Photos by Jennifer Meyers/ Herald Journal

FROM THE EDITOR

L

ike many of you, I was a Disney kid growing up. The filmmakers for the corporation introduced me to all kinds of stories about kids, animals and princesses. I wondered what it would be like to live in a jungle like Mowgli, fight pirates and fly like Peter Pan or get lost in an enchanted Wonderland like Alice. Born in the ’80s, I was around for the releases of “The Little Mermaid,” “Beauty and the Beast” and “Aladdin,” and I’d say those, along with “Cinder-

ella” and “The Lion King” rank among my top Disney animated films. Perhaps it’s because they take me back to my childhood. I can’t count the number of times I pretended to be Ariel with my cousins every time we went swimming. We thought we could sing just like her, or at least we really wanted to. I loved the music from “Aladdin” and imagined what it would be like take a ride around the world on a magic carpet. And everything about “Beauty and the Beast” is pretty much perfect, from the dancing dishes, to the talking furniture, to the songs. I also love the story about change in perspective, change of a heart and the possibility that maybe nothing is

quite as it seems. This weekend and next, the Sky High Players are performing the “Beauty and the Beast” fairy tale. It’s a wonderful Disney film that’s been transformed into a wonderful stage show. I’ve seen it performed at Capitol Theatre in Salt Lake City and at the local Old Barn Theatre. For this upcoming rendition, the cast has gone all out with costumes and choreography. The group hired a professional makeup artist who’s done amazing work on the Beast. It’s a lot of work to put on a show of this scale, especially with a large cast. Read about it on page 8, then hopefully go support the students. — Manette Newbold


Logan downtown businesses will showcase photos, paintings, jewelry Featuring 12 of Cache Valley’s local businesses, galleries, and nonprofit art spaces, the CVCA Gallery Walk will be Friday, Feb. 10, from 6 to 9 p.m. Art lovers will have the opportunity to socialize and tour a full spectrum of galleries and business spaces. Start at any participating location and pick up a map, or go online at www.cachearts.org to print out a map or download it to your phone. Enjoy everything from fiber expressions to fine masterpieces by some of Cache Valley’s favorites.                                This walk features artwork by Kathy Puzey, Colleen Howe, Jacob Wayne Bryner Art, Robert Guy, Kristi Grussendorf, Roxanne Pfister, Lucy Watkins, Cache Valley Photographers, Russ Fjeldsted and many more.     Participating locations include: Logan Fine Art, Caffe Ibis Gallery Deli, The Crepery & Citrus and Sage, Gia’s Italian Restaurant, Global Village Gifts, Logan Downtown Alliance at Indian Oven, Mountain Place Gallery, The Sportsman, SDesigns at

– By Lael Gilbert, page 10

PET OF THE WEEK Available for adoption Photo courtesy Jessica Smith Parker

the Thatcher-Young Mansion, Utah Public Radio, Sego Event Planning & Floral Design and Winborg Masterpieces Art Gallery.  

Artists interested in being considered for a future walk can email events@centerforthearts.us or call 435-753-6518 ext. 11.

USU choirs going totally ’80s tonight The combined choirs of the Utah State University music department will present “That Totally Awesome ’80s Concert” on Friday, Feb. 10, at 7:30 p.m. in the Kent Concert Hall located in the Chase Fine Arts Center. “It’s certainly not a typical evening of scholarly music from long-gone composers,” said Cory Evans, director of choral activities at USU. “The songs will have the audience longing for the days of leg warmers, boom boxes and mullets.” “That Totally Awesome

’80s Concert” is a followup to last year’s “That ’70s Concert,” also presented by the USU choirs. “The ’80s were such a rich period of popular music, so it’s been hard to decide what pieces to choose, but I think we’ve got a good mix of everyone’s favorites,” said Evans. The evening will feature tunes such as Phil Collins’ “In the Air Tonight,” Journey’s “Faithfully,” Foreigner’s “I Want to Know What Love Is” and The Proclaimers’ “I’m Gonna Be (500 Miles).”

When: Friday, Feb. 10, at 7:30 p.m. Where: Kent Concert Hall TICKETS: Tickets are $10 for general admission, $8 for seniors and youth, $5 for USU faculty and staff and free for USU students with ID.

The USU Chamber Singers, University Chorale and the Women’s Choir will join forces with guitarists from the USU guitar program and members of the newly-formed instrumental

ensemble Out of the Blue for the evening’s entertainment. “The audience is invited to show up in classic ’80s outfits and can expect to hear some really rad music,” said Evans. Tickets are $10 for general admission, $8 for seniors and youth, $5 for USU faculty and staff and free for USU students with ID. More information and tickets are available at the Caine College of the Arts Box Office in Room 139-B of the Chase Fine Arts Center, online at arts.usu.edu or by calling 435-797-8022.

Pet: Blondie From: Cache Humane Society Why she’s so lovable: Sweet,

gentle and loving, Blondie is a golden senior. She loves children and being around people. She would make a perfect companion for a senior or family needing love. She also likes to go for walks and rarely barks. Blondie is fully house-trained, spayed and microchipped. Blondie would prefer to be the only dog in the home, but she gets along well with dog-friendly cats.

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 10, 2012

Artists gather for Gallery Walk

“The first time I drank (Italian chocolate) I was mentally transported to a large boat tipping precariously on a chocolate river, Oompa-Loompas pulling at the oars.”

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ALL MIXED UP

Quotable


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 10, 2012

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Rhythms Bridger Folk Music Society presents two concerts

Photo courtesy Donald Kallaus

Autoharp player, singer and songwriter Bryan Bowers will perform Saturday, Feb. 12, at 7 p.m. at a private home in Logan. Tickets are $15 and are available by calling Ron or Lisa at 435-881-3261 or 435-7575420. The address for the house will be given when tickets are purchased. From his less-than-glamorous beginning as a street singer, Bowers has become a major artist on the traditional music circuit. He has redefined the autoharp and is also a successful singer/songwriter.

Photo courtesy Christopher Williams

Singer/songwriter/percussionist Christopher Williams will perform Saturday, Feb. 18, at 7:30 p.m. at Crumb Brothers Bakery, 291 S. 300 West in Logan. Tickets are $13 and are available by calling 435-757-3468. Seating is very limited, so advance purchase is recommended.        Hailing from Nashville, Williams is a songwriter, storyteller, and entertainer who performs songs that are honest and confessional, yet never overbearing. His performances engage audiences with an appealing mix of intense passion and humor. 

String quartet coming to Logan The Chamber Music Society of Logan continues it’s 31st season with the appearance of the St. Lawrence String Quartet (SLSQ) at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16, in the USU Performance Hall. The St. Lawrence String Quartet, consisting of Canadian-born musicians, has a long and distinguished performance history. Celebrating their 20th anniversary, the quartet has commissioned five Canadian composers to create work the quartet has performed across Canada. In addition, they have delighted audiences in more than 1,600 performances on five continents. Privileged to study with the Emerson String Quartet, the Tokyo String Quartet and the Julian String Quartet, the St. Lawrence members are also passionate educators. Since 1998, they have held the Quartet in Residency position at Stanford University where they work closely with the schools of music, medicine and Jewish studies.  With Jeffrey Nuttall and Scott St. John on violin, Lesley Robertson on viola and Christopher Costanza on cello, the group has been described by Alex Ross of The New Yorker as remarkable, “not simply for the quality of their music making, exalted as it is, but for the joy they take in the art of connection.”  For their opening performance Feb. 16, the SLSQ will perform Franz Josef Hayden’s “String Quartet in F-minor, Op. 20, No. 5.”  Hayden wrote the quartet in 1722, one in a series of six quartets. At the time of the composition, Hayden had already written more than 50 symphonies and was wellestablished as one of the leading composers of Europe. The six quartets earned Hayden the nickname “the father of the string quartet.” The quartets are considered a milestone in the history of composing which have defined the medium for over 200 years. Before intermission, the SLSQ will perform Argentina composer Osvaldo Golijov’s “Kohelet.” The

Photo courtesy St. Lawrence Quartet

The St. Lawrence String Quartet will perform in Logan next week. When: Thursday, Feb. 16, at 7:30 p.m. Where: USU Performance Hall TICKETS: Tickets are $24 for general admission and $10 for students with ID. They may be purchased at the door or online at www.arts.usu.edu. Further information is available at cmslogan.org.

work was composed for the SLSQ and was co-commissioned by Carnegie Hall and Stanford University. Only eight minutes in length, the piece is inspired from the words of the Son of David from the Book of the Ecclesiastes. It is an unfinished piece whose first movement bursts forth in a beautiful exhalation followed by a calm second movement.

Community outreach A free educational outreach program for the public will be held Feb. 16 from 3 to 4:30 p.m. at the USU Performance Hall.

Finishing the program, the SLSQ will perform Czech composer Antonin’s Dvorak’s “Quartet  # 14 in A flat Op. 105, B. 193.” The piece was Dvorak’s last quartet. It was written after his return from a three-year assignment in the United States, at a time when he suffered from intense homesickness. Dvorak’s happiness upon returning home is heard in his final quartet as a summing up of all he found good in the world.


Photo courtesy Bodie Brower

‘The Slipper and the Rose’

Logan Youth Shakespeare invites all actors between the ages of 9 and 19 to the introductory meeting for their spring play, “A Comedy of Errors.” The meeting will be in the LYS rehearsal space on the third floor of the Bullen Center (next to the Ellen Eccles Theatre) at 43 S. Main from 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16. The cast will rehearse Tuesdays from 4 to 7 p.m. and Thursdays from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m., with additional rehearsals on Saturdays beginning in March. Performances will be in late May and will close June 2. Registration is $300. For questions, contact Mary Jackson-Smith at 760-1061.

Music Theatre West presents “The Slipper and the Rose” at the Ellen Eccles Theatre on Feb. 10-11 and 13-14 at 7:30 p.m. (with a matinee Feb. 11 at 1:30 p.m.). From the creators of “Mary Poppins” and “Chitty-Chitty Bang Bang” comes the timeless story of Cinderella. The show includes memorable music, stunning costumes and choreography. For tickets and information, visit www.musictheatrewest.org.

Photo courtesy Bonnie Larsen

‘Pirates of Penzance’

Photo courtesy Bodie Brower

‘Who Shot Juanito Bandito?’

After more than 50 sold-out performances at Bear Lake and a sold-out run at the Rose Wagner Center in Downtown Salt Lake City, Pickleville Playhouse is bringing the revival of its all-time most popular show, “Who Shot Juanito Bandito,” to the Ellen Eccles Theatre on Feb. 17 and 18. Performances begin each night at 7:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online at www.picklevilleplayhouse.com or by calling 435-752-0026. Juanito Bandito returns in another hilarious, outrageous, and “uniquely Pickleville” musical written by T.J. Davis. Bandito, the self-proclaimed “most guapo villain in the world,” is only one heist away from completing his quest to rob every bank in the Western States and cement his reputation as the baddest bad guy in history. Standing in his way is a selfabsorbed lawman, a hard-working cowboy hero, and a devastatingly beautiful English reporter named Amelia Everlight.

Photo courtesy Paula Zsiray

‘Arsenic and Old Lace’ Mountain Crest High School Theatre Department presents “Arsenic and Old Lace,” a comedy written by Joseph Kesselring, on Feb. 15 to 18 at 7 p.m. in the MCHS auditorium. Tickets are $7 for adults and $5 for students and seniors. Follow newly-engaged drama critic Mortimer Brewster as he learns that his two aunts, Abby and Martha, have been poisoning lonely gentlemen with arsenic-laced elderberry wine and burying them in the basement. When Mortimer finds the body of their 12th victim in the window seat, he learns that his aunts see their murders as an act of charity. Add to this a brother who thinks he’s Teddy Roosevelt and the return of a long-lost nephew, Jonathan, who shows up with a body of his own, and the family secrets start to unravel.

Forty students from Willow Valley Middle School are set to take the stage in “Pirates of Penzance,” the rollicking operetta by Gilbert and Sullivan, being presented Feb. 10 and 11 at Willow Valley Middle School in Wellsville. Aubrey Poppleton, who plays a pirate, says his favorite part of being involved in the play is “the swords. The fight scenes will be the most exciting part!” Weston Miller, who portrays the major general, adds, “I love how it has the humor it does, especially being written 200 or 300 years ago. The story line is entertaining, with lots of fighting. It makes it a lot more entertaining than like Shakespeare plays.” “Pirates of Penzance” tells the tale of Frederic, a young man indentured to a band of pirates until his 21st birthday. As his birthday approaches, he seeks to leave piracy behind, especially after falling in love with an innocent young woman, Mabel. However, the pirate king informs Frederic that since he was born Feb. 29, a leap year, he won’t turn 21 for several more years and therefore must remain indentured to the pirate band. Adding to Frederic’s woes, he finds out the pirates’ next target is Mabel’s father, the major general. Kayla Mathews, a cop in the play, reflected on the three and a half months of rehearsals saying, “Sometimes I don’t feel like coming to rehearsals. Sometimes I need a break from Broadway. But once you get here, I enjoy being with everyone and being a part of it with all the crew.” Jared Larsen (Frederic) adds, “The actors add a lot to it. And Mr. Caldwell (the director) added his own creativity.” Filled with memorable songs and wonderful comedy, “Pirates of Penzance” is a classic operetta for the whole family. “Pirates of Penzance” will be performed at Willow Valley Middle School in Wellsville (525 N. 200 West) at 7 p.m. Tickets are $3 per person or $15 per immediate family and are available at the door.

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 10, 2012

‘Comedy of Errors’

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Stage


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 10, 2012

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movies There’s little mystery to this island. This 3-D sortof sequel wears its formula-for-dollars purpose with pride, delivering a dash of cinematic nonsense that represents Hollywood calculation at its shrewdest and most shameless. Again poking Jules Verne’s remains with a sharp stick, the producers of the 2008 hit “Journey to the Center of the Earth” present their second modern take on the 19th-century fantasist’s wild stories. And “Mysterious Island” is every bit the amusement park ride cloaked as a movie that the first “Journey” was, the new flick stranding a misfit band of

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lizards and electric eels are Michael Caine, Luis Guzman and Vanessa Hudgens. Director Brad Peyton oversees a collection of impressive but annoying visuals, serving up gimmicky 3-D that’s Warner Bros. Pictures continually trying to poke Luis Guzman, Vanessa Hudgens, Josh Hutcherson, Dwayne Johnson and Michael Caine things in your eye. 94 are shown in a scene from “Journey 2: The Mysterious Island.” minutes.

★★ ‘Big Miracle’ Director // Ken Kwapis Starring // Drew Barrymore, John Krasinski and John Pingayak Rated // PG for language At this movie’s center are three gray whales — a mother, father and baby who found themselves trapped within the quickly forming Arctic ice near Barrow, Alaska, the northernmost point in the United States, in 1988. The effort to free them in the open water brought together a disparate alliance of environmental activists, oil executives, journalists, native people and even the Soviets toward the end of the Cold War, and it fascinated viewers worldwide. 107 minutes.

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‘Safe House’ Director // Daniel Espinosa Starring // Denzel Washington, Ryan Reynolds and Robert Patrick Rated // R for violence and some language

“Safe House” is a frustrating movie to watch, because watching it is almost impossible given the way it was filmed and edited. It’s like visual vomit thrown up on the screen. And the worst parts is although the story, the script and the acting are all pretty good, when you can’t see what’s going on, what’s the point?

The Reel Place Aaron Peck

Universal Pictures

Ryan Reynolds is shown in a scene from “Safe House.”

wanted fugitives. He’s lived the past decade abroad, doing whatever ex-spies do. Frost has come into possession of a file that could be very damaging to many top-ranking officials around the world, and he’s willing to sell it to the highest bidder. He gets caught at an American embassy in South Africa though, and he’s quickly transported to the safe house where

Matt Weston (Reynolds) is the “housekeeper.” Recruited from Yale, but part of the CIA, Weston has been assigned as a safe house keeper. Essentially he waits around until someone shows up with a person they need to interrogate. The movie turns into your standard fleeing suspect movie. Frost escapes and its Weston’s duty to

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bring him back. Even though the story is simple enough, the actors here should be able to rise above it. The trouble is that the shaky-cam aesthetic really undermines the performances from

the seasoned actors involved. Washington is one of Hollywood’s premiere facial expression experts. You never really know exactly how important subtle facial expressions are in a movie until you can’t see them because the camera is bouncing around so much. I wanted to yell at Espinosa, “You have phenomenal actors in your movie. Let me see them do their stuff!”

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The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 10, 2012

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What’s not to love about “Safe House”? I mean, the cast is dynamite. You have veteran superstars like Denzel Washington, Vera Farmiga and Brendan Gleeson. Then, you have a very capable young actor in Ryan Reynolds rounding out the ensemble cast. It’s a story where Denzel gets to kick a lot of bad guy butt, so that’s a huge plus. So, why is “Safe House” only so, so? Because you can’t see what’s going on. That’s right, director Daniel Espinosa films “Safe House” like it’s the fourth “Bourne” film. The camera never stays still. The action scenes are some of the most chaotic, unintelligible action scenes I’ve ever witnessed. It was like watching “Quantum of Solace” all over again. The mistake here is that Espinosa, like so many other filmmakers, thinks the shaky-cam adds realism to their movie. It doesn’t. The human eye doesn’t bob and weave like a prize fighter. We have components in our brain that keep our vision from bouncing all over the place. That’s why, when we watch a movie where the camera swings wildly around during the action, we feel like we need a Dramamine just to get through all three acts. The movie revolves around a story of espionage. It’s a cloakand-dagger spy story about a spy who has long since gone rogue. That spy’s name is Tobin Frost (Washington). Frost is one of The Company’s most-

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‘Safe House’ action too busy, shaky

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Beguest our

Sky High Players present “Beauty and the Beast”

By Jamie Baer Nielson

S

Corbin Lee (Gaston) and Taylor Regen (Belle) rehearse in scenes from Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” at Sky View High School on Monday. Photos by Jennifer Meyers/ Herald Journal

ky View High School theater teacher and show director Nan Wharton knew last year’s production of “The Wizard of Oz” would be

hard to top. With last year’s spectacular special effects including flying production members and an entire scene done in grayscale, Wharton had to think big for 2012 — and honed in on the Disney classic “Beauty and the Beast.” Nearly a year in the making, “Beauty and the Beast” will play at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 10, 11, 13 and 16-18 in the Sky View auditorium, with a matinee at 1 p.m. this Saturday. Tickets are $7 online at ezticketlive.com or $8 at the door. Preparation for opening weekend started back in March, when Wharton began acquiring rights for the show, renting backdrops, finding a costume designer and nailing down a choreographer. Auditions were held — in fact, so many kids showed up they had to turn some away, and that “was really sad,” says Wharton — and student preparation began. Wharton, who also teaches theater classes throughout the year at the high school, spends her class periods preparing students for their roles in the play. They each have to write a character analysis of the character they will be portraying, and are always working on technique, motivation, emotion, technical aspects and more, says Wharton. But that’s just the beginning. As showtime nears, all 65 kids in the show need shoes, makeup, production shirts — “the list goes on and on and on and on and on and on …” says Wharton — and someone needs to design and print tickets and programs. Each cast member even has a

technical job to do backstage, says Wharton. Rehearsal time can get intense leading up to the show, says 17-year-old publicity manager Emily Shirley, who plays an enchantress and jewelry box in “Beauty and the Beast.” She says the crew has been rehearsing since November, including 5 a.m. rehearsals, a first-hour theater class and third-hour tech class, afterschool practices and now, up to eight hours a day. But it’s all worth it, she says. “I love knowing they came to watch us,” she said. “I’m anxious, but excited. … it’s a big show that everyone knows, (and) we want to do our best.” Putting together a play is like baking, says Shirley. You start with the dry ingredients, like vocals, sprinkle in some choreography, shoes, costumes, and top with the final set, “like the frosting on top,” she says. The Sky High Players’ annual show includes students in grades 10, 11 and 12, but this year the audience will see bonus appearances from valley first-grader Caden Stuart as Chip and, for the firstever faculty cameo, Sky View Assistant Principal Joel Allred playing the part of the tavern keeper. Wharton hopes to see a big crowd at this year’s show, and has only good things to say about her students and all their hard work and progress over the last 10 months. “The payoff comes when they get audience feedback,” she says. “It’s exciting to watch them make those strides (and gain) that self-esteem. … (By the time curtain rolls around), I expect them to perform very professionally. I’ve done my job at that point.”

Grant Fuller is transformed into the Beast by Shock Value Effects artists Shane and Shawn Gordon. Left: Kristopher Luthy performs the role of Le Fou in Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” at Sky View High School. Photos by Jennifer Meyers/Herald Journal


Beguest our

Sky High Players present “Beauty and the Beast”

By Jamie Baer Nielson

S

Corbin Lee (Gaston) and Taylor Regen (Belle) rehearse in scenes from Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” at Sky View High School on Monday. Photos by Jennifer Meyers/ Herald Journal

ky View High School theater teacher and show director Nan Wharton knew last year’s production of “The Wizard of Oz” would be

hard to top. With last year’s spectacular special effects including flying production members and an entire scene done in grayscale, Wharton had to think big for 2012 — and honed in on the Disney classic “Beauty and the Beast.” Nearly a year in the making, “Beauty and the Beast” will play at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 10, 11, 13 and 16-18 in the Sky View auditorium, with a matinee at 1 p.m. this Saturday. Tickets are $7 online at ezticketlive.com or $8 at the door. Preparation for opening weekend started back in March, when Wharton began acquiring rights for the show, renting backdrops, finding a costume designer and nailing down a choreographer. Auditions were held — in fact, so many kids showed up they had to turn some away, and that “was really sad,” says Wharton — and student preparation began. Wharton, who also teaches theater classes throughout the year at the high school, spends her class periods preparing students for their roles in the play. They each have to write a character analysis of the character they will be portraying, and are always working on technique, motivation, emotion, technical aspects and more, says Wharton. But that’s just the beginning. As showtime nears, all 65 kids in the show need shoes, makeup, production shirts — “the list goes on and on and on and on and on and on …” says Wharton — and someone needs to design and print tickets and programs. Each cast member even has a

technical job to do backstage, says Wharton. Rehearsal time can get intense leading up to the show, says 17-year-old publicity manager Emily Shirley, who plays an enchantress and jewelry box in “Beauty and the Beast.” She says the crew has been rehearsing since November, including 5 a.m. rehearsals, a first-hour theater class and third-hour tech class, afterschool practices and now, up to eight hours a day. But it’s all worth it, she says. “I love knowing they came to watch us,” she said. “I’m anxious, but excited. … it’s a big show that everyone knows, (and) we want to do our best.” Putting together a play is like baking, says Shirley. You start with the dry ingredients, like vocals, sprinkle in some choreography, shoes, costumes, and top with the final set, “like the frosting on top,” she says. The Sky High Players’ annual show includes students in grades 10, 11 and 12, but this year the audience will see bonus appearances from valley first-grader Caden Stuart as Chip and, for the firstever faculty cameo, Sky View Assistant Principal Joel Allred playing the part of the tavern keeper. Wharton hopes to see a big crowd at this year’s show, and has only good things to say about her students and all their hard work and progress over the last 10 months. “The payoff comes when they get audience feedback,” she says. “It’s exciting to watch them make those strides (and gain) that self-esteem. … (By the time curtain rolls around), I expect them to perform very professionally. I’ve done my job at that point.”

Grant Fuller is transformed into the Beast by Shock Value Effects artists Shane and Shawn Gordon. Left: Kristopher Luthy performs the role of Le Fou in Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” at Sky View High School. Photos by Jennifer Meyers/Herald Journal


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 10, 2012

The information that follows is urgent as food matters go. Maybe not as urgent as federal changes in cafeteria law, or tainted cantaloupe or the like, but definitely more urgent than the debate over butter versus margarine, which I’d already started writing about for today. It was, in fact, during the search for information on Napoleon’s obsession with rancid butter, that I happened upon this; the best recipe for hot chocolate ever. Who isn’t tantalized by the smooth, sweet,

dark, caffeine allure of a steaming glass of creamy hot chocolate? You probably have a favorite ... whether it be a recipe, a powder mix, or spattered into foam cup at a gas station. I know there is a lot of good stuff out there. But if you want something really special, there is no better way to get a chocolate fix than to mix up a batch of ciccolata calda or hot chocolate, Italian style. Italian hot chocolate is intense, decadent, chocolatey (more than milky) and thick ... something like just-tempered

Italian-style Hot Chocolate • 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons half-andhalf Let me stop here for a moment. If you aren’t a coffee drinker, you may not have half-and-half in your fridge. I used two percent milk and it was plenty creamy. I imagine that using half-andhalf would make it even better, but you’d get full faster. I wouldn’t go any skinnier than two percent. Sorry for the interruption. Please continue. • 1 teaspoon arrowroot I’m going to stop you again. I’d never before heard of arrowroot. It is, apparently, a thickener, like cornstarch. I’d tried recipes for ciccolata calda with cornstarch, but found them gritty with

Bread and Butter LAEL GILBERT

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Italian hot chocolate a thick, tantalizing treat

chocolate or thin pudding. The first time I drank it I was mentally transported to a large boat tipping precariously

an unpleasant starchy taste. Using the arrowroot made it smooth and nutty. I found arrowroot in the health-food section (you know, along with the bags of flax seed) at the grocery store. I bought the smallest container available, one pound. It was fairly expensive. You only need one teaspoon for the recipe, so now I have a lot of arrowroot in my pantry. If anyone knows where to buy arrowroot in bulk (so you can purchase a teaspoon at a time), please post it in the comments online. Or, swing by my house and get a teaspoon full. I have a lot. Don’t underestimate the importance of this ingredient to the whole experience. • 2 to 4 strips orange zest Chocolate and orange is a classic Italian flavor combination. Unsure how

on a chocolate river, Oompa-Loompas pulling at the oars, and the man himself, Willy Wonka, leaning abeam to port, filling a mug with the rich brown liquid and handing it to me (I must have been Grandpa Joe at the time). Not even my rabid imagination could improve on this beverage. No wonder the Oompa-Loompas were a bit bonkers for it. It was, in fact, a wintery day in northern Italy when I tried this hot chocolate. I’d spent the whole day walking in less-than comfortable

shoes and inadequate wet socks. It was cold ... the kind of damp-cold that a Utah kid never gets used to. The freezing air spilled through the fabric of my coat, straight to my skin. My toes and fingers ached. I had been shivering for hours. I stopped at a small bar and sat at a table in the corner. Italian bars aren’t hardliquor saloons – think more coffee shop/social center. The hot chocolate came in a steaming mug, the wide mouth swirled with milk foam. Two crunchy almond biscotti

to get zest? Wash an orange. Peel off a one-inch strip with a vegetable peeler, keeping it as thin as possible. The orange part has all the flavor. The white pith underneath is bitter, try not to get too much. • 1 tablespoon sugar • 2 ounces bittersweet chocolate – 70 percent cacao recommended Once again, I used what I had in my pantry, which was Ghiradelli 60 percent Cacao Bittersweet Chocolate chips. If you are considering using those cheap, waxy chips you got on sale at Easter last year, skip them. Splurge on something with lots of cacao. If you don’t like dark chocolate, don’t despair – combined with the other ingredients the dark bitterness of the intense chocolate smooths out to creamy sweetness.

sat on a charming mismatched saucer. I sipped, savored and warmed. I dipped the crunchy twice-baked cookies and consumed each slathered bite with rapture. It filled me, warmed me, and satisfied me from head to toe. So, you can see why I’ve had trouble replicating the experience. I have high expectations. It just hasn’t been the same – until last week. I found the basic recipe in the book Hot Chocolate by Fred Thompson but finagled it a bit to achieve perfection.

— Mix two tablespoons of milk (or half-and-half) with the arrowroot in a small bowl until smooth. — In a saucepan over medium heat, warm milk and orange zest until milk is bubbling around the edges. Stir in sugar until dissolved. Remove orange zest and discard. Stir in arrowroot mixture and whisk until smooth (usually less than a minute. Don’t overcook it or the arrowroot will begin to break down). — Remove from heat and whisk in chocolate until smooth. Drink up. If you are going to share, you’d better double the recipe. Be prepared for intense chocolate awesomeness. Serve it in little demitasse cups with biscotti on the side. Be very, very happy.

USU Kiger Hour: How music affects peoples’ lives Music profoundly influences lives, and Utah State University professor James M. Bankhead, head of USU’s music department, wants people to understand just how important it is to their well-being. Bankhead will present “Music — the Soundtrack of Your Life” at the next Kiger Hour talk Feb. 16. Bankhead will discuss how individuals consciously and unconsciously use music to control their environment. He will present a framework for understand-

ing how to interpret musical preferences. “What I want to do is make people conscious of how music is involved with and is an important part of their life,” he said. “It is not ‘fluff’ or ‘nice to have’ or anything like that. Music is like air and water; we need it to survive and to be human.” Prior to joining the faculty at USU, Bankhead directed the School of Music at Sam Houston State University, chaired the Music Department at California State University at Chico, and

was executive director of the Green Bay Symphony Orchestra. He also worked as producer at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts where he produced shows, concerts and festivals involving artists ranging from Bill Cosby to the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. He is also an alumnus of USU, where he completed his bachelor’s of music degree before going on to earn a master’s at Central Michigan University and his doctorate from The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.

His speech in Logan will be held from 5:15 to 7 p.m. at Hamiltons Steak and Seafood, 2427 N. Main St., Logan. A buffet with appetizers, desserts and soft drinks, iced tea or coffee is available. Cost is $6.95 per person (plus tax and gratuity) and billed on an individual basis. Guests can also order from the menu, and a cash bar is available. For planning purposes, please RSVP to Natalie Archibald Smoot in the college office at 435-797-2796 or natalie. archibald@usu.edu.


Celebrate chocolate history at USU museum Saturday With Valentine’s Day approaching, what better time to learn about the rich history of chocolate. Utah State University’s Museum of Anthropology will host a celebration of chocolate Saturday, Feb. 11, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at its weekly “Saturdays at the Museum” event. Chocolate has a rich history and patrons are invited to explore the

many ways it can be enjoyed. The museum will provide a “Chocolate Around the World Tour” that describes what French, Italian, South American and Caribbean cultures have traditionally added to flavor chocolate. At the end of the tour, visitors can sample hot chocolate with different additives from each culture. Additional museum

activities include a chance to make M&M watercolor Valentines, watch a video presentation titled “Milton Hershey: The Chocolate King” at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. and participate in Chocolate Trivia Bingo at noon and 2 p.m. The USU Museum of Anthropology is located the south turret of the historic Old Main building, Room 252. Admission is free.

Logo winner chosen for Young Artist Cup The Mountain Crest Young Artist Cup Committee announces the beginning of the Young Artist Cup season with the selection of the Logo Winners. The first place winner is Alli Randall of Hyrum. Her logo will be used for publicity, programs and T-shirts for the contest this year. Emilee Fielding of Hyrum and Kourtney Cooper of Providence are the second and third place logo winners. Honorable mention goes to Darian June of Millville. Their awards will be given during the Young Artist Cup Competition which will be held Thursday, April 12, and Friday, April 13. The competition will be held each evening at 7 p.m. in the Mountain Crest auditorium.

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The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 10, 2012

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MUSIC

RacecaR RacecaR: Singing in palindromes By Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

Like many musicians, the members of RacecaR RacecaR are not so concerned with becoming famous or making a lot of money. For them, writing and playing songs is just part of who they are, and if people listen along the way, all the better. During a practice at keyboard player Brandon Lee’s house a couple weeks ago, the group talked about the free music they’ve released online and the EP that will most likely be available this spring. Bass player Brandon Casper said the four members of the band would like to get their name out and casually mentioned going on tour someday. Lead vocalist and guitar player, Jett Fesler, chimed in, saying even if the group never tours, he’s happy just releasing new songs and hopes to reach people. “If (a tour) doesn’t happen, I really wouldn’t care one bit as long as we get music out there and people actually listening and enjoying it,” Fesler said. As a full band, including Alex Haslam on the drums, RacecaR RacecaR has been playing together for about six months. But the idea for the group has been around much longer. Fesler and Haslam graduated from Northridge High School in Layton in 2008, then Haslam served a two-year mission for the LDS church. When he returned, he started playing the drums.

While Haslam was gone, Fesler wrote songs and eventually met Lee who started playing acoustic shows with him. Fesler and Lee were the beginning of RacecaR RacecaR, adding Haslam on the drums and Casper on the bass last summer. Fesler writes all the lyrics and most of the chords for the songs, then introduces them to the other members and they improvise on their instruments until everything comes together. “I’ve been impressed with these guys. We can pick a song and learn it in less than a day,” Casper said. “We’ve been able to do that lately. At first it was kind of hard but because we’re really good friends, we’ve been really close lately so we’ve been able to feed off each other a lot.” Many of the titles for RacecaR RacecaR’s recorded songs are palindromes, which are words or phrases that read the same backwards and forwards. And example is their song “A Man a Plan a Canal, Panama,” which they’ve been practicing for Why Sound’s Battle of the Bands. The word “racecar” is also a palindrome, the first one Fesler remembers learning as a child. He said that palindrome came to him in a psychology class and he figured it would make a good name for the band. Fesler said he’s often looking at words, reading then backwards and forwards, and forms other words out of the letters. The group has an alternative rock sound, but

they said their influences come from a variety of music styles. They like to play oldies covers and often incorporate new styles in their songs. Casper, Haslam and Fesler are roommates and inside their apartment is a board where they each write a song every day for the others to listen to. They try to choose new songs to expand their interests and genres of bands and music. “We’re always trying to diversify our musical taste,” Casper said. To listen to RacecaR RacecaR, visit www. myspace.com/racecar1racecar. Their next performance will be Saturday at Why Sound’s Battle of the Bands Part 4. The show starts at 7 p.m. with The Up ColPhotos by Jennifer Meyers/Herald Journal lar$, Puppy Box, DemoliLead vocalist and guitarist Jett Fesler (above) practices for an upcoming performance tion Bio, Via Versa and with Alex Haslam, Brandon Casper and Brandon Lee in North Logan. The four musiAutostigmatic performing cians make up the local band RacecaR RacecaR. as well. Cost is $5.


By Carl Hartman Associated Press

Living in families, though traditional and almost universal on this evolving planet, is experiencing an unplanned but effective attack, according to a new book. Author Eric Klinenberg, professor of sociology at New York University, sees lessons to be learned. He sums them up in his subtitle: “The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone.” What good is living alone? Isolate yourself from all your friends? No wife? No husband? No mother? And all that laundry to do? Babies? Maybe, later. Henry David Thoreau tried it in the mid-1800s, when he was still in his twenties. The result was “Walden,” a book about living alone in the woods — a high point in American literature. “I never found the companion so companionable as solitude,”

he wrote. One of four siblings himself, he died unmarried, at 44. Biographers record one proposal — rejected — to a young woman. He built his cottage within walking distance of his family in Concord, Mass., and the pubs he and his friends frequented. It was on property of his mentor, Ralph Waldo Emerson, one of whose best known works is an essay called “Self-Reliance.” Thoreau’s mother visited often, bearing home-cooked meals. In 1950, about 4 million Americans were living solo. A half-century later, the number had risen to 31 million, with women outnumbering men 17 million to 14 million — figures that have had little public attention. Between those two dates another book appeared that may become a sort of landmark: Helen Gurley Brown’s “Sex and the Single Girl.” Klinenberg quotes her on the new young woman:

Most Americans, Europeans and rising numbers elsewhere, he argues, measure satisfaction with life in terms of independence, integrity and selfrespect. “Our cultural preference for living autonomously is a key reason why today more than 11 million elderly Americans and 72 million Europeans live alone,” he writes, “and why in the coming decades many millions more will do so.” Though the short book is largely concerned with the United States, it devotes 10 “She is engaging because she lives by her wits. She is not a parasite, a dependent, a scrounger, a sponger or a bum. She is a giver, not a taker, a winner and not a loser.” Klinenberg also collects interviews with older people who choose independent living rather than available alternatives as long as they can, though their stories are necessarily sadder than those of young people.

Mirage’ is alternative history of 9/11 By Jeff Ayers Associated Press

An alternate history of the events surrounding 9/11 creates a unique and compelling read in Matt Ruff’s “The Mirage.” In this parallel world eerily similar to ours, Christian fundamentalists hijack four planes on Nov. 9, 2001, and crash two of them into the Tigris and Euphrates World Trade Towers. The United Arab States declares war on terror, and the first attack is on the Christian States of America. Years later, Arab Homeland Security agent Mustafa al Baghdadi captures a suspected terrorist. The interrogation unveils a bizarre secret that Mustafa can-

not believe: The world is nothing but a mirage, and he sees proof in a newspaper hidden

away in the suspect’s apartment. The New York Times dated Sept. 12, 2001, shows planes hitting buildings in New York City, and the hijackers are from the Middle East. The cast of characters is vast, and players known to almost everyone have key and rather surprising roles in Ruff’s alternate scenario. Even though the history isn’t real or accurate, the juxtaposition of realities provides keen insight into the real world. The reader will have many questions during and after the book is finished. Though Ruff doesn’t provide all the answers, the journey is worth taking. This mirage is almost too real.

vivid pages to solutions innovated in Sweden. Back in the 1930s social planner and Nobel Peace Prize winner Alva Myrdal opened a “collective house.” It had 57 units for single women and single mothers, with a communal kitchen, a nursery and small elevator service to each unit for meal deliveries. “Solitude, once we learn how to use it, does more than restore our personal energy,” Klinenberg concludes, “it also sparks new ideas about how we might better live together.”

new york times best-sellers COMBINED PRINT & E-BOOK FICTION 1. “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close,” by Jonathan Safran Foer 2. “Taken,” by Robert Crais 3. “The Help,” by Kathryn Stockett 4. “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo,” by Stieg Larsson 5. “One for the Money,” by Janet Evanovich COMBINED PRINT & E-BOOK NONFICTION 1. “Heaven is for Real,” by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent 2. “Ameritopia,” by Mark R. Levin 3. “Steve Jobs,” by Walter Isaacson 4. “Quiet,” by Susan Cain 5. “American Sniper,” by Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “Taken,” by Robert Crais 2. “Private: #1 Suspect,” by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro 3. “Death Comes to Pemberley,” by P. D. James 4. “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest,” by Stieg Larsson 5. “11/22/63,” by Stephen King HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “Ameritopia,” by Mark R. Levin 2. “American Sniper,” by Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice 3. “Steve Jobs,” by Walter Isaacson 4. “Quiet,” by Susan Cain 5. “Killing Lincoln,” by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 10, 2012

Book on Independent living challenges family life

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Books


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 10, 2012

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CrossworD By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Utter 5. Emulator of Marcel Marceau 10. Quipster 15. Mekong River land 19. Excessive concern 21. Hold the floor 22. Start to freeze? 23. Closely related features of one idea 26. Tone down 27. Monopoly income 28. Boxer’s stat 29. Collapsible shelters 33. Parsonage 34. Fund-raising group 36. Popular computer operating system 37. Hibernating rodent 39. Like some resorts 44. Look like the better option, in a way 48. Egg-shaped 49. Postal motto conjunction 50. Footnote note 51. Mischief-makers 57. Made a wager 61. Deplaned 62. Drubbing 64. Ablutionary vessel 65. However, informally 68. Connects the dots 75. Thickness 76. Start starter 77. Seat of Kansas’s Neosho County 78. Lady of the house 79. Pasturage grass 81. Soil management pros 86. Whit 89. School transportation 91. 200 milligrams 92. Symbols of speed 102. Portuguese titles 103. Contusion 104. Coin featuring Leonardo da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man 105. Shoat cote 106. 10 million

107. Bomb 109. Hitchcockian 113. The ___ Book, issued by the Federal Reserve Board 114. One of seven branches 116. Be independent 124. Kind of palm 125. Nervous mongrel 126. Descriptive for some patented products 127. Spirit 128. Sound effects process 129. State of isolation and anxiety 130. ___ d’amore Down 1. D.C. setting 2. Cut a swath 3. 1969 Peace Prize grp. 4. Woody Herman’s “___ Autumn” 5. Greedy king of Phrygia 6. Part of a list 7. Calliope, for one 8. Shogun’s capital 9. Say in a different way 10. Confederate general J.E. 11. Sharp spur 12. Make the grade? 13. Capt.’s guess 14. Ad ___ (relevant) 15. Tie up 16. Old World buffalo 17. Auditory 18. Trigonometry term 20. Reference 24. Andrea Bocelli, for one 25. Take marks off 29. Place to unwind 30. Lansing-to-Flint dir. 31. Trading place 32. Spurs on 33. See 78-Across 34. Nave bench 35. Way of the East 37. ___ lab 38. Voyaging

39. Main, e.g. 40. “Tristia” poet 41. Sharp point 42. Laila of boxing 43. Kind of trip 45. Joanne Woodward Oscar-winning role 46. Fond du ___ 47. Watch pocket 51. Reindeer herder 52. Jewish month 53. Compassion 54. Tea server 55. Protuberance 56. Canonical scriptures, in Buddhism 58. This puzzle’s theme word 59. Young sheep 60. James Whitcomb Riley’s “___ I Went Mad” 63. Offshoot 65. Michael Moore’s “Downsize ___!” 66. Bulk 67. They come out at the seams 69. Nice hot drink? 70. Amalgamate 71. Buttermilk morsel? 72. Building blocks 73. “___ the glad waters of the dark blue sea”: Byron 74. Online people connector 79. Rubella symptom 80. Hindu month 82. Tuber source in the high Andes 83. Christen 84. Symbol of sovereignty 85. Family heads 86. Possessive pronoun 87. See red? 88. Storage unit 90. Temperance 93. Bamboozled 94. Know-how 95. Singer Starr 96. Batrachian critters 97. Saintly glow

98. Stretch out 99. Razor-billed bird 100. Indignation 101. Actress Myrna 106. Perfume 107. Lion-colored 108. Saturn vehicles? 109. Latin I word 110. Catchall abbr. 111. Music of India 112. Privy to 113. Swelter 114. Operative beginning 115. Flower holder 117. Not quite right 118. Prefix with orthodox 119. Acquire 120. ___ Schwarz 121. Fade away 122. “Xanadu” rock group 123. Casual attire

answers from last week

Herald Journal one to two days prior to the event. Calendar items can be submitted Deadlines inbyThe email at hjhappen@hjnews.com. Any press releases or photos for events listed in the Cache Magazine calendar items are due Wednesday by 5 p.m. They will also run for free

first half of Cache Magazine can be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com. Poems and photos can also be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com and run on a space-available basis if selected.

www.ThemeCrosswords.com


OPTIONS for Independence will have a Valentine lunch at Maddox at 11:30 a.m. Feb. 10. Lunch prices will vary and transportation will be $2. Call Mandie at 435-753-5353 to schedule a ride or for more information. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will visit Hardware Ranch on Friday, Feb. 10, at 11:30 a.m. Come ride a sleigh through the elk farm. Cost is $8. To sign up for this activity, request transportation or to learn about other activities, call 713-0288. Mountain Ridge Helicopters will offer romantic rides Feb. 10, 11 and 14. Visit MountainRidgeHeli.com to schedule a flight and choose a package. Various packages include hotel stays, dinner, roses or gift cards. The Cache Valley Stargazers will hold their monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 10, in Room 244 of the Science-Engineering-Research (SER) Building on the USU campus (free parking in the lot adjacent to SER, behind the Performance Hall). The meeting will feature a talk by Dr. Michelle Larson from USU entitled “One Star, Two Star, Red Star, Blue Star: An exploration of the vast variety of objects called STAR.” For more information, visit www. cachestargazers.org or email cache.stargazers@gmail.com. The Tumbleweeds will perform at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 10. Pier 49 is located at 99 E. 1200 South. There is no cover charge; everyone is welcome. The Hyrum Library’s annual bake and book sale will be held Feb. 10 and 11. Hours are Friday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Feel free to donate baked goods to the sale. All proceeds will go to toward buying new

items for the library.

SATURDAY Music for the Small and Tall will hold a Valentine event Saturday, Feb. 11, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church in Logan. Cost is $6. Ewa Wilczynski will lead children ages 3 through 10 and their parents in musical stories, games, songs and instruments. Singer/songwriter and Mountain Crest student Missy Checketts will have her debut public performance at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza from 7 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 11. Opening for Missy will be Juice Box from 6 to 7 p.m. There will be no cover charge, but tips are appreciated. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will host a ski day at Beaver Mountain on Saturday, Feb. 11, at 7:30 a.m. Adaptive equipment is available. Cost is $25. To sign up for this activity, request transportation or to learn about other activities, call 713-0288. Come celebrate sweetheart day with Sage Junction, a country western band, at the Pioneer Valley Lodge on Saturday, Feb. 11, from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. There will be a dessert bar, chocolate fountain, country music and dancing. This is a free event open to those 55 years and older. Pioneer Valley Lodge is located at 2351 N. 400 East, in North Logan. For more information, call 792-0353. Abracadan will perform at the Logan Arthouse on Feb. 11 at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets are $6. Those who want to stay for Logan Out Loud can buy a package deal for $7. Come for a night of hypnotic entertainment and lots of laughs. For more information, call or text 208-530-1182. The Utah Festival Opera and Musical Theatre Guild will

travel to Ogden to see “Götterdämmerung.” To carpool, meet at the Dansante on Saturday, Feb. 11, at 8:30 a.m. For more information, call Kurt Smith at 770-6302. Nature in the Valley will meet Saturday, Feb. 11, from 10 to 11 a.m. at Mount Logan Park Walkway, 1400 E. 350 South, Logan. The theme this month is Winter Wonderland. Nature in the Valley is a free monthly family nature club for families in Cache Valley. The group meets every second Saturday in various outdoor locations for fun in nature! Bring your kids, grandkids, nieces, nephews, friends, etc.

SUNDAY The Old Ephraim String Band will perform at Caffe Ibis on Sunday, Feb. 12, from noon to 2 p.m.

MONDAY Mountain Crest High School will administer the state ACT free-of-charge at the school March 6 for all juniors. Students can pre-register in the cafeteria during FLEX hour. It is mandatory that students pre-register on the following dates: Feb. 13, juniors whose last names begin with A-G; Feb. 14, juniors whose last names begin with H-N; Feb. 15, juniors whose last names begin with O-Z. For questions call Assistant Principal Terry Williams at 435245-6093. Spring swimming lesson pre-registration is now open at the Mountain Crest STANG Aquatic Center. Lessons are taught Mondays and Wednesdays starting Feb. 13 from 5:30 to 6 p.m. or 6:05 to 6:35 p.m. Cost is $35. Call the STANG Aquatics Center at 435-2457962 or pre-register at the STANG Aquatics Center Monday through Friday after 6:30 p.m. or Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Space is limited, please pre-register.

Common Ground Outdoor Adventures is throwing a Valentine’s Day party Monday, Feb. 13, at 6 p.m. Come share the love as we celebrate with a fun party. To sign up for this activity, request transportation or to learn about other activities, call 713-0288. Providence City will hold baseball and softball registration from Feb. 13 to March 22. For prices, please check out our website at www.providencecity. com, or call Sheri at 435-7529441 ext. 22. No late registrations will be taken. Ages for the sports are 5 through 14. The next SHRM Bridgerland luncheon will be Thursday, Feb. 16, from noon to 1 p.m. at the Beehive Grill, 255 S. Main St., Logan. Cost is $12 for SHRM members and $14 for non-members. Please RSVP by Monday, Feb. 13, at noon to danene.dustin@usu.edu or at www.bridgerlandshrm.org.

TUESDAY

752-2088 by Feb. 14. Alissa Weller will teach a free cooking and community class on how to make great-tasting quick meals at Macey’s Little Theater on Wednesday, Feb. 15 from 7 to 8 p.m. Daniel Davis, photo curator at USU Special Collections and Archives, will be featured in the spring 2012 Friends of MerrillCazier Library lecture Wednesday, Feb. 15, at 7 p.m. Davis will discuss his work and the exhibit, “The Forgotten Photographs of the Union Pacific Railroad,” that has been on display at Merrill-Cazier Library. For more information, call Trina Shelton at 797-2631. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will host a rec night at Logan Recreational Center on Wednesday, Feb. 15, at 6 p.m. Cost is $3. To sign up for this activity, request transportation or to learn about other activities, call 713-0288. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will host a ski day at Beaver Mountain on Wednesday, Feb. 15, at 7:30 a.m. Adaptive equipment is available. Cost is $25. To sign up for this activity, request transportation or to learn about other activities, call 713-0288.

Come join Women in Business (WIB) on Tuesday, Feb. 14, at the BATC for lunch and a presentation where Rick Hill will speak on the many different relationships in our lives. A buffet lunch will begin at 11:55 a.m. Cost is $12 for members and The Utah Assistive Technol$14 for non-members. Those ogy Program will present a interested in attending should free online interactive training, RSVP using the WIB website, http://womeninbusiness.usu.edu. “Assistive Technology and Early Intervention Part 2,” on The WIB organization is comWednesday, Feb. 15, from 3 to mitted to assist business and 4:30 p.m. Contact Storee Powell professional women by providat 435-797-7412 for more inforing networking and professional mation. development opportunities. The organization raises funds to provide scholarships for women who otherwise could not afford to get an education. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will host a fullmoon snowshoe activity Thursday, Feb. 16, at 5 p.m. Come to lunch at the ProviAdaptive equipment is available dence Inn for the Providence and cost is $3. To sign up for seniors Friday, Feb. 17, from this activity or request transpornoon to 2 p.m. Cost is $5 per tation, call 713-0288. couple. RSVP to 752-8216 or

THURSDAY

WEDNESDAY

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 10, 2012

Friday

Page 15 -

calendar


Logan Burgers & Sandwiches

Delicious Food at Reasonable Prices VoteD BeSt BuRgeRS & SanDwicheS in Logan S

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Page 16 -

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, February 10, 2012

L

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Happy Valentine’s Day


Cache Magazine