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Cache Magazine

Who will be the next Miss Cache Valley?

The Herald Journal

JANUARY 27-FEBRUARY 2, 2012


contents

January 27-February 2, 2012

MUSIC 12 Meet local band Tracing Yesterday

theater 5 ‘The Merchant of Venice’ closes Saturday

ART 3 Brigham City museum hosts new exhibit

4 Pacific Railroad photos on display at USU

10 Hyrum Library borrows art from Cache County School District

MOVIES 6 Aaron Peck shares his

PAGE 8

top five Sundance films

MISC.

Photo courtesy Tom Dickey

Miss Cache Valley contestants practice an opening pageant routine at the Logan Rec Center.

3 Science Unwrapped

FROM THE EDITOR

4 Winterfest activities going

I

takes place tonight on all weekend

5 USU museum presents

‘Star Wars,’ ‘Star Trek’ day

BOOKS

13 See reviews and best-sellers

CALENDAR

15 See what’s happening this week

remember seeing a woman at Walmart once who walked like a robot because her shoes were too tall — the heels much too thin. I’m sure she just hadn’t had a lot of practice in them. I remember sort of chuckling with a friend about it and then we moved on. The thing is though, now every time I wear heels I realize I walk like a robot. It’s probably karma for laughing at that lady. It’s also because I haven’t had a lot of practice, either. I’m generally in tennis shoes, sandals, flip flops or the Dr. Martens shoes I’ve had since eighth grade.

I’ve been told I look off balance in heels and I will admit I do feel much safer if I’m holding on to something while walking in them. A few years ago I made a New Year’s resolution to purchase my first pair of stilettos. Before that, all my tall shoes were wedges or platform sandals, the kind where you feel taller and the shoes perhaps look a little more fancy, but they don’t require so much of a balancing act. I still wear those stilettos, but not often. In fact, I prefer to only wear them to places I’ll be sitting down most of the time: plays, nice dinners, church. And I quite like them, despite my mechanical movements from my car to whatever building I’m headed. I’ve also been known to take

them off at wedding receptions and carry them around with me. A girl’s gotta do what a girl’s gotta do. Tomorrow there will be plenty of girls wearing heels in the Miss Cache Valley pageant at the Ellen Eccles Theatre, but I’m sure they figured out long ago how to walk non-robotically. Beyond that, all the girls are talented and involved in their schools or communities. I had a friend who competed in the Miss Syracuse pageant when we were in high school. She said she would walk around her house in her swimsuit and heels to practice. On stage she was graceful. If it was me, I’d probably be in flip flops. No one wants to see an android in a swimsuit. — Manette Newbold


Science Unwrapped covers Gulf oil spill What do the demise of the more difficult and expensive. Roman Empire and 2010 “It takes energy to find Deepwater Horizon disaster and produce energy and the have in common? More than world’s remaining, untapped you might think. petroleum reserves are in “Looking into the past deep, dark, cold, remote and and at the present, we can dangerous locations,” he see that cheap energy and says. “We need highly comincreasing complexity have plex technology and equipcontributed to a mutually ment to meet our energy reinforcing spiral,” says demands.” Utah State University hisA renowned scholar of torian and anthropologist societal collapse, Tainter Joseph Tainter. “Our society, was featured in the National like a number of ancient Geographic Channel’s 2010 societies, has become depen- “Collapse” program, the dent on an energy source 2009 ABC News primetime that can’t sustain us indefispecial “Earth 2100” and in nitely and we have to figure Leonardo DiCaprio’s 2007 out what to do about it.” eco-documentary, “The 11th Tainter, a professor in Hour.” USU’s department of enviHands-on learning activironment and society, is the ties and refreshments will featured speaker for USU’s follow Tainter’s talk. Science Unwrapped program Science Unwrapped’s Jan. Friday, Jan. 27, on USU’s 27 presentation kicks off the campus. He presents “Enerprogram’s new series, “End gy and Catastrophe: What of the World as We Know It: Links the Roman Empire to The Science Behind Apocathe Gulf Oil Spill?” at 7 p.m. lypses,” for spring 2012. in the Emert Auditorium, “Throughout history and Room 130, of the Eccles today, humans have been Science Learning Center. fascinated by impending Hosted by the College of disasters and the threat Science, the event is free of apocalyptic scenarios,” and open to all ages. says Shane Larson, SciTainter is co-author of ence Unwrapped committee the recent book, “Drillchair and assistant professor ing Down: The Gulf Oil in USU’s physics departDebacle and Our Energy ment. “For our new series, Dilemma,” which details the we’ve assembled an excitspecific causes of the Deeping slate of speakers to help water calamity and offers us explore this topic from commentary on energy and diverse disciplines and society, energy and history, points of view.” as well as energy in the For more information, call future. As the world grows 435-797-3517, visit www. increasingly complex, he usu.edu/science/unwrapped says, it needs more energy, or view the Science but finding oil and gas and Unwrapped at USU page on bringing it out is becoming Facebook.

– Alec Spear, bass player in the local band Tracing Yesterday Photo courtesy Brigham City Museum-Gallery

“Sheepherder,” by Minvera Teichert, will be on display at the Brigham City Museum-Gallery through March 22.

Brigham City museum hosts Teichert artwork Thirty-six paintings by Rocky Mountain artist Minerva Teichert will be on display in the Brigham City MuseumGallery through March 22. Admission to the exhibit, “Minerva Teichert Revisited,” is free. Artwork on loan from private collections belong to relatives and friends of Teichert. Some of those pieces have never been on display in a museum. Works from public collections come from the Museum of Church History and Art, the Springville Museum of Art and the St. George Museum of Art. Teichert’s imaginative power can be seen in the following artworks: “Indian Story of the Flood,” “Westerners on Horseback,” “The Iron Horse,” “Breaking a Pony,” “Indian Captives at Night” and “Mums.”

The Brigham City Museum-Gallery is located in the lower level of the Brigham City Community Center at 24 N. 300 West. The entrance is on the west side. Hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday. For further information, call 435-226-1439 or visit www.brighamcitymuseum.org. With a flair for the dramatic, Teichert painted many religious episodes from the Bible and the Book of Mormon. Through the years she produced about 1,000 paintings, including more than 400 murals. While the artist is known for her religious paintings, she also painted many portraits, still-life and Western scenes. The exhibition explores this other side of Teichert’s work.

PET OF THE WEEK Available for adoption

Pet: Ammo From: Cache Humane Society Why he’s so lovable: Ammo

is a gorgeous red/white Australian shepherd. He has an energetic nature and will need a good workout like hikes or brisk walks every day. Ammo’s breed requires him to be a house dog as he needs human contact and involvement in family activities. Take Ammo for a walk and get to know him and his gentle nature.

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 27, 2012

“We all listen to different kinds of music so we all just kind of come play what we’re feeling and put it together and make it work, jam it out.”

Page 3 -

ALL MIXED UP

Quotable


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 27, 2012

Page 4 -

all mixed up Railroad photos on display at USU

Jump rope workshop

The Just Jumpin’ jump rope team will present The Jolt, a jump rope workshop and master exhibition, Saturday, Feb. 4, at the Smithfield Rec Center, 315 E. 600 South. The workshop will be held from 1 to 4 p.m., a silent auction will be held at 5:30 p.m. and the jump rope show will be held at 6:30 p.m. Workshop instructors include USA Jump Rope All Stars Jeremy Lindstrom, L.J. LaVecchia, Vincent Martis and the Just Jumpin’ team. Exhibition performers will be Jeremy Lindstrom who appeared on “America’s Got Talent,” the USA Jump Rope All Stars, and the Just Jumpin’ team. Funds raised from the event will go toward sending Just Jumpin’ to the USA Jump Rope National Championship in Long Beach, Calf.,

University Libraries at Utah State University has created a new exhibit shown at the university’s Merrill-Cazier Library, “Forgotten Photographs of the Pacific Railroad.” The exhibit, assembled by Special Collections and Archives photograph curator Daniel Davis, can be seen in the Merrill-Cazier Library atrium through Feb. 17. A reception for the exhibit is planned Feb. 15 in conjunction with a lecture by Davis for the Friends of Merrill-Cazier Library. “The Forgotten Photographs of the Pacific Railroad” explores the history of the Union Pacific Railroad through photographs and the work of A. J. Russell. The exhibition presents several well-known and idealized scenes of the railroad’s construction (1868-69) as photo-

graphed by Russell while under the commission of the Union Pacific Railroad. In addition to the well-known images, the exhibit presents examples of stereoviews taken by Russell and other photographers that offer a more complete and less sanitized version of the railroad’s history. The stereoviews selected for the exhibit were produced more for the general public than the Union Pacific Railroad company. Stereoviews were the 3-D item of the day in the late 1860s. Viewed through a stereo-viewer, the dual images appeared as a three-dimensional image and were as popular as today’s 3-D movies. The majority of the images in the USU exhibit are drawn from the university’s col-

Photo courtesy USU Public Relations

“Bear River Bridge, Corinne, Stereoview No. 507, 1869,” from the “Forgotten Photographs of the Pacific Railroad” exhibit at Utah State University’s Merrill-Cazier Library. The photo can be seen at the library through Feb. 17.

lection at Special Collections and Archives. Visitors to the exhibit will have the chance to view eight stereoview reproductions through

a stereo-viewer. Along the walls of the exhibit, larger versions of the stereoview can be seen, bringing the images’ details to life.

Get out and about during Winterfest

Princess photo shoot

Music Theatre West presents “The Slipper and the Rose” at the Ellen Eccles Theatre Feb. 9 to 14. The company will host a princess photo opportunity Saturday, Jan. 28, at the Cache Valley Mall from 1 to 3 p.m. Everyone is invited to meet a princess and have a photo taken at no charge.

Celebrate winter with dozens of events for all ages at the second annual Logan Winterfest on Jan. 27 and 28 in historic downtown Logan and at other venues across the valley. “It’s a great opportunity to get out of the house and do something different,” said Julie Hollist, director of the Cache Valley Visitors Bureau. Logan Winterfest brings together a variety of organizations and events to give the community things to do during a traditionally “blah” time of year. Winterfest is presented by the Cache Valley Visitors Bureau. For more information, call 435-755-1890.

Friday • 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ski at Beaver Mountain • All day: Snowmobile at Beaver Creek Lodge • 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Marion R. Hyde Exhibit, USU Twain Tippets Exhibition Hall • Noon to 5 p.m. Visit the elk at Hardware Ranch, Blacksmith Fork Canyon • 7 to 10 p.m. Bridgerland Literacy Scrabble Scramble, Hamilton’s • 7 p.m. Utah State Hockey vs. Washington, George S. Eccles Ice Center • 7 p.m. USU Gymnastics vs. Southern Utah w/Boise State, Dee Glen Smith Spectrum • 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. An Evening of One Acts, Chase Fine Arts Center • 8 p.m. Little Barefoot w/Children of the North, Andy Rice (acoustic), Why Sound • 10:30 to 11:30 p.m. The Antics-Improv Comedy, Logan Arthouse and Cinema Saturday • 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ski at Beaver Mountain

• 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. INSIDEwalk Sale, shops in historic downtown Logan • 10 a.m. “Dew the Mountain” Race, Beaver Mountain Ski Resort on Tiny Tim • All day: Snowmobile at Beaver Creek Lodge • 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit the elk at Hardware Ranch • 2 p.m. Matinée Enchantée, ThatcherYoung Mansion • 5:30 to 10 p.m. Vittles and Fiddles, Whittier Community Center • 6 to 9:30 p.m. Free activities, Logan Community Recreation Center • 7 p.m. Miss Cache Valley Pageant, Ellen Eccles Theatre • 7 p.m. Battle of the Bands Part 3, Why Sound • 7 p.m. USU Men’s Basketball vs. San Jose State, Spectrum • 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. An Evening of One Acts, Chase Fine Arts Center • 9 to 10 p.m. Logan Out Loud-Improv Comedy, Logan Arthouse and Cinema


events is provided by a grant from the United States Institute of Museum and Library Services. More information about the IMLS is available online (www. imls.gov). The USU Museum of Anthropology is on the USU campus in the south turret of the historic Old Main building, Room 252. Admission is free. For Saturday activities, free parking is available in the adjacent lot, south of the building. For more information about this event, call museum staff at 435-797-7545 or visit the museum website, anthromuseum. usu.edu. The Museum of Anthropology is part of the anthropology program at USU in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Photo courtesy Mary Jackson-Smith

Rose Jackson-Smith acts as Portia in a scene from Logan Youth Shakespeare’s production of “The Merchant of Venice.”

Hatches return with music and magic Shakespeare play When the Hatch Academy of Magic and Music officially opened in Logan’s historic ThatcherYoung Mansion on Saturday, Jan. 22, 2011, violinist Rosemary Hatch and her husband, deceptionist Richard Hatch, were uncertain how their new venture would be received in Cache Valley. “We just had a ‘build it and they will come’ attitude,” Richard says. The couple had relocated to Logan after nearly 25 years in Houston, Texas, to be closer to Richard’s parents, Anne and Eastman Hatch. “I was certain that Rosemary could find violin and viola students in the valley, but I wasn’t sure I could sustain my career as a performing magician here,” Richard says. “I’d given private and group instruction in sleight-of-hand in Houston, so we decided to open a school of both magic and music and see what happened.” They quickly focused

mance will feature favorites from this past year’s programs, such as “The Music Box of Anna Eva Fay” and “The Ink of the Enamored,” an effect conceived by the great Viennese conjurer, Johann Nepomuk Hofzinser (1806-75). Punx’s “Heart of Glass,” accompanied by Saint-Saens’ “The Swan,” and Dai Vernon’s “Symphony of the Rings,” accompanied by Fritz Kreisler’s “Tambourin Chinois,” are also among the pieces to be included on the program. Musical selections, both solo pieces and performed simultaneously with the magic, will be performed. The show starts at 2 Richard (in back), Jonathan and Rosemary Hatch have p.m. Tickets are $10 for been performing and teaching music and magic for a adults and $8 for chilyear in the Thatcher-Young Mansion. dren younger than 12. As them in Logan. on the Thatcher-Young only 56 seats are availThe family decided to Mansion as the ideal able advance purchase is begin offering occasional venue for the school, with strongly advised. Tickets performances, which they Rosemary’s music studio may be purchased online call “Matinée Enchantée,” at the Hatch Academy on the second floor and Richard’s classes taught in in the downstairs gallery website www.HatchAcad the refurbished attic. Their space almost every month. emy.com, or by calling The Jan. 28 perforson, Jonathan, soon joined 435-932-0017.

closes Saturday

With a modern soundtrack, beautiful language, and an energy only young people can provide, Logan Youth Shakespeare brings “The Merchant of Venice” to life at the Logan Arthouse and Cinema, 795 N. Main. See it tonight at 6:30 or Saturday at 2 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at the door and cost $5 for adults and $3 for students 18 and younger. No children younger than 5 will be admitted. Rarely performed by young companies, “The Merchant of Venice” follows Portia, a bright and beautiful heiress, as she wades through disappointing suitors before meeting Bassanio, the man of her dreams. Unfortunately, in order to woo Portia, Bassanio borrows money from his wealthy merchant friend, who in turn takes out a risky loan from Shylock, a bitter and reviled Jewish moneylender. When the Merchant’s ships sink and Shylock discovers his own daughter has run off with the Merchant’s friend, he demands the full penalty set down in terms of the loan: a pound of the Merchant’s flesh. Logan Youth Shakespeare is a program of Cache Valley Center for the Arts and is open to ages 9 through 19 without audition. Registration is now open for their spring program, “The Comedy of Errors,” and an intense summer production of “Hamlet.” Register online at cachearts.org/lys or call 435-760-1061 for more information.

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 27, 2012

It will be a “beam me up, Scot- vels: Star Trek Tech,” a docuty” moment when Utah State mentary on the technology of University’s Museum of Anthro- “Star Wars,” to be shown at noon pology explores the worlds of and 2 p.m. A costume contest “Star Wars” and “Star Trek.”            will be at 1 p.m. for both “Star “Sci-Fi: The Final Frontier” is Wars” and “Star Trek” costumes, the topic of the next “Saturdays with the winners receiving Aggie at the Museum” activity SaturIce Cream. day, Jan. 28, from 10 a.m. to 4 “It’s amazing how much these p.m.            two iconic series have changed Activities will show how curthe way we live today,” said Eric rent culture has changed via Arthur, museum patron. “Much these amazing works of sciof the technology we enjoy now ence fiction, event organizers has either been inspired by or said. Museum visitors can learn driven forward thanks to ‘Star how modern technologies have Wars’ and ‘Star Trek.’” evolved from the worlds of “Star Community members, as well Wars” and “Star Trek.” Visitors as Utah State students, can visit can also learn their Klingon the museum during its operating name, or make a hand puppet of hours, Monday through Friday Admiral Ackbar. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturdays Museum visitors will have a from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. chance to watch “Modern MarFunding for the Saturday

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‘Beam me up’ at USU Museum


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 27, 2012

Sundance: Celebrity sightings and fabulous films It’s been an insane week up here at Sundance. The place has been buzzing ever since the festival got under way. It’s a crazy 10 days full of parties, celebrity watching and, of course, movies. I usually stay toward the movie end of town and leave the Main Street celebrity stalkers to themselves, but this year it seems celebrities have been even more visible. For those of you who are interested in this sort of thing, I’ve seen more celebrities this year than in my other three years of Sundance combined. I’ve stood next to David Duchovny and walked past Vera Farmiga. I saw “Modern Family” star Ty Burrell get mobbed by a bunch of fans wanting an autograph. When I think back on the famous people I met and saw this time around, the list seems endless. It sure has been a fun few days. However, the most important part about Sundance is the movies. The movies are what drive the festival. The movies are the real reason most people make an annual pilgrimage to Park City. I’d like to take some time and talk about my top five favorite films I’ve seen at this year’s Sundance. Most, if not all, of them have a chance of finding their way to Logan at some point in the future.

The Reel Place Aaron Peck

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movies

Sundance Film Festival

Jackie Siegel is shown with her children during the filming of a documentary, “The Queen of Versailles.”

“Your Sister’s Sister” This is a brilliant little comedy starring Emily Blunt, Rosema-

rie DeWitt and Mark Duplass. The amazing thing about it is it’s almost all improvised dialogue. At the question-and-answer session for the movie the director revealed

only about 20 percent of the movie was actually scripted; the rest of it is the actors playing off each other. It gets even better when you find out DeWitt and Duplass had only

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known each other for four hours before they started doing some really personal and intimate scenes together. This movie is all

about the acting. It’s simply amazing to see these talented actors create a heartfelt story out of a script that was pretty much just an outline.

“The Queen of Versailles” This is one of the most outrageous documentaries I’ve ever seen. I still have a hard time believing that it’s real, but it is. Every single bit. It’s sad, really. Here’s a billionaire family who lost tons of money in the housing crisis


Another movie starring Mark Duplass, but this time we’re talking time travel. Yes, time travel. “Parks and Recreation” fans will be happy to see Aubrey Plaza also starring in this very quirky, very loveable comedy about a man who’s convinced he can travel through time and the group of journalists who secretly want to do a story on him.

Sundance Film Festival

Above: Bradley Cooper and Zoe Saldana are shown in a scene from “The Words.” Left: A scene from “Something From Nothing: The Art of Rap.”

“Something From Nothing: The Art of Rap” This documentary is all about what it takes to create rap lyrics. Here’s the best thing I can say about this movie: the movie theater I was in was full of middle-class 50-somethings, basically people who’ve probably only accidentally listened to rap, and they were transfixed. This is an engrossing documentary whether you listen to rap or not. It’s about the poetry and the artists who create it; the talent it takes to pull it off; and the ideas behind the genre. It’s a fantastic documentary, it really is.

“The Words” Now here’s a very different kind of film. Dennis Quaid plays an author who has just put out a best-selling novel about a young

writer played by Bradley Cooper, who finds an old novel discarded in an antique bag and then passes it off as his own. The way the stories interconnect as we find out more about the

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characters in the book compared to the author existing in real-life is stunningly put together. It’s emotional, thoughtful and very well done. It got purchased by a distributer on the first day of the festival so there’s a big chance it will be coming out in

the next few months. It’s been a fun time here. There have been some great movies, and some not-so-great ones. The snow has been off and on, but for the most part it’s been very nice weather. It’s been the perfect time to be

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The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 27, 2012

“Safety Not Guaranteed”

at the festival. For those of you who are looking to make a visit to see a few movies, here are some tips. The last weekend of the festival (Jan. 27 to 29) is the easiest time to try and get tickets to movies. If you don’t want to go to Park City, there are always places like The Tower and The Broadway in Salt Lake City, or even Peery’s Egyptian Theater in Ogden. The last weekend it’s easy to get in the wait list line and see a couple movies before the festival is over. The crowds really die down by week’s end anyway, and that’s a great time for locals to check out what the whole festival is all about. If you decide to go, I hope you have a great time.

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and are now living on borrowed money. It’s eye-opening to see how utterly detached they are from the realities of the world. Here’s a woman who actually asks, “Who’s going to be my driver?” when she rents a car for the first time from Hertz. It’s astounding to see the stunning opulent decadence these people have lived in for so long. You almost cheer for their downfall.

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‘A girl’s moment to shine ’ Miss Cache Valley to be named Saturday

F

ifteen contestants will take the stage Saturday at the Ellen Eccles Theatre to participate in the 2012 Miss Cache Valley pageant. They will be judged in five areas: personal interview, physical fitness, evening wear, talent and an onstage interview, but there is more at stake than a crown, a title and a chance to vie for Miss Utah this summer — these girls are also competing for tuition waivers to Utah State University. “It’s a great way for these girls to get their education,” says Tiffani Rudd, co-director and judge chair of Miss Cache Valley. She said five scholarships will be awarded. The girl who is crowned Miss Cache Valley will receive one year’s tuition. The first attendant will win a $2,500 tuition waiver. The second, third and fourth attendants will each get $1,500. The contestants will be judged by a panel of five, Rudd said. There are 100 points possible. The personal interview is worth 25 percent. Physical fitness is 15 percent, evening wear is 20 and talent is 35. The onstage interview makes up 5 percent of the score. Rudd said personal interviews will be conducted before the pageant Saturday evening. This is a chance for judges to get to know the girls, Rudd said, and to see how well they think on their feet. Topics for these questions can range from current events to the book the contestant read most recently. “It’s just a broad, broad range of questions,” she said. Contestants will be asked two questions during the onstage interview, which takes place in front of the audience. The first is about their platform and the second is random, Rudd said. During the evening wear segment, judges are not looking for the most expensive dress, Rudd said. They want to see confidence and poise.

“This is the girl’s moment to shine and feel wonderful,” she said. The Miss Cache Valley Scholarship Pageant is in its 20th year, and Rudd said the program has been growing the last few years. She said participation gives girls experiences “they will take with them for the rest of their lives.” Contestants pick a platform and complete service hours, and they need to be aware of world events. Contestants also raise funds for the Children’s Miracle Network and spread awareness of the organization supported by Miss America, Rudd said. Stephanie Romney, Miss Cache Valley 2011, said her experiences with the pageant made her more confident. She said she also gained more respect for herself. After winning last year’s competition, Romney had the opportunity to promote her platform: community involvement in public schools. Romney said she advocated her cause with a service club at USU called Students Teaching Arithmetic and Reading, or STAR. She also worked with the Utah PTA. Romney said if she could offer any advice to this year’s contestants, it would be for them to be confident in themselves. If they are, the judges will notice, she said. Rudd said that, in addition to being “another avenue for scholarship,” competing in the Miss Cache Valley Scholarship Pageant helps girls “learn and grow.” That is something Rudd said she and other pageant organizers are able to see: “That’s the reward we get, to see these girls blossom.” The Miss Cache Valley Scholarship Pageant is at 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 28, at the Ellen Eccles Theatre, 42 S. Main St. in Logan. Tickets are $12 at the door.

— By Arie Kirk

Photos courtesy Tom Dickey

Left: Stephanie Romney is crowned Miss Cache Valley 2011 as Miss Utah 2010 Christina Lowe looks on. Right: Miss Cache Valley 2012 contestants practice their group routine at the Logan Rec Center. The girls will perform together Saturday at the pageant at the Ellen Eccles Theatre.

Contestants and their platforms

Mackinzie Hamilton SMILE One More Time, a program that helps kids build their selfesteem

Brooklyn Denney Preventing domestic violence through education

Katie Marsh HAH! Healthy and Happy, which promotes healthy lifestyles

Jacqueline Stuart Motivating community members to vote

Samantha Niemand Helping girls have confidence

Amanda Taylor Helping girls accept themselves

Karlie Major Motivating kids to exercise

Ariana Naylor A Spoonful of Gratitude, encouraging people to serve at retirement homes

Ashley Mickelson Advocating the progam To Write Love on Her Arms

Ashlie Scott Special Heart for Special Needs, promoting service and kindness

Victoria Hepworth Offering language programs

Ellie Tucker Helping kids with degenerative nerve diseases through Hope Kid

Sariah Brooks Raising awareness of autism

Lindsey Lopez Promoting the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty

Brielle Jensen Offering kids with asthma the opportunity to attend Camp Wyatt


‘A girl’s moment to shine ’ Miss Cache Valley to be named Saturday

F

ifteen contestants will take the stage Saturday at the Ellen Eccles Theatre to participate in the 2012 Miss Cache Valley pageant. They will be judged in five areas: personal interview, physical fitness, evening wear, talent and an onstage interview, but there is more at stake than a crown, a title and a chance to vie for Miss Utah this summer — these girls are also competing for tuition waivers to Utah State University. “It’s a great way for these girls to get their education,” says Tiffani Rudd, co-director and judge chair of Miss Cache Valley. She said five scholarships will be awarded. The girl who is crowned Miss Cache Valley will receive one year’s tuition. The first attendant will win a $2,500 tuition waiver. The second, third and fourth attendants will each get $1,500. The contestants will be judged by a panel of five, Rudd said. There are 100 points possible. The personal interview is worth 25 percent. Physical fitness is 15 percent, evening wear is 20 and talent is 35. The onstage interview makes up 5 percent of the score. Rudd said personal interviews will be conducted before the pageant Saturday evening. This is a chance for judges to get to know the girls, Rudd said, and to see how well they think on their feet. Topics for these questions can range from current events to the book the contestant read most recently. “It’s just a broad, broad range of questions,” she said. Contestants will be asked two questions during the onstage interview, which takes place in front of the audience. The first is about their platform and the second is random, Rudd said. During the evening wear segment, judges are not looking for the most expensive dress, Rudd said. They want to see confidence and poise.

“This is the girl’s moment to shine and feel wonderful,” she said. The Miss Cache Valley Scholarship Pageant is in its 20th year, and Rudd said the program has been growing the last few years. She said participation gives girls experiences “they will take with them for the rest of their lives.” Contestants pick a platform and complete service hours, and they need to be aware of world events. Contestants also raise funds for the Children’s Miracle Network and spread awareness of the organization supported by Miss America, Rudd said. Stephanie Romney, Miss Cache Valley 2011, said her experiences with the pageant made her more confident. She said she also gained more respect for herself. After winning last year’s competition, Romney had the opportunity to promote her platform: community involvement in public schools. Romney said she advocated her cause with a service club at USU called Students Teaching Arithmetic and Reading, or STAR. She also worked with the Utah PTA. Romney said if she could offer any advice to this year’s contestants, it would be for them to be confident in themselves. If they are, the judges will notice, she said. Rudd said that, in addition to being “another avenue for scholarship,” competing in the Miss Cache Valley Scholarship Pageant helps girls “learn and grow.” That is something Rudd said she and other pageant organizers are able to see: “That’s the reward we get, to see these girls blossom.” The Miss Cache Valley Scholarship Pageant is at 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 28, at the Ellen Eccles Theatre, 42 S. Main St. in Logan. Tickets are $12 at the door.

— By Arie Kirk

Photos courtesy Tom Dickey

Left: Stephanie Romney is crowned Miss Cache Valley 2011 as Miss Utah 2010 Christina Lowe looks on. Right: Miss Cache Valley 2012 contestants practice their group routine at the Logan Rec Center. The girls will perform together Saturday at the pageant at the Ellen Eccles Theatre.

Contestants and their platforms

Mackinzie Hamilton SMILE One More Time, a program that helps kids build their selfesteem

Brooklyn Denney Preventing domestic violence through education

Katie Marsh HAH! Healthy and Happy, which promotes healthy lifestyles

Jacqueline Stuart Motivating community members to vote

Samantha Niemand Helping girls have confidence

Amanda Taylor Helping girls accept themselves

Karlie Major Motivating kids to exercise

Ariana Naylor A Spoonful of Gratitude, encouraging people to serve at retirement homes

Ashley Mickelson Advocating the progam To Write Love on Her Arms

Ashlie Scott Special Heart for Special Needs, promoting service and kindness

Victoria Hepworth Offering language programs

Ellie Tucker Helping kids with degenerative nerve diseases through Hope Kid

Sariah Brooks Raising awareness of autism

Lindsey Lopez Promoting the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty

Brielle Jensen Offering kids with asthma the opportunity to attend Camp Wyatt


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 27, 2012

Page 10 -

Hyrum Library displaying school district’s art By Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

According to Bushman’s research, the original funds for the If you’ve ever walked art came from the 1899 Utah Art Bill introduced through the Cache by Utah State LegislaCounty School District tor Alice Merrill Horne. Office you may have The bill provided funds noticed the murals and for the purchase of oil paintings of colorful a state art collection mountains and fields, American Indian culture known today as the Alice Art Collection. and scenes from the In the 1920s, Horne West. It’s a collection that’s been around since formed 37 collections the early 1900s and rep- of Utah art in public schools, so all children, resents many local and no matter their means, regional artists such as could have direct conMinerva Teichert, John nection with original art. Henri Moser, J.T. HarEach student was asked wood and others. to contribute 10 cents Scott toward Bushman the purof the chase Hyrum of art, Library BushFounman dation said, and Board is many hoping to paintget more ings the eyes on district those owns painttoday ings and came recently from that borrowed effort. a few The of them paintfrom the Artwork by John Henri Moser. ings district were office for the library. Seven paint- hung in schools in the ings from the collection county for years and unfortunately many of are now on display in them became tarnished. the library and will be Some were displayed in switched out every six cafeterias where food weeks or so through was splattered on them September. or chairs were bumped Bushman said Cache against them. County School District In the late ’70s, the possesses one of the Cache County School premier collections of District’s Fine Art ComUtah art from the early mittee was formed by 20th century. Some Brenda Anthony, Madia of the paintings are appraised for thousands Ashment and Nancy of dollars and have been Calderwood. They met with Clark Puffer, refurbished through the who was the district’s years. In fact, the hissuperintendent at the tory of how the art was time, and were able to obtained is probably one of the most interest- get the paintings out of the schools so they ing aspects about it.

Artwork by John Henri Moser is on display at the Hyrum Library.

wouldn’t be damaged further. In order to pay for refurbishments, one of Teichert’s paintings was sold to the LDS Church and through that sale alone the district was able to finance most of the restoration work for other paintings. The Springville Art Museum also bought a painting from the collection. “It’s an incredible art gallery that the school district owns,” Anthony said, adding she’s often thought about the artists and their meager conditions while painting. Tiechert, who grew up in the pioneer era, painted large murals by

lamp light after her children were in bed. She also mentioned the work of Harwood, which is included in the district’s collection. She said his soft impressionist style is captivating. Currently the Hyrum Library will display work by Moser, William Perkins, Lee Greene Richards and Alma Brockerman Wright. The paintings will be switched out in March, May and July. The Hyrum Library is open Monday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Tuesday through Friday from noon to 7 p.m., and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.


Photos by you

Photos by Karole Sorensen

Left: Kirk Taylor of Mendon stands in a new gulch that was cut by water during the flooding in Mendon on Saturday, Jan. 21. Above: Alan Sorensen walks toward the new gulch in a field above a canal in Mendon as Taylor looks at the scene.

Annual Vittles and Fiddles event will raise funds for playground Join your friends and neighbors as the Whittier Community Center hosts the annual fun-filled musical event Vittles and Fiddles on Saturday, Jan. 28. The event costs $12 per adult and $6 per child and includes musical entertainment and food. Dinner and dessert will be served from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. with food donated by various local restaurants. Entertainment will be provided by Raindogs, Good Times and Uncommon Collective. The music will continue until 10 p.m. After 7:30, anyone can dance and listen to the music for free. New this year, a silent auction will be held in conjunction with Vittles and Fiddles. Money raised from the event will be put toward finalizing the last piece of the Adventure Playground at the Whittier Community Center. The Adventure Playground is a disability accessible

play area that was built by community volunteers in 2009. The Whitter Community Center is located at

290 N. 400 East in Logan. Tickets for Vittles and Fiddles can be purchased at the door starting at 5:30 p.m.

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The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 27, 2012

Page 12 -

MUSIC

Tracing Yesterday introduces new sound By Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

What do you get when you mix rock, funk and dubstep? The sound — or at least the future sound — of Tracing Yesterday, a local band made up of five Mountain Crest High School seniors who enjoy getting together to jam, compete in Battle of the Bands across the state and perform locally. The group has been together for about two years, although guitarist Nick Apgar and drummer Zac Wilson joined within the last year. Tracing Yesterday’s music is fun, upbeat, and combines an alternative rock sound with electronic music. They write their own songs based on their own musical interests and experiences, and they also play some covers for shows and competitions. Wilson says the band currently only has one song that really combines rock and funk with dubstep, but that’s the direction Tracing Yesterday would like to go with their sound. “We’re going to try and do that a lot more because we figure it’s never really been done before,” he says while sitting at his drum set during practice with the rest of the group. “Since dubstep is so popular right now, people might want to hear us because it’s something different

and it’s incorporating something they already like. That’s what we’re hoping.”

Guitarist Jaden Johnson adds they want to play music people can dance to.

performed with electronic/pop bands Blood on the Dance Floor, Breathe Electric, several bands from Warped Tour and local bands. The group says they love playing at The Basement in Ogden, Kilby Court in Salt Lake City, Why Sound in Logan and at house parties where people want to dance and listen to live music. “I would go to parties and school dances and stuff and I’d always think, ‘This would be so much cooler if it was live.’ The same music, but it if was live,” Wilson says. “That’s what we’re wanting to do.” The group doesn’t take themselves too seriously and will constantly throw jokes around the room during practice. And as for the future, it’s kind of up in the air when they all graduate this spring. They would like to selfrecord some of their songs and no matter what, Johnson says they’ll continue to jam, which is what they currently do while writing songs. Eli Lucero/Herald Journal “We all listen to difZac Wilson (above) of the group Tracing Yesterday, ferent kinds of music so practices Wednesday, Jan. 18, in Providence with we all just kind of come Jaden Johnson, far left, and Nick Apgar. play what we’re feeling and put it together and The band started with Bands competitions at make it work, jam it out,” Johson and bass player Utah State University, in Spear says. Alec Spear. Then Jordan Davis County, in Cache Tracing Yesterday will Colledge joined as vocal- County and elsewhere. perform Saturday as part ist and keyboard player. In 2009, when nationof Why Sound’s Battle Wilson came next and ally-recognized band of the Bands. Five other took the place of the Secondhand Serenade band’s former drummer, performed at USU, Trac- bands are also scheduled and Apgar, who has an ing Yesterday took part in to play, with the show starting at 7 p.m. Cost extensive background in a competition where first music and several instru- place had the opportunity is $5. To preview one of Tracing Yesterday’s ments, joined the group to open for the show, but songs, visit www.reverbabout six months ago. the band narrowly came nation.com/tracingyesThey say they’ve in second. However, terday. placed at Battle of the Tracing Yesterday has


By Douglass K. Daniel Associated Press

At some point every schoolchild learns that William Henry Harrison was America’s briefest president, his death from pneumonia in 1841 coming just a month after a record two-hour inaugural address on a wintry day. For young minds the message is clear: Don’t go outside without a warm coat, and don’t talk so much. If you aren’t contemplating doctoral studies in American history, what else is there worth knowing? Author Gail Collins ably answers that question with the Harrison entry in Times Books’ noteworthy The American Presidents series, a kind of Nutshell Library for adult history buffs. True, Harrison’s 31 days in office receive only slightly

fewer pages than Franklin D. Roosevelt’s 12 years. The point isn’t length, but presenting concise, readable portraits of the presidents to a broad audience. Most books in the series are around 200 pages and Harrison’s is about 150. Indeed, the series may be at its best in its effort to make the lives of Harrison, Warren G. Harding and other lesser presidential lights more accessible and interesting. Collins, a columnist for The New York Times, achieves that goal in spite of Harrison’s oh-so-limited legacy. Her journalistic eye for the significant fact and the engaging anecdote helps guide readers through a life of achievement and occasional controversy. Harrison was born in 1773 into a prominent Virginia family, the son of a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Army commission. The young soldier moved up the ranks while fighting Native Americans in the Northwest Territory, then the lands that would become Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin and parts of Minnesota. Those exploits led to his appointment as the territory’s secretary and later as the governor of the vast Indiana Territory, all those lands save Ohio. His lifetime of government service — military general and war hero, Ohio state lawmaker, U.S. congressman and senator, U.S. diplomat, county official His father’s death when William Henry was 18 and studying medicine in Philadelphia left him without ample funds. He tapped his father’s friends, including George Washington, as he successfully sought an

‘Face Thief’ lacks characters, suspense By Michelle Wiener Associated Press

The first few pages of Eli Gottlieb’s third novel, “The Face Thief,” are frightfully good: a woman, later identified as Margot, falls down the stairs, life not so much flashing before her eyes as spooling out in slow motion, mingling with her bonesplintering reality and things she cannot be sure are really there. And so we’re off on what promises to be a narrative of psychological suspense: Margot may have been pushed down the stairs, but by whom, and why? The prime suspects are John Potash, defrauded of his life’s savings by Margot, and Lawrence Billings, whose “Physique of Finance” seminars Margot attended. The cop on the case is Dan France, who visits Margot as she recovers in the hospital. Unfortunately, the book fails

to live up to its initial promise, for two main reasons. First, for a psychological study, the main characters are too flat, motivated by greed for various combinations of love and money — characters we’ve seen before. The lack of originality in Margot is particularly

disappointing, as she reads like a worn-out caricature whose sexual proclivities — sleeping around without enjoyment, using sex as a means to an end — are a major factor in her manipulative and false nature, a mark of her deficient character. There is room in the novel to explore that the same may be true of the two main male characters, possibly all three, but it’s an opportunity not taken. Second, there’s very little suspense. While the ultimate whodunit may be a surprise (but the narrative’s trajectory and the dearth of suspects suggests the mystery is not the point), there’s hardly any tension. We witness Margot’s cons in flashbacks, which drive the story forward, though we know or can guess how it will turn out. I wanted to like this book, and did appreciate several parts. Gottlieb’s writing is strong; sadly his subject matter is not.

— was devoted as much to gaining a regular and plentiful salary as building a young nation. With a wife and 10 children as well as a penchant for investments doomed to failure, Harrison always needed money. Collins’ accounts of the presidential elections of 1836, the year Harrison lost, and 1840, the year he won, provide the slim biography its most lively pages. Lest we forget, running for president has had its silly, disingenuous and ugly sides since the early years of the republic.

new york times best-sellers COMBINED PRINT & E-BOOK FICTION 1. “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” by Stieg Larsson 2. “The Help,” by Kathryn Stockett 3. “Believing the Lie,” by Elizabeth George 4. “The Girl Who Played with Fire,” by Stieg Larsson 5. “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close,” by Jonathan Safran Foer COMBINED PRINT & E-BOOK NONFICTION 1. “Heaven is for Real,” by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent 2. “American Sniper,” by Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice 3. “Steve Jobs,” by Walter Isaacson 4. “Killing Lincoln,” by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard 5. “Bossypants,” by Tina Fey HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “Believing the Lie,” by Elizabeth George 2. “Private: #1 Suspect,” by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro 3. “Gideon’s Corpse,” by Douglas Preston 4. “Star Wars: Darth Plagueis,” by James Luceno 5. “Death Comes to Pemberley,” by P. D. James HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “American Sniper,” by Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice 2. “Steve Jobs,” by Walter Isaacson 3. “Through My Eyes,” by Tim Tebow with Nathan Whitaker 4. “Killing Lincoln,” by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard 5. “Thinking, Fast and Slow,” by Daniel Kahneman Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 27, 2012

Slim biography suits America’s shortest presidency

Page 13 -

Books


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 27, 2012

Page 14 -

CrossworD By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Ball handler? 5. Protections 11. Ranch equipment 16. “Monty Python” airer 19. Car bar 20. Take offense at 21. Dickens’s ___ Heep 22. www.yahoo.com, e.g. 23. Body of rules Marilyn lived by? 26. Orinoco, e.g. 27. Toupee 28. Cannabis 29. Overly ardent 30. Jaunty cap 32. Sidekick 34. Blue moon, e.g. 37. Sapidities 39. Encomium 40. Contemporary 42. Restaurant row? 43. Charitable donation from Cary? 50. Filthy, in a way 51. Peanut ___ 52. Aspersion 53. Tunics worn in ancient Greece 56. Croquet site 58. Postmortem 61. “Hot in Cleveland” actress Gilpin 62. Like an oxeye window 64. Trunk with a chest 66. Item in Gregory’s pantry? 75. Overjoy 76. Perejil, for one 77. It can be gray 78. Urban sight 82. “When I ___ You” (Leo Sayer tune) 84. Implore 87. Dazed and confused 88. “Take ___” 89. Sharp 91. Disney movie remake costarring Sharon?

98. Beat 99. Measurement targets 100. “-zoic” things 103. Propelled a boat 106. Subjects in Christian art 108. Spew forth 109. Synthetic resin 110. Sandwich man? 111. Sacred image: var. 114. ___ sequencing core 115. Shepherd’s locale 116. Fixture in Billy’s foyer? 122. Ballet move 123. Pernod flavoring 124. Unscrewed, perhaps 125. Suffix with psych126. Partook of 127. Spy, at times 128. “M.A.S.H.” extras 129. Part of M.I.T.: Abbr. Down 1. Small-time dictator 2. Dig up 3. Melancholy 4. Ad ___ (relevant) 5. Marine eagle 6. Disease cause 7. Volatile hydrocarbon 8. Anthem’s fifth word 9. Quietus 10. Without emotion 11. Furrowed 12. Drops the ball 13. George ___ 14. Palindromic girl’s name 15. The whole ___ 16. Pack animal 17. Pipe type 18. Artery problems 24. “So that’s your game!” 25. Salon request 31. Very 33. ___ gospels 35. Greedy 36. Templeton in “Char-

lotte’s Web” 37. TV monitor? 38. Albanian money 40. Half of a Sheryl Crow album title 41. Ballpark calls 42. Costa del ___ 44. Deep bellowing sound 45. Salaam 46. Door frame part 47. Mont Blanc, e.g. 48. Fraternity letters 49. Grate on one’s nerves 53. Balancing pro 54. ___ cat 55. Burn up 56. Varnish ingredient 57. Souse 58. Sculptor Jean 59. Bring into play 60. Zenith 62. Not req. 63. European capital 65. “___ on a Grecian Urn” (Keats poem) 67. Mauna ___ Observatory 68. Moth-eaten 69. Dunaway 70. Street drug 71. Associate, in the Old West 72. Middle of a famous palindrome 73. Stephen of “Michael Collins” 74. Gained a lap 78. Hanger-on? 79. Carolina ___ 80. “Wow!” 81. In conclusion 83. Hallow ending 84. Once, once upon a time 85. Clears 86. Couple 88. Uneven 89. Islam denomination 90. Jackboots 92. Puma, e.g. 93. Mesabi output

94. ___ Cross 95. Linger over 96. Part of an exchange 97. Learned 101. Relating to a breathing condition 102. Certain stiffener 103. Marine tunicate 104. Traction aid 105. Decree 106. Caesar’s father 107. Portfolio part, in brief 108. Pilothouse abbr. 110. Latin 101 word 112. Wounded ___ 113. Bookie’s quote 117. It’s stranded 118. Pound sound 119. PC “brain” 120. “And I Love ___” 121. Auction unit

answers from last week

Herald Journal one to two days prior to the event. Calendar items can be submitted Deadlines inbyThe email at hjhappen@hjnews.com. Any press releases or photos for events listed in the Cache Magazine calendar items are due Wednesday by 5 p.m. They will also run for free

first half of Cache Magazine can be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com. Poems and photos can also be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com and run on a space-available basis if selected.

www.ThemeCrosswords.com


Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will hold a fullmoon showshoeing activity Jan. 27 from 5 to 7 p.m. Cost is $3. Equipment will be provided. Call Bryce at 435-713-0288 for details. RACE Rx will offer a free football seminar Friday, Jan. 27, from 6 to 7 p.m., at 286 N. 850 West, Logan. Dr. Matt Rhea will speak on youth football conditioning and Mike Favero will talk about proper development of young football players. They will also discuss their upcoming football development program and summer football league for kids ages 8 to 18 years. To RSVP or for more information, please email info@race-rx.com. Little Barefoot will perform acoustic music with Children of the North and Andy Rice on Jan. 27 at 8 p.m. at Why Sound. Cost is $5. Cache Valley Eagles Lodge presents cowboy comedian Kip Attaway on Friday, Jan. 27, at 8 p.m. Tickets will be sold at Eagles Lodge, 170 W. 900 North, Logan, for $10 in advance or $15 at the door. For more information, call 435-752-8776. Eagles is a private club for members and their guests. Everyone must be 21 and older with valid ID. Multi-instrumentalist Hillary Murray will perform indie/folk/ pop music at Caffe Ibis on Friday, Jan. 27, from 4:45 to 6:45 p.m. Free. Acoustic rock artists RacecaR RacecaR will perform live from 6 to 8 p.m. at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza. Check them out at www. myspace.com/racecar1racecar. Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza is located at 99 E. 1200 South. There is no cover charge; everyone is welcome.

AggiesFC is putting together a U12 District team. Tryouts will be held Friday, Jan. 27, at the Stan Laub indoor training facility on USU campus from 9:15 to 10:30 p.m. The team needs players in all positions, especially goalkeeper. For questions or concerns, call 760-1091 or email smpricefamily@gmail. com. The Seventh annual Bridgerland Literacy Scrabble Scramble takes place Friday, Jan. 27, at Hamilton’s restaurant, 2427 N. Main St., Logan. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the tournament begins at 7. Registration at the door is $90 per team of three (two players and one scorekeeper) or $10 per spectator. The silent auction will feature more than 100 donations from local businesses and artists and bidding will continue throughout the evening. Call 435-770-0587 for more information.

SATURDAY Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will hold a skiing activity at Beaver Mountain on Saturday, Jan. 28. Cost is $25. Adaptive equipment is available. Call Bryce at 435-713-0288 for details. Battle of the Bands Part 3 will be held Saturday, Jan. 28, at 7 p.m. at Why Sound. Bands performing are Tracing Yesterday, Viewers Like You, Deicidal Carnage, Chucks, Swamp Donkey and The Carpet Layer Distress Band. Cost is $5. Sky View Lacrosse is holding tryouts at the Stan Laub center on Saturday, Jan. 28, from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. for all ninth- through 12th-grade boys. Player registration for the 2012 spring season for boys, grades three to 12, will be held at the North Logan Library (475 E. 2500 North) from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 4. Please come prepared with proof of current U.S. Lacrosse registration, medical/insurance information and cash or check for registration

fees. Call Diana Cannell at 7703299 or email dcannell@allred jackson.com for questions. Cache Singles 31 and older will head to Hardware Ranch to see the elk Saturday, Jan. 28, at 2 p.m. Cost is $5. For carpooling, meet at the Willow Park church, 340 W. 700 South in Logan, at 1:30 p.m. Refreshments will be served. Quaid Peterson and friends will share poetry at Open Mic Poetry at Caffe Ibis on Saturday, Jan. 28, from 4:45 to 6:45 p.m. All poets are invited to share their work. Master guitarist Kris Krompel will perform from 6 to 8 p.m. at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza, 99 E. 1200 South. Kris is one of the most versatile professional musicians in the valley and this is a rare chance to hear him perform a solo set without his band. There will be no cover charge, but tips are appreciated. Crimson Rose will entertain residents and the public at the Pioneer Valley Lodge at 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 28. This is a free event open to all who would like to attend. Pioneer Valley Lodge is located at 2351 N. 400 East, North Logan. For more information call, 792-0353. 

SUNDAY Guitarist extraordinaire Zac Bettinger will perform at Caffe Ibis from noon to 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 29. Free.

MONDAY Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will hold a snowshoeing activity Jan. 30 from 2 to 4 p.m. Cost is $3. Contact Bryce at 435-713-0288 or pro grams@cgadventures.org for more information. Linda Wentz will entertain on the piano at 3 p.m. Monday, Jan. 30, at the Pioneer Valley Lodge. Her program is called

“My Gift for You.” Pioneer Valley Lodge is located at 2351 N. 400 East, North Logan. For more information, call 435- 792-0353. Everyone welcome. The annual Art Guild Warehouse Show will be held Jan. 30 through Feb. 3 at Gallery 102 of the Chase Fine Arts Center on USU campus. Come see what students have created. The USU Counseling and Psychological Services Center is sponsoring a screening of the film “Boys and Men Healing” on Jan. 30 at 6:30 p.m. in the TSC Auditorium. The film depicts the healing journey of men and boys who survived sexual abuse. The center hopes screening the film will raise community awareness and provide an opportunity for survivors and those who know a survivor to have a forum to discuss the issue. Jim Struve, who specializes in treatment of child sexual abuse, and a pair of male survivors will lead a panel discussion and answer questions from the audience after the film. Logan Parks and Recreation is offering a free week to all fitness classes from Jan. 30 to Feb. 4. Classes include Zumba, step aerobics, power toning, yoga, piyo, turbo kick, boot camp, total body conditioning and beginner step circuit. During the free week we will offer aerobic month passes for buy one get one 1/2 off. The Rec Center is located at 195 S. 100 West in Logan.

TUESDAY Common Ground Outdoor Adventures rec night will be Tuesday, Jan. 31, from 6 to 10 p.m. Cost is $3. Contact Bryce at 435-713-0288 or programs@ cgadventures.org for more information. PinTech Computers will sponsor a free computer class Tuesday, Jan. 31, at 6 p.m. The subject will be Software Basics. PinTech is located at 270 N. 400

West, Suite C, in Hyrum. Call Don Pinkerton at 245-8324 or check Pin-Tech Computers on Facebook for more information.

WEDNESDAY Stokes Nature Center is holding a Nature Night on Wednesday, Feb. 1, from 4 to 7 p.m. at SNC. Free. The program includes information on local animals and ecosystems, and the center’s exhibits and critters will be open for all kids and parents. For more information, call 435-755-3239 or email nature@ logannautre.org. Ken Parker from The American Legion, Salt Lake City, will be at the Department of Workforce Services Employment Center (180 N. 100 West) on Wednesday, Feb. 1, from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Parker will assist veterans in understanding and applying for VA benefits including compensation, pension, hospitalization, education and various other benefits. This is a free service to all veterans. Please bring the following documents so that we may better serve you: DD form 214, marriage/divorce papers, birth/adoption/death certificates and children’s Social Security numbers. “Buzzed for a Cure,” a fundraiser for breast cancer research, will be held Feb. 1 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at West Point Dairy, 570 N. 500 East, Hyrum. Participants will get their heads shaved for a $5 donation. Contact Ron or Steve at 245-0147 for more details. 

THURSDAY A gallery talk featuring artist Ross Peterson will be held at Tippetts Exhibit Hall on USU campus at 11:30 a.m. Feb. 2. The Autism Spectrum Disorders Logan support group for people with autism or their family members and friends will meet Feb. 2 from 7 to 9 p.m. at OPTIONS for Independence, 1095 N. Main, Logan.

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 27, 2012

Friday

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The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 27, 2012

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20% OFF 10% OFF Menu Full Rodizio AnyItem Must present coupon at time of service. Not valid with any other offer. EXP. 2/3/12 Holidays excluded.

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Must present coupon at time of service. Not valid with any other offer. EXP. 2/3/12 Holidays excluded.

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Gift Cards are available

24/7

Buy One Get One Free Breakfast Skillets

Open at 7 am

Equal or lesser value. Expires 2/3/12

18 East Center St. Logan • 227-0321 Mon-Thur 7am - 9pm Fri & Sat 7am - 10pm

2.00 OFF

$

Any MeAl

Coupon may not be combined with any other offer. Must present the coupon at time of purchase. Offer expires: 2/3/2012

690 North Main, Logan • 752-9252

Open Sun- Thurs 6am - 10pm • Fri & Sat 6am - 11pm

For information about advertising on this page please contact Angie Duncombe at

792-7263

Monday – Friday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm


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